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Extra Democratic Ballots Needed


Voters cast their ballots in N.H. (The Washington Post).

Updated 4:36 p.m.
By John Solomon
The predictions for a big turnout in New Hampshire's primary -- especially on the Democratic side -- were materializing this afternoon as numerous town clerks began expressing concerns they were running low on ballots and summoned more forms from state election officials. The secretary of state's office said it received several calls for extra Democratric ballots during the day, but that no locations had run out.

As a precaution, the Secretary of State's office sent more ballots -- known as overruns -- to several of the requesting towns. In addition, clerks were told that if they ran low at the end of the day, they could use leftover absentee ballots or make copies of the forms, so that all voters could cast ballots, officials said.

"We planned for this and as of right now it is going on 4:30 pm, we have not heard of any places that have run out," Deputy Secretary of State David M. Scanlan said. "And we have procedures in place to deal with it if it does happen."

Secretary of State Bill Gardner has been predicting today's vote could draw a record 500,000 residents -- 100,000 more than the previous high -- as Democrat Barack Obama and a rejuvenated Republican John McCain energized voters in the state in the days since Iowa's caucuses recorded large turnouts. Scanlan said early turnout reports seem to validate his boss's prediction.

"It looks like it's certainly going along the line of Secretary of State Gardner's prediction," he said.

New Hampshire officials said that it was not uncommon for some towns to run low on ballot supplies but that the sheer number of clerks with concerns this time around was a sign of large turnout on the Democratic side. "The extra ballots we have shipped have been mostly Democrat," Scanlan said.

By Web Politics Editor  |  January 8, 2008; 4:36 PM ET
 
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Comments

I don't either because, as I understand it, there is no open primary system for the GOP in Iowa -- here in New Hampshire, you can register for EITHER party right before you vote -- any more questions?

Posted by: JakeD | January 8, 2008 6:49 PM | Report abuse

I was referring to this comment:

"On the new thread re: historical turnout, in 1996, with an incumbent Democrat in the White House, 210,211 voted in the Republican contest, but only 93,044 in the Democratic one. In 2004, with an incumbent Republican running, the numbers flipped: 69,414 voted in the GOP contest and a record 221,309 in the Democratic primary. I woould expect to see even MORE voting in the Democratic primary this time."

About your comment on knocking Hillary out. Do you think the 239K Democratic Iowa Caucus voters versus the 108K Republican Iowa Caucus voters were doing the same thing? I don't. BTW: The registered Dem/Rep voter pool in Iowa is about the same.

Posted by: EricHerrmann | January 8, 2008 6:41 PM | Report abuse

I have noticed that Eric. How does that impact what I said about the GOP are probably crossing over party lines to try and get Hillary Clinton knocked out early?

Posted by: JakeD | January 8, 2008 6:34 PM | Report abuse

JakeD: Maybe you haven't noticed but there isn't an incumbent running in either party.

Posted by: EricHerrmann | January 8, 2008 6:30 PM | Report abuse

Seeing a couple of these comments drives home the fact that there is a whisper campaign trying to brand Obama as something he is not. Obama is an American, a patriot, and a family man who attends the United Church of Christ.

That said, I'm glad to see the Democrats having such a good turnout. It means the party is being reenergized and that's encouraging.

Posted by: HardyHaberman | January 8, 2008 6:17 PM | Report abuse

On the new thread re: historical turnout, in 1996, with an incumbent Democrat in the White House, 210,211 voted in the Republican contest, but only 93,044 in the Democratic one. In 2004, with an incumbent Republican running, the numbers flipped: 69,414 voted in the GOP contest and a record 221,309 in the Democratic primary. I woould expect to see even MORE voting in the Democratic primary this time.

Posted by: JakeD | January 8, 2008 6:15 PM | Report abuse

Probably because the GOP already has the White House and they are crossing over party lines to try and get Hillary Clinton knocked out early -- either way, Clinton will still have the lead in delegate count -- that's what really matters in the end:

http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/primaries/results/scorecard/

Posted by: JakeD | January 8, 2008 6:09 PM | Report abuse

And why aren't the Republicans so motivated? Could it be they're sitting in their rooms, head in hands, ashamed and depressed that they've screwed up this country so badly that they've finally woken the 'Silent Majority' to cast out the usurper Bush. To take back America from evil manipulators and criminals. It's sad to be a Republican.

Posted by: thebobbob | January 8, 2008 5:36 PM | Report abuse

Excuse me, I am having trouble locating Saddam Hussein, or was it Osama I am for?

Barack? Isn't he that Egyptian or Jewish guy?

These Middle Easterners get soooo confusing!

But, you swear he is NOT Muslim, and they are not going to try to kill him for being Apostate?!

Posted by: rat-the | January 8, 2008 5:14 PM | Report abuse

Still, it's better than turning them in two weeks late.

Posted by: annrutherford | January 8, 2008 5:05 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, when you have trouble filling them out, and you wind up tearing up a dozen or so before you get your name and address right, well....

Posted by: rat-the | January 8, 2008 4:57 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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