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Excerpts From Saturday's Clinton Interview

By Perry Bacon Jr.
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton interrupted her weekend of campaigning in Indiana and Kentucky to speak to The Washington Post on Saturday about her campaign. A day after Sen. Patrick Leahy (Vt.) became the most prominent Democrat to publicly urge Clinton to leave the race, her aides sought an interview with The Post, both to knock down any suggestion she would quit the race and to push again their argument that new primaries should be held in Michigan and Florida.

Clinton seemed relaxed and upbeat at the Southside Inn Restaurant in New Albany, Ind., having just finished one of her favorite kinds of the events, a small round-table discussion focused on the economy. At the event, Clinton sat with a few Hoosiers as they discussed in details their economic concerns and the candidate talked about her proposals to solve them. Then she opened the session to questions from more than 200 other people who were crowded in the restaurant's dining area.

In the 13-minute interview (play it below, or read the text after the jump), she was emphatic about the Michigan-Florida point, inserting it into nearly every answer, no matter the question. In talking about Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), the presumptive GOP nominee, she also repeatedly used the phrase "go toe-to-toe with John McCain on national security and beat him on the economy," suggesting she feels that is his real vulnerability. She also offered a framing of the Democratic race ("June is not far away.") that differs from what many Democrats have said publicly.

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Q. You must talk to superdelegates every day. They ask you how are you going to win. What do you say?

Clinton: Well, I tell them that I think this is a very close contest. The popular vote is separated by, I think, 1 percent or less [Note: This estimate counts the primary results in Florida and Michigan; Obama's name was not on the ballot in the latter state.], the delegate count is incredibly close. And this process was designed deliberately by the Democratic Party to go from January to June, and there was a purpose behind that, because it's during this process that voters get a real chance to look at us and take our measure and make their own judgment. And the delegates ... they have to ask themselves who they believe would be the president to turn our economy around and deal with all the problems that we have. And then they've got to really bore down on how we're going to beat John McCain. We have to nominate someone who can go toe-to-toe with John McCain on national security and beat him on the economy.

And at the end of the day, it's all about who would be the best president. This is an ongoing evaluation that voters engage in, that delegates engage in, and it's healthy for the party. This is, I think, good for the Democratic Party. Everywhere I go, and particularly in these last two days in Indiana, people are excited, they're energized.

Q. What do you say to superdelegates who say that, no matter what happens, Barack Obama will be ahead of you in the pledged delegates when this is over?

Clinton: I say that's not how the process works. The process works by counting all the delegates. It's always been designed that way and they have a role and a very important responsibility to determine who they think would be the best president.

Q. So you tell them to pick the best person?

Clinton: Pick the best person and the best nominee to go toe-to-toe with John McCain on national security and to beat him on the economy, because this will be for naught if we don't win in November. And I obviously think I will have a better chance of going toe-to-toe with Senator McCain.

Q. You think Barack Obama can't win the general election?

Clinton: I'm just saying I think I have a better chance. I believe that I will be able to take the coalition that I put together. You cannot, as Democrat, win the White House without a very big women's vote. It's impossible. You go back and look at what's happened in the last four or five elections, if women don't turn out for the Democratic nominee, we don't win.

Q. You assume there are some women who will turn out for you that won't turn out for Senator Obama?

Clinton: What I believe is that women will turn out for me, all across the country that's been the case. ... I think that women are very keyed on this race and it's important for us because we have to have women in the fall.

Q. Howard Dean, Nancy Pelosi, Chris Dodd, Pat Leahy are talking about how they worry this primary is too divisive. But you said yesterday you don't see why they're worried.

Clinton: I don't. I think this has been good for the party, we continue to bring in millions of new voters. ...

They're missing a very important fact which is we have to figure out how Michigan and Florida voters count.
We cannot go forward in this process until we make a decision that will give voters in Florida and Michigan the confidence that the Democratic Party -- not Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton, but the Democratic Party -- cares about their votes. ... I think it is a missed opportunity for the Democratic Party, our leadership and everyone else associated with the DNC, not to say we're going to resolve this. I don't know why Senator Obama resisted a revote in Michigan.

Q. You believe he resisted a revote in Michigan.

Clinton: I know he did. His campaign rejected the plan that was put forward.

Q. They had some legal and logistical concerns.

Clinton: That was a smoke screen. The governor and the legislature were ready, the Democratic National Committee said it met all the rules. .. If we don't win Michigan and Florida [in November], we don't win the White House. The states that we have to win are the ones I'm more likely to win and I believe I'm in position to win. And it is shortsighted for anyone in the Democratic Party, on behalf of Barack Obama or behalf of any other rationale, to end this process. When the DNC set it up so we had a schedule of contests from January to June, it was certainly with an understanding we might be in this situation where we have two very good candidates running for the nomination.

