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Psychiatry Roulette

     My editor said my post yesterday about psychiatry was a bit obtuse in parts. Like, what did I actually THINK about psychiatric medication? Was I pro or con? The answer is, once a blogger starts letting people know what he or she thinks, the jig is up. You have to KEEP THEM GUESSING. It's the Bob Dylan method of communication. Forty-five years after he hit the Village, there's still no one who has the foggiest notion what he's been talking about. Even his recent memoir is kind of elliptical. That's why we call him a genius. (By the way, has anyone heard this notion that Einsten had Asperberger's Syndrome? [Or, um, Asperger's. Which is almost as bad as Asperberger's.] This is why psychiatry is so much fun -- you can combine it with history, wild speculation, and mind-reading, and soon you've invented a whole new field of study: paleopsychotelepathy.)

    At the risk of communicating clearly: I think psychiatric medication is fantastic stuff that has improved and saved countless lives. Thank God we no longer live in a time when, if you were eyeball-poppingly out of your gourd, your only options were a straitjacket, prison, a lobotomy or 5-day-a-week couch therapy with someone who wanted to know if you used to wet the bed. I'm not saying those options are no longer valid for some people, only that, like ATMs and cellphones and Email and jetliners, pills save us so much time. As for Tom Cruise, I thought he was good in "The Color of Money" and "Risky Business" and "Born on the Fourth of July," but was terrible in that bartender movie ("Cocktail"??) and ought to be a gentleman and shush up about Brooke Shields. Doesn't Scientology include a doctrine about manners

     I shouldn't have lumped The Post series in with Cruise, because the series talks about systemic flaws in psychiatry and Cruise rejects psychiatry altogether. The Post series makes a fundamental point: That psychiatry is an inexact science that in some situations suffers from cultural biases and misperceptions and insensitivities (which, to be more direct, is a kind of institutional racism). Shankar Vedantam will discuss the series on this site today at Noon. He's a terrific science writer and not long ago produced a great Post magazine story about subconscious racism that affects, among things, job applicants. Of course many Americans don't think racism is a problem anymore. They should check out Gene Robinson's column today about the Runaway Bride and her phantom Hispanic attacker.   

By Joel Achenbach  |  June 28, 2005; 8:31 AM ET
 
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Comments

The author represents everything that's wrong with the MSM today. His opinions are way out of line, and I personally find them completely offensive. I can't beleive that the Post would sink to such depths. I am disgusted.

Everyone knows 'Cocktail' is Cruise's best movie.

Posted by: jw | June 28, 2005 11:24 AM | Report abuse

I think a good blog post raises as many questions as it answers. Besides, who can really say where they stand on any issue these days? Everything is so darn complicated. Anyone who claims to have a definitive answer to anything is probably looking at the problem from too narrow a perspective.
(That being said, shouldn't it be "Asperger's," not "Asperberger's"?)

Posted by: Achenfan | June 28, 2005 11:28 AM | Report abuse

Thank god somebody said it, Joel; where are Tom's manners, and what does it matter what he thinks about Brooke's meds?

And Cocktail just plain sucked.

Posted by: LP | June 28, 2005 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Mr. Achenbach, you forgot my favorite of the "old-timey" treatments for mental illness - the Southern method. Just take said person whom may not have a strong grasp on reality, put them in your parlour and say "well, that's crazy Uncle Billy. Don't worry he hasn't bitten anyone in a while..."

I am offended that you failed to include this social therapy. However, I am intrigued by your thoughts on paleopsychotelepathy, do you have a newletter about it?

Posted by: DC Fan | June 28, 2005 11:34 AM | Report abuse

And as soon as you establish the new field, you'll have problems with people like Tom Cruise practicing pseudopaleopsychotelepathy.

Posted by: kbertocci | June 28, 2005 11:35 AM | Report abuse

Oops, I meant newSletter...

Posted by: DC Fan | June 28, 2005 11:35 AM | Report abuse

Asperberger's is WAY worse than just Asperger's...i mean that's like the difference between manic depression and just being "out of sorts"

Posted by: Achenbach | June 28, 2005 11:41 AM | Report abuse

And speaking of crazy, has anyone seen this rader guy who apparently just up and confessed to being the guy who terrorized kansas for a couple of decades? why is it that serial killers just don't hold the same kind of fascination anymore? This guy barely made headlines.......

