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Posted at 1:25 PM ET, 02/27/2011

Chris Christie: Collective bargaining rights 'didn't come down from tablets on top of the mountain' (Sunday talk shows)

By Felicia Sonmez & Emi Kolawole


Sunday Talk Shows:

CBS: Christie -- Collective bargaining rights "didn't come down from tablets on top of the mountain"
CNN: Lieberman, McCain discuss military option in Libya
FOX: Huckabee "very much considering" running for president
NBC: McCain -- "We've really got to get tough" on Libya
ABC: Moammar Gaddafi's son -- "We didn't use force" against protesters
C-SPAN: Van Hollen "cautiously optimistic" shutdown will be averted



CBS: FACE THE NATION

Christie: Collective bargaining rights "didn't come down from tablets on top of the mountain"

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) discussed the situation in Wisconsin and the continuing protests by state government workers against a move by Gov. Scott Walker (R) to eliminate collective bargaining rights. Those rights "didn't come down from tablets on the top of the mountain," Christie said. He also had harsh words for the teachers' unions, charging that they "protect the worst of the worst...and it's ruining our education system." He praised President Obama's overall approach to education reform. "I think the president's been on the right track," Christie said, praising Obama's push for merit pay and the "Race to the Top" program. But Christie added: "Overall, I didn't vote for him, and I doubt I'll vote for him next time."

Christie reiterated that he will not run for president in 2012 and declined to say who he would support among the potential candidates, noting that "we don't have a field yet." He praised Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels (R), saying he was addressing real issues. "You cannot be blow-dried and poll-tested," he continued. Asked if he was referring to former Alaska governor Sarah Palin (R), Christie said his comment was aimed at all of the potential candidates, but that the first time he made the comment it was indeed directed at Palin. Christie also declined to say whether Palin was ready to run for president, saying that it was a decision for her to make. Christie also said that he thought criticism of First Lady Michelle Obama's attempts to push for better nutrition was "unnecessary," acknowledging his own struggles with his weight and his support for efforts that would help children avoid such struggles in adulthood.

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CNN: STATE OF THE UNION

Lieberman, McCain discuss military option in Libya

Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) joined in a pre-taped interview from Cairo to discuss the uprising in Libya. Asked if there was a military option for Libya, McCain said, "I think there possibly could be." Lieberman joined McCain in criticizing the Obama administration's response as being too slow and not clear enough, acknowledging that the White House had been cautious in its response due to safety concerns for Americans still in Libya. "Now is the time for action, not just statements," said Lieberman.

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) discussed the fast-approaching threat of a government shutdown. Conrad said that House Republicans' most recent two-week proposal is "acceptable" but "not the way to go," urging passage of a longer-term funding measure. Asked whether he felt he could cut $57 billion out of the 2011 funding measure, Conrad said it was possible, but that the ramifications of such deep cuts could be unsustainable. Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) and Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy (D) discussed the states' budget crises and the ongoing union protests in Wisconsin. "Do I think the Democrats look great in this? No," said Malloy, calling the situation in Wisconsin a "travesty."

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FOX: FOX NEWS SUNDAY

Huckabee "very much considering" running for president

Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee (R) said that he's "very much considering" running for president again but is "working through that process," noting that he's looking at whether he can raise the "obscene amount of money" necessary to compete in the GOP primary and against a president "who's going to have a billion dollars piled up just waiting on somebody to come after him." Huckabee criticized President Obama on the economy, charging that he "has created more debt in two years than George Bush did in eight." He also said that Obama has "alienated the African-American community" by directing the Department of Justice to no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act, adding that Obama "better explain" why he changed his view. Asked about his previous criticism of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney (R) on health care, Huckabee said that Romney's role in implementing health care reform in Massachusetts doesn't "disqualify" him from running for president but added that Romney should acknowledge that "it didn't really work like we thought. ... That's what leaders do."

