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McCain: NATO Should Address "Russian Aggression"


Russian troops move along a road near the border between North and South Ossetia August 11, 2008. (Reuters)

By Robert Barnes
ERIE, Pa. -- Republican presumptive presidential nominee John McCain today called for a strong response to "Russian aggression" toward Georgia, including an emergency meeting of the NATO North Atlantic Council to "demand a ceasefire and begin discussions on both the deployment of an international peacekeeping force to South Ossetia and the implications for NATO's future relationship with Russia."

McCain continued to take a tough stance toward Russia, saying, "Russian President Medvedev and Prime Minister Putin must understand the severe, long-term negative consequences that their government's actions will have for Russia's relationship with the U.S. and Europe."

His remarks follow:

Americans wishing to spend August vacationing with their families or watching the Olympics may wonder why their newspapers and television screens are filled with images of war in the small country of Georgia. Concerns about what occurs there might seem distant and unrelated to the many other interests America has around the world. And yet Russian aggression against Georgia is both a matter of urgent moral and strategic importance to the United States of America.

Georgia is an ancient country, at the crossroads of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and one of the world's first nations to adopt Christianity as an official religion. After a brief period of independence following the Russian revolution, the Red Army forced Georgia to join the Soviet Union in 1922. As the Soviet Union crumbled at the end of the Cold War, Georgia regained its independence in 1991, but its early years were marked by instability, corruption, and economic crises.

Following fraudulent parliamentary elections in 2003, a peaceful, democratic revolution took place, led by the U.S.-educated lawyer Mikheil Saakashvili. The Rose Revolution changed things dramatically and, following his election, President Saakashvili embarked on a series of wide-ranging and successful reforms. I've met with President Saakashvili many times, including during several trips to Georgia.

What the people of Georgia have accomplished -- in terms of democratic governance, a Western orientation, and domestic reform -- is nothing short of remarkable. That makes Russia's recent actions against the Georgians all the more alarming. In the face of Russian aggression, the very existence of independent Georgia -- and the survival of its democratically-elected government -- are at stake.

In recent days Moscow has sent its tanks and troops across the internationally recognized border into the Georgian region of South Ossetia. Statements by Moscow that it was merely aiding the Ossetians are belied by reports of Russian troops in the region of Abkhazia, repeated Russian bombing raids across Georgia, and reports of a de facto Russian naval blockade of the Georgian coast. Whatever tensions and hostilities might have existed between Georgians and Ossetians, they in no way justify Moscow's path of violent aggression. Russian actions, in clear violation of international law, have no place in 21st century Europe.

The implications of Russian actions go beyond their threat to the territorial integrity and independence of a democratic Georgia. Russia is using violence against Georgia, in part, to intimidate other neighbors -- such as Ukraine -- for choosing to associate with the West and adhering to Western political and economic values. As such, the fate of Georgia should be of grave concern to Americans and all people who welcomed the end of a divided of Europe, and the independence of former Soviet republics. The international response to this crisis will determine how Russia manages its relationships with other neighbors. We have other important strategic interests at stake in Georgia, especially the continued flow of oil through the Baku-Tblisi-Ceyhan pipeline, which Russia attempted to bomb in recent days; the operation of a critical communication and trade route from Georgia through Azerbaijan and Central Asia; and the integrity and influence of NATO, whose members reaffirmed last April the territorial integrity, independence, and sovereignty of Georgia.

Yesterday Georgia withdrew its troops from South Ossetia and offered a ceasefire. The Russians responded by bombing the civilian airport in Georgia's capital, Tblisi, and by stepping up its offensive in Abkhazia. This pattern of attack appears aimed not at restoring any status quo ante in South Ossetia, but rather at toppling the democratically elected government of Georgia. This should be unacceptable to all the democratic countries of the world, and should draw us together in universal condemnation of Russian aggression.

Russian President Medvedev and Prime Minister Putin must understand the severe, long-term negative consequences that their government's actions will have for Russia's relationship with the U.S. and Europe. It is time we moved forward with a number of steps.

The United States and our allies should continue efforts to bring a resolution before the UN Security Council condemning Russian aggression, noting the withdrawal of Georgian troops from South Ossetia, and calling for an immediate ceasefire and the withdrawal of Russian troops from Georgian territory. We should move ahead with the resolution despite Russian veto threats, and submit Russia to the court of world public opinion.

NATO's North Atlantic Council should convene in emergency session to demand a ceasefire and begin discussions on both the deployment of an international peacekeeping force to South Ossetia and the implications for NATO's future relationship with Russia, a Partnership for Peace nation. NATO's decision to withhold a Membership Action Plan for Georgia might have been viewed as a green light by Russia for its attacks on Georgia, and I urge the NATO allies to revisit the decision.