Posted by: LP | June 28, 2005 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Rader = BTK. I thought he got too much press. Maybe he just needs some PPT to get him on track.

I always get the two confused, but I thought that between psychology and psychiatry, one is a science, the other is more like scientology.

Someone help me out?

Posted by: TnD | June 28, 2005 11:57 AM | Report abuse

TnD:
I think psychiatrists provide treatment for medical diseases of the brain (chemical imbalances?), whereas psychologists provide psychotherapy for discussing "issues," e.g., "My mother never understood me." Simply put, psychiatrists treat psychoses, and psychologists treat neuroses.

Posted by: Achenfan | June 28, 2005 12:07 PM | Report abuse

If T. Cruise knows about psych I'd like to see his diploma. Scientology was supposed to be a send-up (that went wrong,now,didn't it). I do believe geriatric care "homes" systematically abuse drugs to minimize workload at the cost of having residents in perpetual stupor.And for all the jokes, madness hits people in their self-esteem because they feel both guilty and helpless. Not fun. Drugs do help there but it's one application in a nation going nuts on overdoing it. Take the ads off TV.

Posted by: opit | June 28, 2005 12:36 PM | Report abuse

The drug adds should definitly be taken off of tv. Wasn't their some sort of legislation or fcc-something or-other about decnecy in marketing? Things like hard liquor, cigarettes, etc., that didn't need to be advertised on television? (I'm looking for help on this - I know it has a name) the same should go for prescription drugs. (And i think feminine hygiene products, too, but that's another story)

Posted by: LP | June 28, 2005 12:46 PM | Report abuse

In one of my books on how to write science fiction (by L. Sprague DeCamp, I believe) purchased when I was a kid, Ted Sturgeon (another master SF writer) who served with Hubbard during WWII reports Hubbard as saying, "Some day I will pull something that will make P.T. Barnum look like a piker."

And he did. And Tome Cruse fell for it.

It sounds like the Medicare people have been listening to Tom Cruse. Or they are reacting like typical old men who believe that everything is due to force of will and only the weak and stupid need help.. If so they like Dianetics have same attitude as they have towards everything.

Dianetics is a pseudo-science and is now practicing pseudo-psychology, as are the Congress and Medicare. It's all based on false to fact assumptions about biology and how the mind works -- they separate mind and body when in fact mind and body cannot be separated.

To understand this and Dianetics I recommend every one read http://www.lisamcpherson.org/hayakawa.htm .
This is an article by SI Hayakawa.
It does two things: 1) it give a perfect example of how people invent a science out of their own experience and vocabulary. 2) It shows that Dianetics is not a reflection of how the world (1951) works, nor biology, nor neural science.

General Semantics also teaches that the structure of our language reinforces the structure of our thoughts. Therefore, if we decide that the only thing we need is will power to solve our problems that will be translated into public policy. In addition, will power cannot fix broken bones, cure cancer, fix jaundice, etc. Only medicine can, and it only the neural logical medicines which can put people mentally back together so they are not depressed

The General Semantics people are: http://www.general-semantics.org/
I think there are antibiotics, so to speak, against cults like scientology, the evangelicals and a cure for the Republican attempts to mix Church and State.

I think another is the Enlightenment out of which America was born. (Although I tried this in another forum and was told that "The ideals of the Enlightenment are too liberal for America.")

So, this is my attempt to help bring a different way of looking at our current abstractions to the various debates, as Alfred North Whitehead said, "Anything which jogs you out of your current abstractions may be better than nothing."
By the way because I know you all will be wondering I am gay and "loving it." to reprise the refrain of the McDonalds commercial

Anti-depressants have helped millions of people endure their lives because of they temporarily fix a chemical imbalance in the brain. For some, now:
The world is a carousel of color,
Wonderful, wonderful color.
The world is a carousel of color,
History, comedy, fantasy,
There's drama and mirth,
There's old mother earth
With all of her secrets to see.

Because of anti-depressants taken by people every day. They make life bearable for millions of people who could not endure their existence if the remained depressed. It enables creative people to build masterpieces at 10 at night that they could not do if they were still depressed. It is not their fault or because of a lack of will that they are this way and if they can change their outlook, and be happier why not?

Otherwise, there would be more suicides, and their lives would be unbearable.

I find though the Evangelicals may be nice to individual people but they cannot go from one level of abstraction to another and learn the lessons that their actions have consequences on real people, because they think themselves so perfect (or dreadfully robotic) that they cannot imagine anyopne else not being that way.