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels (R) rejected the idea of making a deal with Democrats who have fled to Illinois in order to block action in the state legislature, saying that "we will talk about what sort of changes or amendments they might want, but while they are subverting the democratic process, there is nothing to talk about." Asked how he would reform Social Security, Daniels said that he would "bifurcate" it so that those who are already in the program are "good to go" while younger people would have a "brand new compact;" he also advocated for raising the retirement age. Daniels sketched out a similar "bifurcated" approach to Medicare, noting that he would leave the program as is for older Americans and support a private voucher program for younger people. Asked about his tenure as budget director under President George W. Bush, Daniels said that voters should look at his six years as Indiana governor; "don't look at two-and-a-half years where I was in the supporting cast with no vote." On his call for a "truce" on social issues, Daniels said that "it's only a truce if both sides agree to stop fighting for a little while." He also declined to give a timeline on deciding on a presidential run and joked that "if it comes down to height and hair, I probably wouldn't do very well."

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NBC: MEET THE PRESS

McCain: "We've really got to get tough" on Libya

Arizona Sen. John McCain (R), speaking from Cairo, sais that he agreed with U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice's statement that Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi "has lost the legitimacy to rule." Noting that the Libyan government is "using air power and helicopters to continue these massacres," McCain said that a no-fly zone could be imposed and that the U.S. should recognize a provisional government in eastern Libya. "We should make it clear that we will provide assistance to that provisional government, and finally, we should make it absolutely clear that anyone who continues or is engaged in these kinds of barbarous acts are going to find themselves on trial in a war crimes tribunal. We've really got to get tough," McCain said. He said "Gaddafi's days are numbered" and the question is "how many people are going to be massacred before he leaves, one way or the other." McCain also projected that the types of uprisings happening in the Middle East could spread to other countries, pointing to recent calls for protest in China. Asked about the recent Rolling Stone report that he was among several senators targeted by alleged "psy-ops" by the U.S. Army in Afghanistan, McCain said he wasn't sure whether anything happened that went beyond the legitimate way that briefers are briefed, adding, "put me down as skeptical."

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) defended his position on curtailing collective bargaining rights for public employees. Asked about exemptions for police officers and firefighters, Walker argued that "this is not a value judgment about employees, but it is ultimately about preserving public safety." Walker stood by his remark that "this is our moment in Wisconsin's history," saying," I make no apology for the fact that this is an important moment in time." Asked about how the standoff may end, Walker described himself as "an eternal optimist" and predicted that "at least some" of the state senators who have fled the state will return. He cautioned, though, that if the bill fails to pass by Tuesday, the state will lose $155 million in savings, and "if we continue down that path, we start seeing layoffs." Walker also said he had rejected the idea of planting troublemakers into the crowd of protesters. "The bottom line is we rejected that because we have had a civil discourse," he said.

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ABC: THIS WEEK

Moammar Gaddafi's son: "We didn't use force" against protesters

Saif Gaddafi, son of Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi, said that the crisis in Libya right now is not "American business" and that the government didn't use force against protesters. "Show me a single attack," Gaddafi said. "Show me a single bomb. Show me a single casualties. The Libyan air force destroyed just the ammunition sites." On the resignation of senior Libyan officials, Saif Gaddafi said that "the ship is sinking, they think, so it's better to jump." He dismissed the possibility that he or his father will leave the country. "We live here; we die here; this is our country," he said. He also charged that "there's a big gap between reality and the media reports," contending that much of the country is calm. Another of Gaddafi's sons, Saadi Gaddafi, warned that there would be "civil war" in Libya if Moammar Gaddafi were to leave the country. He also contended that Libyans have had normal freedoms. "Everybody wants more; there is no limit," Saadi Gaddafi said. "You give this, then you get asked for that, you know?"

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D), Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer (R), Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick (D) and South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (R) discussed the ongoing standoff in Wisconsin. Patrick argued that states can make tough budget decisions "with labor at the table, instead of doing it to labor." Haley charged that Democratic lawmakers who left Wisconsin were "cowardly" and "irresponsible;" Brewer called it "despicable" that the Democratic legislators "would leave their job." Meanwhile, Patrick said that his predecessor, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney (R), "deserves a lot of credit" for co-authoring the state's health-care overhaul. And Haley declined to make an endorsement among the potential White House 2012 contenders, noting that "there is no one that I feel like I owe at this time."

