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Posted at 6:31 PM ET, 02/ 3/2011

Senate passes resolution calling on Hosni Mubarak to begin transfer of power in Egypt

By Felicia Sonmez

Updated: 9:08 p.m.

The Senate on Thursday passed a resolution supporting democracy in Egypt and calling on President Hosni Mubarak to begin the process of transferring power and creating a caretaker government as attacks on anti-government protesters entered their second day.

The resolution, sponsored by Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry (D-Mass.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), passed Thursday evening by unanimous voice vote. It calls on Mubarak "to immediately begin an orderly and peaceful transition to a democratic political system, including the transfer of power to an inclusive interim caretaker government, in coordination with leaders from Egypt's opposition, civil society, and military, to enact the necessary reforms to hold free, fair, and internationally credible elections this year."

The resolution also "strongly condemns the intimidation, targeting or detention of journalists," calls on all parties to "refrain from all violent and criminal acts," and "expresses deep concern over any organization that espouses an extremist ideology, including the Muslim Brotherhood."

In a statement Thursday night, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said, "The Egyptian people have sent a clear message that it is time for change. The Senate heard that message, and we will continue support the people of Egypt as they determine their future."

Earlier Thursday, Kerry emphasized that the resolution does not specify whether or not Mubarak should be part of a caretaker government and noted that the choice remains up to the Egyptian people.

"We want them to make that kind of choice and not narrow the options here," Kerry said. "But the key here is to respect people's rights, to end the violence, to provide an opportunity for this transfer, and to begin to pull Egypt out of this chaotic confrontation and begin to embrace the aspirations of the people."

The full text of the resolution is below the jump.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

RESOLUTION

Mr. KERRY (for himself and Mr. MCCAIN) submitted the following resolution:



______________________________________

Supporting democracy, universal rights, and the peaceful transition to a representative government in Egypt.

Whereas the United States and Egypt have long shared a strong bilateral relationship;

Whereas Egypt plays an important role in global and regional politics as well as in the broader Middle East and North Africa;

Whereas Egypt has been, and continues to be, an intellectual and cultural center of the Arab world;

Whereas on January 25, 2011, demonstrations began across Egypt with thousands of protesters peacefully calling for a new government, free and fair elections, significant constitutional and political reforms, greater economic opportunity, and an end to government corruption;

Whereas on January 28, 2011, the Government of Egypt shut down Internet and mobile phone networks almost entirely and blocked social networking websites;

Whereas on January 29, 2011, President Hosni Mubarak appointed Omar Suleiman, former head of the Egyptian General Intelligence Directorate, as Vice President and Ahmed Shafik, former Minister for Civil Aviation, as Prime Minister;

Whereas the demonstrations have continued, making this the longest protest in modern Egyptian history, and on February 1, 2011, millions of protesters took to the streets across the country;

Whereas hundreds of Egyptians have been killed and injured since the protests began;

Whereas on February 1, 2011, President Hosni Mubarak announced that he would not run for reelection later this year, but widespread protests against his government continue;

Whereas on February 1, 2011, President Barack Obama called for an orderly transition, stating that it "must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now." He also affirmed that: "The process must include a broad spectrum of Egyptian voices and opposition parties. It should lead to elections that are free and fair. And it should result in a government that's not only grounded in democratic principles, but is also responsive to the aspirations of the Egyptian people.";

Whereas despite President Hosni Mubarak's pledge in 2005 that Egypt's controversial emergency law would be used only to fight terrorism and that he planned to abolish the state of emergency and adopt new antiterrorism legislation as an alternative, in May 2010, the Government of Egypt again extended the emergency law, which has been in place continuously since 1981, for another 2 years, giving police broad powers of arrest and allowing indefinite detention without charge;

Whereas the Department of State's 2009 Human Rights Report notes with respect to Egypt, ''[t]he government's respect for human rights remained poor, and serious abuses continued in many areas. The government limited citizens' right to change their government and continued a state of emergency that has been in place almost continuously since 1967.'';

Whereas past elections in Egypt, including the most recent November 2010 parliamentary elections, have seen serious irregularities at polling and counting stations, security force intimidation and coercion of voters, and obstruction of peaceful political rallies and demonstrations;

and

Whereas any election must be honest and open to all legitimate candidates and conducted without interference from the military or security apparatus and under the oversight of international monitors: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Senate--

(1) acknowledges the central and historic importance of the United States-Egyptian strategic partnership in advancing the common interests of both countries, including peace and security in the broader Middle East and North Africa;

(2) reaffirms the United States' commitment to the universal rights of freedom of assembly, freedom of speech, and freedom of access to information, including the Internet, and expresses strong support for the people of Egypt in their peaceful calls for a representative and responsive democratic government that respects these rights;

(3) condemns any efforts to provoke or instigate violence, and calls upon all parties to refrain from all violent and criminal acts;

(4) supports freedom of the press and strongly condemns the intimidation, targeting or detention of journalists;

(5) urges the Egyptian military to demonstrate maximum professionalism and restraint, and emphasizes the importance of working to peacefully restore calm and order while allowing for free and non-violent freedom of expression;

(6) calls on President Mubarak to immediately begin an orderly and peaceful transition to a democratic political system, including the transfer of power to an inclusive interim caretaker government, in coordination with leaders from Egypt's opposition, civil society, and military, to enact the necessary reforms to hold free, fair, and internationally credible elections this year;

(7) affirms that a real transition to a legitimate representative democracy in Egypt requires concrete steps to be taken as soon as possible, including lifting the state of emergency, allowing Egyptians to organize independent political parties without interference, enhancing the transparency of governmental institutions, restoring judicial supervision of elections, allowing credible international monitors to observe the preparation and conduct of elections, and amending the laws and Constitution of Egypt as necessary to implement these and other critical reforms;