Q. Some Democrats say you are losing time if you want to define McCain as the third term of George Bush, that the next few months would be a great time to do it.

Clinton: General elections start when there is a nominee or putative nominee. They think they have theirs, we don't yet have ours. ... We have frozen this election. ... There are stages in elections. I really believe that we are bringing more people in this process, we are getting people who have never voted, we are getting people who have never voted Democratic. June is not that far away, when we'll see the end of the contests. We cannot go forward until Florida and Michigan are taking care of. Otherwise the eventual nominee will not have the legitimacy that I think will haunt us. I can imagine the ads the Republican Party and John McCain will run if we don't figure out how we can count the votes in Michigan and Florida.

Q. Is there any scenario in which you won't compete in the primaries in June?

Clinton: No. I am committed to competing everywhere that there is an election.

Q. There was a story today that [quoting people who had spoken privately with Clinton] said you felt the "big boys" were trying to push you out, "bullying" you. Did you use those phrases?

Clinton: No , I did not. ... I never said that. I'm always amazed when I read things I supposedly said that I never said. Look, I think that what is going on with people trying to shut this process down is very counterproductive. I think it is not in the best interests of the Democratic Party. ... It would be perilous for me to say, 'You know, Barack Obama won x,y and z. That's not enough electoral votes. He should drop out.' Why would anybody say that?

We need to let this contest continue. I know there are some people who want to shut this process down, and I think they are wrong and I have no intention of stopping until we finish what we started, and until we see what happens in the next 10 contests, and until we resolve Florida and Michigan. And if we won't resolve it, we'll resolve it at the convention -- that's what credentials committees are for -- because I feel so strongly about this. For the life of me, what Barack was afraid of with Michigan I will never understand. There is no doubt in my mind he would have done just fine running a vigorous campaign."

Q. Obama is winning among the pledged delegates, but you might win Pennsylvania and other states. I know you think it says something about your candidacy; what does it say about his candidacy? Do you think it says something about his candidacy?

Clinton: Yes, I think it does say something -- indeed Perry, I do. I think his base is much narrower than my base, and the big states that we have to win are the ones that I have thus far done better in. The calculation that everybody is making, I don't believe is right.

Q. What calculation?

Clinton: Only looking at where we are right now. That's why you have a variety of ways for people to become delegates. And the whole purpose of the so-called automatic delegates is for them to exercise their independent judgment.

Q. You understand one of the fundamental questions: He has won more than 80 percent of the black vote, one of the most loyal elements of the Democratic Party. For the superdelegates to, in effect, pick you over him is going to be a very tall order.

Clinton: I have very intense segments of the Democratic Party who have supported me -- Hispanics and women. We can't win without African Americans, Hispanics and women, so something's got to give, but how we do it should focus on who would be the best president and best nominee. You've seen these polls, people who supported me won't support him, people who supported him won't support me. We both have that problem. That's why once we figure out who the nominee is, we're going to have a unified Democratic Party, but to look at one-half of this equation, I think, is very incomplete.

By Post Editor  |  March 30, 2008; 10:55 PM ET
Categories:  Hillary Rodham Clinton  
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Comments

Hillary Clinton's campaign is now so desperate that she is accusing the Obama Campaign of stopping people from voting. With all of the big lies under her belt she has lost all credibility of not only occupying the White House, but the U.S. Senate. May be the Obama Campaign will stop people from voting through Sniper Fire.
Monica

Posted by: socamara05 | March 31, 2008 10:00 PM | Report abuse

I pray that Hillary will be our candidate not that horrible Obama. Because of Obama's refusal to make a disavowal or an apology for something that his Reverend said in January, I have become very anti-Obama. I started doing research on him and what I found only substantiated my new found opinion of him. This man is not happy unless he is orating. Actions seem to have very little meaning for him. When he was supposed to be voting in the Senate, he would wander around and vote down the middle of the road, rather than take a stance on a bill and cause someone to take offense at his action. For 10 months the man has been the head of our Foreign Affairs Committee but he has yet to call a meeting. In the meantime, Afghanistan, which is a responsibility of this committee has been in trouble with a rising Taliban force. Our troops are sustaining more casualties. Obama does not seem to care.Caring means taking action!
How would this man handle other crises if he were Prsident? If his past and present
actions are an example, I think we would be in a lot of hot water!.

