Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Posted at 2:45 PM ET, 02/14/2011

Budget 2012: Defense Department

By Walter Pincus

The president's proposed fiscal 2012 budget requests $553 billion for the Defense Department's base spending and another $118 billion for Afghanistan and Iraq for a total of $671 billion.

While the base budget would rise $22 billion above the fiscal 2010 figure expected to be available this year, the funds for Iraq and Afghanistan would drop by $41 billion from the $159 billion expected for this year. That would put the proposed overall fiscal 2012 figure almost $20 billion under overall defense spending for the current year.

Increased spending next year would go to cybersecurity, which would total $2.3 billion, and to new but far lesser expenditures to protect against biological weapons.

The budget would eliminate some weapons systems, including the $13 billion Marines amphibious landing craft called the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle -- a decision already announced. It also deals with skyrocketing military health care costs through what are termed "efficiency and management reforms" projected to save nearly $8 billion over the next five years.

Next year, however, outlays for 9.6 million active and retiree Defense health care beneficiaries, plus construction of hospitals and clinics, is scheduled to grow to $52 billion. But the increases projected are less than in past years.

Another $12.8 billion is requested for Afghan security forces, up nearly $1 billion from the current year request and even more from the amount contained in the current fiscal 2011 continuing resolution.

View agency budget document (Annotated PDF)

Budget 2012 analysis: Full list of agencies

By Walter Pincus  | February 14, 2011; 2:45 PM ET
Categories:  44 The Obama Presidency  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Secretary Clinton: House Republican budget cuts will endanger national security
Next: Budget 2012: Homeland Security

Comments

I think one may, in certain cases, add Foreign Aid to Defense spending inasmuch as part of the justification for Foreign Aid, is to assist US Security.

Along that line of thought; why does our Congress insist that campaign donations do not sway their positions on domestic policy issues; and then simultaneously justify foreign aid as a means to influence foreign leaders? Does money suddenly become influential when leaves the Continental United States? Someone please explain this to me. Thanks.

Posted by: nanonano1 | February 14, 2011 5:07 PM | Report abuse

I think one may, in certain cases, add Foreign Aid to Defense spending inasmuch as part of the justification for Foreign Aid, is to bolster US Security and influence foreign leaders.

Along that line of thought; why does our Congress insist that campaign donations do not sway their positions on domestic policy issues; and then simultaneously justify foreign aid as a means to influence foreign leaders? Does money suddenly become influential when it leaves the Continental United States? Someone please explain this to me. Thanks.

Posted by: nanonano1 | February 14, 2011 5:05 PM | Report abuse

Absoulely astounding!! Even though the majority of the American taxpayers believe the defense budget is over the top in waste and unnecessary spending .It just shows how little regard our congressman have for our concerns. Just keep hacking away on social services in favor of needless spending project We will remember next election.

Posted by: cliffc1 | February 14, 2011 4:44 PM | Report abuse

More blow no show! We have the audacity to question military activities of countries like Egypt, Russia and China while our military and its budget continues to skyrocket. Who is really oppressed? them or us? No one is remotely interested in taking on the military industrial complex. Just continue to kick the can down the road. SHAME. We will remenber next election.

Posted by: cliffc1 | February 14, 2011 4:34 PM | Report abuse

More blow no show! We have the audacity to question military activities of countries like Egypt, Russia and China while our military and its budget continues to skyrocket. Who is really oppressed? them or us? No one is remotely interested in taking on the military industrial complex. Just continue to kick the can down the road. SHAME. We will remenber next election.

Posted by: cliffc1 | February 14, 2011 4:34 PM | Report abuse

The defense and security spending is way more ....you have to add in all the agencies they hide it in- dod, homeland stupidity, veterans admin and pensions, 145 other fed security forces, the 16 intel agencies/departments, border wars and doe- a useless agency that has ten national labs that as far as I can see do nothing more than dod research (founded in 1976 with one mandate get us off foreign oil- they've done one of the worst jobs in history!).....

With all above the defense and security budget is upwards of $1.4 TRILLION just this year.....end these senseless and unethical wars and quit maiming and killing hundreds of thousands and bring our troops home and close nearly all foreign bases and cancel all weapons programs and we can save at least $600-700 BILLION.....

BTW- $1.4 TRILLION is nearly $4 BILLION A DAY! Total is more than 2 times rest of world defense spending and approx. 20 times the next largest defense spender China who has a pop nearly 4 times the united states....what is wrong with this picture.....

Posted by: ticked | February 14, 2011 3:55 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company