(8) pledges full support for Egypt's transition to a representative democracy that is responsive to the needs of the Egyptian people, and calls on all nations to support the people of Egypt as they work to conduct a successful transition to democracy;

(9) expresses deep concern over any organization that espouses an extremist ideology, including the Muslim Brotherhood, and calls upon all political movements and parties in Egypt, including an interim government, to affirm their commitment to non-violence and the rule of law, the equal rights of all individuals, accountable institutions of justice, religious tolerance, peaceful relations with Egypt's neighbors, and the fundamental principles and practices of democracy, including the regular conduct of free and fair elections;

(10) underscores the vital importance of any Egyptian Government continuing to fulfill its international obligations, including its commitment under the Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty signed on March 26, 1979, and the freedom of navigation through the Suez Canal; and

(11) ensures that United States assistance to the Egyptian Government, military, and people will advance the goal of ensuring respect for the universal rights of the Egyptian people and will further the national security interests of the United States in the region.

By Felicia Sonmez  | February 3, 2011; 6:31 PM ET
Categories:  44 The Obama Presidency  
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Comments

“If Obama thinks a leader should step down simply because large crowds of people protest in the streets of the capitol for a week or so, I’ve got an idea.”

Is it not time for Obama to say what he means and do what he says????That would be REAL CHANGE!

Posted by: redhawk2 | February 7, 2011 3:29 PM | Report abuse

“If Obama thinks a leader should step down simply because large crowds of people protest in the streets of the capitol for a week or so, I’ve got an idea.”

Is it not time for Obama to say what he means and do what he says????That would be REAL CHANGE!

Posted by: redhawk2 | February 7, 2011 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Seems odd to me that these senators pass a resolution about the president of Egypt, but care less about doing something here at home, about our president!

Posted by: arnien | February 4, 2011 12:51 PM | Report abuse

the corrupted regimes, both Shah Iran and Mubarak of Egypt ARE MUSLIM TRAITORS!, supported by zonist US and Israel.
IT IS TIME FOR CHANGE IN EGYPT, YES WE CAN.
HANDS OFF FOR ZIONIST US !!
More than a million gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square as massive countrywide protests are held against President Mubarak.
Source : Aljazeera


Ben Franklin quoted "God helps those who help themselves."


Allah will not change a condition of a people, until they change themselves

(Quran 13:11).

Posted by: lipservice007 | February 3, 2011 11:48 PM | Report abuse

The Senate Resolution about the oppressive Egyptian regime would have credibility and appreciation among the Egyptians and the other Arabs had the same Senate passed a similar resolution about the Israeli oppressive occupation of the Palestinian people! In the ME, very much like here, members of the Congress are seen as a bunch of hypocrites!

Posted by: editor4tonio | February 3, 2011 10:18 PM | Report abuse

The Senate Resolution about the oppressive Egyptian regime would have credibility and appreciation among the Egyptians and the other Arabs had the same Senate passed a similar resolution about the Israeli oppressive occupation of the Palestinian people! In the ME, very much like here, members of the Congress are seen as a bunch of hypocrites!

Posted by: editor4tonio | February 3, 2011 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Huh?! Since when does the US Senate CONTROL anything in Eqypt??!! No wonder the world hates the USA...especially our allies. The message that is being sent is: "Don't trust the USA. They will drop you in two seconds if they think it's politically correct to do so." What a bad joke the US Govt truely is...

Posted by: NO-bama | February 3, 2011 9:07 PM | Report abuse

Was this passed before or after their matches on the Senate tennis courts? Or between buffets? Or at their barber shop? or after the lobbyists figured out how to make $$ on Mubarak's mess.

The defense contractors must be fuming. They could lose a $2 billion account. We sold them Abrahms tanks and F-15's? Who is Egypt scared of? The Romans? Moses?

This must have sent shivers up Mubarek's spine. Do they even have a clue the fires this man has walked through for the past 30 years? A lot of them for the U.S. of A.

Posted by: wesatch | February 3, 2011 8:28 PM | Report abuse

I love it when US politicians try to make the public believe they can dictate other countries what they should & shouldn't do. I am not sure if those people ever heard the term "Self Determination" which, by the way, is part of the UN constitution which all UN members including the USA have agreed to.

Isn't it funny that those are the same guys that do not have a say on what their wives cook for dinner...!!!!

I will consider this my "Joke of The Day"

Posted by: ymag | February 3, 2011 8:21 PM | Report abuse

What right does the U.S. senate have to interfere in the internal affairs of Egypt?
So, a government suppressing a long-term and disruptive demonstration is all of a sudden wrong?
Where was the U.S. Senate during the demonstrations in Iran?
I can’t recall a U.S. Senate resolution addressing the crisis in Iran.

Posted by: Jen06 | February 3, 2011 8:01 PM | Report abuse

You know if you bought yourself an " over the counter " remedy for heartburn or nausea , you'd be screaming for your money back if it didn't work. Yet, every time you open your eyes, up pops a Kerry , or a Hussein bin Obama to offer advice to other Nations on how they should act, and whom they should follow. This in light of the fact that the jug-eared boob in the Brown House now ; and masquerading as a President, possesses only the meager credentials of a "stand-up comic, or a 3rd rate Ward Healer. As to Kerry, Hell the only bright thing he ever did was to marry an heiress, and therefore, never have to worry about running short on Catsup for the rest of his life.

Posted by: puck-101 | February 3, 2011 7:28 PM | Report abuse

No despot gives up power willingly, it is not in their nature.
I hope that no action by our government forces Mubarak to take desperate and destructive measures to keep his office, for the sake of those brave Egyptians who have already dared and endured so much.

Posted by: OldUncleTom | February 3, 2011 7:25 PM | Report abuse

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