Posted by: afed27 | March 31, 2008 6:59 PM | Report abuse

Political.com-vogue should be removed!
They are just dissing Hillary and taking up all the space!

Some of these people just don't have the political sense it takes to see that Obama is pulling the wool over their eyes...and the problem is...they won't figure it out until it's too late....just like they did with George Bush.

Will they never learn?!

Posted by: maggi37 | March 31, 2008 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Hillary should stay in until she wins. She is the only one that can beat McCain,I can't even imagine what Obama will try to do.. Recite elequent poetry. He has no experience. Half the time he has spent as a Jr. Senator has been running for President. What he became a Senator in January 2005??. Before that..He wrote a book about Words.. This is really what is wrong about America is that so many people live in a fantasy. He is not the one..If your voting for him because he is black..well he is also Muslin and white.. . He also never had it that rough, he went to one of the most expensive "prep schools" Then to Harvard? How many single parent of any race gets that opportunity? He is on a free ride with nothing on his resume except a book that he wrote. I would rather vote for Stephen King. He isn't any scarier than Hussein Barrick Obama.

Posted by: rlarkin2 | March 31, 2008 1:45 PM | Report abuse

political.com-vogue should be removed. they have posted about 30 times on this blog and each one is about 10 pages long. I do not believe it for a second. Its obvious they are just trying to take up space and slam hillary. Its just another drepublican or obamaican.

Posted by: rlarkin2 | March 31, 2008 1:32 PM | Report abuse

Has anyone seen Reverend Wright? I guess he may be off somewhere resting for the torrent of press coverage he will get once the general election campaign starts.

Or maybe he's practicing the phrase "FOUR MORE YEARS".

Posted by: lithium452 | March 31, 2008 11:57 AM | Report abuse

I see the Washington Post can publish the transcript of Hillary Clinton's intervew which offered nothing new in terms of her winning strategy rhetoric .

Hell, why not use this blog space to show the transcript of one of Rev. Wright's sermons in which one statement was taken out of context about 9/11?

Posted by: ajtiger92 | March 31, 2008 11:43 AM | Report abuse

vs_sv: "I was just watching my favorite morning show TODAY (because of Meredith Vierra) which I switched off because of Chris Matthews fag*got face appearing right now.

"I urge all to BOYCOTT GE products, NBC and MSNBC dogs Chris Matthews and Keith Dobberman"

Actually, I tend to boycott folks who use ignorant slurs like "fag*got" to describe people they don't agree with. You know, like Ann Coulter did when she referred to John Edwards at a conservatives' gathering recently. (Congratulations on being a "thinker" of her caliber.) I have no doubt that when a person is comfortable using "fag*got" in a public forum, they're probably just as comfortable throwing around other slurs like the N-word in private company. Who needs these mental midgets?

And for the record, it's Keith OLBERMANN. You know, practically the only guy on network news willing to stick his neck out and hold the Bush administration accountable for all their lies, deceptions, criminal activities and such. Yeah, he's the one we Dems need to silence, all right. Good grief, vs_sv, stop pretending to be a Dem already. And you might wanna take that sheet off and launder it once in awhile. It's starting to stink.

Posted by: whatmeregister | March 31, 2008 10:18 AM | Report abuse

Hopefully, when this Election is OVER, someone will finally snap out of the Coma that is our Process, and realize how badly screwed up the Archaic System actually is.

States like Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Indiana and others are so far down the line, that BEFORE they ever manage to become as IMPORTANT as the sniveling FIRST States in all this, Dorks like Peloser and Howling Dean try to "Broker" the Race.

THEN, to add Insult to Injury, AFTER the totally screwed up Primary system gets us the Two-Sides of the same Coin, we have a Country-Wide Election that often gets called after the Eastern Time Zone shuts down THEIR Polls. Or, like in 2000, Conceded, then Retracted because Floriduh crosses Time Zones.

Hawaii ever Actually being the Decider? NOT LIKELY!

There will ALWAYS be "Minority" Districts in places like Ohio and Floriduh that somehow manage to get Extended Hours(Somehow or another-EVERY TIME!).

In my opinion, it would be better to have a Database that only allows Social Security referenced Votes to be collected, and then "Aired" SIMULTANEOUSLY! POPULAR Vote, Wins!

Otherwise, the trend for People to Vote by Residence in Strong Districts-Meaning "This is "Republican" Territory-so Why Bother to Vote, we will win"?, will just continue to be the Norm!

Then, California, and Hawaii will always feel like they are wasting their Time, it will be over before they are off Work!

