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The Tyranny of Options

   Somehow related to the decline of mass media and the rise of ipod isolationism is the phenomenon of the picky-picky culture, as described Monday by Libby Copeland. She reveals the ramifications in the realm of romance. [The Achenblog normally abjures alliteration; pardon the anomaly.] It's a wonderful piece full of great anecdotes and the underexploited journalistic resource known as real people. She pauses to pull back and capture the broader sociobioculturalogical picture:

    "There is something peculiarly modern about this phenomenon, something aligned with our dark privilege of too much , this consumeriffic culture in which jeans and houses and breasts and ring tones are customizable. Consider it all: geographical dislocation, cities filled with singles, extended childhoods and postponed childbearing, speed-dating, the growing sense that the dating pool is as vast as the 454 men-seeking-women between the ages of 29 and 31 within five miles of your Zip code on Yahoo Personals.

    "In a world of infinite possibilities, the notion of falling in love, of finding The One, seems itself like the taquito girl, small-town and old-fashioned. Once upon a time, The One would've lived in your village or another one like it. Now, she could be this sweet girl across from you at the dinner table, but she could also be someone you haven't yet met. What if there's another woman somewhere in the world, like this girl, but better? Someone who will snowboard with you, and doesn't do that strange throat-clearing thing?"

    I can speak for the older members of this blog community when I say that, back in our day, we had arranged marriages, and they worked just fine.

    I'd add to the option-maximizing forces the general rise of mobility, particularly in communications. It's hard for young people to believe, but before the invention of cell phones and Blackberries, we spent a lot of time wondering where the heck someone else was. Like, weren't we going to meet on this corner by the Burger King? Or did she think we were meeting at that other Burger King? Someone was always lost. Confusion was the baseline for human interaction. You had to try to imagine how the other party would think and react in a given situation. You'd conclude, "She'll give up after 30 minutes and go to What-a-Burger." It was exhausting. If you ever did finally catch up with someone, you'd be so spent from the process, you'd just give up and get married.

   

By Joel Achenbach  |  February 7, 2006; 10:09 AM ET
 
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Comments

I read that yesterday, as well.

The cat lady standing on her bed wearing cowboy boots and hat was a nice illustration.

Hey, how great would that be for our kids if they learn that they never have to compromise anything ever, and that a relationship can be found(ed) on match.com rather than built over time?

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 10:20 AM | Report abuse

Starbucks has just announced where its next shops are going to be located.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060207/ts_nm/environment_species_dc

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 7, 2006 10:34 AM | Report abuse

I worked with a Muslim from India that defended arranged marriages. His argument was that with our divorce rate, we weren't doing any better than the traditional methods. Of course we don't have honor killings or any of the other "traditional" trappings of those societies.

Still, if your DVD player breaks, you don't repair it, you just get a new one. I think relationships are treated the same way. We have "starter marriages" now. In the words of The Waitresses:

But I don't want to be somebody else's
Learning experience
Some rich kid's way to spend his allowance
I want magic in my real world
Some modern voodoo to make it work
Voodoo to make it work
....
So I'll stop being clever
and just say it straight
I guess I set impossible goals
and I don't know when to quit
Is that it? Is that it? Is that it? Is that it?
....
My goals?
My goals are to find a cure for irony
and make a fool out of God.

Full lyrics available here:
http://www.lyrics007.com/Waitresses%20Lyrics/Jimmy%20Tomorrow%20Lyrics.html

Posted by: yellojkt | February 7, 2006 10:40 AM | Report abuse

I work with a guy who announced one day he'd be going back to India for a wife. His parents had arranged meetings with three different girls and their families. He hit it off with one of them and they're now happily married with a baby. One thing that struck me about the whole process was the realization that so many problems come from competing demands of two familes, often with different religions, and in this case that's been handled up front. Both sides are supportive.

Of course this doesn't help ME at all, but it really did change my Western attitude about the whole thing.

Posted by: asdg | February 7, 2006 10:48 AM | Report abuse

All my relationships with men had busted. The bubbles of true-blue romance had burned brightly, then burst. There were the brainy, bright, bookish, brawny, bronzed, bratty, even blubbery ones--and then the break-ups. Blue and broken-hearted, I was barely able to believe in romance.

Then Bill bounded on the scene. He brought me a bunch of bright blooms and we bonded beautifully. Breakfasts in bed, baubles, backpacking, biking, bricklaying, bubble baths, bratwursts, bee-bop, braving the blue, bracing Pacific breakers. We've bounced around--from the backwaters to the blue states to the Bible belt. Better bellow it out--bonded for 20 years of wedded bliss.

Posted by: Loomis | February 7, 2006 10:59 AM | Report abuse

Bricklaying?

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 7, 2006 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Further to asdg's and yellojkt's points:

Whatever system one uses to find a mate, the reality is that the relationship will be between two unique individuals with their own beliefs, preferences, and ways of doing things. Each person will always view the world and the relationship from his or her own perspective. And often, matches are made at such a young age, when a person hasn't even begun to become the person he or she will be 5, 10, or 20 years hence. Perhaps humans aren't really designed for life-long unions?

************

"The special relationships of the world are destructive, selfish, and childishly egocentric. . . . The world uses its special relationships as a final weapon of exclusion and a demonstration of separateness."

-- from "A Course in Miracles," Foundation for Inner Peace

Posted by: Dreamer | February 7, 2006 11:14 AM | Report abuse

To: Contributors to Achenblog
Fr: Kevin Duncan, Corporate Counsel
Washington Post Corporation

RE: Alliterations

Please be advised that today's "Boodle" has reached its daily quota of alliteration. Therefore, any further occurences of the use of the same vowel or consenant to begin a word in a string of words will be looked upon with extreme disfavor, and in some cases, great umbrage.

Please conduct yourselves accordingly. Please also excuse all spelling errors; this memo was written in haste.

***

Posted by: LegalCow | February 7, 2006 11:15 AM | Report abuse

I'm fastening my seatbelt, putting my tray table and seatback in the upright and locked position, and tightening my chinstrap just in case.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Hmmm. That was a mighty mean memo that the merchants of malpractice and misery, those jaundiced jugglers of jurisprudence, foisted upon the fine and friendly fans of this family-oriented and fantastic font of fact, fun, fantasy and fantasmagoria.

I shall hasten to comply.

Tomorrow.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Here's a link to Paul Farhi's chat from yesterday if any one missed it. It's pretty funny.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2006/02/03/DI2006020302479.html

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 11:28 AM | Report abuse

In other words, bc, "Fasten your seatbelts. It's going to be a bumpy night!" (k'guy can name that film in 3 naniseconds)

Posted by: Nani | February 7, 2006 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Loomis likes alliterative laughter, lawyers like lucrative lawsuits, that's life. LOL

Posted by: Shiloh | February 7, 2006 11:30 AM | Report abuse

This is for Nani:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4258794138972547179

Get a hanky before clicking the link though. This is one cute commercial.

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 11:36 AM | Report abuse

My fiancee and I met on match.com. Just sayin'.

I sent her the that article and she said, "I was just like that--finding a million different things that were wrong, but with you I just didn't try to find things." And there are a lot of things wrong with me that she could have decided to break up with me over. So I guess the moral is that maybe all the pickiness isn't so bad--when you meet the right person the little things just stop mattering.

Posted by: jw | February 7, 2006 11:37 AM | Report abuse

I have a friend who was working in Montenegro and ended up marrying a Serbian woman from Belgrade. They spent a lot of time with her family there. When they returned to the U.S. about a decade ago, my friend was constantly remarking on how much stronger "family" is in that part of the world... kids don't leave home, even married children live with their parents, etc. etc. How in the U.S. we had too much divorce and too many people move so far from their families (of course, not noticing that his wife had just done that very thing).

We pointed out to him that it was the rampant unemployment and lack of decent housing that caused that closeness. Our children don't have to live at home to stay alive and can get jobs all over the country (or the world) if they so choose.

And making choices means also making mistakes. We used the expression "too much choice" but I like Joel's "tyranny" better.

Posted by: TBG | February 7, 2006 11:39 AM | Report abuse

Thank you omni. I'm saving that one.

It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood (homage to Mr. Rogers). The day is young but you can already tell it's gonna be a great boodle. Loomis and Curmudgeon are going to keep topping each other, Scottynuke will join in and Cassandra is going to chuckle!!! (Me too.)

Posted by: Nani | February 7, 2006 11:55 AM | Report abuse

[I think we're long overdue for a Seinfeld reference]

JERRY: I still can't believe you're going out on a blind date.

ELAINE: I'm not worried. It sounds like he's really good looking.

JERRY: You're going by sound? What are we? Whales?

ELAINE: I think I can tell.

JERRY: Elaine, what percentage of people would you say are good looking?

ELAINE: Twenty-five percent.

JERRY: Twenty-five percent, you say? No way! It's like 4 to 6 percent. It's a twenty to one shot.

ELAINE: You're way off.

JERRY: Way off? Have you been to the motor vehicle bureau? It's like a leper colony down there.

ELAINE: So what you are saying is that 90 to 95 percent of the population is undateable?

JERRY: UNDATEABLE!

ELAINE: Then how are all these people getting together?

JERRY: Alcohol.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 11:57 AM | Report abuse

>JERRY: Alcohol.
Heh heh. I wonder if anyone has done a study on the correlation of stiffer drunken driving laws vs marriage rate/age.

I can't be the only one afraid to go out lest I get arrested under the auspices of "Mothers Against Driving After Drinking A Glass Of Wine With Dinner".