Posted by: kxrcooper | June 28, 2005 1:17 PM | Report abuse

OK, so we have another nutburger celebrity (sorry if I offended any non-celebrity nutburgers out there) ranting about something on which he has little knowledge. What is goofier -- the celebrity ranter or their fans, hanging onto their every word as if it's gospel? Tom Cruise is a vertically challenged pretty-boy celebrity. Not even an actor --there's a difference, you know. What about the people who read every book on Oprah's book list as if her recommendations will make them smarter, richer, or more socially savy. Oprah isn't even an actress -- she's a very wealthy black woman with some sort of eating disorder that makes her weight fluctuate to coincide with ratings week.

Maybe it's not the celebrities in need of a shrink, it's their fans who cling to every word, imitate them, emulate their squirelly lifestyles, idolize them. Get a life, people. If you're so depressed you can't function, find a doctor, not a ranting egotistical celebrity. You can always turn the damned boob tube off and get on with your own life.

Posted by: WASP | June 28, 2005 1:20 PM | Report abuse

Far from it being any of my business to vitiate an otherwise temperate conversation, I have to note WASP's apparent resentment of Oprah.

On its face, the comment that "Oprah isn't even an actress -- she's a very wealthy black woman with some sort of eating disorder that makes her weight fluctuate to coincide with ratings week," serves as punctuation on the sentence he pronounces on her flock who take to heart the suggesed readings from her book club. I share this sentiment to an extent, and choose to see the book club designation as a boon to the authors' career more than evidence of a good reading list.

Oprah is not an actress, and though her professional experience is in broadcast journalism, she is not a journalist. Oprah is an institution. And like so many insitutions that launch personalities into the public spotlight, Oprah coincidentally gave wide berth to a Bat-Sheet Crazy Tom Cruise some weeks ago.

My point: saying that Oprah is a very wealthy black woman is like saying that Shaquille O'Neal is a very wealthy black man. Both are true. And if we didn't know their skin color just from being alive during the past ten years, then we should be able to tell from the lack of Euro-centric discretion that their parents applied when giving them their names. Thanks WASP for reminding us to keep our eyes open.

Posted by: peter | June 28, 2005 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Two different thaughts:
-i think that "cocktail" was that kind of "chewing-gum" eighties movie, good to watch with your girlfriend in a summer night and nothing more...
About psychiatry, i believe that Tom Cruise should be more humble and less fanatical.Psychiatry do saves lives indeed.For some forms of mental diseases the only way to treat them is whit medication.Anyway, i think this is obvious.Tom Cruise should get focused in his career, instead of taking positions about health issues. Please, sorry for my bad english.It´s my first post here(i finally got the courage).i´m writing from Portugal and i would be delighted if someday Mr.Joel Achenbach would cross the ocean and spend a few days in my country, expressing his opinions on this blog(wich, i confess, has introduced me in this fantastic world of blogging).

Posted by: suprassis | June 28, 2005 2:26 PM | Report abuse

"I always get the two confused, but I thought that between psychology and psychiatry, one is a science, the other is more like scientology."

-"I think psychiatrists provide treatment for medical diseases of the brain (chemical imbalances?), whereas psychologists provide psychotherapy for discussing "issues," e.g., "My mother never understood me." Simply put, psychiatrists treat psychoses, and psychologists treat neuroses."


Close, but no cigar. Look at thr words. Psychology=the science of mind and behavior.
Psychiatry=a branch of medicine that deals with mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders.

One is the study, the other is the practice. Kind of like the relationship between physiology and physicians. One relates to the other, but is not entirely the same thing.

In short, Tom Cruise is, in technical terms, "crazy as a dog in a hubcap factory."

and...Cocktail was subpar, at best. My vote is "Legend" for his best work.

Posted by: Joe Me | June 28, 2005 2:33 PM | Report abuse

Wow! I just finished the Hayakawa review on Dianetics. Having never read the book myself, I am amazed that the quotes as presented don't completely repulse anyone with a modicum of intelligence.

I wonder if Ms. Katie has read the parts of "Dianetics" that describe mothers as being adulterous or mothers attempting to abort their children, and if she has, how she could consider Tommy-boy as anything but wierd for subscribing to these notions.

On another note, and to attempt my own "auditing" anyone else notice that some people who post to these types of sites seem eternally bitter? I wonder what engrams they are suffering from?