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C-SPAN: NEWSMAKERS

Van Hollen "cautiously optimistic" shutdown will be averted

Maryland Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen said he was "cautiously optimistic" that a government shutdown would be averted, at least for the next couple of weeks. He argued that "what Republicans are proposing right now is reckless," citing reports that immediate deep cuts could prove problematic. "I think we can come together on some specific cuts based on the merits," he continued, calling it "wrong" to put forward a specific projection for total cuts. "Republicans should not be using the budget process to deal with hot-button social issues," Van Hollen added, referring to recent Republican amendments such as one that would block federal funding for Planned Parenthood.

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By Felicia Sonmez & Emi Kolawole  | February 27, 2011; 1:25 PM ET
Categories:  44 The Obama Presidency, Sunday Talkies  
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Next: White House warns of relying on stopgap measures

Comments

well its nice to see Union Thugs can actually post, thou its likely a script prepared by the white house and blessed by the union Iman and Prophet, The Great and Wonderous Fraud Known as B Hussein Odumba. Unions are a thing of the past and need to go. Bust the unions, fire all the strikers and offer the jobs to people who want to work, not whine and complain and threaten any opposition to their strangle hold on the American Way of Life. Barry must go, Unions must go the way of all Dictators and their Thugs. One final comment, this country is starting to look more and more like Nazi Germany with a fraud and failure of a leader (Hitler as a painter, Barry at everything), the Black Shirts, i.e., the Unions and the undesirables (the Jews, Communists, Gypsies, etc in Germany) and the traditional Americans like those who are Christian, White, middle class, hard working tax payers and worst of all Republicans. This is the world of Barry and his loyal and dangerous Union followers. I fear for this nations future and the cost of having to take it back.

Posted by: upgp1946 | March 1, 2011 5:14 PM | Report abuse

well its nice to see Union Thugs can actually post, thou its likely a script prepared by the white house and blessed by the union Iman and Prophet, The Great and Wonderous Fraud Known as B Hussein Odumba. Unions are a thing of the past and need to go. Bust the unions, fire all the strikers and offer the jobs to people who want to work, not whine and complain and threaten any opposition to their strangle hold on the American Way of Life. Barry must go, Unions must go the way of all Dictators and their Thugs. One final comment, this country is starting to look more and more like Nazi Germany with a fraud and failure of a leader (Hitler as a painter, Barry at everything), the Black Shirts, i.e., the Unions and the undesirables (the Jews, Communists, Gypsies, etc in Germany) and the traditional Americans like those who are Christian, White, middle class, hard working tax payers and worst of all Republicans. This is the world of Barry and his loyal and dangerous Union followers. I fear for this nations future and the cost of having to take it back.

Posted by: upgp1946 | March 1, 2011 5:13 PM | Report abuse

Here we go again, several posting on this thread would love to make you think that the public sector union produces something of significance, they don't. They want you to think it was the union that defined working conditions, and that union workers are some kind of super human worker, it is bull. the unions have single handedly driven up your costs of living, did you know they pay auto workers to sit at home and get paid, try and find a private sector job like that. Did you know the whimping, whining public workers are mad because it is now common knowledge that they have been raping the American taxpayer with their 6 digit salaries, cadillac healthcare, and 6 digit retirement income? Those of you in the industrial private sector, how many of you are getting all those bennies listed? It is easy to spew bull about the INDUSTRIAL unions, these governors are talking government workers, who are useless, and tie up your lives with red tape, making the need for more worthless union workers justifiable. Guess who they vote for. Anyone that will allow them to keep stealing from the taxpayer. Guess who is paying for that? YOU! These people are parasites, leeches, they have no business having unions in government jobs, it is a direct conflict of interest. They can make it sound all warm and fuzzy, but at the end of the day, you pay for the lies. Buy the lie, buy union! And pay for it.