Posted by: asdg | February 7, 2006 12:13 PM | Report abuse

K-guy, you don't appear to be handy, so allow me. "All About Eve." (The speaker is Bette Davis.)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 12:14 PM | Report abuse

Such pressure, Nani, such pressure!!!

*Googling "cures for writer's block" * *L*

Having gone 0 for 2 at the altar so far, I distinctly doubt my demented declarations could conceivably contribute to the current conversation concerning love's longing to linger despite losing out to Lilliputian issues.

That should not be taken to mean I'm not in a relationship right now, though. *S*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 12:15 PM | Report abuse

Yes that is correct. I liked your comment. I too belong to the same profile and this was of great help.

David Jefferson
admin@statefarm4less.com
http://www.statefarm4less.com

Posted by: David Jefferson | February 7, 2006 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Huh?

Posted by: Anonymous | February 7, 2006 12:22 PM | Report abuse

Drifting a bit perhaps but...

The marriage/partnership statistics reflect a focus on immediate gratification and a willingness to "settle" as opposed to what I call "moments of resonance"...those times when everything that needs to come together for a perfect and probably unique slice of life does so. Athletes and performance artists sometimes call it being in the zone. I once heard k.d. lange sing an old Roy Orbison song, "Cryin" and even with just the sound of the radio I could tell that she had gone somewhere else and had become one with that song.

Sara Hughes, the 2002 Olympic figure skating gold medalist had that moment of resonance when she landed her first triple axle or whatever it was in her final routine. The instant her skates touched down on the ice, she knew she was there, knew that at that split second in time everything that followed was going to be flawless and I'll bet money she also knew that no matter what the judging outcome, she would never be better than she was right then. You could see it in her face like the first light of sunrise..."I'm there...this moment is mine and I am going to wring every last ounce of energy and life out of it that I can."

It can be so quiet you barely know it has happened...you feel it and don't know it until later. As gentle perhaps as a butterfly on the windowsill or as complex as an orgasm that drains the body and subsumes the soul leaving only enough of you to lay there with your lover and breathe together.

That is the core...to find a person with whom you can experience a series of all sorts of moments of resonance....a coming together of spirits that happens perhaps without warning or preparation but yields the improbable equation, 1+1=3 against a backdrop of a breaking wave, a shooting star, a dripping icicle...resonance...yep...resonance.

Posted by: Jim Brodhead | February 7, 2006 12:29 PM | Report abuse

We interrupt this boodle to bring you a breaking Carbucks-related, coffee-related news event surpassing global warming, NSA wiretapping, and other geopolitical events in depth and importance.

As some of you may be aware, the Today Show and other outlets this morning showed a photograph of Britney Spears driving her mega-SUV in Malibu, with her new baby in her lap instead of in a car seat in back(Ms. Spears was also unbelted). Matt Lauer, in particular, tore Ms. Spears a new one, pointing out that such a thing was not only unsafe but also illegal.

Ms. Spears has responded by claiming she was driving to a coffee shop with the baby in a proper seat in back, and was accompanied by a bodyguard (seen in the photo). The bodyguard went in to get the coffee, and Ms. Spears unfastened said infant and played with said infant in her lap while she waited. A crowd of stalking paparazzi at this moment began to descend on the scene, and as the bodyguard got into the car with thew java, Ms. Spears put the petal to the metal and got outa there, not having time to put the baby back in the car seat.

Clearly, another Carbucks-related incident demonstrating the hazzards of caffeine addicted SUV-driving celebrity behavior, your honor.

OK, you may all return to your paparazzi-free, humdrum lives, now.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 12:32 PM | Report abuse


...the story in tuesday's wash post about
creation of canadian park preserve to be
called GREAT BEAR RAINFOREST was some
very good news...the core area of 4.4
million acres of coastal rainforest with
a buffer area of over 10 million acres is
a triumph of the long view for preserving
and protecting a part of the natural
world...genuine positive outcome...all
who were involved with this should be
seen as having set a high mark of vision
and farsighted policy...
...it surely would be a massive change for
the better to see such outcomes coming to
light in other parts of planet where the
daily assault on forests,watersheds and
coastal areas is so reckless and heedless
of the consequences of intrusive human
activities on generations to come...
...an example such as this where it was
possible to balance use with protection
and preservation is worthy of much study
...it is highly enlightened viewing of
how earth's still large natural areas can
be shielded from the planetary plundering
and natural habitat ruination of man...we
humans are central to all habitat balanced
usage ... how generations to come will find
the planet is dependent on what is wisely
held back from human intrusion,protected
and conserved now...it is not a matter of
waiting another 25,50 or 75 years...the
decisions made or not made since the 1950's
have already altered many regions forever
with the consequences of shortsighted
exploitation,poorly considered transport
and housing layout leading to neverending
encroachment...it does require leadership
and willingness to change...that positive
outcomes are possible is evident with the
creation of GREAT BEAR RAINFOREST...

Posted by: Anonymous | February 7, 2006 12:38 PM | Report abuse

Mr. Kevin Duncan,
Corporate Counsel
Washington Post Corporation

Dear Mr. Duncan:

Please be advised that the copy I heretofore submitted to the Achenblog is subject to both edits and revisions.

Please also add to the list of the men I've dated:

blonde, brunette, balding, brave and Bohemian

As to activities I've engaged in while married, these may also include but are not limited to:

birdwatching, baring our bodies--breasts and buttocks--for brisk dips into brooks beyond babbling, burning beef burgers on the barbecue, bouncing basketballs, being beach bums, berry-picking, and imbibing before New Year's beckoning bleary-eyed.

Sincerely,
Loomis

Posted by: Loomis | February 7, 2006 12:38 PM | Report abuse

what unalloyed crap today. jeez. get a life

Posted by: Anonymous | February 7, 2006 12:38 PM | Report abuse

humdrumhumdrumhumdrumhumdrum...

I kinda prefer it like this.

humdrumhumdrumhumdrumhumdrum...

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Arranged marriages are common in my husband's family. Two of his sisters had them. They are happier than many, if not most, of the marriages I see. Of course, my husband and I are about as opposite that as you can get: from two different countries, two different religions.

The way American society is today, arranged marriages would never work, but where you have a close-knit community where families really know eachother, arranged marriages can work. I respect the ability of the families to judge what's important in the long run, and many of the young people there do too. Naturally if someone doesn't want an arranged marriage, that should be their choice. My husband's youngest sister refused several of her family's suggestions. She's now in her mid-30s and has decided that she'd rather be single than married to someone she's not in love with.

Both methods have their upsides and downsides. I can't imagine choosing an arranged marriage and I'm willing to bet my daughters won't either, but there certainly are plenty of people who don't get it right on their own either.

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 7, 2006 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Joel,

Nice "Whataburger" reference. I do miss the "Homegrown Taste of Corpus Christi."

Posted by: aflapr | February 7, 2006 12:44 PM | Report abuse

Clearly the poster at 12:38:57 does not get what the boodle is all about.

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 7, 2006 12:56 PM | Report abuse

I had a life once. They're over-rated.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 7, 2006 1:01 PM | Report abuse

*sigh* There's always somebody that didn't get the memo, AB.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 1:02 PM | Report abuse

I am noting all entries subsequent to my memo, and am taking umbrage accordingly.

You are warned.


Atty. Kevin Duncan
Washington Post Corporation

Posted by: HolyCow | February 7, 2006 1:03 PM | Report abuse

Indeed, yellojkt. "Heaven is a place where nothing ever happens." -- Talking Heads

Posted by: Dreamer | February 7, 2006 1:04 PM | Report abuse

The Taquito Moment brings to mind the Tori Amos song, Tear in Your Hand:

"By the way I don't believe you're leaving because me and Charles Manson like the same ice cream."

A friend of mine quoted that to my brother (a physicist) when he said he'd broken up with his girlfriend because she said "yes" when he asked her if she thought you would bounce if you fell to the center of the earth.

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 7, 2006 1:07 PM | Report abuse

That Kevin Duncan -- taking umber-toned umbrage from the underbelly of his udder.

Posted by: Tom fan | February 7, 2006 1:09 PM | Report abuse

"Given that true intellectual and emotional compatibility is at the very least difficult, if not impossible to come by, we could always opt for the more temporal gratification of sheer physical attraction.

That wouldn't make you a shallow person, would it?"

Lyle Lovett: "Here I Am"

Posted by: asdg | February 7, 2006 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Burger King? Whataburger? Not only does this Blog stink, it raises your cholesterol.

Man, that B.K. reference gave me the "trots"!

Posted by: The Lonemule | February 7, 2006 1:14 PM | Report abuse

SCC entry:
"his" and "udder" probably don't belong in the same sentence, do they.
Taking a bit of poetic license here, in the interest of getting HolyCow's goat. Or calf, or whatever.
[How does Kevin Duncan feel about mixed metaphors?]

Posted by: Tom fan | February 7, 2006 1:14 PM | Report abuse

Looks like Mr. Jefferson's Automated Robot was able to penetrate Hal's shields.

jw, I'm glad you met your match on match.com. I guess my thinking is that making long term relationships work isn't about similarities, it's about communicating and working through the differences. As Dreamer points out, people change over time and in ways we can't predict very well. Work through the differences as they evolve and all should be well.

A-fan, thanks for the alcohol/undateable bit. That was funny then, and is still funny now.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 1:16 PM | Report abuse

Warning, warning, potential tune cootie:

Anticipation, anticipation
...
Is keepin' me waitin'


(Can't say I didn't warn you)

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 1:24 PM | Report abuse

"These are
the good old days . . ."

