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More Dyspeptic Ranting About Journalism

    Forget humor and observations, this is a blog full of rants! We rant 'til we drop, and then, unlike those other lame and limp political blogs, we keep ranting, right there on the ground, quivering and sputtering and spewing and foaming and spitting and wildly waving our arms as though we're being attacked by crazed raptors!!!!!

    Yesterday in the Boodle a certain person named "Ray" posted this comment: "MSM is at it again read Richard Cohen (a revolting idiot) and to a lesser extent David Broder (mr. despicable DLC) opinions today and you will know why we want to war in Iraq with WaPo's blessings.... WaPo does not reflect either a completely lib or conservative bias. No it reflects the ESTABLISHMENT thinking - which means whatever the NEOCONS want is good for the US. They only rely on "official sources" - if it is not acknowledged by an official it did not happen. Infact we now know that the only reason WATERGATE was a success because an "OFFICIAL" the #2 at the FBI was doing the leaking!!!!. ESTABLISHMENT people!!!."

   Dear Ray: Being part of the Establishment is, for me, a lifelong ambition. I consider social climbing to be not so much a personality flaw as a calling. I love to sit on my back porch, fire up a stoge, look out on my newly green if still tragically crab-grass infested lawn, and savor the feeling of Absolute Power. That said, there's the Establishment as you define it and the Establishment as defined in the October Vanity Fair, the one with the smutty Paris Hilton cover (and the incredibly great picture inside of Bradlee on the beach). The magazine lists "The 50 Most Powerful Leaders of the Information Age," and several thorough readings of the article produced not a single mention of my personal self. Apparently to be in the Establishment you have to reflexively spend and lose many billions of dollars before lunch every day, though you could also be Tom Cruise or Oprah or J.K. Rowling.

    Now, in a bit of a change of pace, I want to repost a bunch of material that ran in yesterday's very interesting rant-filled Boodle. Some of this material lapsed into cogent thought and equanimitical observation, but we won't let it happen again. In reposting this I am taking everything out of context and probably making it totally incomprehensible, but I can't seem to stop myself. It's the coffee.

    LB: At least when our paper, The Chickasha Daily Express ran the headline "Dead Pig Found In Ditch", they had a picture to prove it. Although now when I think about it, the whole thing may have been staged to provide a sensational headline, and from the picture angle, it may have just been a trash bag. I mean you couldn't see it's snout or anything. I don't know who to trust anymore..

   firsttimeblogger: ...As for the news, it would appear that actually reporting on the "news" of the day is not as important as entertaining the dumb clucks out there. I read newspapers every morning online from all over the world, and I find that I get more important information from the foreign press than I do here. The Post certainly is no longer what it used to be...

   Achenbach: About your comment: "The Post certainly is no longer what it used to be." I agree. It's better. There are a lot of problems with today's news media, but I think the idea that the business used to be so much better, more aggressive, more this and that, is an artifact of the natural glazing imposed upon memories by time.

   firsttimeblogger: I'm not sure I can really agree with you about the Post....I don't think the Post did what it should have with Bush at the relevant time of the Iraq business....I don't look upon the Watergate mess in substance as the good old days, but I do believe the Post was a whole lot better then at getting to the root of it. It seems to me, in consideration of what Bush and company have gotten away with over the past too many years, that the Post has not done its job as well as it did then....Bush has gotten away with proverbial murder, and the Post has for the most part, given him a bye, in my opinion.

    Achenbach: [Protracted ranting....Tremendous overreaction to reasonable firsttimeblogger comments....skin so thin as to be epidermically non-existent...]

     LP: Journalism as a whole has suffered under the corporotacracy for quite some time, and the American public suffers in turn. When I was a student in journalism class, the first lesson of every semester was how journalists comprise the Fourth Estate. In this respect every major news outlet has been failing the American poeple for a long time.

    Cassandra S: The Post did an exceptional job of the Watergate scandal, and has done absolutely nothing about the Bush administration's war in Iraq, and the group that was plotting that war way before the terrorist struck. Everyone in Washington knew what was going on, yet no one talked about it, and still don't talk about it. It's as if newspapers took some kind of oath not to tell the truth, or to overlook the truth.

   JW: The papers HAVE complained and inquired on our behalf. Perhaps not at the beginning of the war, but let's remember, EVERYONE got hoodwinked there--Democrats, Republicans, everyone thought there were WMD in Iraq.

    LP: NOT everyone was hoodwinked. NOT everyone supported the war. I was at the protests myself. "Perhaps not at the beginning of the war.." you say. That is inexcusable. What better time to be questioning our elected officials? Maybe journalists can't go to the ballot box for us, but if Americans as a whole were better informed, perhaps the past elections would have come out differently.

   Ray: JW - please do not insult our intelligence and memories - NO ONE believed Saddam to be a REAL threat to the US even if he was bristling with WMDs. Since when did US foreign policy turn on Kurds getting gassed 20 not 10 years ago!!. The media were not bamboozled or lied to - they went along and even the WaPo editorial page ENDORSED the war!!!. I DESPAIR ...

    Achenbach: [Digressive, rambling, off-point ranting.]

    I'm biased but I think the highlight of the day was Achenblahblah's list of all the Pulitzers the paper has won since 1999. I will repost that list now, even though winning Pulitzers is hardly the full measure of journalistic excellence (though it will be, naturally, if I ever win one) and doesn't excuse the mistakes we make. It's not perfect by a long shot, but it's a great paper and I think it's a better paper today than it was when I came here 15 years ago. The notion that the paper has dropped the ball when it comes to investigative journalism is factually incorrect. In the 1970s, the Golden Age of The Post, the newspaper won nine Pulitzers, of which exactly two were for reported news -- Jim Hoagland for foreign coverage and the Post staff for Watergate. The rest were for editorials, commentary, criticism, etc. Here is the list of Pulitzers just since 1999:

   1999 - for Public Service, by The Washington Post, for an investigative series of stories "Deadly Force, " about the unusually high rate of shootings by the D.C. police department.

   2000 - for Public service, by The Washington Post, for an investigative series, "Invisible Lives, Invisible Deaths," by Katherine Boo, about the fatal neglect of D.C.'s mentally retarded in group homes.

   For Criticism, by Henry Allen for his coverage of photography.

   For Feature Photography, by Post photographers Carol Guzy, Lucian Perkins and Michael Williamson for their work on the Kosovo conflict.

   2002 - for Investigative Reporting, by Sari Horowitz, Scott Higham, and Sarah Cohen for a series on the District's child protection system where children have died due to government agencies placing them in unsafe homes and institutions.

   For National Affairs, by The Washington Post, for aftermath coverage of September 11, by Karen DeYoung, Dan Eggen, Barton Gellman, Amy Goldstein, Walter Pincus, Thomas Ricks, Susan Schmidt, and Bob Woodward.

   2003 - for Commmentary, by Colbert I. King for his against-the-grain columns that speak to people in power with ferocity and wisdom.

   For Criticism, by Stephen Hunter for his authoritative film criticism.

   For International Reporting, by Kevin Sullivan and Mary Jordan for their exposure of horrific conditions in Mexco's criminal justice system.

   2004 - for International Reporting, by Anthony Shadid for his extraordinary ability to capture, at personal peril, the voices and emotions of Iraqis as their country was invaded.

   2005 - for General Non-Fiction, by Steve Coll for his book, "Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001."

  So it's not like we've all gone to sleep over here.

By Joel Achenbach  |  October 14, 2005; 10:23 AM ET
 
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Next: Showdown at High Noon

Comments

All this ranting seems to be having an adverse effect in the grammar and typo department:

[Hey, now I'm ranting!!!!!]

"the Establishment as you define it an [sic] the"

"great picture inside ofBradlee [sic]"

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 10:36 AM | Report abuse

[Wow, that was quick. I take back my rant.]

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 10:37 AM | Report abuse

today should be interesting

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 10:40 AM | Report abuse

Woah, he fixed those fast Tom fan. The two of you are an editing/writing super team!

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 10:42 AM | Report abuse

I struggle with "adverse" and "averse."

Posted by: Achenbach | October 14, 2005 10:44 AM | Report abuse

I feel bad that some people who posted interesting comments yesterday didn't get mentioned in today's kit, but it was running long.

Posted by: Achenbach | October 14, 2005 10:46 AM | Report abuse

yes,using our colleague's suggested terminology:

oberblogger and unternitpicker made in heaven.

aaarrrrggghhhh

Posted by: Golconda | October 14, 2005 10:47 AM | Report abuse

Joel, I'm a little upset that you didn't mention Paul Lynde in today's Kit.

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 10:47 AM | Report abuse

effect and affect throw me for a loop

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 10:48 AM | Report abuse

I'm averse to adversity.

Posted by: Bob S. | October 14, 2005 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Allow me:

"I am averse to typos and grammatical errors. They have an adverse effect on me."

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 10:48 AM | Report abuse

sit and set

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 10:49 AM | Report abuse

[Bob S. beat me to it, and was much less verbose than I was. I've become redundant. The only thing left for me now is to become a disgruntled employee.]

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 10:50 AM | Report abuse

And I was just a set up for other people's much more coherent comments! That's worse than not getting mentioned at all! From now on I'm sticking with Seinfeld references, and whether the first protest I ever go to will be when MLB decides that Linda Cropp is a big dumb doo-doo head and they move the Nationals to Skagway.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 10:50 AM | Report abuse

adsorption and absorption

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 10:50 AM | Report abuse

Bush and bash ?


Hi, everyone.


Now, I must mollify the press.

Posted by: melvin/a | October 14, 2005 10:51 AM | Report abuse

transubstantiation and consubstantiation

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Hi, everyone.

Bush and bash?


Now, I must mollify the press

Posted by: melvin/a | October 14, 2005 10:54 AM | Report abuse

Ooh! Ooh! I know the answer to the effect/affect question:

"Effect" is a noun, whereas "affect" is a verb -- except when "affect" is used to describe mood, etc. -- e.g., "He had a flat affect."

[But somebody else has probably already explained this one already, far more succinctly. I'm going to have to burn down the building.]

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 10:54 AM | Report abuse

Here's an Oldie but a Goodie that adds some perspective to all of this. Lewis Lapham spells out the differences between the permanent government (Fortune 500 CEOs) and the provisional government (our elected officials).

http://gnv.fdt.net/~aabbeama/PJB_from_left.html

Once you've bought into fictions like "one person, one vote", and "of the people, by the people", other "facts" that rest on this fiction sometimes become tricky to report on. This is hard work, people! Do you want the Post to go out of bounds, get brought down, and then leave us with only the Washington Times?? Sometimes, you are better off ignoring the man behind the curtain.

This particular citation seems to be from a collection of writings from the left that supported Pat Buchanan - whaa?? - who tried to rescue us from Corporate Oppression. It's a glimpse into the recent past, from just before they came up with the awe-inspiring idea to COMBINE evangelical beliefs and greed into one platform.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 10:54 AM | Report abuse

awful and offal

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 10:54 AM | Report abuse

Set vs. Sit

Allow me:

Granny: "I'm a-gonna set here next to the cement pond and have me some tonic."

Grandmother: "I think I'll sit here by the pool and enjoy a dry martini."

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 10:56 AM | Report abuse

SCC entry:
"already explained this one already"

Further redundancy.

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 10:56 AM | Report abuse

founder and flounder - a New Classic in the world of confusing homophones.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 10:56 AM | Report abuse

english was never really my forte

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Ray reminds me a little of a co-worker of many years ago. This guy was retired military, a SAC bomber driver actually, who was then double dipping at the Post Office along with various other misfits and my own desparate newly graduated newly married self. He told me in great confidence soon after we met for the first time that he was concerned because his next door neighbor had a machine in his basement that caused his house to vibrate. This rang a bell. That night after work I dragged out the old Psych 101 textbook and there, in the description and examples of paranoia, was the man who thinks his neighbor has a diabolical machine.
I don't know Ray at all. He may very well be a fine fellow. But he needs to dial back the caps and exclamation marks if he wants a fair hearing. In my experience it is when you drop your voice that people strain forward to catch what you are saying.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 10:57 AM | Report abuse

Writing such as the paragraph I'm about to paste in momentarily--the last 'graph from Paul Krugman's column today in the New York Times, is why I'm a PAYING Times Select customer.
***

What we really need is political journalism based less on perceptions of personalities and more on actual facts. Schadenfreude [joy at another's sorrows] aside, we should not be happy that stories about Mr. Bush's boldness have given way to stories analyzing his facial tics [read Dana Milbank's column in the Washington Post]. Think, instead, about how different the world would be today if, during the 2000 campaign, reporting had focused on the candidates' fiscal policies instead of their wardrobes.

Posted by: Linda Loomis | October 14, 2005 10:57 AM | Report abuse

Which, by the way, should be pronounced "fort" not "for-tay."

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 10:57 AM | Report abuse

I think Granny would say "I'm a-fixin to set......

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 10:58 AM | Report abuse

Kguy
just because you are paranoid doesn't mean that people aren't out to get you.

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 11:01 AM | Report abuse

Under the category of "what reality should we report today?" - Harry Shearer points out the press has known forever that Bush manufactures his speaking events, but they only report on it now that he's under 40% in the polls. It was always a Fact, but I guess now it is a Relevant Fact. Or his real bosses are tired of him and have tossed him to the wolves.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/harry-shearer/the-sharks-read-the-polls_b_8853.html

With criminal charges hovering over the leaders of the House, the Senate, and important White House figures, I guess the Fortune 500 CEOs have had enough of this administration. So who will be the next corporate stooge to be set up as a "reformer", to lead us all in a "populist revolt"? I can't wait for the next episode of THIS particular reality show!