Posted by: TnD | June 28, 2005 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Dear Lord,
Joel, now you're influencing other countries. Now they're all going to have this crazy notion about Americans across the pond... oh wait....too late for that.

Anyway, so we all agree that Tom and every other "star" (be it movie, sports, what have you) have the same thing we all have: opinions, and nothing else. It's just bad that they dont' see it as an opnion; they see it as truth, absolut(e) to a fault. I really wonder if these guys really smell what they're shoveling. And, it's that "god you people are morons" tone he has when speaking now.

So, what's the over/under on when his career bottoms out? (my vote is right after Katie Holmes stops drinking the Kool-Aid)

look at me, talking like I know these people. Next thing you know I'll be making up goofy names for them, like TomKat(ugh). What are we, 10 years old?

Posted by: FItz | June 28, 2005 2:43 PM | Report abuse

Dear Lord,
Joel, now you're influencing other countries. Now they're all going to have this crazy notion about Americans across the pond... oh wait....too late for that.

Anyway, so we all agree that Tom and every other "star" (be it movie, sports, what have you) have the same thing we all have: opinions, and nothing else. It's just bad that they dont' see it as an opnion; they see it as truth, absolut(e) to a fault. I really wonder if these guys really smell what they're shoveling. And, it's that "god you people are morons" tone he has when speaking now.

So, what's the over/under on when his career bottoms out? (my vote is right after Katie Holmes stops drinking the Kool-Aid)

look at me, talking like I know these people. Next thing you know I'll be making up goofy names for them, like TomKat(ugh). What are we, 10 years old?

Posted by: FItz | June 28, 2005 2:51 PM | Report abuse

The F-14 "TomKat" - Quite amusing, Fitz. Top Gun, now that's a Cold War classic.

"Talk to me Goose!"

Intercom response:

"I'm sorry, Mr. Anthony Edwards is unavailable. He's performing an ER lobotomy on a tough guy who didn't want to take meds."

Posted by: peter | June 28, 2005 2:58 PM | Report abuse

First, let's be honest and cross into Gene W's area. If you look at the scene in Top Gun, where T.C. throws his buddy's dog tags into the drink, he simply throws like a girl. Draw your own conclusions.

As to T.C. asking Lauer if he knew the history of Psychiatry...Lauer should have asked if T.C. knew the history of Scientology. Dianetics, the precurser to Scientology was a Medical Fraud. Hubbard was trying to find a way to turn a few bucks while writing SciFi. When the Feds and a variety of states went after him for this scam, he was creative enough to turn it into a religion, which is virtually prosecution proof...and affords some wonderful tax advantages. I suspect that even L.R.H. had no concept that his "theology" would go this far.

Posted by: Catcher50 | June 28, 2005 3:03 PM | Report abuse

A post so nice, I made it twice.

Yeah, you think Cruise catches himself some days repeating that line? Maybe it's his centering phrase, like some people say "focus" or "bumblebee tuna".

I'd love to catch him doing something wacky like that, but I guess we'll only get to see the side of him he wants to show. On second though, nevermind.

So, who'd win in a dogfight: Lou Gosset jr., or Tom Cruise?

and while we're here....Cruise or Kilmer for the Cheez-its(TM)"Cheeziest Smile"?

"You are danger to yourself and everyone else around you."

Posted by: Fitz | June 28, 2005 3:08 PM | Report abuse

OFF TOPIC!

I just noticed one of the headlines on the Washingtonpost.com front page:
"Viagra Does Not Cause Blindness"

I didn't know this was up for debate, but once you think about it, no one ever said it was viagra that caused blindness and hairy palms...

oh, to be on topic. Tom Cruise does throw like a girl. He also runs like a Welshmen.

Posted by: Jeff | June 28, 2005 3:12 PM | Report abuse

Gossett's _Iron Eagle_ series perhaps is less passe, because if I remember, the bad guys are Arabs.

Bumblebee tuna sounds delicious.

Scientology's version of the Rapture, if you will, may involve Tom Cruise buzzing the towers of Cydonia on Mars.

Laura Miller reviews "Dianetics" in Salon:

http://www.salon.com/books/review/2005/06/28/dianetics/index.html

Posted by: peter | June 28, 2005 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Viagra doesn't cause blindness but it sure improves memory. They never forget to take the damned things.

Posted by: WASP | June 28, 2005 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Lou Gosset Jr.??? Cripes, now those were some lousy movies. At least Top Gun had Meg Ryan going for it.