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Dreamer quoted:

"And often, matches are made at such a young age, when a person hasn't even begun to become the person he or she will be 5, 10, or 20 years hence. Perhaps humans aren't really designed for life-long unions?"


That makes sence. For the longest time we weren't supposed to live much longer then 30. We could say that we are living 2 full lives nowadays.
Those that are realy lucky find the one person that they can share more than one lifetime with.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 7, 2006 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Noble nota bene Nukester, Nani noted needlessly.

Posted by: Nani | February 7, 2006 1:53 PM | Report abuse

This is my last warning. Continued use of alliteration will result in psychic implantation of pernicious "tune cooties" in offender's brains. Selected tunes may include: "Pink Pussycat," by Devo; "Having My Baby," by Bobby Goldsborough; and "Where Were You (While I was falling in Love)," by Dr. Hook.

I mean it. Cut it out.


Atty. Duncan
Wash. Post Corp.
All Rights Reserved

Posted by: CowLaw | February 7, 2006 1:59 PM | Report abuse

Blogging Belgian becomes better brainiac by browsing brilliant boodle.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 7, 2006 2:03 PM | Report abuse

So how are ya gonna measure the alliteration, CowLaw? With a silly sausage sillimeter?

I think I can handle the punishment for flagrantly flouting your rules -- just so long as you don't add Charlene's "I've Been to Paradise But I've Never Been to Me" to your list of tune cooties. Or that one about lighting a fire in the morning and keeping it burning strong and curling up on the couch.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 2:07 PM | Report abuse

Bring out the Weapon of Mass Alliteration Obliteration:

Oooga Chuka Oooga Chuka

I'm hooked on a feeling,
I'm high on believing,
That you're in love with me.

(repeat ad nauseum)

Posted by: yellojkt | February 7, 2006 2:09 PM | Report abuse

taking umbrage accordionly

a widely admired technique used by WaPo lawyers to force especially windy umbrage past free reeds by means of a hand-operated bellow(s)

Posted by: kp | February 7, 2006 2:11 PM | Report abuse

I believe we have a winner. Good work, yellojkt.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 2:11 PM | Report abuse

I'd like to nominate the line-

"Little old lady got mutlilated late last night"

- by the late great Warren Zevon
'Werewolves of London'

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 2:19 PM | Report abuse

*thinking thanks for Nani are thoroughly thematic at this time*

But I gotta put my vote in for Euro's entry. Flawless.

Toon cootie antidote, anyone??

Don't Worry
Be Happy
Ooooo-Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-OoOoOoOoWeeeOoooo
Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-OoOoOoOoWeeeOoooo
Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-Ooh-OoOoOoOoWeeeOoooo...

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 2:23 PM | Report abuse

I like the part about the werewolf having a Chinese menu in his hand -- it kind of makes him a sympathetic character.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 2:25 PM | Report abuse

So, who used the word "promiscuously" in Weingarten's chat?

Posted by: Tim | February 7, 2006 2:30 PM | Report abuse

I don't find the werewolf a sympathetic character, A-fan.

His hair is *perfect*.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 2:31 PM | Report abuse

C'mudge, how about these?

"What a dump!"

"How's about we have a picnic?"

"It appears Mr. Kaplan has dandruff."

"Yeah, you was a mess!"

"There's a speed limit in this town Mr. Neff."

Posted by: Nani | February 7, 2006 2:36 PM | Report abuse

Really bc? You can't be swayed by the fact that he "ran amok"?

Speaking of perfect and not-so-perfect hair, I'm having a particularly bad hair day today -- because it's BPH day, of course! Achenbach's law. (Sorry, Joel.)

Oh, and Tim: That "promiscuously" in Weingarten's chat has just *got* to have been Joel.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 2:37 PM | Report abuse

Scotty,

We studied that song in English class in the 3rd grade.
Our teacher liked to liven things up once in a while by giving us a song to study instead of texts that explained what a larder was.


I still know most of it by hart and I'm sure I'll be hearing "Your landlord says the rent is late. He might have to litigate. Don't worry, be happy. Don't worry be happy now. " again and again until I go to bed.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 7, 2006 2:38 PM | Report abuse

My family was lost in London about two years ago and we were trying to get back to Piccadilly Circus when I saw a Chinese restaurant. I thought to myself that the name sure sounded familar. Sure enough, it was Lee Ho Fook's. I wonder if it makes its money off of Warren Zevon pilgrims re-enacting the events of the song.

Don't know about Trader Vic's, but I sure could use a pina colada about now.

Blatant Zevon related blog plug:
http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2006/02/my-life-in-music.html

Posted by: yellojkt | February 7, 2006 2:38 PM | Report abuse

My favorite other Warren Zevon song is "Roland the (Headless) Thompson Gunner"

Posted by: TBG | February 7, 2006 2:47 PM | Report abuse

Talkin' about the man.

Posted by: TBG | February 7, 2006 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Got me on two, Nani. "What a dump" is bette again in Beyond the Forest. The speed limit Mr. Neff is Double Indemnity. Don't recognize the other two.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 2:53 PM | Report abuse

Don't worry, A-fan. I'm having a bad hair week myself.

We'll all look better after some alcohol.

I, too, was wondering who used "promiscuously" in Gene's chat, and whether anyone we'll see this evening would admit to it.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 2:55 PM | Report abuse

"Roland's-" pretty good, but I prefer "Lawyers, Guns, and Money", and "Excitable Boy".

Well, and the stuff he did with Hiaasen was pretty cool too.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 2:57 PM | Report abuse

Do they serve "a big dish of beef chow mein" at M&S? Gonna be a hungry bunch of BPHers...

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 3:00 PM | Report abuse

Draw blood.

Okay, the song lyric I'd like to nominate is ...

"The boy in the bubble and the baby with the baboon's heart, and I believe ..."

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 7, 2006 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Basically anything off of disk 1 of "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead" (prophetic title) is stellar. Not that the newer stuff isn't good. Just that the earlier material was so stellar.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 7, 2006 3:04 PM | Report abuse

mudge, Kaplan's dandruff, Cary Grant to Eva Marie Saint in N by NW. Picnic line, Ingrid Bergman to Cary Grant in Notorious. You was a mess, Brando to Eva M. Saint in On the Waterfront.

Posted by: Nani | February 7, 2006 3:10 PM | Report abuse

Headline on WaPo's home page:

D.C. Pitches Schools, Libraries

In my house, when we pitch something it means we throw it away.

"Did you see the letter that our son got from the Army Recruiter?"

"Yeah... I pitched that."

Posted by: TBG | February 7, 2006 3:13 PM | Report abuse

Ad nauseam, yellojkt, ad nauseum is the wrong mood for that usage. But, I agree it is the winning song of the day for obliteration of alliteration.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 7, 2006 3:20 PM | Report abuse

Nani
I am chuckling at some of these comments. I've been married twice, first husband dead, second one, don't know, and really don't want to know. I've learned some things about marriage, but I suspect there is much to know. I think marriage is one of God's best gifts to mankind, yet like so many of God's gifts, we abuse it terribly.

Posted by: Cassandra S | February 7, 2006 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Ah, not mere alliteration, but consonance from Shiloh!

Posted by: Tim | February 7, 2006 3:23 PM | Report abuse

All this talk about food and hair and stuff ad nauseum is making me sick.

I hope I don't have diarrhea all over the bar at M&S tonight.

Are we meeting there because of all the lobbyists on this blog?

I want to sit on Nuke's lap, though, now that I know he's single.

We can talk about the meaning of Brokeback Mt. for members of this blog.

See ya'll later on K Street.

Posted by: Bahaghavidawoman | February 7, 2006 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Since we've got the school of Warren Zevon in session ...

When he appeared on Letterman, shortly before his death, the band played "I'll sleep when I'm dead" as Warren walked onstage.

Now, a question. Zevon has a song about Boom Boom Mancini, with a recurring line about how "Boom Boom Mancini's fighting Bobby Ciccone (sp?)." Does anybody know what that means?

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 7, 2006 3:34 PM | Report abuse

it's a homoerotic allusion to the afterworld, BS

Posted by: Julie Goldfarb | February 7, 2006 3:36 PM | Report abuse

SciTim: Only Lonemule would think of someone as being inconsonant.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 7, 2006 3:43 PM | Report abuse

inconsonant, or, incontinent. the latter might pertain more precisely to this blog, if I may offer a Germanoaussi opinion.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 7, 2006 3:45 PM | Report abuse

Is any going to be at the BPH early, cause I have no work to do, absolutely none, and I'm going bonkers. I guess I could use this time to read my dirty novel.

Shanghai Baby

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 3:49 PM | Report abuse

test

Posted by: jo | February 7, 2006 3:54 PM | Report abuse

You could always take a walk, omni. Or, show up at the BPH early and talk to the Achenfish.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 7, 2006 3:54 PM | Report abuse

TesT.
One, TWO.
TesT.
One, TWO.
One, TWO.

Tom fan types "test" twice and "One, TWO" three times.

[How'm I doing, CowLaw?]

Posted by: Tom fan | February 7, 2006 3:57 PM | Report abuse

Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini was a boxer during the 1970s and 80s. Right about the time the song came out, Mancini fought a boxer named Bobby Chacon (note proper spelling, not Ciccone) and beat him pretty easily.

There was a movie made about Mancini, who once killed a South Korean boxer in the ring.