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:03 AM | Report abuse

This Washington Post Achenblog is brought to you by DysPepsi.

Indulge in the Joy of DysPepsi TODAY!

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 11:04 AM | Report abuse

See, this is the thing that doesn't make sense to me. This WAS reported, back in the days of Bush's town halls for Social Security reform. Bush manufacturing speaking events is relevant news, but it's also old news which, I believe, was often on the front page.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 11:05 AM | Report abuse

LB: yeah, maybe the guy had a washing machine that was seriously unbalanced. That would explain everything!

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:06 AM | Report abuse

I love it here Fridays.

Posted by: dr | October 14, 2005 11:10 AM | Report abuse

jw: I'll buy that - so then the theory is that it just didn't "resonate" back then. After that fake news conference in N.O., this is part of his new image, so it's relevant now.

Much like, once you've been called a flip-flopper, you'll never be judged fairly again. Go ahead, pick any random politician / celebrity, and filter all news about them through the "he's a flip-flopper!" schema. Suddenly, everything backs it up! This week, I'll try this theory out on ... Melissa Gilbert.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:11 AM | Report abuse

Sometimes my washing machine gets unbalanced and waddles across the room, spilling soapy water in its wake. I'd call that a diabolical machine.

But I do agree with kurosawaguy. The caps and exclamation points need to be used very sparingly if a person wants to be heard and taken seriously. I'm fine with one or two words in all caps, but much more than that and I tend to tune out (vision out in this case?) a person. It sounds/looks hostile to me and I've always been relatively freaked out by hostility. I try to avoid it.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 11:13 AM | Report abuse

I've never been accused of flip flopping. When I'm wrong, I stick with it, just ask my wife.

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Well, yeah, something was unbalanced all right. Perhaps I should reiterate the most relevant fact in the story. We were working at the Post Office.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 11:16 AM | Report abuse

I didn't realize that Melissa Gilbert is out as SAG head. I doubt I'll get many quotes out of her this week - drat.

New flip-flopper test case of the week - Gene Weingarten.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Sometimes I'm forced to use caps because italics aren't available. Or bold lettering. If it were possible, everything I write would be MAD Magazine style, with seemingly random words in bold.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 11:19 AM | Report abuse

Joel, I start reading the Post after 9/11, before, I was reading the Times. I enjoy the Post, but have stuck with it because of your blog. As I said before, it is interesting and I learn. I had to look up the "d" word in your blog today, great for me. I was here for Watergate, and got much of my news from television, and reading Bob Woodward. I live in a very poor county in rural North Carolina, and I love to reach out to people and I like to hear(I am deaf) what people think, because it is a learning situation for me. Your blog is okay, and so is the Post. I read the opinion page mostly. This not a suck up, I'm too old for that, just stating what I feel. Most people could care less about what is going on in the world, unless it affects them directly. A few people take a deep and honest interest in the affairs of this country because it is in our own best interest that we do. I salute those that do take interest, continue that work.

Posted by: Cassandra S | October 14, 2005 11:20 AM | Report abuse

I've been speaking Swedish for 30 years now, and I still have to pause before I say "anka" or "änka". Wait, wait -- anka means "duck" and "änka" means "widow". Um, I think -- or is it the other way around? My Swedish friends think it's hysterical. The tables turn, however, when they screw up the English. I try to remain polite, all the while gritting my teeth and clenching my fists to avoid bursting into laughter (Swedes just hate to be embarrassed, and I must be careful with my timing to allow that to happen).

Thanks, Joel, for finding my comments of yesterday to be reasonable. I tried to be reasonable in my rantaliciousness, because I find this whole mess this country is in to be exceedingly and exceptionally unreasonable.

I am a relative newcomer to the blogosphere, and I find it both interesting and tantalizing -- and it's a very, very important venue in which to express ourselves.

Again, I thank my fellow bloggers for their support, as it's relatively comforting to know that I'm not alone in my feelings and beliefs.

That said, I've just been handed an embarrassment of riches to the tune of three lawsuits (well, two and a half so far) and a mighty license agreement to draft for a client and I'm gonna go underground for awhile, as even lawyers have to eat. I will lurk on occasion and maybe even blurt out a blog entry from time to time.

I must say that yesterday was fun -- no, really. And thanks again Joel.

Posted by: firsttimeblogger | October 14, 2005 11:24 AM | Report abuse

From Tina Brown's op-ed on women in politics yesterday in the Washington Post:

Miers's whole story can be read as a cautionary tale for women on the move. It's about the sacrifices she made, the muzzled nature of her striving.

Segue:
And Karen Hughes learned the trick of being the Big Mom of her boss's [George W. Bush] dreams, offering him the combination of awestruck admiration and gentle correction that Mother Bush was too acerbic and confrontational to manage. ("George, take your feet off my table," Kitty Kelley quotes Bar telling him in a typical mother/commander in chief exchange at a family get-together at Kennebunkport.)

Segue:
The former chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain, Lord Palumbo, who lunched with Mrs. [Margaret] Thatcher six months ago, told me recently what she said when he asked her if, given the intelligence at the time, she would have made the decision to invade Iraq. "I was a scientist before I was a politician, Peter," she told him carefully. "And as a scientist I know you need facts, evidence and proof -- and then you check, recheck and check again. The fact was that there were no facts, there was no evidence, and there was no proof. As a politician the most serious decision you can take is to commit your armed services to war from which they may not return.

"Happy Birthday, Lady T -- and hail to you and all the women who've gone before!
***

So, shall we talk about the parenting skills of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher? Why didn't Tina Brown tell us the following about Mrs. Thatcher's son, Mark?

"Prelude to Terror: The Rogue CIA and the Legacy of America's Private Intelligence Network," Joseph J. Trento, 2005:

p. 209
Why would Margaret Thatcher engage in such an enterprise [fulfilling the Republican pledge of arms to Iran in exchange for delaying the hostages' relase until after the Carter/Reagan elections] with the Republicans? Kamal Adham. By this time, [former head of Saudi Intelligence] Adham had moved many of his operations to London and had cultivated not only Thatcher, but also her husband, Denis, and son, Mark. According to Sarkis Soghanalian, Adham brought Mark Thatcher into the arms business. Soghanalian, who had infuriated he Thatcher regime when he had arranged the purchase of Exocet missiles by Argentine during the Falklands War, had believed he could never do business in Britain again. "To my great surprise, I larned that as long as I did business through a Mark Thatcher company, I could even purchase classified American equipment for export." Soghalain realized at the time that he had run into "Kamal's system of cultivating the sons of the politicians. He did it with Mark Thatcher and he did it with George Bush."

Posted by: Loomis | October 14, 2005 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Just to clarify:
Despite my mentioning that I was considering becoming a disgruntled employee, I do not work at the Post Office.

[Wow, yet another coincidence.]

That said, wouldn't it be great if Hal could technologically regress the 'blog so that we could post creepy messages composed of magazine clippings pasted together to form words -- you know, the kind serial killers send to newspapers and police departments. That would be cool.

[As I've said before, sometimes my work at the FBBI makes me crazy.]

Posted by: Tom fan | October 14, 2005 11:25 AM | Report abuse

I think there are two places where the news media most dropped the ball during the runup to war.

Yes, there's the WMD issues, much discussed yesterday.

But there's also the annoying fact that many people to this day think Saddam was in cahoots on 9-11, when that simply isn't the case. I'm working from memory here and that's a dangerous thing, but it was something like 40 percent of voters who thought there was a real connection back in November -- when we had a presidential election.

I think the press really blew it there.

By the way, I do agree with JW that the media reported many times that Bush's people manufacture and control public events and photo ops as much as possible, even screening those who could attend his so-called town hall meetings. I recall one rally where Bush's handlers went into the stands behind the podium, telling people who might be on camera to take off their ties, so as to achieve as less "corporate" look.

Posted by: Bayou Self | October 14, 2005 11:29 AM | Report abuse

Loomis - next you're going to tell me that LaRouche was right all along: the Queen deals drugs! Thatcher started the Balkan war, and murdered a German Banker!

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Can we all agree, by the way, that what the world needs most is ... more Swedish lawyers!

Posted by: Bayou Self | October 14, 2005 11:32 AM | Report abuse

Usage Note: The word forte, coming from French fort, should properly be pronounced with one syllable, like the English word fort. Common usage, however, prefers the two-syllable pronunciation, which has been influenced possibly by the music term forte borrowed from Italian. In a recent survey a strong majority of the Usage Panel, 74 percent, preferred the two-syllable pronunciation. The result is a delicate situation; speakers who are aware of the origin of the word may wish to continue to pronounce it as one syllable but at an increasing risk of puzzling their listeners.

jw - I'm a musician, so I say for-tay.

Touché!

Posted by: Off Topic | October 14, 2005 11:32 AM | Report abuse

"Schadenfreude" used to be my favorite word to drop randomly into conversation, because then I got to explain it and look really smart. Unfortunately it is now popular enough that you appear pendantic if you try to explain. I blame "Avenue Q" for bringing it out to the masses.

I still have "defenestrate".

To change the subject: Most sexually ambiguous Saturday morning television actor/voice actor: Paul Lynde or Rip Taylor?

Posted by: yellojkt | October 14, 2005 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra S, thanks so much for that nice comment and I'm very glad you're a Post reader! (I'm going to show this to my boss and demand a raise.) (To no effect.)(Because they would be averse to it.)

Posted by: Achenbach | October 14, 2005 11:36 AM | Report abuse

Hey Bayou Self (or "hej"), I'm not now, nor have I ever been Swedish. Just lived over there. Gives me the immense freedom not to take part in any of their reindeer games or other traditions that I don't want to do. I get the glory with no guts. Works for me.

I was born in Detroit: today's rant is GO RED WINGS!!! GO PISTONS!!! You will note that I say nothing about Lions and Tigers. Although I have seen lions (and adorable cubbies) in Africa. Never been (yet) to a tiger zone.

Now I really have to go. . .

Posted by: firsttimeblogger | October 14, 2005 11:37 AM | Report abuse

yellojkt: I thought that "Babu", from the animated version of "I Dream of Jeannie", was a really, um, conspicuous voice out there in the 70s. Then, years later, I watched old Three Stooges episodes and realized that the guy was just doing a Curly Joe impersonation. It was only just now, while looking up the info on the IMDB, that I found out that it really WAS Curly Joe (Joe Besser) doing the voice of Babu!

I have no idea about Joe's orienation (not that it matters), but the voice sure was distinctive.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:39 AM | Report abuse

Last night, my husband said that if the White House wanted a scripted, stage-managed event yesterday with Bush addressing (in an exchange with) soldiers in Iraq before the election, why didn't the White House and DoD just hire paid actors to play soldiers?

Posted by: Loomis | October 14, 2005 11:42 AM | Report abuse

Joel, I think what your bosses need are more adverts before they give you a raise.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 11:43 AM | Report abuse

yellojkt"
Unfortunately it is now popular enough that you appear pendantic if you try to explain. I blame "Avenue Q" for bringing it out to the masses.

Pedantic.

Posted by: Loomis | October 14, 2005 11:44 AM | Report abuse

so how do you pronounce foyer?

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 11:45 AM | Report abuse

Whoops, I accidentally posted this in yesterday's 'boodle.

SCC entry #1 for me today.

Joel, no Pulitzer for you unless you Kit on rebar and Hobbitses.
Don't make me call Getler.

On a note more related to the Kits of the past couple of days, Reader pointed out yesterday: "The majority of American voters elected the people who are holding office. I just would like to mention that 50.01% is a majority. Just because "most Americans aren't like us" doesn't mean "people like us" are rare. There are lots of us out here. The tide will turn."

Please, let's not rehash the 2000 Presidential election.

I agree that there is a tide turning, and with inflation beginning to rear it's head, the GOP's position is looking more and more difficult. The question continues to be: Can the Dems actually take advantage of their good fortune?

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 11:47 AM | Report abuse

And Joel is pulling a fast one on us using the word "equanimitical". It does not Google and all real words and most fake words return at least one hit. Dictionary.com gave a lot of alternatives like "enigmatical" which can't possibly be what he intends. As they say in "Putnam County Spelling Bee", definition please. (my second Broadway musical reference for the day)

Posted by: yellojkt | October 14, 2005 11:47 AM | Report abuse

Whenever Democrats try to sell themselves out to Corporations, they get accussed of being Republican Lite. Well, how else are they going to get enough money to get elected? I picture other Republicans (fiscal conservatives?) moving in to fill the void soon-to-be-left by the current Republicans.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 11:53 AM | Report abuse

I like these journalism awards as well, if not better:

Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award Criteria

The award, presented annually at The Lovejoy Convocation to a member of the newspaper profession, was established in 1952.

To stimulate and honor the kind of achievement in the field of reporting, editing, and interpretive writing that continues the Lovejoy heritage of fearlessness and freedom.

To promote a sense of mutual responsibility and cooperative effort between a newspaper world devoted to journalistic freedom and a liberal arts college dedicated to academic freedom.
The selection committee makes its choice of a recipient on the basis of:

Integrity, without which no newspaper can function in its traditional role as a public servant.

Craftsmanship, without which no one can succeed as a journalist.

Character, intelligence, and courage.

The recipient may be an editor, reporter, or publisher. It is important only that he or she be a newsman or newswoman, regardless of title, who, in the opinion of selection committee members, has contributed to the country's journalistic achievement.