Posted by: tymtrvlr1 | March 1, 2011 8:54 AM | Report abuse

Thank you Governor Christie. Thank you Governor Walker. Thank you Governor Daniels. Thank you Governor Kasich. While collective bargaining may not be sacred to you, it is to me, and to millions of other union members in this country and abroad. Through your efforts, the union movement is unified not only in the United States but also with our overseas brothers and sisters like it has not been in nearly half a century. We have villains now, politicians who are a clear and present danger to the way of life of millions of both unionized and non-unionized members of society. Non-unionized? Certainly. In so many industries, the unionized workforces have served as quasi-unions for those that eschew unionism. For example, in the auto industry, many of the workers in the non-unionized southern auto plants enjoy a significantly higher wage and benefit package than workers in similar manufacturing in their geographic areas. Do the foreigners that operate these plants feel that much more benevolent than other employers? No, the foreigners have known for a long time that in order to keep the unions out of their plants, they have to provide competitive wages with the northern unionized plants. While they remain non-union, they have received significant wage packages and health-and-safety protections, both at their locations and on the national level because of the efforts and sacrifice of the northern unionized workforce. The foreign owners would never have agreed to these benefits otherwise. So, yes, Midwestern governors, and you too, oh Rotund One, keep up the good work. We are keeping close track of your every words, and those words will be tweeted, Facebooked and texted millions of times, worldwide, ad infinitum.

Posted by: rtinindiana | February 28, 2011 4:22 PM | Report abuse

Thank you Governor Christie. Thank you Governor Walker. Thank you Governor Daniels. Thank you Governor Kasich. While collective bargaining may not be sacred to you, it is to me, and to millions of other union members in this country and abroad. Through your efforts, the union movement is unified not only in the United States but also with our overseas brothers and sisters like it has not been in nearly half a century. We have villains now, politicians who are a clear and present danger to the way of life of millions of both unionized and non-unionized members of society. Non-unionized? Certainly. In so many industries, the unionized workforces have served as quasi-unions for those that eschew unionism. For example, in the auto industry, many of the workers in the non-unionized southern auto plants enjoy a significantly higher wage and benefit package than workers in similar manufacturing in their geographic areas. Do the foreigners that operate these plants feel that much more benevolent than other employers? No, the foreigners have known for a long time that in order to keep the unions out of their plants, they have to provide competitive wages with the northern unionized plants. While they remain non-union, they have received significant wage packages and health-and-safety protections, both at their locations and on the national level because of the efforts and sacrifice of the northern unionized workforce. The foreign owners would never have agreed to these benefits otherwise. So, yes, Midwestern governors, and you too, oh Rotund One, keep up the good work. We are keeping close track of your every words, and those words will be tweeted, Facebooked and texted millions of times, worldwide, ad infinitum.

Posted by: rtinindiana | February 28, 2011 4:21 PM | Report abuse

I love these fat cats - in Christie's case just fat - denigrate those who work hard for a living (union). They have the attitude of "I've got mine...".

Without the union we wouldn't have 40 hour work weeks; health care; safe highways; safer mines; smaller school sizes; safer hospitals; well trained police, fireman, EMS workers; safe drinking water; safer factories; safter aircraft flown by trained personnel (pilots and stewards)etc.; etc.

It is insulting to those who died before we had unions that bargained to enact safe working conditions. I'm not and have never been a union worker (will and pleasure or exempt) but I always stand with my union friends and have never ever crossed a picket line to work.

Posted by: rlj611 | February 28, 2011 12:21 PM | Report abuse

I think Walker ought to give all the teachers a pink slip, then re-hire the teachers as needed, without the unions.

The unions are trying to hold on to power with the democrats help.

Allow for the democracy! Do your jobs and get back to work!

Huckabee/Walker 2012 !!!
Paul/Pawlenty
Gingrich/Romney

Posted by: JBfromFL | February 28, 2011 11:09 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: ohiodumb ...Collective bargaining is not in the scriptures but their is a bit about being a gluten.

Your name sure does fit your post! ;o)

Gluten (from Latin gluten "glue") is a protein composite that appears in foods processed from wheat and related species, including barley and rye. It gives elasticity to dough, helping it to rise and to keep its shape, and often giving the final product a chewy texture.