Nice catch on the "TomKat", although I doubt Tommy would recognize an F-14 if it was parked on his foot.

"Where'd whoooo-go?"

Posted by: TnD | June 28, 2005 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Kelly McGillis, not Meg Ryan.

Posted by: chtc | June 28, 2005 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Meg Ryan played Goose's wife. Remember the piano scene:

"You shake my nerves and rattle my brain...Goodness Gracious, Great Balls of Fire!"

Posted by: peter | June 28, 2005 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Her too, but Meg is much cuter.

Posted by: TnD | June 28, 2005 3:50 PM | Report abuse

chtc, you'd be so right if he were thinking of the main love interest of the movie, but he is right, Meg Ryan is Goose's wife.

way to burn yourself.

Posted by: Fitz | June 28, 2005 3:52 PM | Report abuse

and you forget you best line : "Take me to bed, or lose me forever."

Posted by: Fitz | June 28, 2005 3:53 PM | Report abuse

TnD et al: a psychiatrist also has a medical degree, while a psychologist has a PhD. Therefore, a psychiatrist may prescribe medicine as well as work cognitive behavioral therapy or other non-medicinal therapy. A psychologist only directly does counseling and cognitive behavioral therapy or other "talk" therapy, although s/he may refer patients to a psychiatrist or other M.D. for medicinal treatment.

Posted by: toady | June 28, 2005 4:14 PM | Report abuse

TnD et al, i will add to what toady just wrote. a psychiatrist is an MD who took a speciality in psychiatry, disorders of the mind or however you specifically want to define that. they prescribe the meds that TC thinks do everyone harm. while psychiatrists can do talk therapy, practically a person would see a psychiatrist once every few months, for a few minutes for a check up. they are also the attending physicians in inpatient mental health units. (i suppose TC would have all those places closed, b/c clearly, as all mental health disorders are illusions, they are unecessary)

as Toady said, psychologists are gen PhDs, but a person can also get therapy from Master's level counseling Psychologist, Family Therapist, and Social Workers. (this would be the "working on 'compulsive eating beh'" etc to compliment the "weight watchers band aid" in {i think it was Achenfan's} comments earlier). talk therapy teaches people how to look for patterns, change destructive beh, cope with stress, etc, which sometimes doesn't come naturally to people.

can also be supportive to people with seriouse/persisitent mental illness like schizophrenia, bipolar with psychotic features, etc.

Posted by: e1 | June 28, 2005 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Confusion around the pscyhiatry/psychology distinction was only exacerbated by Heir Docktor Professor Cruise's fumbling equivocation during the Lauer interview:

"When I started studying the history of psychiatry, I understood more and more why I didn't believe in psychology."

More egregious consequences have followed from less suspect equivocations, see the war in Iraq.

Cheney: "There was a relationship between Iraq and Al Qaeda that stretched back through most of the decade of the '90s."

On second thought, that is a bald-faced lie, which only happens to derive from sloppy research and contempt for facts.

Posted by: peter | June 28, 2005 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Expunge surplusage.

Posted by: Fitz | June 28, 2005 5:49 PM | Report abuse

Surplusage sounds delicious too. The "reactive part" of my brain is stuck on LR Hubbard's neologism "evolute," which basically means "develop." Too much on the equivocation, duly noted - I work around horses.

Posted by: peter | June 28, 2005 9:17 PM | Report abuse

Watch the Color Purple and tell us Oprah is not an actress!

Posted by: Anonymous | June 28, 2005 10:31 PM | Report abuse

With pre-apologies -- now THAT's what
Dean and Rove need -- I thought an asperberger
was a blood-thinning artery clogger.


-- stan

Posted by: Stanley Krute | June 29, 2005 1:05 PM | Report abuse

Asperger's Syndrome is one of the most fascinating "disorders" out there. But I don't think it's considered a psychiatric affliction, because it's actually on the autistic spectrum (and autism is considered a disorder rather than a mental illness.)

I have heard that Einstein had it, and some people think Newton did, too. (of course these are posthumous diagnoses, which are iffy at best!). A lot of people think Bill Gates has it, as well. People with Asperger's are extremely formal in speech and behavior, quite socially inept, very flat, monotone, unemotional, loners, but unusually smart. It's basically a very high functioning form of autism, and people with Asperger's, as with autism, are often completely obsessed with unusual and/or mathematical concepts and things; stuff like fractals and cellular automata and whatnot. Asperger's is the disorder of geniuses, really.