Posted by: Loomis | October 14, 2005 11:57 AM | Report abuse

I like these journalism awards as well, if not better--because of the fearlessness required.

Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award Mission and Criteria

The award, presented annually at The Lovejoy Convocation to a member of the newspaper profession, was established in 1952.

To stimulate and honor the kind of achievement in the field of reporting, editing, and interpretive writing that continues the Lovejoy heritage of fearlessness and freedom.

To promote a sense of mutual responsibility and cooperative effort between a newspaper world devoted to journalistic freedom and a liberal arts college dedicated to academic freedom.

The selection committee makes its choice of a recipient on the basis of:

Integrity, without which no newspaper can function in its traditional role as a public servant.
Craftsmanship, without which no one can succeed as a journalist.
Character, intelligence, and courage.
The recipient may be an editor, reporter, or publisher. It is important only that he or she be a newsman or newswoman, regardless of title, who, in the opinion of selection committee members, has contributed to the country's journalistic achievement.

Posted by: Loomis | October 14, 2005 12:00 PM | Report abuse

Thank you loomis on "pedantic", I almost looked that up and then threw caution to the wind. Now my flawed spelling is on display to the boodle and all lurkers. We need spell checkers built into blog software. Although that would prevent anyone from ever posting to a Xanga site.

Posted by: yellojkt | October 14, 2005 12:10 PM | Report abuse

yellojkt, look up "equanimity" as the rood of Joel's maybe-word.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 12:11 PM | Report abuse

Blase: blaze or blah-zay?
Panache: Pah-nash or pah-nahsh?

I like musicians, so I say zay and nahsh.

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 12:11 PM | Report abuse

SCC: "root".

Bah.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 12:12 PM | Report abuse

come on folks ?foyer?

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 12:13 PM | Report abuse

Linda, you got me Googling and I found this possible explanation for the MSM's "weenyness":

http://www.nieman.harvard.edu/reports/99-4_00-1NR/Roberts_Supreme_Court.html

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 12:15 PM | Report abuse

I thought I'd jump in here and stick up for WaPo. It is the only U.S. daily (website) that I visit everyday. As a Canadian reader, I find it to be among the best of the best. That doesn't mean there haven't been mistakes along the way, but on the whole I find WaPo to be fair, balanced and informative.

Frankly, I think the big problem is that journalists are concerned about "access" - I mean, if the government shuts you out for writing a critical piece, your job just got a lot harder - sources won't talk to you, and politicians won't take your questions or agree to be interviewed.

As a result, the sense I get is that journalists are being bullied into not being as critical as they might. Instead, it becomes all about reporting: so and so said this, this guy said that - and those people aren't routinely challenged for what they say.

So, after 9/11, journalists didn't seem to be able to question or criticize the Bush administration, for fear of losing that access.

I think that is changing a little bit, sparked in part by the response to Hurricane Katrina. Just reporting empty platitudes wasn't enough, and some journalists really took it to the politicians (I'm thinking of Anderson Cooper from CNN freaking out on a Senator from Louisiana, IIRC).

I'm curious to know what papers the WaPo critics think are "better". Maybe I'll check them out!

Until then, its WaPo (and the Economist) for me.

Posted by: Paul | October 14, 2005 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Why dyspeptic ranting inistead of just "ranting"? You've really gone over the edge now, Joel.

It is a tough burden, being part of the Establishment, I agree. I think it happens once you buy your first home. Once I too protested the home mortgage deducation (why should renters be subsidizing home-owners?), but now I recognize that such protests are dangerous and destabilizing, and ultimately have a whiff of socialism. And if Bush proposes such a socilistic reform, I'm sure the liberal fringe will crucify him for it. "How dare he!"

It's such a cheap and easy shot to complain about the media. So let's get to it...

I like the Post. A lot. I however remain frustrated that it is imperfect, suffering flaws that are almost, what's the word, human.

But maybe your editors were endorsing the war in Iraq based on principle (like many liberal publications ... New Republic comes to mind) of Wilsonian universal rights and all that hooha. The nuanced argument now is that failure in Iraq is a failure of execution -- boy that's a cop-out though, don't you think? Maybe the failure is that Wilsonian idealism also requires prgamatic patience.

Does the American public have patience to endure a conflict for 10 years without wavering, on faith that democracy is valuable, and will take root if you give it a chance? Can we bear the reality of 1000 casualties a year as the price for liberty in a faraway nation of oppressed people?

I guess it is very human to lose patience.

Posted by: Kane | October 14, 2005 12:19 PM | Report abuse

If your house cost less than $500,000, it's "foy-er"; more, it's "foy-yay."

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:23 PM | Report abuse

Adverse and averse= a classic reason why Latin should be force-fed to all students.

Ad= towards verse=turn.
a= from ab, away. verse=turn.

So when you're averse, you turn away from an adverse situation that has turned to worse.

It's amazing how many contranym prefixes look nearly alike in Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, etc.
(hyper, hypo, ab, a, ob, ad, in, an, anti, ex, e (for a) etc.).

Affect= ad= towards (one), making.
Verb (noun for psychologists, meaning mood)

Affection affects people.

effect= ex= out of, outwards, making.
It is not a verb, but a noun.

Affection has an effect on people.

Those prefixes could make sense if these prefixes and roots are ultimately based on and supplemented by gestures.
Gesture does help one speak better, this has been scientifically proven.

Wave to yourself as you say AFFECT and wave out on EFFECT and you'll probably never forget the difference again.

Lingua Romana Vivat!

Posted by: Wilbrod | October 14, 2005 12:23 PM | Report abuse

What I don't get is inflammable = flammable, but indefensible = not defensible.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:25 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, you aren't by any chance Magister Twohig, from my high school, are you?

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:26 PM | Report abuse

well thanks jw. I don't want to sound like a rube and say foy-er or like I'm puttin on airs and say for-yay. Our house has two, so I usually say "this here room is the big entry way and that there one is the small entry way".

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 12:27 PM | Report abuse

Foyer is the French word for mud room.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 12:31 PM | Report abuse

re: Swedes not liking to be embarrassed?

Once I was heading to dinner with a Dutch woman who had brought a salad. She listed its ingredients, ending with "mice." I goggled at her, said "mice?" and she nodded. "Mice?" I gasped again. Yes, she had put mice in the salad, she indicated impatiently. I pictured her serving them up with the tongs by their little tails. Finally found out she meant maize, corn, just couldn't remember our word. She was NOT pleased at being laughed at. Maybe she was part Swedish.

Posted by: suecris | October 14, 2005 12:31 PM | Report abuse

jw, you asking Wilbrod if he's your HS teacher makes me think about when I get on an elevator at work with a stranger from another company/floor, sometimes I wonder "hmmm... could this be kurasowaguy or maybe even melvin/a?"

How would I know as long as we are playing that "we're not really two complete strangers standing two feet apart in a small room so we'll just pretend we're here alone" elevator game.

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 12:31 PM | Report abuse

Remember that Seinfeld episode when George dated the pretentious woman who said "papp-i-ay mash-ay," wore chopsticks in her hair, and recited some poem about popinjays and mumbo jumbo?

He started using the "It's not you, it's me" routine to break up with her, but she demanded to know what was wrong with her, and he had to admit, "OK! It IS you! Yes, it IS the chopsticks! And come on: 'Papp-i-ay mash-ay'? Who says 'papp-i-ay mash ay'!?"

After they broke up, she checked herself into "Woodhaven," a mental institution.

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 12:33 PM | Report abuse

Foy-er.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 12:35 PM | Report abuse

It took me a minute to figure out what "papp-i-ay mash-ay" was, so George was right when he said, "Who says 'papp-i-ay mash-ay'?!"

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Equinamitiy: Evenness of mind; that calm temper or firmness of mind which is not easily elated or depressed; patience; calmness; composure; as, to bear misfortunes with equanimity.

Just because a word has a root doesn't mean it's a real word. Many of the best Bush-isms are the result of wildy misapplied prefixes and suffixes.

And all this Post bashing, praising, and hand-wringing is moot. The Post is what it is, one of the three national major daily printed national sources of news, comment, and agenda setting. The Times and WSJ have different roles and purposes, but the three tend to reflect various portions of the spectrum.

Other newspapers may be arguably "better" or "fairer" or "less-biased" but the Post has a unique roll as a near paper of record.

Posted by: Anonymous | October 14, 2005 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Sara, I still haven't figured it out.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:38 PM | Report abuse

vase or vahse?

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 12:39 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, jw:
Papier mache (pronounced "paper mash-ay" -- I think).

(The woman made papier mache hats.)

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 12:40 PM | Report abuse

jw, flammable isn't really a word. The real word is inflammable, which means likely to go up in flames. However, people consistently throught that the "in" meant not, which was fairly reasonable. So they thought that scare "inflammable" sign meant this truck could be bumped with impunity. So, in the interests of safety, truckers and janitors and the like have had to invent the word "flammable" to mean likely to go up in flames.

Posted by: suecris | October 14, 2005 12:41 PM | Report abuse

SCc - scare = scary
throught = thought

I'm going to go hide now.

Posted by: suecris | October 14, 2005 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Pay-tronize or Pah-tronize?

Classic story: My brother once said something to which I replied with a snarky comment, and he said to me, "Don't PAY-tronize me!" I replied, "I think it's PAH-tronize." He refused to agree, so I finally said, "Fine, it's PAY-tronize." He looked at me for a moment and then shouted, "Don't PAH-tronize me!"

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:43 PM | Report abuse

Ohhh!!! I remember that episode now. Haha. I love George/Larry David.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Me too, jw. I think there's a little bit of George in all of us.

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 12:47 PM | Report abuse

And re: flammable. Interesting. I've learned my one thing for the day. Brain deactivated.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Why do Americans spell words like patronize with a Z, and the British use an S? I get color/colour (kind of) but the z/s thing seems really arbitrary. Is it just to make those stuffy Brits peeved?

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 12:50 PM | Report abuse

Annoyingly, one does not aver that to which one is averse. They're kinda' opposite.

Posted by: Bob S. | October 14, 2005 12:52 PM | Report abuse

[Been working way too hard this morning, now have only the lunch hour to catch up on the real activity of the day.]

1)Can the Word of the Day please be "equanimitical"--even if it isn't a word! It's so fun to say.

2)Your establishment wannabe rap reminds me of some graffitti that made a huge impression on me as a culture-shocked college freshman:
Someone wrote on the bathroom wall: "The best way to fight the ruling class is to live in peace and dignity." And underneath, someone else wrote: "I'm all FOR the ruling class--I'm a member!"

3) The pronunciation debate is a little muddled. The point is that "forte" is French and in French it is pronounced as one syllable. The Italian word that has the same spelling is pronounced with two syllables. The question of whether to pronounce a word that has a foreign origin the way the foreign language does or to English-ify it is still an interesting question, just not relevant to this particular case.

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 12:53 PM | Report abuse

Why dyspeptic ranting inistead of just "ranting"?

Answer: because dyspeptic is a swell word.

Posted by: dr | October 14, 2005 12:54 PM | Report abuse

It's a nifty word!

Posted by: Bob S. | October 14, 2005 12:55 PM | Report abuse

Yeah jw, but do you find that you start spelling things with an S after reading too much of the Economist? That and Labour. I do it all the time.

Posted by: Kane | October 14, 2005 12:57 PM | Report abuse

Seriously, folks, all you techies out there. Is it DAY-tuh or DAT-uh?

I seem to be alone at my workplace in pronouncing it the way the dictionary dictates.

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 12:57 PM | Report abuse

I just had a lovely lunch of mashayed potahtoes and aigs bennydicktyne. Yum

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 12:58 PM | Report abuse

And jw, why do the Brits say they're going to hospital and Americans say they're going to the hospital?

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 1:00 PM | Report abuse

DAT-a for everyone except LP.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 1:01 PM | Report abuse

TBG, the elevator is the only place that I can be infallibly identified. I am the only person in the entire world who does not push the already lit button for his floor.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 1:02 PM | Report abuse

To WaPo critics and those generally disatisfied with the performance of the fourth estate: to mix metaphors "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him/her vote rationally."

The information has been in the market place -- WaPo and other have reported it, some more accurately than others. It's up to we the voters to make sense of it and call a spade a spade. If, for example, a big chunk of voters think S. Hussein was behind 9/11 -- reported evidence to the contrary -- well shame on them for continuing to be dupes. If voters accept that the Republican party will deliver the goods (entitlements, pork, two wars, etc) at no cost to them (increased taxes), well further shame on them.

Thankfully, the last election was a slim majority, and the pendulum will swing in the other direction, and in another 10-15 years, I'll be complaining about the performance of the other party in power ;)

Posted by: untethered | October 14, 2005 1:03 PM | Report abuse

What about maths. Why plural? I'm going to work on my maths just sounds silly.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 1:04 PM | Report abuse

jw - You'd only be PAY-tronizing your brother if you paid him...

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Spelling rules are a fairly new invention in the English language.

Ever read Robert MacNeil's "History of English"? Wonderful book, and if you were lucky, you saw it on PBS in a tv version. But it talks a lot about the diversity and the unique ability of English to adapt.

Posted by: dr | October 14, 2005 1:04 PM | Report abuse

kurosawaguy:
And I'm guessing that when you're waiting for the elevator to arrive, you don't repeatedly push the "up" or "down" arrow to make the elevator arrive faster.

(If you also wait for people to exit the elevator before you try to get into it, then I think I might heart you.)

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 1:05 PM | Report abuse

PGM--that's what I always thought, but the dictionary doesn't make a distinction.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Great question, Reader. I reflexively thought the pronounciations were "dayta for plural, dahta for singular" which five seconds of pondering informs me is foolish.