Posted by: erodrik | February 28, 2011 8:39 AM | Report abuse

Poor Chris! Hasn't he noticed that during the passing years that EVERYTHING has become a God given right! I have a God given right to a big screen TV! I have a God given right to my welfare check! I have a God given right to YOUR tax dollars for my personal use!

Posted by: erodrik | February 28, 2011 8:30 AM | Report abuse

Chris Christie is right about one thing: collective bargaining rights did not come down on a tablet from God - they came from hard fought battles between the unions and management. Christie is just another fat-cat Republican who despises the poor and the middle class so I'm not surprised by whatever comes rolling out of his trap. Christie you are just a big fat loser! Mark Montgomery NYC, NY boboberg@nyc.rr.com

Posted by: boboberg | February 28, 2011 6:14 AM | Report abuse

These coupons from the website printapons get sent to your browser automatically and you just copy and paste in the shopping cart. Easy to use and its free. Check out.

Posted by: marydbeaty | February 28, 2011 4:46 AM | Report abuse

Diner

Unions are just no longer needed, and the Wikileaks video showing corruption and back room deals is just the latest proof that they don't really stand for the people they represent: http://fms.nu/eiZw0G

I know, my father-in-law had an on the job issue, and the union just backed off when push came to shove... The employer was totally at fault.

Posted by: webcontent2011 | February 28, 2011 12:58 AM | Report abuse

Public sector unions have nothing to do with the "working man." they are just corrupt, monopolistic, organizations, using taxpayer money to lobby the Government for more taxpayer money.

Posted by: pgr88 | February 27, 2011 2:28 PM | Report abuse
------------------------------------
I completely understand the argument you're making here, and it has absolutely no merit.

Public employees who happen to be union members have exactly the same kind of ownership over their wages as non-union employees of a private company. The funds from which union dues are paid are not, in any sense, taxpayer dollars. They are funds belonging to the employee, what that employee does with his money is nobody's business, and that's what a principled conservative would say about union dues.

As for what unions have to do with the working man, it is manifestly impossible for an individual employee to negotiate with his employer as an equal. It makes no difference whether the employer is a private company or the government.

This debate isn't just about collective bargaining, as such, either. The vindictive attitude toward labor that has developed in this debate points to a much broader question: Is it in our interests to continue to support the existence of the middle class, as we knew it during the 20th century?

Social Darwinism is dedicated to the notion that the laissez-faire free-for-all is the only true expression of capitalism, and "devil take the hindmost" is simply the way the world is meant to be. Those less able to rise above the pack, the less ruthless, the ordinary, are consigned to the poverty due the masses as a matter of natural law. It's a great justifying rationalization for those who desire to indulge themselves at the expense of their fellow man.

As a practical matter, the prosperity of the twentieth century was unprecedented in human history, and that prosperity was based on distribution of wealth to working-class citizens through the mechanism of collective bargaining. If we want to restore the prosperity we inherited from our parents, we have to restore the middle class as the focus of economic policy.

From a technical perspective, there's a great case for the middle class. The effect of having a large proportion of the population both well-funded, and willing to spend most of what they earn, is major market growth. Assets being spent on living expenses are high-velocity assets, moving through transactions in rapid succession, generating economic benefit in each transaction. By comparison, investment assets are spent very slowly, and produce correspondingly low levels of economic benefit, per dollar invested.

Middle class wages really are the fiscal foundation of the entire US economy.