The System needs to catch up with the New Century!

Posted by: rat-the | March 31, 2008 9:57 AM | Report abuse

queenskid: "SHAME ON YOU HILLARY CLINTON. You agreed, and I can watch you do it on youtube, with everyone else, that the votes in Michigan and Florida would not count. Now you lie about it...."

If the rules or their application now get fecklessly changed, wonder how many states will disregard them and bolt for Summer primaries next time around?

Posted by: FirstMouse | March 31, 2008 9:47 AM | Report abuse

The interviewer ought to be ashamed of himself. This thing is an embarrassment and a completely wasted opportunity to gather information that might have actually informed someone's vote.

Posted by: zukermand | March 31, 2008 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Mrs. clinton i am a nobody who lives in a state that you that don't count because it's not a big state but we do we beat you big. however if you you can't pay your bills and run a clean campaign how are you ready start on day one please explain to me. i am a woman who will not vote for you and i want you to to stop and think what you are really doing not for obama but for the party. there are rules that can not be changed just to suit you on a whim if the situation was reversed we would not be going through this drama. you say you are like mararet thacker she would not act like this please for the sake of the party re think these actions

Posted by: richdoll | March 31, 2008 8:39 AM | Report abuse

SHAME ON YOU HILLARY CLINTON. You agreed, and I can watch you do it on youtube, with everyone else, that the votes in Michigan and Florida would not count. Now you lie about it like a four letter word that sort of sounds like count.

You are not a good example for any woman anywhere. I do not want my wife nor daughters to lie the way you do. I do not want my daughters and wife to be delusional like you are.

Go back to Chicago, and root for the Cubs, losers like you.

Posted by: queenskid | March 31, 2008 8:35 AM | Report abuse

Whatever happened to this thread at 2:40AM?

vs_sv, are you svreader's evil twin?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | March 31, 2008 7:54 AM | Report abuse

It is time to BOYCOTT stations who are a front for candidates. MSNBC takes the cake. They are so biased that it makes me puke. I am a democrat and I have stopped watching MSNBC and NBC, especially fag*gots like Chris Matthews who gets a tingling up his leg.

I was just watching my favorite morning show TODAY (because of Meredith Vierra) which I switched off because of Chris Matthews fag*got face appearing right now.

I urge all to BOYCOTT GE products, NBC and MSNBC dogs Chris Matthews and Keith Dobberman

Posted by: vs_sv | March 31, 2008 7:19 AM | Report abuse

The pledged delegate and caucuses rules of the Democratic Party for the Democratic primary are not democratic! To put it mildly it is a big disgrace! If the Party had followed the rules as per the national presidential elections, Hillary would have been nominated on Super Tuesday. Hillary has already won New York, New Jersey, California, Ohio and Texas. If all the pledged delegates from these states are given to Hillary which she rightly deserves, there would have been no mess! DNC should have at least followed the same rules followed by the Republican Party so that all the candidates would have the same playing field during the primaries.


. DNC made a mistake in not having some compromise before the election with Michigan and Florida regarding pledged delegates as was done by the RNC. Now, without making further complications they should accept the result. In Michigan they should give all the 'uncommitted' votes to Obama because, if his name was in the ballot he might have got those votes. In Florida the result should be accepted. Obama's complaint that if he had campaigned in these states, he would have got more votes is not correct. None of the other candidates campaigned there either. He campaigned more vigorously in Texas and Ohio and still did not win them
In future, the primary election rules should be same as national election rules. Then, there will not be this long political circus!

Posted by: hcsubbarao | March 31, 2008 6:37 AM | Report abuse

The mentality of black and white men are more alike than the mentality of women compared to men. If you really want change you should vote for Hillary Clinton. Barack Obama has never ever been talking about gender and discrimination towards people based on their sex rather than their individual merits. I think that he and his followers (mostly young women as well as young men) are very strong supporters of male chauvinism, which refers to the belief that males are superior to females. However Clinton is stronger, more intelligent and more experienced than Barack Obama.

Obama behaves like a self-confident, cocky lady-killer and his male identity can be associated with the tough-guy Macho Culture. In that sence President Bush, Senator Obama and Senator McCain are alike.

So, again if you really wants change you should vote for H.Clinton.

Posted by: royrichard | March 31, 2008 6:36 AM | Report abuse

Hillary has selective math, and a selective memory. She remembers being shot at in the Balkans, but can't remember that she agree that Michigan and Florida wouldn't count in the primary.

Haven't we had enough selective memory from the Bushes and Clintons?