Both are acceptable. Data is technically plural for datum, but common usage means data pronounced either way is acceptable for signular or plural in reference to a mass of unprocessed observations, usually numerical. In a digital era, everything is numerical, right? But there is such a thing as analog data in theory (and that rare thing called the natural world).

Interestingly, data => infromation => knowledge => wisdom. Somewhere in there is pattern recognition, econometrics. But where do we find humor, Joel? Juxtapositions, I think he'll say.

Posted by: Kane | October 14, 2005 1:06 PM | Report abuse

jw:
"Maths" is short for "mathematics." "Math" is just plain weird. I can live with saying "the hospital" instead of "hospital," but I refuse to say "math" (although I've started pronouncing Z as "Zeeeeeee" instead of "Zed").

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 1:08 PM | Report abuse

kurasawaguy, I'll keep my eye out for you then.

Speaking of elevators (were we?) I usually frantically push the "close" button when I see someone coming, but make them think I'm pushing the "open" button. I doubt either does anything, but it always makes me smile to do that. My little subversive "meanness" for the day. I'm really a pretty nice person.

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 1:16 PM | Report abuse

I say "day-tuh." My personal crusades are to get people to recognize that data is the plural of datum, and to pronounce the innermost Galilean satellite of Jupiter, Io, as "ee-oh", not "eye-oh." Oh, and the correct cliche is "couldn't care less," not "could care less." Could you care less?

Posted by: ScienceTim | October 14, 2005 1:19 PM | Report abuse

I have never heard anyone say 'maths'.

Posted by: pj | October 14, 2005 1:23 PM | Report abuse

Reader, my Webster's shows both pronunciations of 'data' as correct, to Kane's point.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 1:26 PM | Report abuse

Anyone else read Krauthammer's flu column and find it a bit over the top?

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 1:26 PM | Report abuse

ScienceTim:

Old Galileo found some Jovian moons,
E-I-E-Io

And one of these was sulfuric vulcanism
E-I-E-Io

With a P-U here, and a P-U there, here a Feh, there a Bah...


Well, it seems I've crossed over the fine line between clever and stupid.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 1:37 PM | Report abuse

So, the Post won a couple of beauty contests, and we're supposed to be impressed or believe that the Post's "journalists" are not asleep ... Why? Stephen Hunter won a prize for writing something? This is the guy who said (and I'm paraphrasing here) don't waste your time or money on Shrek 2 because the story is shallow! Uh, pal, it's a cartoon and requires "heavy" storyline ... Why? Isn't there something to be said for the liberating and joyous effect of falling on the floor laughing out loud? I beg to differ, Mr. A.

Posted by: Slim | October 14, 2005 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Paul writes:
So, after 9/11, journalists didn't seem to be able to question or criticize the Bush administration, for fear of losing that access.

Paul, in journalism it's called: "The Access of Evil."

Posted by: LL | October 14, 2005 1:42 PM | Report abuse

A buddy of mine used to go crazy in staff meetings (I wasn't there), because one guy constantly said stupid things like "Out like a lamp" and "could care less" and "can't see the trees in the forest."

When I suggested that perhaps this person was being ironical, my friend became very still, and embarassed. So busy being an elitist ...

That said, SciencTim, I'm with you. My own chuckler "drawing a line in the sand" which people use to mean getting serious about placing hard limits. But isn't that the whole point: a line in the sand is unserious, it blows away with the winds (wind, winds, math, maths). Was it not commonly understood a generation ago that a "line in the sand" was a sign of insincerity? Carved in stone, now that's more like it!

What's their offer?
5 days, 5 million dollars.
Are they serious?
No, it's just a line in the sand.

Posted by: Kane | October 14, 2005 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Also, who actually awards Pulitzer prizes? I know nothing about this process. Is the media patting itself on the back? Could the PulitzerPrizePeople decide one year that nobody really deserved a prize?

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 1:44 PM | Report abuse

My dictionary shows both pronuciations for "data", too, but the FIRST one is the PREFERRED one, isn't it? So thank you, ScienceTim, because once again what we look for here at the A-blog is, what was it again? oh, yes, validation. And btw, where is Videlicet?

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 1:45 PM | Report abuse

route - rout or root? I suppose Manhattan Transfer would sound weird singing "Get your kicks on rout 66". I adore that group. I like to put on their CD, open the kitchen window so I can hear outside while toiling in the garden.

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Another good article:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/13/AR2005101302084.html

I remember reading a few weeks ago - it may have been this very blog? - about the donation of these rations. Comments from some British readers suggested that the 'mericans might find some of the entrees a bit strange. I'm sure they'd be saddened to hear of this waste.

George Bush doesn't care about (British) Black Angus, people!

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 1:48 PM | Report abuse

mdmbkr, at your suggestion I just read Krauthammer's piece on the flu. Yes, it's waaaay over the top. He conveniently neglects the fact that almost everyone on earth has already been exposed to flus OF THE TYPE of the Spanish flu, and therefore has significant immunity to that type. So who cares, really, if it gets out. Now the bird flu, that's another matter.

Posted by: suecris | October 14, 2005 1:48 PM | Report abuse

My 9-year-old cannot explain to me why "Duh" and "No Duh" mean the same thing...

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Maths

In France, one studies "les maths" (but not to pronounce the 's') or "la mathematique," which multiplies when you shrink it.

In general, those "who know many lessons" are called "polymaths." You have this dental sound in English.

You can say that French language is not English, but Battle of Hastings bestows relevance on this mingling.

Posted by: Herve | October 14, 2005 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Re: the repeated listing of the Washington Post's Pulitzers

I guess the next time we tell Joel he has a misspelled word, he's going to bring out those trophies he won in the Alachua County Spelling Bee...

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 1:49 PM | Report abuse

Maybe a dingo killed your boodle.

Posted by: Anonymous | October 14, 2005 1:52 PM | Report abuse

"Zed" is how you say Z in French. I remember very little from French class, but I do remember that. I can still say the entire alphabet.

The other day I was talking with friends about languages and I said, "All I remember from French class is 'Me llamo Sara.'" Then there was a pause in which everyone looked at me, waiting for me to realize I was an idiot, and then I said, "Wait...Je m'appelle Sara. I never even took Spanish."

SCC just in case I spelled the Spanish part of this post wrong. Like I said, I never took Spanish.

And I say it's DAT-uh. And PAH-tronize, though I'm known to use both.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Wait. Nevermind. I just said it out loud and realized that I say DAY-tuh.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 1:55 PM | Report abuse

SCC: 1:37 PM, substitute "had" for "was".

Duh.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Zed's dead, baby.

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Shrek was clever, Shrek 2 was a total waste.

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Brazil or Brasil?

I say Brasil, but that's probably because of influences from friends. I think most Americans make the "zee" instead of the "ss" sound when they say it.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Dyslexic rockers:

Zed Leppelin

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 2:01 PM | Report abuse

A favorite bumpersticker:

DYSLEXICS OF THE WORLD, UNTIE!

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Ha! I've seen that before. It's always funny.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:04 PM | Report abuse

suecris: He also casts the current bird flu (H5N1) as being apocalyptically deadly (ever read The Stand?). But in reality an extremely virulent flu won't become widespread because it kills its hosts before they can spread it.

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 2:04 PM | Report abuse

One of the attys I work with is the biggest liar (yeah, Iknow, I know). And he always starts his whoppers with "Look, I'll be perfectly honest with you..."
In olden times, my Uncle Claude would stand with the menfolks under the water tower on Main (only) street in Karnes City, Texas, while Aunt Dora went in the general store. One or more of the men always had a stick and seemed to be drawing pictures in the caleche (red clay). I always wanted to hang with Uncle Claude, but Aunt Dora always said "No, they're talkin men talk, you stay right here with me."

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 2:05 PM | Report abuse

its the Caribbean that people can't pronounce. Care-a-be-ahn

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 2:06 PM | Report abuse

I think the presence of Krauthammer on the paper almost single-handedly negates two of the WaPo's pulitzers. I'd love to be driving by Brookings and happen to see E.J. Dionne getting in a fistfight with Dr. K.

Sara, how do you say HOWARD Brazil?

Posted by: edward | October 14, 2005 2:10 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I forgot that you don't live here, Sara. So you probably don't even know who Howard Brazil is...

Posted by: edward | October 14, 2005 2:12 PM | Report abuse

Favorite bumper sticker:

Eschew Obfuscity

Posted by: pj | October 14, 2005 2:14 PM | Report abuse

I suppose I would say Brazil. Because it's a brand name, for lack of a better term.

And I think both Brazil and Brasil are right, I've just been swayed by my friends from there over the years into using their pronunciation.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:15 PM | Report abuse

As in Howard Johnson Brazil hotels, right?

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:16 PM | Report abuse

The real question is: Tar-GET or Tar-ZHAY?

My mom comes up with the wierdest pronounciations: for example, she says "mit-SU-bish-IE" instead of "Mitsu-BISHI" almost as if she's trying to sound Japanese. She also says "pe-kahn" while my dad says "pe-CAN". (She's a Texan and he's from the DC area).

I once dated a guy with a heavy southern accent and he said he had to "put ol in his car". It took me a few minutes to realize he meant "oil". He also said fixin'a lot. I didn't understand why he didn't just go do something insted of fixin' to do something!

Recently, my pronounciation of levee was called into question. I normally pronounce it correctly, but for some reason I said "LEE-VEE" and a friend laughed at me.

Thanks for defining affect/effect. I struggle with this all the time!

Posted by: AJ | October 14, 2005 2:20 PM | Report abuse

Whew! What a 'boodle today!

My favorite journalistic word du'jour is "impacted", when used as a adjective. As in the shoppers at the mall have been impacted by higher prices this season.

How hard is it to say, "The higher prices had an impact on shoppers..."?

I get a mental picture of a giant dollar sign randomly jack hammering some poor soul into the tile floor.

Although an argument could be made for; "Hurricane Katrina impacted thousands."

Happy Friday!

Posted by: RA | October 14, 2005 2:22 PM | Report abuse

TBG: I think you've put your finger on it.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 2:25 PM | Report abuse

mdmbkr said of Krauthammer: "He conveniently neglects the fact that almost everyone on earth has already been exposed to flus OF THE TYPE of the Spanish flu, and therefore has significant immunity to that type. So who cares, really, if it gets out. Now the bird flu, that's another matter."

Noting, as ever, that I'm a physicist, not a biologist (although my Dad and stepmother are bio-types...): I think Krauthammer is not too crazy on this one. I think he's incorrect on the ability to acquire biological knowledge -- to use biological and genetic information, you have to know what you're doing in detail, whereas you can go by the seat of your pants to make nuclear work, as long as you're not too committed to doing a good job of it. I don't think that that is a problem for terrorists. I think he underestimates the complexity of genetics.

What he proposes is not too far off the mark, however. I recall that the scientists who reconstructed the 1918 flu virus noted that they are not concerned by their virus getting out, as everyone is now *expected to be* pretty much immune to it. However, you could imagine jiggering with its proteins so that it looks different to the immune system, thereby creating a virus to which no one carries prior immunity. Expose yourself and your buddies to just the identifying proteins (without the virus) and you have made yourself immune and thus made a useful weapon. The pesky part is that it would kill your own people in the same proportion that it kills everyone else. Talk about your Pyrrhic victories.

Posted by: ScienceTim | October 14, 2005 2:26 PM | Report abuse

My friend's mother calls their old Grand Prix a Grand Pricks.

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 2:27 PM | Report abuse

SCC: second line "an"
And I checked it twice. Ahhh Friday.

Posted by: RA | October 14, 2005 2:27 PM | Report abuse

AJ
trust me, its pe-kahn. I have 3 trees in my yard.

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 2:27 PM | Report abuse

The theme to The Andy Griffen Show is playing somewhere in my office...

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:29 PM | Report abuse

SCC: Griffith

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:31 PM | Report abuse

Sara, it may just be playing in your head.

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 2:31 PM | Report abuse

Griffith..

and thanks, it's now playing in my head!

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 2:32 PM | Report abuse

A Pee-can is what you piss in when there's not a pe-cahn tree to stand behind.

Posted by: yellojkt | October 14, 2005 2:33 PM | Report abuse

No, because now the Star Wars song is playing and I hate Star Wars. I wouldn't allow that to play in my head, even subconsciously.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:33 PM | Report abuse

what is the stars wars song? the one with the ewoks dancing?

Posted by: edward | October 14, 2005 2:35 PM | Report abuse

No, it's that "Dum, dum dum dum, dum dum dum dum dum dum dum" song. I'm sure that helped you immensely. It's the song that I associate with Darth Vader.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Sara the dum dum dum dum song is from Jaws

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 2:44 PM | Report abuse

Guess who's back!!. Ray is back with a brand new rant!!. I just cannot believe the discussion today after the revelations of the past 24 hours and yet another despicable WaPo hit job by David Nicholson (sp?) in today's editorial. I do not bother even read Krauthammer anymore. I stopped reading him when I last lived in DC. I guess I should be glad that the only critique of my ranting was that the Establishment includes Paris Hilton plus homeowners and that I over use caps and exclamation points. Sometimes a man/woman has gotta know their limitations. I have a distinct feeling that the erstwhile citizens of our capital city are in a daze and just refuse to face reality. Alas, I shall state my case more succintly and retire henceforth with haste. NEOCON=Establishment(official washington, corporate masters (bechtel), newspaper editors/publishers and K-street lobbyist)=US Foreign Policy=Disaster=Election of people like Bush. I rest my case.