The Secretary of State should begin high-level diplomacy, including visiting Europe, to establish a common Euro-Atlantic position aimed at ending the war and supporting the independence of Georgia. With the same aim, the U.S. should coordinate with our partners in Germany, France, and Britain, to seek an emergency meeting of the G-7 foreign ministers to discuss the current crisis. The visit of French President Sarkozy to Moscow this week is a welcome expression of transatlantic activism.

Working with allied partners, the U.S. should immediately consult with the Ukrainian government and other concerned countries on steps to secure their continued independence. This is particularly important as a number of Russian Black Sea fleet vessels currently in Georgian territorial waters are stationed at Russia's base in the Ukrainian Crimea.

The U.S. should work with Azerbaijan and Turkey, and other interested friends, to develop plans to strengthen the security of the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline.

The U.S. should send immediate economic and humanitarian assistance to help mitigate the impact the invasion has had on the people of Georgia.

Our united purpose should be to persuade the Russian government to cease its attacks, withdraw its troops, and enter into negotiations with Georgia. We must remind Russia's leaders that the benefits they enjoy from being part of the civilized world require their respect for the values, stability and peace of that world. World history is often made in remote, obscure countries. It is being made in Georgia today. It is the responsibility of the leading nations of the world to ensure that history continues to be a record of humanity's progress toward respecting the values and security of free people.

Posted at 11:21 AM ET on Aug 11, 2008  | Category:  John McCain
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Comments

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Did Dubya ask NATO to handle Iraq? Putin could give a damn less what the world thinks. It just seems funny to see Dubya trying to act presidential.

Posted by: jw | August 12, 2008 5:58 AM

Some of you people just don't get it. Your president has killed hundreds of thousands of Iraqis and and-Americans, illegally. Don't you see how silly it is for him to judge Russia. And more of your Heroic men and women will still die from the pollution of the ultimate illegal strike against Iraq. Your President says Russia is not a super power, Test them. There is enough ammo to destroy this Planet 20 times over. Our friends, our neighbors, wake up. Forget about stupid media and look at the facts. Just an older Canadian who wants to make up for my stupid mistakes and greed. We all did it to our younger generation, big time. All for oil, to hell with international laws, it is done, your President fixed that big time, and our Prime Minister did not help much. Someone, prove me wrong, I can take it. May we all be blessed by some god? It is getting so close to election Day for you all, and the the world is watching us and laughing, but what is there to laugh about. All of us, or should I say the irrelevant issues of today. Their might be a chance for change, and enough of the dam stupid media in Canada and the U.S of A. It still is we the People, Yes, No?? We still need each other more than anything , yes, no??

Posted by: justadad55+ | August 12, 2008 4:50 AM

Posted by: JakeD | August 11, 2008 8:36 PM

casey:

Perhaps you missed Obama's comments from "vacation"? I wonder if The One even knows what NATO is?

Posted by: JakeD | August 11, 2008 7:14 PM

I think people underestimate the limitlessness of McCain's stupidity and total lack of understanding of fundamental foreign affairs. That's why he's the Republican nominee today. The man is a dangerous buffoon and his imbecility is staggering.

Posted by: Gwen | August 11, 2008 5:08 PM

It's comical that McCain thinks the Russians give a hoot about the opinions of an old fuddy duddy like himself as they continue their naked aggression against Georgia. The Russians know perfectly well that McCain has zero chance of becoming President so they will brush his words off just as one brushes a fly off one's jacket.

Posted by: David S. Robins | August 11, 2008 4:16 PM

BushCo sold Georgia the arms to do what they did. BushCo used them as pawns to advance their own interests.
Grampy McCain, as you see, fits neatly into this lie. Georgia thought we would come to their rescue and yet here's McCain blathering on again like he thinks he's making sense or something.

Posted by: ZappoDave | August 11, 2008 3:41 PM

BushCo sold Georgia the arms to do what they did. BushCo used them as pawns to advance their own interests.
Grampy McCain, as you see, fits neatly into this lie. Georgia thought we would come to their rescue and yet here's McCain blathering on again like he thinks he's making sense or something.

Posted by: ZappoDave | August 11, 2008 3:41 PM

Warmonger McCain is out there all by himself with his tough-guy talk against Russia. Everyone else in the world is aligning on a cease fire. Furthermore, everyone knows America is no position to do anything about it because our forces are bogged down in Iraq. Heck, even Georgia's forces are bogged down in Iraq. Now they want out of Iraq and they're leaving.

McCain is a loose cannon with no sense of how to deal with a crisis other than to start another useless war somewhere in the world.

Posted by: casey | August 11, 2008 3:35 PM

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