Bush/Clinton/Clinton/Bush/Bush/End of Dynasty - Obama!

Posted by: postfan1 | March 31, 2008 2:45 AM | Report abuse

Tp njhardy123--There's a reason that it makes no sense to you that just because Mrs. Clinton wins a primary in a particular state, it does not follow that she is the one who would carry that state in the fall. The reason it makes no sense is that over the 20-30 years, it hasn't worked out that way. This electoral vote argument in the primary season is just hot air that is not born out by looking at the statistics. Just yet another Clinton campaign spin. Rachel Maddow said last week that the next thing we'll hear is that only the states that have the letter R in them will be good states as opposed to all the bad states she lost.

Posted by: karela | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Tp njhardy123--There's a reason that it makes no sense to you that just because Mrs. Clinton wins a primary in a particular state, it does not follow that she is the one who would carry that state in the fall. The reason it makes no sense is that over the 20-30 years, it hasn't worked out that way. This electoral vote argument in the primary season is just hot air that is not born out by looking at the statistics. Just yet another Clinton campaign spin. Rachel Maddow said last week that the next thing we'll hear is that only the states that have the letter R in them will be good states as opposed to all the bad states she lost.

Posted by: karela | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

I think my previous comment was lost so I hope I'm not repeating myself. I see no reason for Clinton to drop out of the race. This is a very close contest between she and Obama. She has definitely picked up momentum since the Ohio, Texas, R. I. , and Vt. primaries. I think it adds to the excitement for the Dems. Even if it goes to the convention floor, I see nothing wrong with this. After all in the old days, that is when the Democratic nominee was determined.
I feel the excitement of voters living in up-coming primary states. It takes me back to my college days when I worked on my first presidential primary campaign in Nebraska going door to door asking people to cast their vote for Senator Robert Kennedy. The high point for me was when a friend of mine (also a Kennedy supporter) got to meet and shake his hand in a hotel lobby, late at night, in Omaha, Ne. This memory is forever etched in my mind. Sadly, not too long after that he was assassinated in California.
I have always been told that the Democratic Party is the "big tent" party and I believe with all my heart that it still is. That is why it disturbs me to see some Obama supporters and media pundits calling for Clinton to withdraw from this campaign. If these people want organization, everyone chanting the same "mantra" and marching to the same drumbeat, then they are in the wrong Party. It seems to me that this Party's lifeblood is its diversity, its color, its "agreeing to disagree, its tolerance for diversity.

Posted by: catjohn1 | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

I think my previous comment was lost so I hope I'm not repeating myself. I see no reason for Clinton to drop out of the race. This is a very close contest between she and Obama. She has definitely picked up momentum since the Ohio, Texas, R. I. , and Vt. primaries. I think it adds to the excitement for the Dems. Even if it goes to the convention floor, I see nothing wrong with this. After all in the old days, that is when the Democratic nominee was determined.
I feel the excitement of voters living in up-coming primary states. It takes me back to my college days when I worked on my first presidential primary campaign in Nebraska going door to door asking people to cast their vote for Senator Robert Kennedy. The high point for me was when a friend of mine (also a Kennedy supporter) got to meet and shake his hand in a hotel lobby, late at night, in Omaha, Ne. This memory is forever etched in my mind. Sadly, not too long after that he was assassinated in California.
I have always been told that the Democratic Party is the "big tent" party and I believe with all my heart that it still is. That is why it disturbs me to see some Obama supporters and media pundits calling for Clinton to withdraw from this campaign. If these people want organization, everyone chanting the same "mantra" and marching to the same drumbeat, then they are in the wrong Party. It seems to me that this Party's lifeblood is its diversity, its color, its "agreeing to disagree, its tolerance for diversity.

Posted by: catjohn1 | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

I guess the annoying thig about listening to Hillary is that she never takes a break from self-promotion, even if it doesn't do a good job of representing the truth. It's exhausting, really.

--She counts Michigan and Florida, the two Putin-rules elections, in the popular vote total.

--She says that superdelegates should exercise independent judgment and pick the best person. I understand you can't hold someone accountable for everything their campaign says, but Carville just called Bill Richardson "Judas" for exercising his independent judgment in favor of Obama. Carville's article in the Post the other day made it clear that he, and at least some other Clinton backers, expect to garner support from superdelegates by calling in favors -- hardly the sort of "independent judgment" that most voters would be comfortable with.

--She says it takes a big vote by women to win the White House. Sure. It also takes a big vote by men, a constituent group who Obama is winning. In fact, it really comes down to who has more voters, regardless of gender -- a category that Obama is winning.