Posted by: Ray | October 14, 2005 2:45 PM | Report abuse

I'm trying to clean my house today. I allow myself to come and check the Boodle after each (at least 15 minute) job, i.e., clean a bathroom, check the boodle, vacuum a room, check the boodle, etc. Only now I'm tiring and it's becoming "empty a wastebasket, check the boodle, give the dogs fresh water, check the boodle." I'm pathetic.

Posted by: suecris | October 14, 2005 2:46 PM | Report abuse

************* ALERT *********************

This 'Comments' section has registered a 9.24 on the Silliometer. Please modify or reduce frivolous entries until further notice.


Recommended Inside Head Music: "Night People," BeeGees

Please continue

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 2:47 PM | Report abuse

A person could go insane trying to translate all these "dum dum dum dums"!

Personally, I get a kick out of hearing someone whistling the theme from "The X-Files" (Da dum da dum da dum -- too too too TOO too!)

[What was that I was saying earlier about Woodhaven?]

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 2:49 PM | Report abuse

I absolutely refuse to be serious on Friday afternoon.

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 2:51 PM | Report abuse

LB, the dum dum dum song is always the funeral march. If the funeral march is what I think it is.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Dear Ray,

You have a Manichaean view of the world (a lovely word, I learned it when a paper I wrote got critiqued ... um, reamed), but I can't tell which of two sides you consider to be salvation from unmitigated disaster, and which one you claim to be the cause of unmitigated disaster. Are you really so cynical as to believe that corporate CEOs actually directly control the government, including the Supreme Court? Have you seen the fnords yet?

Posted by: ScienceTim | October 14, 2005 2:51 PM | Report abuse

SCC: always=also

I am grammatically worthless today!

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 2:52 PM | Report abuse

ScienceTim: the words you quoted aren't mine =)

I agree with you about the complexity of reconstructing the virus from the sequence. Even if you mail-ordered the DNA from some lab, you wouldn't have a working virus.

Also I think any immunity to the 1918 flu in the population is pretty weak at this point. There are people alive today who survived the epidemic, and they would probably be fine, but their descendants would have a weaker immunity. I wouldn't be surpised if the 1918 flu was able to become widespread in the event of a release. But I think it's less of a threat than the current H5N1 avian flu.

The danger we face isn't that 95% of humans will be killed by the flu. If the avian flu becomes an epidemic and kills, say, 30% of the people it infects, we'd still have to deal with around 1.5 billion dead bodies.

There was an issue of Foreign Affairs recently with a few H5N1 articles that were informative. It may be available online for free now.

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 2:53 PM | Report abuse

Sara
I don't think it is

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 2:59 PM | Report abuse

Hmm...crap.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 3:01 PM | Report abuse

Sorry about that, Chief, I mean mdmbkr.

Posted by: ScienceTim | October 14, 2005 3:01 PM | Report abuse

I'm not sure what would take more skill -- being able to put together a "dum dum dum" construction that someone else could actually guess in the absence of any other clues, OR, being able to guess the tune solely on the basis of a string of "dum dum dum"s.

I think if we were to start playing such a game, we would break CowMonitor's Sillometer.

[Bet you can't guess this one! Dum dum dum dum dum dum . . .]

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 3:04 PM | Report abuse

Achenfan,

Styx, Mr. Roboto.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 3:05 PM | Report abuse

This is where I got the idea that there was still some leftover immunity:

CNN on-line 10/5/05:

The public health risk of resurrecting the virus is minimal, U.S. health officials said. People around the world developed immunity to the deadly 1918 virus after the pandemic, and a certain degree of immunity is believed to persist today. Also, in previous research, scientists concluded that modern antiviral medicines are effective against Spanish flu-like viruses.

But, since it's CNN, it could be wrong.

Posted by: suecris | October 14, 2005 3:06 PM | Report abuse

And the sequence you were dum dum-ing was the "domo arigato" line.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 3:07 PM | Report abuse

dum dum
dum dum dum dum
dum dum dum dum dum dum dum dum

Posted by: LB | October 14, 2005 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Now I have a mish-mash of all of those songs in my head, complete with images of ewoks wearing disco suits being eaten by Great White Sharks.

Woodhaven indeed. Time to porch.

Posted by: mizerock | October 14, 2005 3:08 PM | Report abuse

I always hum Vader's Theme as:

Dum dum dum, dum-de-dum, dum-de-dum,
dum-bah-dum, dum-da-ba-dah-dah, da-da...

Though for women I use:

Da-dump-da-dah-dah-da-da-da,
da-dump-da-dah-dah-da-da-da,
da-dump-da-dah-dah-da-da-da..

Anyone recognize it?

Silliness continues nearly unabated.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:09 PM | Report abuse

Achenfan, Jingle Bells?

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 3:10 PM | Report abuse

bc! That's it! The first one. Vader's Theme. That was playing. That was my "dum dum dum, dum dum dum dum dum dum" comment.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 3:11 PM | Report abuse

I would add for that second, you need a much quicker tempo than Vader's Theme.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:11 PM | Report abuse

Achenfan will guess this one easily:

la la la laa, la la la la la la la la lah

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 3:12 PM | Report abuse

Yay! You're welcome, Sara.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:13 PM | Report abuse

This morning, NPR was playing La Mer by Debussey, and it is very impressionistic, as you all no doubt know, very much like the sound of the sea, and you can't hum that, can you? The announcer said, even people who know what La Mer sounds like usually can't hum it, but this conductor (I'm sorry, I forgot his name!) can, and then they recorded him, "humming" La Mer--but he didn't sing dum dum dum, he sang da da da. It was very pretty, the melody that he did, and it was the melody that most of us can't even hear in La Mer.

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Ha ha, Nani! The "Rosemary's Baby" lullaby!

[But really, I didn't expect anyone to take my challenge seriously -- I don't know what the heck my own "dum dum dum" sequence represents! (although now that I look at it more closely, it could be "Rocket Man," I suppose).]

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 3:16 PM | Report abuse

Now, look what you made me do, Achenfan!

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Brazil

In Brazil, it's bra-zee-o

Varig

In Brazil, it's vah-de-gee

Also, in the US it's Brazil, but in Brazil it's Brasil

I think.

Posted by: kp | October 14, 2005 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Meter is now at 9.455. You are warned.

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Meter is now at 9.455. You are warned.

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 3:20 PM | Report abuse

Only 9.455, CowTown? Why, that thing is harder to break than I thought!

La la la la . . . Trrrrrrrr!

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Where, oh where are you tonight?
Why did you leave me here all alone?

I searched the world over and thought I'd found true love...

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 3:28 PM | Report abuse

It's not you -- it's me.

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 3:30 PM | Report abuse

You met another and Pbththth you was gone...

Drat... now must get paper towel for monitor and keyboard.

Posted by: RA | October 14, 2005 3:32 PM | Report abuse

Achenfan, IIRC, at relativistic velocities any increases in speed for a given mass require a square of the energy input relative to the velocity increase. Going from .98c to .99c takes a LOT of power.

It may be safe to assume the same for Sillocity.

We'll just ignore any mass increases for now.

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:35 PM | Report abuse

SCC: "Silliocity"

Let's light this candle!

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Bah. I'm sure we can crack it.

Hell-oooooo! I just had a big ball of OIL dropped on me!
La la la.

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 3:37 PM | Report abuse

Achenfan, you had me at Hell-oooooo!

bc

Posted by: bc | October 14, 2005 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Sara,
I know this is late but its most likely the Imperial March from Star Wars which was not played in its entirety until cue 32 in Episode 5, The Empire Strikes Back. Although thematic fragments of it were recorded for Episode 4 John Williams did not fully develope his ideas until later. Also, John Williams recycled that theme into Anakin's theme from Episode 1 which I found very clever. Stealing ideas from Wagner again (yay leitmotifs!)

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 3:40 PM | Report abuse

develop. sigh.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Science references have caused meter to drop to 8.995. Discussions of politics, Kit Topic, or jet fighters will cause Silliometer reduction of as many as 4 points.

Please conduct yourselves accordingly.

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 3:43 PM | Report abuse

What about hamburgers? Silly? Or no?

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Is develope like an antelope? Of course, that would mean one could antelop something, which doesn't even sound like a don king-ism.

Posted by: edward | October 14, 2005 3:47 PM | Report abuse

John Williams stealing ideas from Wagner? I thought that the Star Wars thematic ideas were mostly stolen from Holst.

Jet fighters? When were jet fighters discussed here? My father gets tetchy on the subject, noting that nobody says "prop fighters" or "fighter props", which is not to be confused with agit-prop. Is that hyphenated?

Posted by: Tim | October 14, 2005 3:48 PM | Report abuse

Imperial March. Now I have a name other than "Vader's Theme." Perfect. Thanks PGM.

Hamburgers. Yum.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 3:49 PM | Report abuse

I have a terrible habit of adding "e" on the end of words when I type really fast (well, I have worse habits I suppose). When I write really fast I always leave off the last letter. Maybe I'm compensating...

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Dammit, been working all day and have come late to this party! Hate when that happens. Got a lot to catch up on:

yellojkt: If you thought Paul Lynde and Rip Taylor were "sexually ambiguous" I'm noty too sure you were paying close attention.

To whoever did "Zed Leppelin": LOL and welldone!

Re: Day-ta versus Dahta: I think it has to be Day-ta, because otherwise the Brent Spiner character in Star Trek NG would be Dahta, and even Patrick Stewart calls him Dayta. And since Jean-Luc Picard rules, that pretty much is game, set and match.

If your house costs less than $200,000, it's just "hall."

Yes, Krauthammer was way over the top (so what else is new?) And I'm not too worried about disposing of the 1.5 billion dead bodies; my broker just put me into a new Soylent Green franchise.

Anything else? Oh, yes, the WP is a great newspaper, despite some minor flaws. Some of you seem to be demanding perfection where it isn't realistic. Excrement happens, people. Evangeline Lilly probably isn't perfect, either, but I ain't complainin'.

Thank you. You may continue now.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | October 14, 2005 3:52 PM | Report abuse

George Bush doesn't care about reporting for duty! (If I flew fighter jets I would show up early and often.)

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 3:53 PM | Report abuse

Tim

Jet fighters have not been discussed in this particular boodle, or any other that I can think of. But, if they were, this would have a substantial effect on the Silliometer. Jet Fighters are never frivolous, even if discussed frivolously.

I hope I have made this clear.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 3:55 PM | Report abuse

peanutgallermember said: "When I write really fast I always leave off the last letter."

I have this problem too, and I've always wondered if it's some really minor form of dyslexia or something. On an 8th grade spelling test I got everything right except I wrote "terminat" instead of "terminate". As if anyone doesn't know how to spell terminat!

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Ah,the calm before the STURM UND DRANG.

Posted by: Anonymous | October 14, 2005 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Jet Fighters vs. Prop Fighters?

How About:
Ink Pen (my wife)
Electric Light Bulb (my grandmother)

What other types of pens and light bulbs are there?

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Actually, Hans Zimmer is much more into stealing from Holst specifically (compare The Battle track in gladiator to Mars from the Planets for a blatant example). But Holst is such an awesome composer that you can't really blame the modern composers from emulating him. I was actually speaking of John Williams utilizing the idea of leitmotifs, or every character having a specific theme that follows them throughout the opera/movie and then manipulating the theme to sound sad, heroic, love struck or however you wish but the theme remains recognizable. Wagner is master of this device and you can get an excellent example of this by watching/listening to his Ring Cycle (4 4 hour operas add up to a 16 hour opera monster! Mwa-ha-ha-ha-ha!). The Ring Cycle is fantastic and you can always pick out Siegfried's theme and Brumhilda's theme and then there's the Siegfried And Brumhilda In Love theme, et cetera.

I am such a nerd.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 3:59 PM | Report abuse

You've all doubtless heard of the dislexic who sold his soul to Santa.


Damn, boosted the meter to 9.12.

Okay, the F/A-18 is used by the Navy and Marines. It has an unclassified cruising speed of Mach 1.8. Forward sections are built by MacDonald Douglas, rear exterior sections by Northrup (out of carbon fiber).

Let's see if that helps.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 4:01 PM | Report abuse

I think it's time for another... Rovestorm!

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 4:02 PM | Report abuse

...and how about the dyslexic agnostic that refused to accept the existence of DOG.

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 4:08 PM | Report abuse

esskay: My dad eats hamburger sandwiches and hot dog sandwiches

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 4:08 PM | Report abuse

peanutgallerymember, so which Wagner piece was used in Appocalypse Now. Robert Duvall played it for his "boys" while waging air attacks against villages.

Posted by: Nani | October 14, 2005 4:09 PM | Report abuse

I don't know. Haven't seen Apocalypse Now (I'm going to be banned from the boodle, I know it). Does it go Dum da da dum dee
or
do do dum dug
?

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 4:13 PM | Report abuse

And whilst we're at it, peanutgallerymember, the ballet is Rodeo, what is the composers name and what is the movement. (I thik it's the last) It's the one they used for the "Beef, it's what's for dinner." ads.

I've been wracking my brain since the first hamburger reference.

I can't think anymore. It's Friday

Posted by: RA | October 14, 2005 4:15 PM | Report abuse

SCC: "think"

Posted by: RA | October 14, 2005 4:16 PM | Report abuse

Hoedown (sp?). Aaron Copeland.

I revel in my nerdom.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 4:18 PM | Report abuse

It is such a tricky piece to play. They make it sound really good in the beef commercials.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 4:19 PM | Report abuse

Valkyries! Yes!