See http://www.boxrec.com/media/index.php/Boxer:Bobby_Chacon:009523 and http://www.boxrec.com/media/index.php?title=Boxer:Ray_Mancini:001639

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 3:58 PM | Report abuse

Hi Cassandra! Mr. Nani and I were married only a few years when he passed away. It was a shame too because we got along so beautifully. Even when we "fought". This will probably sound crazy or sick to anyone but you, but he still visits me. Not often, nothing especially romantic and always when I least expect it. Like a couple of years ago when I'd laid new linoleum in the bathroom, he zoomed thru with "Hey, great job!"

Posted by: Nani | February 7, 2006 4:01 PM | Report abuse

That doesn't sound crazy to me, Nani.

Posted by: Dreamer | February 7, 2006 4:03 PM | Report abuse

falling finding flame
picky picky pickers pick
truest tender thing

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Curmudgeon - Thanks. I knew Mancini was a famous boxer and all, silly. But not knowing the spelling on Chacon kinda messed up the storyline for me when I went searching.

The death of the Kim is a prominent part of Zevon's song. ("He said 'someone should have stopped the fight, and told me it was him.")

But Chacon was kind of a last hurrah for Mancini. Now that song will make more sense. Thanks again.

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 7, 2006 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh,

My son is signing up for Latin I for next year at his high school. Maybe he'll be able to set me straight.

Illegitimi non carborundum

Posted by: yellojkt | February 7, 2006 4:11 PM | Report abuse

LUPA (Latin Usage Policing Agency),( also in Spanish "magnifying glass") is investigating the use and misues of ad nauseam. The site has been fairly constant in self-policing, but one usage appears to have escaped notice. "Bahaghavidawoman" (sic) not only misused ad nauseum, but compounded the error by creating confusion by the cited handle. The Bhagavad Gita, in Sanskrit is the "Song of the Blessed One," while vida in Spanish means "life" and veda in Sanskrit means "prohibition," and the Sanskrit word for "knowledge" is Bhagavad. I'm sure you can understand our confusion. Both Sanskrit and Spanish are outside the usual LUPA purview and any assistance in apprehending the malefactors would be appreciated.

Posted by: LUPA | February 7, 2006 4:13 PM | Report abuse

No lack of work to do, just a little crispy from trying to keep other people's plates spinning. My boss threw up his arms and headed home for some beverages a little while ago.

I'm gonna catch the Metro here shortly, start on the Ys early, guys (and ladies).

bc

Posted by: bc | February 7, 2006 4:16 PM | Report abuse

Yellojkt:

Congratulations. A classical education is a wonder to behold. And there may be job opportunities in LUPA.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 7, 2006 4:16 PM | Report abuse

And then he swung from the tree and lit on the
ground. He started to rock, really rockin' around
It was a crazy little ditty with a swingin' tune
(sing aboop boop aboopa lopa lum bam boom)

Well, bless my soul, rock and roll
flyin' purple people eater.
Pigeon-toed, undergrowed, flyin' purple peopleeater.
Flyin' little people eater
Sure looks strange to me. (purple people?)

Posted by: alliteration junkie | February 7, 2006 4:18 PM | Report abuse

For the briefest of moments, I thought "Bahaghavidawoman" was spelled differently:

Bohdisattva, won't you take me by the hand
Bohdisattva, won't you take me by the hand

Won't you show me
The shine of your Japan
The sparkle of your China
Won't you show me

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 4:23 PM | Report abuse

To Mrs. Lupa--yes, you know who you are:

Your pedantic, sanctimonious, tongue-in-your-cheeks commentary suggests a repressed persona--and a surfeit of bologna.
Nonetheless, we pray for your redemption.
DooWaDidi.

BW

Posted by: BWoman | February 7, 2006 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Two of the first CDs I ever bought were by Debbie Gibson. I'm not proud of this, but when you make a lot of choices, some are bound to be bad. This includes romance. Often you have to be in a relationship with someone to see if you want to be in a relationship with someone. This makes breakups and heartache an intrinsic part of the process. Once you get married this ends. While you still have to make some very huge choices (like if you wanna stay married) the number of possible scenarios shrinks. Although this can be confining, it is also calming. Until you have children. Then the number of choices goes way up, as well as the knowledge that little people whom you love a whole lot may suffer if the choices you make for them turn out to be bad. This is scary. Although sometimes what seems like a bad choice, given enough time, can turn out fine.
My daughter loves Debbie Gibson.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 7, 2006 4:34 PM | Report abuse

That's Funny RD Padouk.

Though I never bought any thing by Debbie there was a time when I did like to listen to her.

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 4:37 PM | Report abuse

I love Debbie Gibsone, too, and I am aged between 25 and 35. Am I sick?

Posted by: Julie Goldfarb | February 7, 2006 4:37 PM | Report abuse

I also like the theme of Brokeback Mountaine.

Posted by: Julie Goldbarb | February 7, 2006 4:39 PM | Report abuse

nah, not sick, but I think you might want ease up on the e.

Posted by: omni | February 7, 2006 4:54 PM | Report abuse

it's a nervous tic I have--the e. there is a lot of that in my jeans.

Posted by: Julie Goldfarb | February 7, 2006 5:30 PM | Report abuse

joel, i've been waiting here at the burger king on 13th street for 20 years. guess it's the wrong one.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 7, 2006 5:31 PM | Report abuse

A lot of e or a lot of nervous tics?

Posted by: Julie | February 7, 2006 6:10 PM | Report abuse

5:31:38 PM: Joel is likely trapped at 3rd & C SE in the Madison annex, trying to figure out the next kit. His 20 year tardiness should be excusable.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 7, 2006 6:20 PM | Report abuse

I gotta lay off the cheese!!!!

I haven't had a healthy one since the Reagan years!!!!!!

Posted by: The Lonemule | February 7, 2006 6:47 PM | Report abuse

Lonemule, If you're here, that can only mean that you are NOT at the porching hour--? Why not? No, wait, don't tell me.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 7, 2006 7:48 PM | Report abuse

Although I left early, 'twas a bodacious BPH...

Dreamer, 'Mudge and I in the same room at the same time... Hilarty ensued! :-)

And Dreamer, that was really very kind and totally unnecessary, but much appreciated.

YES, kbertocci, lots of photos were taken.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 8:51 PM | Report abuse

While you guys were out in the real world, some of us were still playing around in cyberspace. On Yellojkt's blog (http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com) he posted a link to Snapshirts (http://www.snapshirts.com/custom.php), a site that makes word clouds from any blog you submit--they analyze the words on the blog and list the most common words in alphabetical order, and the size of the words shows how often they appear on the site. I did the word cloud for Achenblog and posted it on my blog (http://readthinklive.blogspot.com)--I think it's pretty cool.

=========

Looking forward to seeing the BPH photos.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 7, 2006 9:03 PM | Report abuse

Where's that editing tool; I need it NOW!

http://readthinklive.blogspot.com

Posted by: kbertocci | February 7, 2006 9:05 PM | Report abuse

Hey, kbertooch, I seem to be the first one back from the porching hour (had that damned bus to catch). I'll just give a quick report, and leave the good stuff for the rest of the gang. There were 10 of us in attendence: omni, Tim/ScienceTim, TBG, Dreamer (A/T fan), TA, bc, scottynuke, mo...ops, there was the fellah came in with mo, whose name I didn't catch (somebody will fill it in tomorrow), and moi. Photos were taken. The BPH had the same waitress this time as last time (so I'm told), so she'll likely be drafted into the Legend and Lore that is the Achenblog, and become the Official BPH Waitress. (Did anybody get her name?) Real names and workplaces were exchanged, but of course those must remain confidential. Safe to say about 2/3 of us work for one government agency or another (and no duplications), so you may remain confident that your federal government is being subverted from the inside by smart-ass, wisecracking Achendrones all across the board, rather than in concentrated pockets of subversion. Food (especially shooters and the incredible $1.95 [yes!] cheeseburger platters) was consumed, certain beverages were quafed, and certain secret photos were taken which will be revealed--I'm guessing by mo--later on, so I won't spoil that. Toasts were proposed and drunk to those of you who weren't there.

As of the time I had to leave, no one had yet been arrested, everyone was fully clothed (bc had on his official Achenblog T-shirt under his regular shirt), and no one (up to that point, anyway) needed bail money or a cab ride home. I cannot speak for what may have transpired after I left.

Carry on.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 9:13 PM | Report abuse

I left the DC area for the west eight years ago, but I do wish I was there for the BPH!

Posted by: nellie | February 7, 2006 9:22 PM | Report abuse

I BOOOed. scottynuke seems to have filed whilst I was composing.

Ditto to what scottynuke said, Dreamer. That was very nice of you. (In lieue of eating her hat, as she'd promised if we both showed up, she bought us a round.)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 9:25 PM | Report abuse

How's this for BPH photo service??? *G*

http://www.monkeyview.net/id/2480/bph/index.vhtml

Hope it works as advertised!

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 7, 2006 9:48 PM | Report abuse

Excellent! Looks like a fabulous time was had by all. Great captions, Scottynuke - I'm so glad you and Mudge attended - and at the same time! Love the shoutout to Eurotrash. And I was wondering why there weren't more pictures of mo, since she wasn't taking them, but she's Achenshy. Were those the lopers behind you? No, they look too friendly and fun loving...

Or is it all just a Photoshop trick?

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 7, 2006 9:58 PM | Report abuse

Talk about turnaround, Scottynuke!

You appear to have captured it all--the Achenplayers, the Achengroupies, the happiness and fun of the BPH, and the BUND. And the biggest splash of color, after the swath of bund--the Mudge tie!