--Drawing a parallel between calling for her to drop out and calling for Obama to drop out is patently absurd. He's the candidate with the substantial delegate lead, and, last I checked, delegates are how the nominee is determined.

--She says Obama's base is narrower than hers. But he's gotten more votes and more pledged delegates. How did that happen? Either he has a bigger base than she does, or else he does a better job of reaching outside his base.

--She refers to "so-called 'automatic delegates'". But the only people who've used that language are the people in her own campaign; everyone else calls them "superdelegates". Calling them "so-called" is a bizarrely self-referential way of trying to get people to adopt the language her campaign has chosen.

Anyhow, I'm sure I'm missing some points, but you get the gist. It's just excruciating to listen and hear point after point where she leaves out every inconvenient detail, no matter how important.

Posted by: davestickler | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

I guess the annoying thing about listening to Hillary is that she never takes a break from self-promotion, even if it doesn't do a good job of representing the truth. It's exhausting, really.

--She counts Michigan and Florida, the two Putin-rules elections, in the popular vote total.

--She says that superdelegates should exercise independent judgment and pick the best person. I understand you can't hold someone accountable for everything their campaign says, but Carville just called Bill Richardson "Judas" for exercising his independent judgment in favor of Obama. Carville's article in the Post the other day made it clear that he, and at least some other Clinton backers, expect to garner support from superdelegates by calling in favors -- hardly the sort of "independent judgment" that most voters would be comfortable with.

--She says it takes a big vote by women to win the White House. Sure. It also takes a big vote by men, a constituent group who Obama is winning. In fact, it really comes down to who has more voters, regardless of gender -- a category that Obama is winning.

--Drawing a parallel between calling for her to drop out and calling for Obama to drop out is patently absurd. He's the candidate with the substantial delegate lead, and, last I checked, delegates are how the nominee is determined.

--She says Obama's base is narrower than hers. But he's gotten more votes and more pledged delegates. How did that happen? Either he has a bigger base than she does, or else he does a better job of reaching outside his base.

--She refers to "so-called 'automatic delegates'". But the only people who've used that language are the people in her own campaign; everyone else calls them "superdelegates". Calling them "so-called" is a bizarrely self-referential way of trying to get people to adopt the language her campaign has chosen.

Anyhow, I'm sure I'm missing some points, but you get the gist. It's just excruciating to listen and hear point after point where she leaves out every inconvenient detail, no matter how important.

Posted by: davestickler | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- freeing up cash for critical media buys but also earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.

Clinton's campaign did not respond to recent, specific questions about its transactions with vendors. But Clinton spokesman Jay Carson pointed on Saturday to an earlier statement the campaign issued to Politico, asserting: "The campaign pays its bills regularly and in the normal course of business, and pays all of its bills."

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Dear Senator Clinton:

There is nothing wrong with staying in the race, as Mike Huckabee did though he had no mathematical chance to win. And there is nothing wrong with staying in the race and talking about real policy issues, issues that are important such as Iraq, health care or economic policy.

There is, however, a real problem with remaining in the race and having you, your husband and/or your campaign surrogates continuously attack the character, credibility, and charisma of the other democratic candidate.

I am not a political insider, not a political pro or pundit. I am a just democrat, a democrat who wants a democrat to win the white house in 2008...why don't you?


Posted by: jonathanR | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Dear Senator Clinton:

There is nothing wrong with staying in the race, as Mike Huckabee did, though he had no mathematical chance to win. And there is nothing wrong with staying in the race and talking about real policy issues, issues that are important such as Iraq, health care or economic policy.

There is, however, a real problem with remaining in the race and having you, your husband and/or your campaign surrogates continuously attack the character, credibility, and charisma of the other democratic candidate.

I am not a political insider, not a political pro or pundit. I am a just democrat, a democrat who wants a democrat to win the white house in 2008...why don't you?


Posted by: jonathanR | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Dear Senator Clinton:

There is nothing wrong with staying in the race, as Mike Huckabee did, though he had no mathematical chance to win. And there is nothing wrong with staying in the race and talking about real policy issues, issues that are important such as Iraq, health care or economic policy.

There is, however, a real problem with remaining in the race and having you, your husband and/or your campaign surrogates continuously attack the character, credibility, and charisma of the other democratic candidate.

I am not a political insider, not a political pro or pundit. I am a just democrat, a democrat who wants a democrat to win the white house in 2008...why don't you?


Posted by: jonathanR | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- freeing up cash for critical media buys but also earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.