Posted by: lonquest | February 27, 2011 10:16 PM | Report abuse

The people on this site are absolutely ridiculous. The republicans aren't asking for an arm or a leg. 12% health care contributions and 6% towards pensions. I know, it's a disgusting idea, having to pay for a benefit you consume. And the collective bargaining process is hardly fair as it is now. Basically, if the unions don't get everything they want, they'll go on strike, and since the government must run, the Unions always get their way. Many union workers across the nation don't have the right to collectively bargain and believe me, they aren't working in sweatshop conditions. They are so disillusioned by being under the Union thumb that they can't understand reason anymore. The democrats only care about unions because they are their biggest campaign contributers. They talk about the republicans supporting big business and how giving them tax breaks is a bad thing, but they are too stupid to realize that no matter how much they tax a corporation, the corporation will always make the profits they need. It's their job! To make a profit for their shareholders. Taxing the corporation only raises consumer prices, so the cost of living across the board rises. Everybody is poorer when we tax a corp. If they were smart at all, they'd invest their money and perhaps get rich themselves. However, that would require being educated, and not being easily manipulated into thinking that profit is evil and capitalism is dead. Instead they'd rather steal from the few rich, who already pay many times more in taxes than the poor do and they collect far less benefits than the poor do. The hatred for corporations is totally unwarranted. Who do you think makes the products that you use every day. It's ridiculous. The Unions do nothing but consume resources and cause inefficiency in government.

Posted by: CommonSenseGuys | February 27, 2011 9:37 PM | Report abuse

Fat Elvis of NJ is the most overrated governor in the country. I hope he runs for Pres, he wouldn't even win his home state.


People in this country have come to believe it's on the brink of ruin and everyone must do their part to save it. They see union government employees with decent wages, healthcare, and pensions that they themselves don't have and they want to take it away from state workers to save themselves a buck or two in taxes. Mutual sacrifice in their eyes. What they don't see is the ever decreasing tax revenue being collected from corporations and the extremely wealthy. It's starving both the federal government and state governments of cash.


Outside of military expenditures, federal government spending on quality of life issues has been below that of other nations with first-rate living standards. We've become a second-rate nation in that regard. And why? Because the government is too afraid of demanding more taxes from corporations and the elite ruling class, has been dumping the burden on the middle class, and has been spending more and more on the military and wars.


That's been the greatest Right Wing con of them all: Taxes are bad, but especially bad for the wealthy and corporations. The so-called "job creators". Like what, the wealthy are going to move away? So what. And corporations are going to send their jobs overseas and hide the income in Cayman Island banks? Too late.


Every person (Teabagger cretins i.e. the middle class Republican base) against what unions stand for are like stupid a-holes being flogged by their Republican plantation boss and thanking him for it. Every politician too afraid to call out the elite --making a killing is this country-- and demanding more money from them are useless cowards.

.

Posted by: DrainYou | February 27, 2011 8:10 PM | Report abuse

Collective bargaining rights may not be sacred but tax cuts for the rich parasites and corrupt corporations apparently are in right wing America thanks to good little fascists like Christie.

Posted by: vztownes | February 27, 2011 8:03 PM | Report abuse

Go here to see that on Face the Nation Chris Christie said he believes in collective bargaining:

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7357882n&tag=contentMain;contentBody

Posted by: Mae238 | February 27, 2011 6:19 PM | Report abuse

WOW! You cherry-picked for your report.

Chris Christie also said on Face the Nation that he believes in collective bargaining:

"What I believe in is true, adversarial collective bargaining. What I've said in New Jersey is, as long as it's fair and reasonable collective bargaining."

He said that he would be bargaining with public union members in May for their next year contract.

Posted by: Mae238 | February 27, 2011 6:16 PM | Report abuse

Collective bargaining is not in the scriptures but their is a bit about being a gluten.

Posted by: ohiodumb | February 27, 2011 6:15 PM | Report abuse

Unions are nothing but a political arm of the democRAT party, and need to go the way of the dinosaur.

Posted by: LibsRLostInSpace | February 27, 2011 6:11 PM | Report abuse

Wow, there are some of the nastiest and vile people this forum and most if not all are on the side of the unions.

Posted by: gr8gozo | February 27, 2011 5:51 PM | Report abuse

Most Republicans would love to turn the clock back 100+ years on workers' rights.

If corporate CEOs and their paid lackeys in Congress had their way, all labor unions would be banned and all federal and state labor laws regulating workplace conditions repealed. Workers' comp, overtime, paid vacation, health benefits, sick days, pension funds, etc. ... all would be distant memories.

A labor union stripped of collective bargaining power would be completely ineffectual and purposeless, serving as little more than an organized pity party -- somewhat akin to the Sarah Palin fan club.