Posted by: Sirin | June 29, 2005 10:02 PM | Report abuse

Hmmmm. That definition of Asperger's is probably applicable to a good proportion of Achenblog readers (myself included). The "unusually smart" part, I mean.

Posted by: Achenfan | June 30, 2005 9:06 AM | Report abuse

Ed Klein= Achenbach
Tina=Achebach's editor

Ed + Tina = internet meeting.

Posted by: fdg31 | June 30, 2005 10:51 AM | Report abuse

Ah, but we do know one thing about Bob Dylan, he hung out with Warhol and all those artists, in fact he referred to Warhol as "Napoleon in rags." You may remember the lyric from "A Rolling Stone":

"You used to be so amused
at Napoleon in Rags
and the language that he used.

Go to him now
You can't refuse

When you ain't got nothin'
you got nothin' to lose
You're invisible now,
You've got no secrets to conceal..."

So this could be a commentary on Warhol's art:

You used to be so amused at Andy Warhol's Art
And the mediums and subjects that he used

Copy him now, you cannot refuse

When you have no talent (are not noticed), you have nothing to lose.

You are invisible now (to the critics and the public)

You have to secrets (talents unused) to conceal.

Posted by: Kurt | June 30, 2005 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Asperger Syndrome is a mental illness listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders).

You can read a description of the disorder here:

http://ani.autistics.org/dsm4-aspergers.html

The fact Asperger is a mental illness does not mean there isn't an organic and, possibly, genetic aspect to it.

The 'genius' myth is false. Many Asperger sufferers have obsessions that make little sense to others (such as memorizing transit schedules, for example) and difficulty understanding and communicating with others. The symptoms lead to difficulty getting and keeping work. It is as if other people don't really 'count' to them. If you've ever encountered a person so self-centered other people seemed to barely register, that person may have had Asperger Syndrome.

Posted by: June Gordon | July 1, 2005 1:33 AM | Report abuse

"It is as if other people don't really 'count' to them. If you've ever encountered a person so self-centered other people seemed to barely register, that person may have had Asperger Syndrome." -- from June Gordon.

Or that person could have been a lawyer. We have a couple who can't find their way across the street by themselves. Having worked with and around lawyers for years, I can attest they rarely ever acknowledge the presence of support staff. Geniuses maybe, socially inept for sure. We are the invisible people who run their offices -- nameless, faceless cannon fodder.

Posted by: WASP | July 1, 2005 9:39 AM | Report abuse

Yes indeed, every single one of us is sick in our own way. And yet we are also wonderful.

Posted by: Dreamer | July 1, 2005 10:56 AM | Report abuse

I actually didn't know that autism was considered a mental illness, I thought it was a disability. This is why the Department of Mental Health won't place or treat people with autism -- in California, anyway.

I know that not all Asperger's sufferers are geniuses, but the fact is that many of them them test in the genius level for IQ. It's their ability to obsess and hyperfocus on details that enable them to see things other people might not, and to think about the world in a different way. However, you're right, a lot of people with Asperger's do just seem strange, have a normal IQ, and are obsessed with things like train schedules, for instance, and aren't solving any cosmic mysteries. (However, autistic persons with intellectual delays usually fall somewhere else on the spectrum and aren't considered Asperger's. The autistic disorder spectrum is extremely large).

Anyway, I definitely wouldn't consider it a mental illness the way you would schizophrenia or manic depression. But many people with autistic disorders do also suffer from emotional problems resulting from their disorder, so the line can become pretty blurred.

Posted by: Sirin | July 1, 2005 11:28 AM | Report abuse

Didn't anyone notice that in War of the Worlds Tom through the ball like a girl? No guy who has a ball and glove and talks their son into throwing, throws like that. Ruined the movie if you ask me. Okay, maybe not even throws like a girl. More so like someone who has never thrown a ball around.

Posted by: Throws like a boy | July 6, 2005 10:56 PM | Report abuse

Didn't anyone notice that in War of the Worlds Tom through the ball like a girl? No guy who has a ball and glove and talks their son into throwing, throws like that. Ruined the movie if you ask me. Okay, maybe not even throws like a girl. More so like someone who has never thrown a ball around.

Posted by: Throws like a boy | July 6, 2005 10:57 PM | Report abuse

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