Clinton's campaign did not respond to recent, specific questions about its transactions with vendors. But Clinton spokesman Jay Carson pointed on Saturday to an earlier statement the campaign issued to Politico, asserting: "The campaign pays its bills regularly and in the normal course of business, and pays all of its bills."

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Dear Senator Clinton:

There is nothing wrong with staying in the race, as Mike Huckabee did, though he had no mathematical chance to win. And there is nothing wrong with staying in the race and talking about real policy issues, issues that are important such as Iraq, health care or economic policy.

There is, however, a real problem with remaining in the race and having you, your husband and/or your campaign surrogates continuously attack the character, credibility, and charisma of the other democratic candidate.

I am not a political insider, not a political pro or pundit. I am a just democrat, a democrat who wants a democrat to win the white house in 2008...why don't you?


Posted by: jonathanR | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary, you don't have the women's vote wrapped up, just the over-60 women's vote. There's a difference.

More to the point...when your superdelegates explain their continued support of you without saying "best person to be President", you're in trouble. Trust me on that.

You're trying to get Obama superdelegates to switch, while your own (e.g., Sheila Jackson Lee) are saying "you can't expect me to switch when I gave my word over a year ago". Or as McGovern said, he endorsed you out of loyalty.

That's not good enough, Hillary. Face it: it's over. The longer you wait, the more delusional you appear. (Although after the Bosnia thing, we knew that.) Wishful thinking is not part of the job description. We've tried faith-based, now we're ready for a President who's reality-based. I realize it's a Catch-22, but this is the point you need to forget your dreams and focus on your legacy.

Posted by: TomJx | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- freeing up cash for critical media buys but also earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.

Clinton's campaign did not respond to recent, specific questions about its transactions with vendors. But Clinton spokesman Jay Carson pointed on Saturday to an earlier statement the campaign issued to Politico, asserting: "The campaign pays its bills regularly and in the normal course of business, and pays all of its bills."

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- freeing up cash for critical media buys but also earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.

Clinton's campaign did not respond to recent, specific questions about its transactions with vendors. But Clinton spokesman Jay Carson pointed on Saturday to an earlier statement the campaign issued to Politico, asserting: "The campaign pays its bills regularly and in the normal course of business, and pays all of its bills."

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama. ....

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:40 AM | Report abuse

Why should Clinton drop out? The race is very close and Hillary has been enjoying the momentum in the last big primary contests in Ohio, Texas, R. I. and Vermont. She is expected to do very well in Pa. and West Va. and is competitive in Indiana. I see nothing wrong with the race going to the convention. After all, that's what happened in the old days before there were primaries and even after there were primaries.
I am a lifelong Democrat and have worked on many campaigns starting when I was in college and campaigned for Robert Kennedy in l968 in the Democratic primaries in Nebraska. I loved going door to door and encouraging people to vote for him. The best moment for me and a friend who also campaigned for Senator Kennedy was when we got to shake his hand in a hotel lobby. No one else was around except for his security and a few other people accompanying him. This memory is forever etched in my mind. Sadly only a short time later, he would be assassinated in California. However, in college, I continued to be active in the Young Democrats even though I was in colleges and states that were predominantly Republican.
I feel the excitement of those voters who have yet to cast their ballots in the up-coming Democratic primaries. I was always told that the Democratic Party was a "big tent" Party. This Party was home to working class, the elite, the oppressed, the minorities whether they be ethnic, racial, or religious minorities, the Party that spoke for those with little or no voice. Yes sometimes that has created chaos, disorganization, noise, and confusion but I think if voters want organization, everyone speaking the same "mantra", less tolerance for diversity, we all know which Party that they can join.
As for me, I throw myself in with the "rabble". I'd much rather have the color and confusion than stuff shirt pundits who are usually clueless as to what the American voters are really thinking but are so blinded by their own arrogance that they don't realize they know nothing.

Posted by: catjohn1 | March 31, 2008 2:39 AM | Report abuse

Hillary Fails Again

Hillary Rodham Clinton's cash-strapped presidential campaign has been putting off paying hundreds of bills for months -- freeing up cash for critical media buys but also earning the campaign a reputation as something of a deadbeat in some small-business circles.

A pair of Ohio companies owed more than $25,000 by Clinton for staging events for her campaign are warning others in the tight-knit event production community -- and anyone else who will listen -- to get their cash upfront when doing business with her. Her campaign, say representatives of the two companies, has stopped returning phone calls and e-mails seeking payment of outstanding invoices. One even got no response from a certified letter.