Posted by: mdmbkr | October 14, 2005 4:20 PM | Report abuse

Isn't Apocalypse Now based on the novel Heart of Darkness by...oh I can't remember his name but he wrote Lord Jim also.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 4:23 PM | Report abuse

I dunno about the greatness of Holst. I love The Planets, but it's the only thing of his that I have ever heard.

I thought it was very very standard for characters in movies, operas, and musicals to have their own theme. It may come from Wagner, but it doesn't make Williams a particular thief from him.

In Apocalypse Now (which I've never seen), it's The Ride of the Valkyries.

Rodeo is by Aaron Copland.

Posted by: Tim | October 14, 2005 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Ah HA!! Thank you P-member! I will be able to sleep tonight. And you're right, I bet the strings hate to play that thing, but when you get it right it's a thing of beauty.

Now CowTown, we have 30 minutes to crack that meter. I'm sure we can do it.

Posted by: RA | October 14, 2005 4:24 PM | Report abuse

Now I really want some steak. That damn advertising campaign runs pretty-much non-stop in the back of my head around dinner time, leading me to constantly walk into the kitchen and wonder "what's for dinner? damn! where's my steak?!"

Posted by: edward | October 14, 2005 4:25 PM | Report abuse

and remember, gang, it's

Mind Over Member,


so do be careful.

Posted by: goombah | October 14, 2005 4:26 PM | Report abuse

People it's Friday, and you're salivating real bad.

Posted by: Cassandra S | October 14, 2005 4:27 PM | Report abuse

esskay: pig pens? Cowpens? Pens and Niddles? (that was for you dyslexic fans)

nani: Ride of the Valkyrie

Yes! Rovestorm! Rovestorm! Rovestorm! (You're all upposed to begin chanting it with me. Let's hear it now!)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | October 14, 2005 4:28 PM | Report abuse

in that case, Cassandra S, shall we dance?

Posted by: Goombah | October 14, 2005 4:28 PM | Report abuse

PGM, Joseph Conrad wrote Heart of Darkness.

I don't know if Apocalypse Now has anything to do with it though.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 4:28 PM | Report abuse

Esskay, I can help you out with the "ink pen" thing--in case I haven't mentioned it enough times in the past two or three days, I learned to speak in Oklahoma. When I went to college and asked my roommate if she had an "ink pen" I could borrow, she *laughed* at me. Clue #853 that I was not speaking the lingo and needed to study up on it. In Oklahoma, the words "pen" and "pin" are pronounced EXACTLY the same. That's why they say "ink pen." If you use standard English pronunciation, then you can use the standard term ("pen") without fear of being misunderstood.

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 4:28 PM | Report abuse

bc: I was reading the Oct issue of Esquire, and the "Indefensible Position" was that Gilmore Girls is the best show on TV for men. You are not alone.

Gilmore Girls Is the Best Show on TV for Men
The Indefensible Position

by A. J. Jacobs | Oct 01 '05

I KNOW THAT professing my love for Gilmore Girls is a bit like saying that I just went to a really super scrapbooking workshop. It's just not something straight adult males are supposed to say. I mean, the show has a Carole King theme song, for God's sake. Sally Struthers plays a recurring character. Doesn't matter. I love it, and you should, too.
I first tried Gilmore Girls a year ago, late at night, my wife asleep, The Daily Show over. I faced the dregs of her TiVo selections, and Gilmore Girls looked slightly more promising than Big Brother .

I was smitten from the first moment--or at least from the first moment after the Carole King theme song. The show, about a single mom, Lorelai, and her daughter, Rory (both of whom, incidentally, are quite hot), takes place in a small Connecticut town, a quirky Northern Exposure -like village free from homelessness and cops searching bags in the subway. The dialogue is clever, clipped, allusion-heavy--Billy Wilder meets Us Weekly .

And the characters speak fast, really fast, like FedEx-commercial-from-the-'80s fast. You have to pay attention; this is no time to work on your scrapbook, or else you'll miss the best writing on TV. Here's Lorelai, played by Lauren Graham: "My mother--she was here. I can feel it. Smell that? The room smells like guilt and Chanel No. 5." And here's Rory complaining about being held captive at a soul-deadening dinner: "This is Iran in '79 and you are Jimmy Carter. What do we do?" Or Lorelai and her contractor: "Tom, I'm lovin' you like a two-dollar whore." Tom: "Terrific. I'll tell the wife."

And, men--in case I didn't make the hot-actress point sufficiently clear: This is a show worth watching even if the sound is muted, especially now that Rory--played by the stunning Alexis Bledel--is out of high school and you can leer at her without feeling like you should be chemically castrated.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 4:29 PM | Report abuse

Karnes City, Texas, Nani? I used to drive through there on my way to the coast from Austin. Always stopped to shift ballast, take on tamales and jettison used beer. It's south of Seguin, the self proclaimed pecan capitol of the world with the pecan as big as a watermelon in the town square, which is really just a hunk of concrete painted to look like a pecan. Depending on whether you are from Texas or not, this kind of thing brings a smile or makes you squirm. In my youth I squirmed, but since then I have seen the concrete dinos in Utah and the Paul Bunyun statue in Minnesota, etc. etc. and I am reconciled. Sort of like when you're a teenager and you cringe when you see your parental unit (male) heading out to mow the lawn wearing Madras plaid shirt, different Madras plaid shorts, huaraches, and tractor hat, and now you smile when you think about it and just miss having the guy around.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 4:30 PM | Report abuse

apocalpyse now IS based on heart of darkness, as i'm sure several other people have posted in the time it takes me to compose this.

but only one starred a sweaty marlon brando.

Posted by: edward | October 14, 2005 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Finally, I can understand my wife a little better (no, not really!). - thanks Reader

However, she was born in Washington DC and grew up in the suburbs. She has never been anywhere near Oklahona.

Still, thank you, I never thought it politically correct to approach the subject with her directly...

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 4:33 PM | Report abuse

Tim, you are right. John Williams is not "stealing" the practice of leitmotif and I apologize for any disrespect that may have occurred from my choice of words (I actually do like John Williams, especially his Hook soundtrack). The leitmotif does have its start before Wagner (perhaps going as far back as the harp and lute ballads of the Troubadour and Trouvères of the Middle Ages) however Wagner was the one who named this practice "leitmotif" and made it famous as a standard practice for modern opera/movie music.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 4:34 PM | Report abuse

Yeah! Gilmore Girl Appreciation Club here we come!

Okay, maybe not, but I can dream.

kurosawaguy, the concrete dinos in Utah--were they in Vernal? If they were, did you think that museum was a waste of time? Because I sure did. And I live in Minnesota and I still haven't seen the Paul Bunyun statue. Any chance you remember where it was?

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 4:34 PM | Report abuse

I've never seen Apocalypse Now, but I've read Heart of Darkness. So I kind of feel like I've seen it now.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 4:35 PM | Report abuse

I don't know about Minnesota, but there's one in Bangor, ME.

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/attract/MEBANbunyan.html

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 4:38 PM | Report abuse

Sara,

Yes, Apocalypse Now is based on Heart of Darkness. Copolla's wife Eleanor wrote a book about the filming of the movie called Notes. She also made a documentary about it called Hearts of Darkness. Both are very highly recommended.

Posted by: pj | October 14, 2005 4:39 PM | Report abuse

There's a P. Bunyan statue made out of wood and metal in Sitonface, Wyoming. It's lit up
nicely at night.

Posted by: Lipid | October 14, 2005 4:40 PM | Report abuse

I know I've mentioned this before, but you haven't lived until you've seen the Mentone Egg:

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tips/getAttraction.php3?tip_AttractionNo==471

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 4:41 PM | Report abuse

Thanks edward and pj, I heard that from my African Lit teacher in college but since I have never seen the movie I couldn't make the judgement for myself and instead spread what may have been baseless rumors. I need to do work and not Achenbloghog now. Boss lady is looking over my cubicle.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 4:43 PM | Report abuse

Sara,

Apocalypse Now is based on the novel. But the movie is set during the Vietnam War not Colonial Africa. You may have read the book, but you haven't seen the movie.

Posted by: pj | October 14, 2005 4:44 PM | Report abuse

PGM,

John WIlliams also stole from Beethoven. Especially the rhythms of the fourth movement of his Fifth Symphony.

Posted by: pj | October 14, 2005 4:46 PM | Report abuse

PB and his blue ox are up Bemidji way, dontcha know.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | October 14, 2005 4:49 PM | Report abuse

I am pretty sure that 'choppers and napalm were not in the original novel (being absent from colonial Africa) but they play an important role in this very moving movie.

And although 'The Ride of the Valkyries' was inspirational, it was The Doors "The End" which haunted me for days after watching. I went right out and bought The Doors LP with that song on it...

Posted by: esskay | October 14, 2005 4:53 PM | Report abuse

The Director's Cut of Apocalypse Now includes an interesting scene where the Martin Sheen charactor comes upon a group of French colonialists maintaining a "plantation" of sorts in the jungle. And, other stuff goes on I can't describe in polite company.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 4:53 PM | Report abuse

yeesh! i go and do some work on a friday and miss all this!! actually, a co-worker brought his kid in - adorable kid but he's an enegizer bunny kid! i swear if i could bottle that energy there would be no fat ppl in the us! and of course, the kid made a beeline for me and insisted i play with him all day! i'm not sure how i feel about people pawning their kid off on co-workers during work... i mean, hey, i gotta work too!!

and thanks a BUNCH sara, now i can't get that freakin darth vader song outta my head! i LOVE old star wars much better than the new stuff... new stuff is way too cgi for me and when i was a kid, well the standards of special effects where set by star wars! (but yes, i've always thought of it as darth's song as well)

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 4:53 PM | Report abuse

Heh. Sorry mo. I will now hang my head in an apologetic nature.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 4:56 PM | Report abuse

9.0175

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 4:58 PM | Report abuse

and sara - you MUST MUST MUST see apocalypse now - NOW! it's a marvel of film making, scripting and acting! the use of light and shadow in itself is worth watching and the acting (yes, must mention the acting again) man, oh man... then when you find out marlon brando ad libbed the whole thing... no script! the godfather (1 and 2 but 3 should not even be allowed with the first 2) is my all time fav movie but apocalyse ranks up there...

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 4:58 PM | Report abuse

Up the Silliometer!

Spam, spam, spam, spam. Spam, spam, spam, spam. Wonderful spam, marvelous spam

Posted by: Dave | October 14, 2005 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Sara: PJ's right. Apocy is "based" on HOD, but is so significantly different they can't be compared in any meaningful way. Here's what they have in common: both are about a trip up a river through the jungle, and the object of the search is a guy who "went native." Beyond that, there's no comparison. Both are great works, but very different. It's almost like saying that one of K-guys's (and my) favorite movies, Magnificent Seven, is "based" on "Seven Samurai." Yes, it is, but that doesn't mean if you've seen one you "know" something about the other.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | October 14, 2005 5:01 PM | Report abuse

It was mo's Energizer-bunny-kid story that did it, wasn't it CowMonitor?

That story made me laff!

[Sounds like that kid liked you, mo -- just goes to show you're a friendly Goth, not a scary Goth.]

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 5:01 PM | Report abuse

Jet fighter is one of those phrases that didn't exist until there was a need for a distinction. "Were you trained on a prop plane or in a jet fighter?" Not the most elegant example but there are a lot of combinations like this.

Did anyone go to a day baseball game before there were night baseball games?
Electric guitar vs acoustic guitar.
Ballpoint pen vs ink pen.
Automatic transmission vs manual transmission.

Posted by: yellojkt | October 14, 2005 5:02 PM | Report abuse

Can I say that this is the first time I've ever posted on the Achenblog?

Posted by: TV Presenter | October 14, 2005 5:03 PM | Report abuse

Actually, it was the exchange on Giant Pointless Statues of Things that moved the needle up the most. Mo helped.

There's a giant muskie in Hayward, Wisconsin. Has an observation deck in its open mouth.


Now we're at 9.205

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 5:07 PM | Report abuse

My kids didn't know why we say we dial a phone.

I also wonder if they've ever heard a cash register go "ka-ching" but they know what that sound effect is.

There are lots of obsolete terms like that--in the sense that the act is obsolete but the term lives on.

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 5:09 PM | Report abuse

TV Presenter

Yes, you may say "this is the first time I've ever posted on the Achenblog."

But, be advised we're engaged in a serious exchange of frivolity (is that a word). Just be careful.


9.225

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 5:10 PM | Report abuse

TV presenter at 5:03:21.

No, you cannot say that this your first time, but you are, of course, welcome.

And please note there are no displeasing sexual side effects from participation in this blog, although there are other deflating
symptoms that have cropped up in tests.

Posted by: buttercutie | October 14, 2005 5:12 PM | Report abuse

Studies show that Boodling increases your risk factors for Involuntary Expectoration Syndrome, usually involving coffee and computer monitors. New users are urged to be cautious and beware of their surroundings at all times.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 5:15 PM | Report abuse

The E! True Hollywood story of Saved by the Bell is on. Kelly Kapowski's a cutie.

Posted by: jw | October 14, 2005 5:15 PM | Report abuse

There's a difference between John Williams using Beethoven and using Holst. Holst's works are still protected under copywrite while Beethoven's are pubic domain (if you go back to the original manuscript).

Also, the giant acorn in Raleigh North Carolina is always a fun visit. If you don't mind the bums on the park benches that is.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 14, 2005 5:16 PM | Report abuse

But what if, you know, me and me mates like to, you know, dress up like mice.