Posted by: labman57 | February 27, 2011 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Unions can bankrupt a company because the market will refuse to pay enough to cover the business's cost structure with an overburdened labor cost. No problem to me.

Governments don't sell cars. They tax to get their money, and when the payroll costs exceed revenues, they will just tax more. Then they will seize your house, your cars, your paychecks to raise the money to pay for holiday time off for public employees.

We can't allow that.

I once had the state seize a paycheck from a job that provided no benefits-- a few year back one August. I figured my week's pay covered the cost of the Labor Day holiday pay for one state worker.

Posted by: blasmaic | February 27, 2011 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Unions can bankrupt a company because the market will refuse to pay enough to cover the business's cost structure with an overburdened labor cost. No problem to me.

Governments don't sell cars. They tax to get their money, and when the payroll costs exceed revenues, they will just tax more. Then they will seize your house, your cars, your paychecks to raise the money to pay for holiday time off for public employees.

We can't allow that.

I once had the state seize a paycheck from a job that provided no benefits-- a few year back one August. I figured my week's pay covered the cost of the Labor Day holiday pay for one state worker.

Posted by: blasmaic | February 27, 2011 5:39 PM | Report abuse

Christie says "collective bargaining rights didn't come down on a tablet from the mountain top." He's correct. But the right to rampant corporate greed didn't either. But Gov. Porky, needs to remember there was something about greed, in general, though.

Posted by: BBear1 | February 27, 2011 4:43 PM | Report abuse

Unions' constitutionally-protected rights ain't sacred, says fatso Gov Christie

Yes, but the privilege of Wealthy New Jerseyites to receive tax cuts even in these hard times is sacred.

Fat Gov proved it by giving tax cut to the rich folks of New Jersey even as he fires school teachers, fire fighters and police officers

Posted by: Whispers | February 27, 2011 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Gov. Christie is correct that collective bargaining is not a 'right'. Neither is continued tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations. If the states and the Federal government are going to solve their fiscal problems, then EVERYBODY is going to have to contribute. The idea that these fiscal problems have be solved on the backs of public sector employees is nonsense and the GOP knows it. They just don't have the courage to say that taxes must increase. That is gutless and disingenuous.

Posted by: kinsman_bob | February 27, 2011 3:53 PM | Report abuse

Dear Chris Christie:

If collective bargaining isn't sacred, then neither is the office of Governor of New Jersey, you fat bama!

Posted by: bs2004 | February 27, 2011 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Public sector unions were created to protect workers from abuses of management...specifically...jobs in exchange for political support or favors.

In Gov Walker's budget there is a provision to eliminate competitive bidding when selling government assets. So you tell me...who's watching out for the taxpayer?

Posted by: ilcn | February 27, 2011 3:29 PM | Report abuse

It's like Christie says, "Corporate tax cuts and profits are sacred. Anything else can be dropped (especially the wages and benefits of working people)."
Incidentally, why do people keep complaining that public sector workers are decently paid while everyone else is starving, so public sector workers ought to starve, too? Shouldn't the idea be to organize and get viable compensation packages for everyone else? After all, it's not like corporate profits are suffering, right now.

Posted by: canuck7 | February 27, 2011 3:10 PM | Report abuse

A, yeah Christie, collective bargining is sacred.

It was paid for in the blood of American working men over decades of vicious opposition from conservatives who hired goon squads to maim and murder union organizers.

Posted by: treefrog2 | February 27, 2011 3:03 PM | Report abuse

And large private corporations have nothing to do with the working man, they are corrupt ... using taxpayer money ... so what was your point?

Posted by: StewartNusbaumer | February 27, 2011 2:35 PM | Report abuse

Public sector unions have nothing to do with the "working man." they are just corrupt, monopolistic, organizations, using taxpayer money to lobby the Government for more taxpayer money.

Posted by: pgr88 | February 27, 2011 2:28 PM | Report abuse

Um, duh nothing is "God" given. So what? When are people going to stop relying merely on dubious non-thought backed by superstition to form a political position.

Posted by: occidentalchandala | February 27, 2011 1:39 PM | Report abuse

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