Their cautionary tales, combined with published reports about similar difficulties faced by a New Hampshire landlord, an Iowa office cleaner and a New York caterer, highlight a less-obvious impact of Clinton's inability to keep up with the staggering fundraising pace set by her opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.

Clinton's campaign did not respond to recent, specific questions about its transactions with vendors. But Clinton spokesman Jay Carson pointed on Saturday to an earlier statement the campaign issued to Politico, asserting: "The campaign pays its bills regularly and in the normal course of business, and pays all of its bills."

The New York senator's presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $11 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn't. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.

It's not just the size of Clinton's debts that's noteworthy. It's also that her unpaid bills extend beyond the realm of high-priced consultants who typically let bills slide as part of the cost of doing business with powerful clientele whose success is linked to their own.

Some of Clinton's biggest debts are to pollster and chief strategist Mark Penn, who's owed $2.5 million; direct mail company MSHC Partners, which is owed $807,000; phone-banking firm Spoken Hub, which is waiting for $771,000; and ad maker Mandy Grunwald, who's owed $467,000.

Clinton also reported debts more than one month old to a slew of apolitical businesses and organizations, large and small, in the states through which this historically expensive Democratic primary campaign has raged.

She owed Iowa's Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees $3,500 for catering and venue costs, New Hampshire's Winnacunnet Cooperative School District $4,400 in event costs, Qwest $24,000 for phone service, various branches of the Iowa-based supermarket chain Hy-Vee $15,000 for food, beverages and catering, and $7,700 to Ohio and Massachusetts branches of the theatrical stage employees' union, for equipment costs.

In fact, about a third of the nearly 700 individual debts Clinton reported at the end of February were for various types of "event expenses," including $319,000 for catering and venue costs, $420,000 for equipment, $11,000 for photography and $9,000 for security.

Event production is important to big-time presidential campaigns. It shapes how candidates look and sound, not just to the thousands of people who turn out to campaign speeches and rallies but also to the millions who catch snippets of them on television.

And word is getting around that Clinton's campaign does not promptly pay those who labor to make her events look good, said an employee of the event production company Forty Two of Youngstown, Ohio.

"I feel insulted by the way that the campaign treated this company and treated us personally," said the employee, who did not want to be named talking about a client.

The Clinton campaign paid the company $16,500 to set up a stage, press riser, sound system and backdrops at a Youngstown high school last month for a raucous union rally, where an aggressive Clinton stump speech drew thunderous applause. But the Clinton campaign has yet to pay Forty Two for two other February events, and the employee said the campaign has stopped returning phone calls, e-mails and didn't respond to a certified letter.

"We worked very hard to put together these events on a moment's notice and do absolutely everything to a 't' to make it look perfect on television for her and for her campaign," said the employee. "Sen. Clinton talks about helping working families, people in unions and small businesses. But when it comes down to actually doing something that shows that she can back up her words with action, she fails."

(excerpted from Politico.Com - Vogel)

Posted by: gandalfthegrey | March 31, 2008 2:14 AM | Report abuse

There is no reason for HRC to "drop out" and no legitimate reason for pressuring her to do so.

It would be legitimate for the "Party" to pressure the candidates to be respectful to each other - that is in the Ds' best interest.

If their campaigns continue cheap shots and dueling "conference calls" where they whine to the MSM twice a day they deserve whatever awaits them for that.

It may be difficult to concentrate on issues when they agree on so much, but it is not impossible.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | March 31, 2008 12:34 AM | Report abuse

What i do not understand is the premise that just becasue she won a bigh state it follows quite literally that Obama would therefor not win it in November? How is there a connection between what one Democratic Candidate does in a primary (or deosnt do)that somehow translates into what the whole Democrat consituency will do in a general election...
I cannot see how just because she won a primary or a causcus it means that some how she would get more votes in a general election..than Obama...

Inm uderstood that they were all Democrats who voted...?

It looks to me like comparing Apples and Pears..... I do not see the argument...


Posted by: njhardy123 | March 31, 2008 12:20 AM | Report abuse

Wasn't it Murtha who told her to read it before she voted.It's a good thing she didn't go to Bosnia looking for WMD'S. Living Herstory?

Posted by: rentamob | March 30, 2008 11:53 PM | Report abuse

Real women who have a mind and not afraid to use it are voting Hillary. We don't allow the media pigs like Chris Matthrews who has a boy crush on Obama, or the Howard Dean of the world to make choices for us. Not so fast, we won't stop. Go Hillary!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
3/30/2008 11:20:18 PM

Posted by: gracekelly | March 30, 2008 11:23 PM | Report abuse

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