We in Flyover Land live for these Kodak moments! Thaaaaank you so much for the pics, the captions, the photo IDs (though the regulars from previous BPHs are instantly recognizable)!

Fun that Dreamer had to "pay up."

Posted by: Loomis | February 7, 2006 10:18 PM | Report abuse

Excellent job, Scottynuke.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 7, 2006 10:20 PM | Report abuse

Out-freakin'-standing, scottynuke!

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 10:22 PM | Report abuse

After one more look at the photos, I'm beginning to think bc's lime Achen-T just might tie with the Mudge Bund for most colorful! Hmmm...may also have to reconsider the Scottynuke salmon-colored shirt... (Did and omni and Tim call each other, consult, and decide to wear khaki and blue?)

Scottynuke, those photos are just so much fun! I know, I know, I'm repeating myself. A colorful group, to be sure.

Posted by: Loomis | February 7, 2006 10:29 PM | Report abuse

It's pretty much nolo contendere, LindaLoo--the T-shirt wins. The cummerbund resided in my briefcase for most of the evening, whereas the that lime-greener was right out there. Plus it was Achenofficial--and then made contraband by Att. Kevin Duncan and his wily colleagues. That's an unbeatable three-fer.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 7, 2006 10:42 PM | Report abuse

Hi BPH'ers.

Great pictures. It looks like you had fun.
Next time I'll just jump in my private jet and fly over.

It's the first time I realy had a good look at you all. (I missed the previous photo's)


Who thinks Omni and Tim should do a fun science show on television, something like mythbusters. They realy look the part. Science Tim even has pens in his breast pocket.

Thanks for the greeting. I think I'm now a "Breveted Bonafied Boodler".
What makes it realy special is seeing who holds up the sign. I hope no gun to the head was involved. (Insert smiley here.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 1:07 AM | Report abuse

Hi BPH'ers.

Great pictures. It looks like you had fun.
Next time I'll just jump in my private jet and fly over.

It's the first time I realy had a good look at you all. (I missed the previous photo's)


Who thinks Omni and Tim should do a fun science show on television, something like mythbusters. They realy look the part. Science Tim even has pens in his breast pocket.

Thanks for the greeting. I think I'm now a "Breveted Bonafied Boodler".
What makes it realy special is seeing who holds up the sign. I hope no gun to the head was involved. (Insert smiley here.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 1:07 AM | Report abuse

Nice work, Scottynuke, and so quick! Very well done. It was great to see some new folks there, Curmudgeon, Scottynuke, and Tim/Science Tim. The table behind us enjoyed both us and themselves, as you can tell by their participation in the group photo. Yes, we had the same waitress and she certainly remembers us. Luckily in a good way. She's the one who took the group photo. Too bad Joel wasn't there; maybe he'll appear at the next one and he and I can hold a contest to see who will say the fewer number of words. Lots more pics were taken by mo and I'm sure she will post them as soon as she is able. Oh, and bc's Achenblog t-shirt looked great. Even if the lawyers didn't like it you did a fine job on the shirts, kbertocci.

Posted by: pj | February 8, 2006 1:22 AM | Report abuse

Oh, and I failed to give a toast to yellojkt for including The Waitresses at the top of the blog. That's gotta be a first! I wonder what they are up to these days.

Posted by: pj | February 8, 2006 1:36 AM | Report abuse

Great pictures, Scottynuke. It looks as if the BPH was a success, with fun had by all. The boodle bloggers brought their best to the bar and had a ball. (It's late and hopefully the LawCow goes to bed early.)

bdl

Posted by: boondocklurker | February 8, 2006 3:16 AM | Report abuse

Nani

"zoomed through, hey great job!" Still laughing out loud at that one, Nani. I won't be able to make the "porching hour", too far away, but hope everyone has a nice time. I watched some of the funeral of Coretta Scott King, so sad, could not look at the whole thing. Just keep thinking how much our world has changed because of these two people, Martin Luther King,Jr, and Coretta Scott King, yet there is still much to do. They lived in an era that was fostered by the changes they knew that would make us a better people and a better country. And they did this in a peaceful manner, not violently, but peaceful and loving, and we so desperately need that now, because it seems the world has become a bomb, destructive and never ending. If only we as individuals could see ourselves being better and loving, the opposite of what is going on now, what a wonderful place this would be. And I know that sounds so naive and childish, but can anyone offer anything better?

Posted by: Cassandra S | February 8, 2006 4:34 AM | Report abuse

Most excellent work, Scotty. I have preserved the group shot as a window insert that pops up when I enter the boodle. I especially liked the ceiling shot and stained glass dome lights. They remind me of a place in the District that I once haunted when living there as a part-time resident for two years. It was on PA ave, before the widening 20+ years ago. I can't remember its name, but it was around the corner from the Capitol Hill Inn at 3rd and C where I had temporary digs. The ceiling lights brought back memories. That does not necessarily indicate that I was flat on my back at that tavern, at least not often.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:36 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra: We never hesitate to veer off topic here, do we? What you said fits right into something I was thinking about this morning--I told my husband, I was listening to Stevie Wonder ("Love's in Need") and I got a message from God. Basically, while it's true that "perfect love drives out fear"--it's also true that people in general are afraid of love. Dr. King preached the power of love, and he demonstrated the truth of what he was saying, and people were afraid of him, a lot of people. If we had a leader today who stood up to Bush and his Culture of Fear, and said, people, liberate yourselves from this fear and exercise the power of love instead--I imagine the middle of the road crowd, they would be very afraid of that idea. But bottom line, Cassandra, the only real weapon we have is love. And I mean what Dr. King talked about, it's not weakness, but the greatest power in the universe. I believe that Dr. King was right, and Bush is wrong. Thanks for bringing up the subject.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 8, 2006 6:28 AM | Report abuse

Great pictures, thanks so much! I must say y'all look like professional porchers to me!

Posted by: newkid | February 8, 2006 6:52 AM | Report abuse

Kbertoccia is on target. Be not fearful, Omnia vincit amor.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 7:24 AM | Report abuse

That is, Karen, a Latinate version of an Italianate name. And the translation of Omnia vincit amor is Love conquers all.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 7:26 AM | Report abuse

In al-gebra, kb, I think the formula would be: <3 = 3+ to the unlimited power.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 7:39 AM | Report abuse

Glad everyone likes the pictures, happy to be of service! One of these days we have to arrange a BPH to coincide with visits from our flyover brethren. *G*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 7:54 AM | Report abuse

The BPH was all that! Achenfan said her world was turned upside down with Scottynuke and Curmudgeon there! Science/Tim was hilarious and pj was his usual quiet self. Mo should be a talk-show host, with her ability to guide the subject and bc shone in his Achenshirt.

TA apologized for not being able to boodle as much lately and Omni declared that he'll remain just Omni from now on because keeping track of his suffixes is just too much trouble.

We even had a table of boodler wannabes. Achenfan declared, "Can you believe there are people out there who don't know about the boodle?"

In other words... a great time was had by all!

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 8:11 AM | Report abuse

Ha! Curmudgeon looks exactly like what you would think! He needs to get a talk show or something.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 8:15 AM | Report abuse

Perhaps it was just jealousy at not being at the BPH, but after reading the Dafna Linzer story about Iran this morning I had a flash of color.

If the White House neocons use "Green Salt" like Yellowcake uranimum, it may plunge us into another black hole of war. That made me blue, but I suppose I should instead, see red, or have a spectrographic cranial checkup.

Better yet, if Joel has managed to get out of the Madison annex, a new kit could fix it.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 8:37 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh, Tim has a pocket spectrograph if you need one. Really. *L*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 8:47 AM | Report abuse

I don't for a minute doubt that, Scotty, but my part of rural Florida is not even in flyover country. And I don't think even SciTim could manage a spectrogram via the net. I may have to settle for a word cloud analysis.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 8:54 AM | Report abuse

Well done pics, Scottynuke.

As usual, a very enjoyable evening with smart, funny people. Thanks to those of you who were there in person and those who were there in spirit.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 8, 2006 9:00 AM | Report abuse

Great pics, Scotty!

And yes, shame shame shame on me. SCC cubed. No, strike that. SCC to the power of infinity. As The Fonz once said, I was wr-. . . I was wr-. . . I was not exactly right.

Scottynuke and Curmudgeon are indeed real, unique individuals. Thank you, gentlemen, for being so good humored about this when you really had good reason to take umbrage.

What a humbling experience this has been for me. I really must go and read that book about why people believe weird things, because I think I must be one of those people. I've become a caricature of myself, as in, What the Bleep Do *I* Know? How Achenembarrassing. Thank goodness for my wacky belief system, i.e., that life is but a dream, an illusion, or I'd probably be ready to commit hara kiri [sp?] right about now.

As it turns out, I find the whole thing rather funny. I laughed myself to sleep last night and was still giggling when I woke up in the morning.

[Oh, and one of the best quotes from the eveing came from one of the guys at that table of Boodler wannabes behind us: "Can we join y'all?"]

Posted by: Achen- and Tom fan and Dreamer | February 8, 2006 9:15 AM | Report abuse

Hari-kari, also seppuku, ritual disenbowelment; as differentiated from kami-kazi (divine wind/breath of god) pilots who self-destructed. The English phonetic spellings are variable. And, Tomfan, it is all maya, illusion.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 9:30 AM | Report abuse

What I want to know: How are the hangovers?