Posted by: TV Presenter | October 14, 2005 5:17 PM | Report abuse

Can I just say that this is the last time I'll be posting on the Achenblog?

Posted by: TV Presenter | October 14, 2005 5:18 PM | Report abuse

hah! achenfan... that was funny? didn't realize... hehehehe... see i'm funny even when i'm not trying to be...

yeah, clearly i aint no scary goth - if you've even met me irl you'd know i'm the antithesis of scary goth...

i think kids can smell fear - not that i "fear" kids as much as, well... i'm not exactly a kid person - i don't have any and i don't want any...

and i found out at the bph, much to my embarrasment, that i had always pronounced legumes incorrectly - i said leyshoomes... and i say DAta not dahta - but that could also be cuz of star trek...

when i lived in england they would always mercilessly kid me about my american accent... saying it's root not rawt and taps not fawwcets. i remember the first time i saw a sign for a "boot sale" on a car - i was very very confused! (a boot on a car in england is the trunk - apparently it's like a yard sale but out of your trunk)

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 5:18 PM | Report abuse

dressing up like mice is cool. just make sure you know the boys from the girls, the girls from the boys, and the girls from the girls and the boys from the boys. that about covers it.

Posted by: buttercutie | October 14, 2005 5:19 PM | Report abuse

I. Need. A. Nap. before I engage in any Friday night adventures.

Welcome, TV Presenter.

Posted by: Sara | October 14, 2005 5:20 PM | Report abuse

One word: Woodhaven.

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 5:20 PM | Report abuse

TV Presenter

Fine. Very good, in fact. Do you have a website, with photos? Even better.


9.389

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 5:20 PM | Report abuse

Back to politics: this is the kind of stuff we need to hear from all Democratic candidates (this is New Mexico Attorney General Patricia Madrid (D) on her challenge of Rep. Heather Wilson (R) next year in the state's First District):

"I intend to seek election to Congress because change is desperately needed in Washington," said Madrid in a statement. "The marriage of special interest politics and the Republican leadership of George Bush and Tom DeLay and the complicity of Heather Wilson have failed New Mexicans."

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 5:20 PM | Report abuse

No, you may not say this your last time here. We have approved the mice thing. What more do you want.

Once you're here, you are not free to go, you must participate and make an ass of yourself or the people who challenge or correct your grammar and spelling.

again, welcome

Posted by: buttercutie for cow town & co. | October 14, 2005 5:22 PM | Report abuse

[I 'boodled out of order again. (Maybe it's just as well.)]

[This probably wouldn't happen to me so often if I didn't 'boodle so darn much.]

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 5:22 PM | Report abuse

Does anyone know where I can purchase a copy of 'Illustrated History of False Teeth'?

Posted by: TV Presenter | October 14, 2005 5:23 PM | Report abuse

Wow.

Posted by: Achenbach | October 14, 2005 5:24 PM | Report abuse

To TV Presenter:

I stayed, and I got the t shirt.

Don't fall for Cow Town's request for photos.
He's into "surprise" digital enhancements.

Posted by: Golconda | October 14, 2005 5:25 PM | Report abuse

9.455

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 5:25 PM | Report abuse

Frivolity will cease in, 5, 4, 3, 2, wait for it, 1.

Posted by: TV Presenter | October 14, 2005 5:26 PM | Report abuse

TV Presenter, I thought you said you liked to dress like mice:

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/7242_1488143,00180007.htm

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 5:27 PM | Report abuse

geez - now i know where weingarten got his reading of "hollow men" as ending the world... man, i can be so slow sometimes... he got it from the movie apocalyse now!!! coinkidink? me thinks not!

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 5:28 PM | Report abuse

TV Presenter,

Yes. In the basement of the Georgetown Univ. bookstore, there is a "dental collection." GU closed it's dental school 15 years ago, but they still have quite a stock.

I recently found a first edition of Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

Posted by: temecula | October 14, 2005 5:28 PM | Report abuse

Whoever told you that, well, it was a lie.

Posted by: TV Presenter | October 14, 2005 5:28 PM | Report abuse

I Need. A Nap. before participate in any Friday night, ya know, adventuress, better known as hookups.

Posted by: XincOfMe | October 14, 2005 5:31 PM | Report abuse

What was a lie, TV Presenter?

Re your participation, you might say that you would never join a blog that was willing to have you.

Please stay, at least for the rating sweeps. Some think we are fighting for our lives.

Posted by: Buttercutie | October 14, 2005 5:33 PM | Report abuse

OK, this is political, too:

Last week the U.S. Senate voted overwhelmingly (90-9) to stand solidly against torture. The amendment, introduced by Senator John McCain (R-AZ), calls for prisoners and detainees to be treated according to guidelines established by the Army Field Manual. In short, it outlaws degrading and inhumane treatment of anyone in U.S. military custody.

Bush has indicated that he may veto the appropriations bill if the anti-torture provision is in it. The House of Representatives' version doesn't have it, at this point, so the bill will have to go to committee to draft the final version.

Here's a link that makes it easy to email your representatives in Congress to let them know that you aren't in favor of torture. [WHO, exactly, is IN FAVOR of torture? Sorry about the CAPS, but this issue is just incredible to me. I am truly appalled that the United States isn't standing up for the right side on this issue.]

It only takes a minute. If you have more time, consider sending this to other people who might take action. I sent this to everybody on my email list, and I have NEVER done that for anything before. Usually I'm afraid of offending someone or wasting people's time, but this is actually more than a life-and-death issue. Killing somebody is not as bad as torturing them and then killing them.

http://www.faithfulamerica.org/display_article.php?article_type=action&article_id=200

Posted by: Reader | October 14, 2005 5:35 PM | Report abuse

Rodeo was also famously covered by Emerson Lake and Palmer. Okay, maybe not so famously.

Apocalypse Now is a must-see movie. If you don't see it, you'll never understand the line "I love the smell of napalm in the morning. It smells like victory!"

Posted by: Bayou Self | October 14, 2005 5:36 PM | Report abuse

8.106

Posted by: CowMonitor | October 14, 2005 5:37 PM | Report abuse

and now for an update on H. Miers' sex life....

Posted by: SloppyLouie | October 14, 2005 5:38 PM | Report abuse

on the (sorta) same note reader...

anyone in va notice the tv ads for va governor? apparently kilgore opposes the death penalty and all the anti-kilgore ads have some poor real person who's loved one was killed and the killer caught and now sits on death row... does anyone find these ads creepy?

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 5:40 PM | Report abuse

I find the whole subject of the governor's race creepy. Either candidate is from hunger. I abstain.

Posted by: golconda | October 14, 2005 5:42 PM | Report abuse

mo

It's worse than that, all Kilgore did was represent one or two capital crime defendants on a pro bono basis. I don't think he's even expressed an opinion on capital punishment. The anti-Kilgore people are lower than the Swift Boat Idiots for "Truth."

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 5:45 PM | Report abuse

what i find creepy is that they are acting like just b/c he "supposedly opposes" the death penalty, like cowtown says, they are acting like if he gets elected then all these killers are automatically going to get out of jail and run the streets. death penalty or not they still stay in jail! life in prison sounds pretty brutal to me...

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 5:50 PM | Report abuse

mo and Reader, you just dragged the Silliometer down to below 7.0. Sorry, Achenfan.

Reader, thanks for the link. This shows the beginning of a major rift within the Republican Party.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 5:55 PM | Report abuse

How come no one talks about the Market? It was up 70.75 today.

Posted by: Off Topic | October 14, 2005 5:57 PM | Report abuse

oops sorry!!!! what can i do to bring it back up?

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 5:57 PM | Report abuse

That's OK, CowTown. I was feeling kind of guilty about this Stark-Raving-Mad Boodle. It was supposed to be a Boodle for Ranters, not Ravers.

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 5:57 PM | Report abuse

cowtown - hey, you are also at fault! *phttttthhhttt*

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 5:58 PM | Report abuse

on the post vs. the "foreign" press -- i too read newspapers from all over the world every day, in several languages. it is my job. even limiting yourself to major papers, there are so many of them, of such varying levels of quality, that it's meaningless to say that "they" give a better sense of the world than the u.s. press. they do give a different sense, but it is in no way less biased.

having said that, i can make these generalizations: almost every country's press is less careful with the facts than the american press. i might put the germans up there with us, also the japanese. the brits are by far the worst, unless you count the state-run arab papers, which are just propaganda. the russians are surprisingly diverse.

i used to like the new york times, but it's taken a nose-dive in the past several years. right now, for foreign policy coverage, the post is the best paper out there. (i do not work for the post.) i go here first then check out a couple of the great l.a. times foreign correspondents like doug frantz and paul watson.

Posted by: sc | October 14, 2005 6:01 PM | Report abuse

I accept full responsibility. However, if the Silliometer had peaked, who know what kind of calamity would have befallen us? It's all for the best.


6.033

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 6:02 PM | Report abuse

All good things must come to an end, eh CowTown?

Posted by: Achenfan | October 14, 2005 6:04 PM | Report abuse

Achenfan

Most, but not all.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 6:07 PM | Report abuse

I spent a couple of years as an agricultural reporter in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif.

In that part of the world, many farmers grow Ammins and NECKtrins. You may be more familiar with their brand names, AHL-munds and neck-ta-REENS

Posted by: proxl | October 14, 2005 6:07 PM | Report abuse

me mums still has a somewhat thick spanish accent - she will pronounce some words that crack me up! i always ribbed her about beach (she pronounces it bitch) - that was my fav growing up cuz we went to the beach a lot! hehehehehe and cockroach was cucarotch (in spanish it's cucaracha) - to this day i still say cucarotch!

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 6:13 PM | Report abuse

Hey boodlers, you're talking about Kaine, not Kilgore. Kilgore is the doofus that is insinuating that because Kaine is morally opposed to the death penalty he'll let murderers walk.

Even when he defended them, he only wanted to get them off death row, not out of jail completely.

Remember.. Kaine=good Kilgore=bad

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 6:14 PM | Report abuse

proxl

I remember reading that Black Diamond, the biggest distributor of California Almonds, had to train farmers who were going to be in their commercials to pronounce it All-Monds, rather than Ammins. I kind of like the Ammins pronounciation, don't know why.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 6:15 PM | Report abuse

TBG

Thanks for the correction. Virginian's are fortunate that I don't vote there. I'd mess things up totally by accident.

Posted by: CowTown | October 14, 2005 6:17 PM | Report abuse

Happy Birthday october 14,1890
to Dwight David Eisenhower.......best wishes.....

Posted by: ~easterbunnie | October 14, 2005 6:18 PM | Report abuse

eeeeppp!! thanks tbg!! i'm a virginian and i vote! good thing you straightened that out! i always turn off mentally when i see the ads cuz i find them so creepy! i mean what maroon is gonna believe that kaine is gonna release murderers cuz he's anti-death penalty?

Posted by: mo | October 14, 2005 6:23 PM | Report abuse

mo,

I'm so glad I did my good deed for the day!

Posted by: TBG | October 14, 2005 6:40 PM | Report abuse

Way up at the top of the boodle there was boodling of letters and English. I must protest. Its not zee, it's zed. The ulitmate British pronunication/American pronunciation thing.

Posted by: dr | October 14, 2005 7:25 PM | Report abuse

Having reviewed the evening's bidding, the top comment award goes to Mr. or Ms. "Achenfan" for correctly tagging the traffic as raving rather than ranting.

We hope, TV Presenter, that you will stay in either case, as there really are only about 8 or 10 people who generate comments.

Bon soir.

Posted by: buttercutie | October 14, 2005 9:29 PM | Report abuse

This is the end. This is the end, my friend...

Posted by: Anonymous | October 14, 2005 10:01 PM | Report abuse

As someone who lived through Watergate I can tell you something about the strange times we now live in now.

In the Watergate days it was the press that wrote about the Nixon WH, and the people, at least those over 30, that did not believe it. The Wash Post was called "Pravda" by many respected people.

Today we have the MSM doing nothing but spout what the WH feeds it. Its the people, one by one, who are coming to the realization of what is going on in the WH with little help from the MSM.

It took Nixon's own words on tape to convince people the press was right. What will it take today to convince the MSM that the people in large part are right?

Oh yea, and what's up with the silent college campuses? Tuition is way up. Guess not having a draft keeps 'em quiet. But no draft can't last much longer. Bush has a long agenda. He marked it when he was elected in 2000. He called it the axis of evil and there were three. He's taken down one, sort of, and he's got over 1000 days left in his administration. If I were in college I'd be very worried.

Take this advice you young people (and you members of the MSM): Think for yourselves and question authority! Oh yea, and don't trust anyone over 30 (except me of course :^)

Posted by: Sully | October 14, 2005 11:40 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Joel, the Post employs a tremendous number of talented people, including yourself. But the people who run the Post are major-league suck-ups who cherish their access to power and wouldn't dream of jeopardizing that access by questioning the things that the powerful actually care about. Better to beat up on the dysfunctional D.C. agencies for not doing their job -- the reigning Republicans certainly have no problem with that. But when it comes to questioning such things as the wholesale shift of the tax burden from the rich to the middle and working classes, forget it. Real newspapers are tigers; the Post is a tame, domesticated little tabby cat.

Posted by: DeanFan | October 15, 2005 12:31 AM | Report abuse

Thanks Tom Fan and Wilbrod for clearing up affect and effect. I will sit down on my setee and ponder the rest of this boodle.

bdl

Posted by: boondocklurker | October 15, 2005 4:14 AM | Report abuse

This boodle has given me a whole new appreciation for the term "strange attractor."

