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Ad of the day: The Murkowski attack ad pile-on (Updated)

Today's ad of the day is not one ad but a series of attack ads in Alaska, where Republican write-in candidate Lisa Murkowski is getting pummeled from the left and the right as she seeks to keep her seat in the Senate.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee came out with this spot claiming that Murkowski has "gone Washington" and "turned her back" on Alaska.

Democrat Scott McAdams, who is caught between a surging Murkowski and fading GOP nominee Joe Miller, has this ad going after the senator, claiming that "she's changed" and that "she thinks unless you collect a big taxpayer salary, your job isn't worth anything." The spot concludes with the announcer saying, "Lisa, public service is measured in results, not a paycheck."

This final ad, from Miller, goes after Murkowski for using the Obama campaign's 2008 slogan "Yes, we can." The ad pairs video of Murkowski on the campaign trail with images of President Obama, as text appears saying "Wall Street bailouts" and "cap & trade." It ends with Murkowski mid-scream and text that reads, "Don't be fooled again."

Last, but not least, Murkowski is out with an ad of her own, which goes after neither candidate.

While we're not likely to know the results of the Alaska Senate race until well after voters go to the polls, it's pretty clear that this is one of the more fascinating -- and negative -- ad wars of 2010.

In other ad news:

-- The Post's Greg Sargent reports on a Michigan ad from GOP House hopeful Dan Benishek that features a series of tea party rally signs, one of which reads "repent or perish."

-- UPDATED 11/01/2010 10:34 p.m.: Morgan Freeman has made his 2010 ad debut has released a statement saying he did not lend his voice to an ad for North Carolina Republican congressional candidate B.J. Lawson and that he doesn't support Lawson's candidacy. "These people are lying. I have never recorded any campaign ads for B.J. Lawson and I do not support his candidacy. And, no one who represents me ever has ever authorized the use of my name, voice or any other likeness in support of Mr. Lawson or his candidacy," the statement read.

Lawson had confirmed on his Facebook page that Freeman did the voiceover, but the campaign later said they had been "tricked" by the ad's creators. "We're apologizing to Congressman Price, to the voters, and most of all to Morgan Freeman because this is not the campaign we wanted to run, and not the campaign we have run," Lawson campaign spokesman Martin Avila told CNN.

The ad is no longer available on YouTube, and Lawson's opponent, Rep. Dave Price is not letting Lawson off the hook. "This is simply not credible. How can a candidate seriously claim that they had the voice and purported support of a well-known actor like Morgan Freeman without ever having spoken with him?" asked Price campaign spokesman Andrew High. Price also released a statement going after Lawson, "This is an unfortunate and desperate attempt to fool voters in the last hours of a campaign. By using Mr. Freeman's good name, BJ Lawson has ruined his own, and he should be ashamed. Now the voters will decide whom they trust." (h/t CNN)

-- Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) has made her campaign 2010 swan song ad, featuring footage of Obama's endorsement.

-- The group Concerned Nevadans That Care About Our Country has released an ad featuring voters speaking out against Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.). But these aren't just any voters. Nearly all of them represent traditionally Democratic constituencies, including unions, African Americans and Hispanics. (h/t The Washington Times)

-- After weeks of being attacked with her own statements in Democrat Jerry Brown's ads in California's governor's race, Republican Meg Whitman has released an ad of her own using a CNN "Late Edition" interview in which Brown says, speaking of his 1974 campaign promises: "It's all a lie." (h/t Hot Air)

-- Florida state Senate candidate Lizbeth Benacquisto (R) used a campaign ad to reveal publicly, for the first time, that she was raped at age 19. In the ad, Benacquisto claims that her opponent, Democratic state Rep. Kevin Rader, asserted that her position on abortion rights made criminals out of rape victims. (h/t ABC)

By Emi Kolawole  | November 1, 2010; 1:32 PM ET
Categories:  44 The Obama Presidency, Ad of the day  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Palin attacks Politico for 'crap' story, tells anonymous sources to 'man up'
Next: Where do I vote? Polling locations and other election day questions answered

Comments

The Murkowski and Angle ads are both pretty effective.

Posted by: JBaustian | November 2, 2010 12:16 PM | Report abuse

The famous photographer Karsh of Ottawa once said that he was worried that some day Americans would be choosing their leaders by judging them in photos by their (good) looks. It's much easier than listening to their negative attacks on each other. If anyone of the candidates completely explained what their plans and visions were for their State and America, I don't seem to remember. I guess I like to judge them on how well they explain their policies. The formation and explanation of thought reveal a person's true intellect.

Posted by: allset707 | November 1, 2010 2:39 PM | Report abuse

The famous photographer Karsh of Ottawa once said that he was worried that some day Americans would be choosing their leaders by judging them in photos by their (good) looks. It's much easier than listening to their negative attacks on each other. If anyone of the candidates completely explained what their plans and visions were for their State and America, I don't seem to remember. I guess I like to judge them on how well they explain their policies. The formation and explanation of thought reveal a person's true intellect.

Posted by: allset707 | November 1, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

The famous photographer Karsh of Ottawa once said that he was worried that some day Americans would be choosing their leaders by judging them in photos by their (good) looks. It's much easier than listening to their negative attacks on each other. If anyone of the candidates completely explained what their plans and visions were for their State and America, I don't seem to remember. I guess I like to judge them on how well they explain their policies. The formation and explanation of thought reveal a person's true intellect.

Posted by: allset707 | November 1, 2010 2:37 PM | Report abuse

The famous photographer Karsh of Ottawa once said that he was worried that some day Americans would be choosing their leaders by judging them in photos by their (good) looks. It's much easier than listening to their negative attacks on each other. If anyone of the candidates completely explained what their plans and visions were for their State and America, I don't seem to remember. I guess I like to judge them on how well they explain their policies. The formation and explanation of thought reveal a person's true intellect.

Posted by: allset707 | November 1, 2010 2:35 PM | Report abuse

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