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 9:32 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh, Edmund's Scientifics sells pocket spectroscopes on-line for cheap, cheap, cheap. The ultra-cheap kind, what I carry with me at all times, are less than $2.00 each, and over-priced at that. You can get them in bulk for $1.38 each. They have much spiffier ones, however, compelte with a little wavelength scale inside. You're getting up into the $5 to $7 range on those babies, however. I leave mine at home.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 8, 2006 9:37 AM | Report abuse

hey Tim, I may do a full itemmized list later, but for now just three things I did not pull out of my bp yesterday eve: a small paperback Webster's Scholastic Dictionary; a Tasco Sonoma(TM) 10x25 Fully Coated Optics (288FT/1000YDS 96M/1000MM #16-1025-1); "Shanghai Baby" a novel.

Shanghai baby I'm a geeky nerd.

That's my new saying. Instead of "Yeah baby" I'll say "Shanghai baby".

haha

Posted by: omni | February 8, 2006 9:39 AM | Report abuse

Okay, I'm ready for the Achenconvention. Anybody into event planning? How about having it at the Four Seasons (I hear that's a nice place)? Maybe have Joel lead the panel discussion on boodling for fun and profit. Don Graham as keynote speaker on the impact of boodling on the Internet community. Anybody got other ideas?

Posted by: slyness | February 8, 2006 9:42 AM | Report abuse

omni, I'm starting to worry that your relationship with this Shanghai Baby might not be a healthy one. Oh, for those innocent days when your heart belonged to Audrey Tautou.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 9:43 AM | Report abuse

One thing is obvious in the photos--that jw loaned Scottynuke his rouge pot. I know, I know--it's all in the capillaries.

I keep turning over in my mind, jw, that you met your betrothed at match.com. Very similar to a story I did back in my Silicon Valley days.

Who contacted whom first? Was it the description or the pictures that attracted one of you to the other? What was your first date? Was it smooth dating from the start? Did you get off to a slow dating start or was it a rocket ride (bowing to Science Tim and bc)? How long did you date before you popped the question?

How many successful matches can match.com claim? Had either of you ever dated others through match.com--successfully or unsuccessfully? Why turn to match.com? Would you recommend match.com to others?(Too curious by half.)

Think Weingarten needs to get ahold of you, jw, for another feature story...Valentine's Day being just around the corner and all.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 9:45 AM | Report abuse

omni and I geeked out by comparing all the crap that we tote with us wherever we go, becuase you never know when you might need it. We were matched for Leatherman pocket tools, pen supplies, and toothbrushes. I began to pull ahead on cameras, flashlights, and the pocket spectroscope. omni took a commanding lead when he produced spare socks, a screwdriver, a tape measure, twine, a compass (magnetic, not drawing), and adhesive tape. He put the record out of reach when he pulled forth the bubble wand.

I will note, however, that I have a glasses repair kit, lens cleaning materials, and a mini first aid kit in a pocket that I forgot about. I also could have pulled honorable defeat out of ignominious shame if I had remembered the purple reflectorized mylar ribbon that I keep in the back pocket of my vest. I've been carrying it for 5 months so far, why stop now?

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 8, 2006 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Don't worry to much Achenfan. I'll probably finish it this week, and then I'll be writing non stop about conspiracies while constatntly looking over my shoulder (I'll be reading my non-Ludlum Ludlum novel).

Posted by: omni | February 8, 2006 9:45 AM | Report abuse

[I think I've got an Achenhangover. I usually find my office to be sufficiently warm, but today, I'm cold. I'm cold . . . I'm cold . . . I'm cold.]

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 9:47 AM | Report abuse

[Just can't seem to get my "core temperature" up.]

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 9:48 AM | Report abuse

Why not hold it here Slyness?

http://www.atomium.be/HTMLsite/dyn/eindex.html

I find it a good Boodling monument. (And I could attend it, which is the great for me.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 9:49 AM | Report abuse

I went to the Four Seasons once, with my wife and I as guests of her sister, a corporate big-wig at that time. I don't think I could afford hors d'oeuvres there. Or, as people in my class call 'em, snacks.

Posted by: Tim | February 8, 2006 9:49 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh,
Buy the more expensive spectroscope--complete with the small wavelength scale inside. A person just cannot go out into the world with his/her implements of spiffitude.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 9:50 AM | Report abuse

Nerd guys, I am in laughter induced pain.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 9:51 AM | Report abuse

omni, STim, either of you have a microscope in your pocket for Loomis to put jw under?

Posted by: newkid | February 8, 2006 9:52 AM | Report abuse

Dreamer,

A couple of shots of Wodka will help both the hangover and make you feel warmer.

Of course you'll get a new hangover tomorrow, but that can be helped by some Wodka.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 9:54 AM | Report abuse

I'm cured now. I won't need the spectrescope (spelling intentional)

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 9:54 AM | Report abuse

Dreamer, I think you, 'mudge, and Scottynuke all handled an odd (and somewhat uncomfortable) situation quite graciously.

My hangover's not doing so well, lots of asprin and water have really taken the wind out of it's sails.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 8, 2006 9:54 AM | Report abuse

pj,

Patty Donahue, the original lead singer for the Waitresses, died of lung cancer in 1996 at the age of 40. The music always lives on.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 8, 2006 9:55 AM | Report abuse

LindaLoo, laughter only accentuates my rosacea, what can I say??? *L*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 9:56 AM | Report abuse

The weird thing is, although I went to bed after midnight and woke up at 5:00 a.m., I feel fully rested, and my head ain't achen. I feel good (nah nah nah nah nah nah nah) -- I knew that I would. Maybe I'm high on the truth.

Posted by: Dreamer | February 8, 2006 9:59 AM | Report abuse

SCC: its. Of course.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 8, 2006 10:01 AM | Report abuse

Ah the boodle morning after. Great photos, and the morning after stories, well, it's a darn good thing I am running behind here, and the coffee is not ready yet.

Posted by: dr | February 8, 2006 10:02 AM | Report abuse

omni and Tim,
When was the last (most recent time) that you used one of the items you tote around?
*L* about the twin toothbrushes and the pair of socks. Of course, the cummerbund could always be used as a compress or tourniquet in a state of emergency.

(Note to Scottynuke--since I danced some ballroom in my past, my dates, on one or two occasions, wore a cummerbund. Heaven forbid that our family was ever of such spiffitude to have one under our own roof. My memory is that it was pronounced by my mother as "cumberbund." So, when Mudge said he was taking not one but *three* on his cruise, I looked up the word. Lo and behold, it is cummerbund, which is how I discovered its linguistic root is Urdu and that it was originally used as a loin band.)

Just curious--my question to you both in the first graf, my husband is a little geeky like you, but not quite to your extremes. *L*. Of course, he commutes but eight miles to work.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 10:04 AM | Report abuse

Nobody has yet described one of the funniest moments: ScienceTim and omni, demonstrating exactly how science nerdish they both really are, started emptying out their pockets and showing the stuff they routinely carried around with them. (ScienceTim was even wearing his fisherman-type vest, which holds extra science-nerdy stuff.) Hilarious.

ScienceTim also reported on the presentation he was mentioning the other day--turned out very successful, to something like 450 people, on the subject of comets.

I am unable to report on the status of hangovers. I only had a single Guinness.

I also gotta tell ya, until the boodle I never heard of McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurant (I lead a sheltered, monastic life, given to contemplation and a few handfuls of rice) but that is one toddlin' joint. The menu and wine list are unreal, and the happy hour prices are outa sight. And the regular menu prices are also surprisingly good, for a place only a few blocks off Connecticutt Ave.--actual working-type people with mortgages and children can eat there (cajun-spiced mako shark with corn salsa, $15.70 !!!!) I have to rank it right up there with Musso & Frank's in LA and John's Grill in San Francisco.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 10:06 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra, "that sounds so naive and childish, but can anyone offer anything better?"

In a playground full of small children, there are no colours of skin, no language barriers, only other kids to play with, other kids to laugh with.

Adults would do well to learn to look at the world with the open accepting eyes of children. Childish and naive? In my dreams, I hope so.

Posted by: dr | February 8, 2006 10:07 AM | Report abuse

Wow, I don't recall hearing that about Patty Donahue. How very sad. Yes, the music does live on. I heard "Christmas Wrapping" over the holidays again last year. Must go listen to "Square Pegs" and "I Know What Boys Like" again.

Posted by: pj | February 8, 2006 10:10 AM | Report abuse

Curmudgeon is hoping that the staff of McCormick & Schmick read his praise so that the next time he gets his food for free.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 10:10 AM | Report abuse

Cur does have that monastic, Friar Tuck look in the pix. And his menu of dining establishments indicates a lot of missionary work. I won't compete with that.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 10:13 AM | Report abuse

newkid,
After the *bathroom reader* material (with significant contributions by Achenfan) exchange, this jesting with jw today is mild by comparison, but just as mindless.

But I'm sure jw is just as flushed with Achenembarrassment today as he was that particular Sunday when he admitted that his time spent in the department of philosophy just wasn't as meaningful without his WaPo Sunday magazine.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 10:13 AM | Report abuse

newkid,
After the *bathroom reader* material (with significant contributions by Achenfan) exchange, this jesting with jw today is mild by comparison, but just as mindless.

But I'm sure jw is just as flushed with Achenembarrassment today as he was that particular Sunday when he admitted that his time spent in the department of philosophy just wasn't as meaningful without his WaPo Sunday magazine.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 10:14 AM | Report abuse

"In a playground full of small children, there are no colours of skin"

So true... when my son was 3 or 4, he insisted that my neighbor (who is black) looked exactly like my sister (who is white). I always agreed with him and never pointed out their main difference in appearance.