Posted by: RD Padouk | October 15, 2005 8:38 AM | Report abuse

Ok, I have some objections to Sully's comments. I am so sick and tired of you elders sitting back and telling us youngins that we are not politically active enough and too quite. Let me clue you in on something, we are not silent. Far from it. More young people are working in the political system and on campaigns than EVER in the history of the US before. Just because we're not out having sit ins and chanting "hell no we won't go" doesn't mean we're not actively protesting. I don't know about anyone else, but as soon as I see protestors and signs and chanting, I automatically filter it out as noise. I know I'm not alone. It took over a decade of protests to change anything during Vietnam. Look at all the political clout Cindy Sheehan has (and that would be none). What we are doing is waiting and infiltrating the system until when regimes change over, we will be in charge of your retirement money and then lower the cost of tuition and books. If you ever read college newspapers (and I read several) you would see that the students are in fact screaming about the rising costs of tuition and even louder about the rising costs of textbooks (price is rising at something like 200% above inflation). But we have the maturity to realize that protesting will only get you so far and we are using the channels available to us that due to earlier protesting, have opened up. My undergraduate university was in the top ten most activist campuses in the nation according to Mother Jones (http://www.motherjones.com/news/outfront/2003/09/ma_508_01.html That would be #6 for those interested).

Rant over...for now.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 10:03 AM | Report abuse

Ok, I have some objections to Sully's comments. I am so sick and tired of you elders sitting back and telling us youngins that we are not politically active enough and too quite. Let me clue you in on something, we are not silent. Far from it. More young people are working in the political system and on campaigns than EVER in the history of the US before. Just because we're not out having sit ins and chanting "hell no we won't go" doesn't mean we're not actively protesting. I don't know about anyone else, but as soon as I see protestors and signs and chanting, I automatically filter it out as noise. I know I'm not alone. It took over a decade of protests to change anything during Vietnam. Look at all the political clout Cindy Sheehan has (and that would be none). What we are doing is waiting and infiltrating the system until when regimes change over, we will be in charge of your retirement money and then lower the cost of tuition and books. If you ever read college newspapers (and I read several) you would see that the students are in fact screaming about the rising costs of tuition and even louder about the rising costs of textbooks (price is rising at something like 200% above inflation). But we have the maturity to realize that protesting will only get you so far and we are using the channels available to us that due to earlier protesting, have opened up. My undergraduate university was in the top ten most activist campuses in the nation according to Mother Jones (http://www.motherjones.com/news/outfront/2003/09/ma_508_01.html That would be #6 for those interested).

Rant over...for now.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 10:04 AM | Report abuse

Ok, I have some objections to Sully's comments. I am so sick and tired of you elders sitting back and telling us youngins that we are not politically active enough and too quite. Let me clue you in on something, we are not silent. Far from it. More young people are working in the political system and on campaigns than EVER in the history of the US before. Just because we're not out having sit ins and chanting "hell no we won't go" doesn't mean we're not actively protesting. I don't know about anyone else, but as soon as I see protestors and signs and chanting, I automatically filter it out as noise. I know I'm not alone. It took over a decade of protests to change anything during Vietnam. Look at all the political clout Cindy Sheehan has (and that would be none). What we are doing is waiting and infiltrating the system until when regimes change over, we will be in charge of your retirement money and then lower the cost of tuition and books. If you ever read college newspapers (and I read several) you would see that the students are in fact screaming about the rising costs of tuition and even louder about the rising costs of textbooks (price is rising at something like 200% above inflation). But we have the maturity to realize that protesting will only get you so far and we are using the channels available to us that due to earlier protesting, have opened up. My undergraduate university was in the top ten most activist campuses in the nation according to Mother Jones (http://www.motherjones.com/news/outfront/2003/09/ma_508_01.html That would be #6 for those interested).

Rant over...for now.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 10:06 AM | Report abuse

I did not mean to post twice. I'm not that much into ranting. Apologies all around.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 10:08 AM | Report abuse

This boodle has given me a whole new appreciation for the term "fubar."

Posted by: enfantachen | October 15, 2005 10:21 AM | Report abuse

This boodle has given me a whole new appreciation for the term "fubar."

Posted by: enfantachen | October 15, 2005 10:24 AM | Report abuse

This boodle has given me a whole new appreciation for the term "fubar."

Posted by: enfantachen | October 15, 2005 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Ah! I just realized it posted three times! Sorry Sully, I really didn't object THAT much to what you were saying. It just tweaked the same nerve that one of my professors did when he walked into class on 9/11 and said "Boy I'm glad I'm not *your* age" and then started his lecture like nothing happened. He didn't get a good review at the end of the semester.

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 10:28 AM | Report abuse

Good god, the comments section is out of control.

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Good god, the comments section is out of control.

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Good god, the comments section is out of control.

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Good god, the comments section is out of control.

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Happy triple posting!

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 11:11 AM | Report abuse

um, for example, comments keep loading multiple times.

Trying to inflate your popularity figures, Joel?

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:12 AM | Report abuse

um, for example, comments keep loading multiple times.

Trying to inflate your popularity figures, Joel?

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:15 AM | Report abuse

Happy triple posting!

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 11:15 AM | Report abuse

um, for example, comments keep loading multiple times.

Trying to inflate your popularity figures, Joel?

Posted by: en-dash | October 15, 2005 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Seriously, Joel, can we get a handle on this? I hit post once and then its like I'm the Achenbloghoggin' Queen of the Fair. Let's go!

Posted by: peanutgallerymember | October 15, 2005 11:28 AM | Report abuse

Lol...No magister Twohig here.

I took Latin as my first foreign language at puberty. Being traumatized by the death of my Latin teacher, I switched to Spanish, and fumbled through French, which ruined my Spanish skills.

But back to the data. Data as in Star Trek: The Next Generation is Day-tuh. He corrected Dr. Pulaski when she called him Dah-ta, to settle that.

What would have Cicero said? Likely DAAHH-ta, maybe.

Long vowels always take the stress in Latin. The proper latin pronouncation is supposed to be more like Ä as in father, but pronounced a bit longer than the short a (more like a in Dinah).

DAY-ta is a reasonable English rendition, even though that pronuncation would be considered a diphthong, and be written dætum.

Glory be, I've finally used that word "diphthong". Now to come up with a dirty limerick using it...

Posted by: Wilbrod | October 15, 2005 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Oh, ugh, those governor ads. I saw that "anti-death penalty one" and all it made me do was wish I could vote for option #3. At least I'm not a Virginian anymore.
I thought the creepiest bit was Kilgore's face at the end.
With a face like that I wouldn't endorse killing people as part of my platform if I wanted to get elected, that's all I'm saying.

Posted by: Wilbrod | October 15, 2005 12:33 PM | Report abuse

"Daetum" would be pronounced DIE-tum, viz. "ae" dipthong.

Good point about long vowel sound always being stessed if indicated, otherwise always first syllable is stressed, and to add to it, the last syllable -ultima is never stressed.

Rabbit from hat, TA-DAAAH (non possum facere)
-"That is not an oppossum"

Posted by: Inscipio Farrakhannus | October 15, 2005 1:07 PM | Report abuse

Interesting Kit and Kaboodle. Congrats to all who were quoted.

I agree that the press has fallen down on its mission of reporting on issues that matter. Too much horse race, inside politics, not enough issues (especially those that the politicians are doing nothing about, like fighting poverty). I suppose we the people bear some of the blame, because we as a whole don't pay attention or tune in, so the news has become more entertainment than news. I do not understand why people don't vote. I would love to see an in depth study of that, to see if it's access, or cynicism, or apathy that keeps people from exercising their only power.

The Post is a good paper - and I'm reading more of it since I've discovered the boodle, because of what other boodlers refer to. But I think it could be better.

Posted by: mostlylurking | October 15, 2005 2:02 PM | Report abuse

I meant to say that I find Jon Stewart more insightful than the regular news. Although now that Bush is down, the MSM seems to be taking its shots. But what took them so long? Bush has always been an empty suit - surrounded by cronies, divorced from reality, completely incompetent and unpresidential. Oh, but such a nice guy, someone you'd love to have a beer with (even though he doesn't drink - although my husband thinks he's hitting the sauce again). Yep, give me C-SPAN where I can see the pols unfiltered or Jon Stewart - or Achenbach.

Posted by: mostylurking | October 15, 2005 2:10 PM | Report abuse

Hey Wilbrod, did you go to WTW?

Posted by: TBG | October 15, 2005 2:30 PM | Report abuse

Wow.. I promise this is not a boodle to find out who Wilbrod really is. I seem to taken the second guess (after jw). Sorry.

Posted by: TBG | October 15, 2005 2:31 PM | Report abuse

It's the 'boodle's very own version of "Where's Waldo?":

Who's Wilbrod?

(Almost as hard to guess as "dum dum dum dum dum dum dum.")

Posted by: Achenfan | October 15, 2005 2:37 PM | Report abuse

wilbrod = buttercutie, wearing a nice suit

Posted by: enfantachen | October 15, 2005 3:27 PM | Report abuse

wilbrod = naf-neh-ca ??

Posted by: gorbydoll | October 15, 2005 3:30 PM | Report abuse

If the cure for breast cancer is found, Judith Miller should be put back in jail, and ignored with Norman Mailer praise. Murderers on the street, no consequence ink. Dry up and blow away on a Nantucket yacht, Judy. Your soul is foul.

If there is a structure fire, may the Gray Lady supplicate ashen Phoenix elegant fall splotches. Molotov libations on 42nd street where the Grey Goose is cooked.

If Miller doesn't send Libby a tender Valentine, then the goosehouse whorehouse might as well be the warehouse of Pentagon corpses.

Judith Miller is damaged goods.

Posted by: Karma | October 16, 2005 1:35 AM | Report abuse

New York Times? Subscribe to a rag that subscribes to bloodletting?

"Mais non, the hyperbole of entitlement under the code of tradition is sufficient to maintain credibility, nest paw?

"Then we charge more."

"But with the escalation of discerning tastes who seek more than flimsy words that smell like prep school cigarette butts, what are we to do?"

"We go online. One hundred percent. Then we charge readers for obituaries."

"Obituaries!!"

"David Brooks!"

"Obits, obits, Op-eds. Op-eds, op-eds! Op-eds, yeah, we can charge for the all-stars. Dowdy Dowd, Fraidy Friedman, and the lot of 'em!"

"Obituaries."

"Obituaries."

"We know our audience."

"The smart ones don't buy toilet paper, they get the Times on their doorstep."

Posted by: Next Generation | October 16, 2005 2:21 AM | Report abuse

Excellent Posting!!!!

Posted by: me | October 16, 2005 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Someone made a comment about wanting to know why people don't vote, and that is interesting, I would also like to know why people don't vote. Living in rural North Carolina, I see a lot of people that don't exercise that right. Many of the comments I hear from people where I live, is that it just doesn't make any difference if you vote or don't vote. The majority will do what they want anyway. I personally don't feel that way. Too many people died fighting for me to have the right to vote. I certainly will not make light of that sacrifice.

Posted by: Cassandra S | October 16, 2005 5:48 PM | Report abuse

Cassandra S--

I'm with you. I'm on my soapbox on every election day. People find it "inconvenient?" Especially now, when everybody can vote by mail, and vote before the election, there is just no excuse. I say every election, if you are a woman, people have DIED for your right to vote! If you are a person of color, people have DIED for your right to vote. If you are an American, guess what? people have died so that you can have the right to vote.

If you can convince people who agree with you to vote, it's one way to increase the power of your own vote. Good luck, Cassandra, do whatever you can do. Don't give up the fight.

And keep in touch here on the A-blog. You do us a favor by commenting from your unique perspective.

Posted by: Reader | October 16, 2005 7:01 PM | Report abuse

TBG- I shouldn't have put that datum in regarding dead Latin teachers.

Any WTW alumni would not have failed to notice that the latin club won more trophies than the sports teams combined, all thanks to an excellent teacher.

After her death, she was written up in Reader's Digest-- "Unforgettable Maureen O'Donnell."

Thousands attended her funeral. I don't know if the funeral was in Latin, but I wouldn't have been surprised.

I expect maybe 20 at my funeral, that is, if they can find me first.

Posted by: Wilbrod | October 16, 2005 7:12 PM | Report abuse

And speaking of voting rights, they are actively under attack--in Florida, mostly via dirty tricks that are difficult to prosecute, but in Georgia, via actual legislation--the ACLU is suing to stop a new kind of "poll tax" on people who don't have drivers' licenses:

http://www.acluga.org/press.releases/0509/photo.ID.html

Posted by: Reader | October 16, 2005 7:39 PM | Report abuse

wow...dead boodle.

ok - one word:

REDSKINS!

Posted by: Off Topic | October 17, 2005 4:13 AM | Report abuse

Warn out bunch, eh, Off Topic????

The Post's differences between Watergate and now?

I would say that now, it accepts no answer from officials as an answer. as in Scotty Jibberish.

I would say now, the Post doesn't expect facts to back up claims.

On these two, if no answers or facts are forthcoming, the Post sits on its collective hands and doesn't start questioning those who are supposed to provide them. They should be loudly saying that something is wrong.

Finally, the missing ingredient at the Post, Coleman McCarthy. Talk about a Social Compass.

Posted by: Dolphin Michael | October 17, 2005 7:53 AM | Report abuse

You Stink!!!!

Posted by: the other guy | October 18, 2005 5:17 PM | Report abuse

ang haba haba wala namang drawing

Posted by: pro_drawing | July 7, 2006 8:44 AM | Report abuse

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