When I was pregnant with his little sister, he was five years old and he pondered out loud over what color she would be when she was born. He honestly thought it was just chance and had never actually noticed that families tend to all be the same color.

Unfortunately, society has changed that outlook (he's now 17); I'd really like to think that his dad and I didn't contribute to that change. I think one of the ways that kids have this pointed out to them is when they hear things like, "He's the first black head coach at that school," or "she's the first woman elected to the city council." I think that really puzzles a child who thinks everyone is the same and begins to cloud that idea.

I'm not saying that my son now thinks one race is superior to another--he really doesn't. It's just that now he notices differences he didn't see when he was younger.

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 10:19 AM | Report abuse

SCC: oops, I BOOOed again. ScienceTim has divulged the contents of his pockets.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 10:23 AM | Report abuse

SCC: oops, I BOOOed again. ScienceTim has divulged the contents of his pockets.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Linda, here's the interesting thing about online dating--you are in complete control of people's first impression of you. You are in complete control of others' perception, from your picture to whether you use semi-colons or string all your sentences together with ellipses. You have time to craft the perfect response to any email you receive. All this is both a good thing and a bad thing.

On one hand, it takes the pressure off meeting a complete stranger and searching for common interests while trying not to vomit from nervousness. The downside is that you do become very picky. Does someone overuse exclamation points? Delete! Do all their pictures have different anonymous guys with their arms around them? Toss that one! When you're scanning through profiles at a rate of one every few minutes, your criteria can get pretty tough, and petty.

I think I emailed Kristen first, and in all honesty what first caught my eye was that she was a Red Sox fan from a town near where I went to college. In cyberspace just as in the "real" world, the most in consequential things like a shared favorite book or Saturday morning cartoon are the hooks that give you the opening to learn more about a person. After about a month of emails and exchanging instant messages, we decided to meet for drinks after work.

That's when things really started, because the strange thing about internet dating is that until you meet that person, you really have no idea if the person you've been emailing really exists. Does she really look like what you think she looks like? Does she really know anything about baseball, or was she just transcribing what she heard on Sports Center? When you get right down to it, online dating is just another way to narrow down the millions of datable people to a pool of a few you might be interested in. I would say that it's one of the better ways, but when you get right down to it, it's just a vetting system.

So the real story is what happened when we met--what happened after we both decided that the other was not so horrible that we couldn't spend a few hours on a Wednesday afternoon together? We made the usual first-date small talk--it turned out we were both frustrated with the online dating scene, and had been thinking of calling it quits. As first dates go, it was the best I ever had. But things weren't exactly smooth after that first date. We actually went more than a month before seeing each other again. But we had both made enough of an impression that that second date did happen, and a third, and visits with each other's family, and then eventually a proposal. It turned out that we were made for each other; enough common background that we understand each other, but different enough that we make each other a little better, which isn't something that you can get staring at a computer screen.

I proposed 6 months after that second date. Which in this day is a little fast, I suppose. But my attitude was that I just knew that this was the person I wanted to spend my life with. And why wait a year, or two or three?

Was this all because of Match.com? Well, I never would have met Kristen otherwise, so maybe. It really makes you wonder about how much chance has to do with the direction our lives take. For years we were right down the road from each other; I went to college with probably 5 people who she went to high school with, and we still never met until we stumbled on each other on an internet search.

But is our relationship any better because of Match.com? I don't think so. It always comes down to people talking to people, and if that first date hadn't gone well we certainly never would have had another. And I sometimes wonder, how many people overlook the person that's right for them, just because they have the annoying tendency of ending their sentences with a "!!!"?

[to bring this full-circle, feel free to visit the nauseatingly-sweet http://www.kristenandjeremy2007.com]

On one hand, it takes the pressure off meeting a complete stranger and searching for common intrests while trying not to vomit from nervousness. The downside is that you do become very picky. Does someone overuse exclaimation points? Delete! Do all their pictures have different anonymous guys with their arms around them? Toss that one! When you're scanning through profiles at a rate of one every few minutes, your criteria can get pretty tough, and petty.

I think I emailed Kristen first, and in all honesty what first caught my eye was that she was a Red Sox fan from a town near where I went to college. In cyberspace just as in the "real" world, the most in consequential things like a shared favorite book or Saturday morning cartoon are the hooks that give you the opening to learn more about a person. After about a month of emails and exchanging instant messages, we decided to meet for drinks after work.

That's when things really started, because the strange thing about internet dating is that until you meet that person, you really have no idea if the person you've been emailing really exists. Does she really look like what you think she looks like? Does she really know anything about baseball, or was she just transcribing what she heard on Sports Center? When you get right down to it, online dating is just another way to narrow down the millions of datable people to a pool of a few you might be interested in. I would say that it's one of the better ways, but when you get right down to it, it's just a vetting system.

So the real story is, what happened when we met--what happened after we both decided that the other was not so horrible that we couldn't spend a few hours on a Wednesday afternoon together? We made the usual first-date small talk--it turned out we were both frustrated with the online dating scene, and had been thinking of calling it quits. As first dates go, it was the best I ever had. But things weren't exactly smooth after that first date. We actually went more than a month before seeing each other again. But we had both made enough of an impression that that second date did happen, and a third, and visits with each other's family, and then eventually a proposal. It turned out that we were made for each other. Enough common background that we understand each other, but different enough that we make each other a little better, which isn't something that you can get staring at a computer screen.

I proposed 6 months after that second date. Which in this day is a little fast, I suppose. But my attitude was that I just knew that this was the person I wanted to spend my life with. And why wait a year, or two or three?

Was this all because of Match.com? Well, I never would have met Kristen otherwise, so maybe. It really makes you wonder about how much chance has to do with the direction our lives take. For years we were right down the road from each other; I went to college with probably 5 people who she went to high school with, and we still never met until we stumbled on each other on an internet search.

But is our relationship any better because of Match.com? I don't think so. It always comes down to people talking to people, and if that first date hadn't gone well we certainly never would have had another. And I sometimes wonder, how many people overlook the person that's right for them, just because they have the annoying tendency of ending their sentences with a "!!!"?

[to bring this full-circle, feel free to visit the nauseatingly-sweet http://www.kristenandjeremy2007.com]

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Wow, sorry that was so long.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 10:36 AM | Report abuse

Ok, I have no idea what happened there. Ignore everything after the first link. I am an idiot.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 10:37 AM | Report abuse

Oh my gosh... did anyone else experience 404 hell?

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Sorry again, http://www.kristenandjeremy2007.com

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 10:42 AM | Report abuse

Had to link in circuitously, whazzup?

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Yes, I experienced 404 hell as well. I had a real moment of panic. I wondered if it was caused by the link to photos of the Achenshirt.

"Or, as people in my class call 'em, snacks." Ha ha ha!

I have to confess, Curmudgeon did not look exactly like I thought. For some reason I pictured him and "heard" him as the John Locke character from "Lost." I'll have to see if the "real" Curmudgeon overwrites that image.

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 8, 2006 10:54 AM | Report abuse

Nice pics. It looks like a good time was had by all.

I see on one photo it asks where I am. I was over here. By my self.

Okay, there were a few semicolons hanging out with me.

But seriously folks, I live in Texas. Alas, dropping in on BPH in DC just ain't likely to happen.

Say, did they have any Belgian ales there?

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 10:59 AM | Report abuse

I was with Bayou Self. I was the third semicolon after the comma.

Posted by: Achenbach | February 8, 2006 11:04 AM | Report abuse

I just had to go deep into the software of the laptop to nuke the FreedomNet or whatever the heck Barnes and Noble is beaming over here at Starbucks to steal my computer from its rightful connection to T-Mobile. It's like Spectrum Wars over here. Anyway, the blog did go 404 for a while, probably as a result of the hangover from last night's bacchanalia at the usual place. See it's all connected. (Sure looked like fun, great pix.)

Posted by: Achenbach | February 8, 2006 11:06 AM | Report abuse

dr & TBG:

"...and a little child shall lead them" Isa. 11:6, 8-9. The people of the book should read it often.

Don't mean to get all touch-feely here, but there is truth to what you all have been saying about kids.

The lost innocence of my own was sad, but the adult product is satisfactory.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 11:07 AM | Report abuse

I AM SO JEALOUS! What a great BPH. Everybody looked great (thanks for the photos Scottynuke!).

JW and Kristen are a cuter couple than any featured in People magazine. And JW, you get the Boodler Award for actually posting something "on topic."

Must go back to work. Carry on. Cheers.

Posted by: CowTown | February 8, 2006 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Here's something I would kit if I could: The NRA in Florida is pushing for a bill that would prevent businesses from telling their employees that they can't keep guns in their cars in the company parking lot. The story notes in passing that 1 out of 49 people in Florida has a concealed weapons permit. There are 6 million guns in the state. Why do I not feel safe here? Meanwhile a few minutes ago, on Kendall Drive, we were passed by a guy in a pickup jacked so far off the pavement that our car could have passed clean underneath it. He was, of course, bald, with sunglasses and a bristly mustache, and was wearing what my youngest child identified as "a life-beater."

Posted by: Achenbach | February 8, 2006 11:09 AM | Report abuse

Did anyone watch "Scrubs" last night (anyone that wasn't at the BPH that is)? It fit right in with this Kit's theme - J.D. breaking up with girls because of "Taquito Moments." His latest girlfriend's flaw: saying "that's so funny" instead of actually laughing. "Courting Alex" on Monday had the same theme as well. Is the Achenblog at the forefront of American pop culture or what?

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 8, 2006 11:10 AM | Report abuse

I thought the "Where's Bayou Self???" caption was hilarious. (Actually, they were all funny.)

*L*
*S*
Tip o' the hat to Scottynuke.

Posted by: Tom fan | February 8, 2006 11:11 AM | Report abuse

To echo CowTown, thanks jw for drifting on-topic.

I probably can't kit. This is not for lack of interest in blogging, only due to lack of opportunity. Next week things will be back to normal round here. Or abnormal, as circumstances require.

Posted by: Achenbach | February 8, 2006 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Maybe that guy wearing the "life-beater" was the Lone Mule?

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Joel.... could you please post a Kit to all newspaper editors asking them to work on their use of the word "cartoon" in their headlines?

The recent examples are just too comical for such a serious situation.

Thanks
TBG

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 11:14 AM | Report abuse

jw, yer a lucky guy! I said the same thing to 'Mudge last night too.

And to stay on-topic, my GF and I met on Match, too. Lots of parallels to jw, just hasn't moved as fast, 'cuz we're not jw and Kristen. It's still a wonderful ride, I must say!

BS, if you'd showed up, I find it conceivable Dreamer might have paid your return ticket!!! *L*

JA, we'll have to find you a disguise when you attend a BPH, to keep the groupies down to a dull roar.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 11:18 AM | Report abuse

*polite bow to Tom fan* Yer welcome! *S*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 11:19 AM | Report abuse

Let's see, leaving the BPH was strange: Once outside I was clearheaded but walking like I was tipsy [strange]. Went down the escalator was just about to swipe my smarttrip card when I realized/remembered I take the bus home from downtown, not the train. So I get home and my hands are shaking like I had been drinking red bull all night, not beer (had red bull once and said never again). So I take some medicine (aka Blorph) open a beer, watch a movie, two more beers later the movies over and I go to bed. I'm out like a light. I can't remember how the movie ended though. But the good news is: no hangover.

Posted by: omni | February 8, 2006 11:21 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra and TBG, yes we can learn so much from our children.

A few years back while shopping in K-Mart, No. 2 g-girl age 3, selected her very first baby doll, a black baby. As we waited in line to check out, she proudly announced "I gotta baby" to the person behind us. That person, white, looked at me quizacally and asked "Why did she want **that** one" and Hilary responded "cause she's the prettiest".

Another time No. 1 g-girl, then 6 or so, and I watched Mississippi Burning on tv. I had to explain the KKK to her and after doing so, she said she needed to call her little black friend, Felicia, to warn her. I assured her that Felicia's parents knew about the KKK. G-girl responded "No, Nani, they don't have cable."

Cassandra, you once mentioned that some folks think you are obsessed with race and the Katrina victims. I don't think you're obsessed, but rather passionate about these issues. We all need a passion in our life, a goal, a dream. Those who don't are merely marking time.

Posted by: Nani | February 8, 2006 11:23 AM | Report abuse

Thanks for your post, jw. Kristen is stunningly beautiful. I'm sure her good looks, as well as your own, play into your story as well.

Whatever 404 hell is--I think I'm experiencing it, too. The double post, then the persistent message that the achenblog is not on the server I am using.

I guess your post, jw, goes back to the Kit and the questions of what is love? What is attraction? Why do some tentative relationships succeed while others fail?

When I first met my husband, he was low on my totem pole of interest--having just gone through his second divorce and having driven across country with everything that he owned and could fit in his Plymouth Duster. A high school grad--not a lot of cultural literacy. But he was tall, blonde, fit, and handsome--and still is.

We met poolside at the apartment complex where we were both living, a story in itself. And he about to move in three weeks to an apartment closer to where he worked. So I met him in the nick of time.

I was hot for my advertising instructor who taught at San Jose State--not as physically attractive as Bill, but polished, smooth, suave, always charming in any type of social situation, grew up in Boston, well-educated with an M.B.A. from Notre Dame, a successful businessman. I casually dated several people at the time but continued to see Bill on a more consistent basis.

One day, Bill and I decided to have another date at the beach. Our second date had been to go to Monterey and Carmel. We decided on Half Moon Bay. I packed a picnic lunch. We parked in the lot and must have walked at least two miles south down the strand, where it was relatively unpeopled. We played Frisbee, swam, ate lunch, talked.

Late in the afternoon, we made the long walk up the beach to the car. Not far from the parking lot, on the incline of a dune, I spied a woman about my age with a great figure in a one-piece, very red, bathing suit. Her bathing suit was eye-catching, and the rays of the setting sun were making the color of her suit glow. My eyes slowly drifted away from her to her partner. It was my advertising instructor. I was in silent shock.

Everything became too obvious. My advertising instructor wanted to be with her, and Bill wanted to be with me. That was the afternoon that the tide changed in Bill's favor.

I ended up picking Bill because he was so very good with kids and animals. He would have made such a great father. When the time came for us to have kids, we learned the hard way that we couldn't. But I've no doubts that I picked the man who always gave more than 110 percent and who has always had heart.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Of course, no hangover, omni. I think it was Ben Franklin who said "Beer is proof that God loves us."

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 11:28 AM | Report abuse

That was a beautiful love story, Loomis. The best part is that it is obviously still very much alive.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 11:36 AM | Report abuse

Scotty - Dreamer might pick up the tab for my return flight? Would want me outa there that bad, eh?

You know, the thing about that comma that was hanging out with me and the semicolons and Joel is that he (the comma) just kept getting in the way -- but not as badly as the semicolons, of course.

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 11:37 AM | Report abuse

Linda, great story. To go along with it, although this may or may not be a significant insight on relationships--when Kristen and I started dating all of her friends would tell her after meeting me, "He seems really great, and he obviously makes you really happy, but he's nothing like all the guys you used to be interested in!" Ex-math team, marching band member, science dorks were apparently not what used to catch her eye.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 11:40 AM | Report abuse

Curmudgeon has something around his neck in the pictures -- I'm not talking about the the tie -- and it says "affair" on it. It appears to be a strap for an ID badge or press pass. Am I looking too closely at the pictures? If so, I will avert my eyes.

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 11:42 AM | Report abuse

Nani writes:
Cassandra, you once mentioned that some folks think you are obsessed with race and the Katrina victims. I don't think you're obsessed, but rather passionate about these issues. We all need a passion in our life, a goal, a dream. Those who don't are merely marking time.

I so agree with you, Nani. I have one post-it attached to the front of my computer terminal. I heard it from a reporter in North Carolina with whom I had two e-mail exchanges several years ago. I hand-wrote it. The post-it has been in place for about two years now. It reads:

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

Martin Luther King Jr.


Enough Achenbloghoggin' for one day. Off to do chores.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 11:44 AM | Report abuse

And yes, I agree that Kristen is stunningly beautiful, but that's the least of the reasons why I love her.

(Now leaving to pee on the toilet seat so as to restore equilibium to the universe)

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 11:45 AM | Report abuse

Let's see...

sharpie: was used last night

socks: last week (not the same pair in the bp now thought)

binoculars: why just this morning

bubble wand: also last night

dictionary: this morning on commute (don't ask what word I looked up, I'm embarrassed I couldn't remember the def.)

compass: I only brought that to work last year because I wanted to know where north was (the building is a weird shape and I couldn't get my bearings) and it just sort of ended up staying in the bp

little mirror: yesterday morning (no I'm telling what it was used for, but rest assured it's nothing gross or embarrassing)

floppy disks: about once a month or so for my own personal off site backups

mutli-tool: I use this about once a year

That just about covers what my memory is good for. Thanks for asking.

Posted by: omni | February 8, 2006 11:48 AM | Report abuse

Obviously you figured out where Curmudgeon works: the U.S. Department of Boodle Affairs.

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 11:49 AM | Report abuse

SCC fest. time for a walk.

Posted by: omni | February 8, 2006 11:52 AM | Report abuse

This newly formed Department of Boodle Affairs incorporates the former Bureau of Boodling Investigations, which was dissolved for reasons of gross incompetence and ineffectiveness.

[Someone once made the point that the FBBI's activities were tantamount to McCarthyism. I concur, and I'm sorry.]

Posted by: Tom fan | February 8, 2006 11:59 AM | Report abuse

Tom fan,
Maybe Curmudgeon/Scottynuke really is one person who just paid someone else to show up to the BPH to make you think you were crazy...

Seriously though, it seems that you are handling the whole thing with aplomb.

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 8, 2006 12:06 PM | Report abuse

Ah. All is revealed.

Then let me be the first to say "You're doing a fine job, 'Mudgie."

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 12:08 PM | Report abuse

Loomis asked, when did I last use my stuff: I use my pocket spectroscope every week or two, just to look at lights. It turns out that compact fluorescents are very differnt from other light sources, including long-tube fluorescents... I use the camera practically every day. The pocket tripod, not so much. Lens cleaners all the time. Pens, all the time; backup pens, not recently. I better check whether they still work! Toothbrush, I use in airports whenever I travel, which is fairly often, except for a current doctor-prescribed grounding (I'm supposed to be on a mountain in Hawaii right now, darn it). Flashlights -- all the time when I travel, both the primary and the backup. First Aid kit, not so much. Oddly, the thing that I use the least is the supply of business cards. The clip-on sunglasses don't actually fit my current glasses, so they ought to go. Usually, spare napkins in one pocket. A Tootsie roll, for emergencies.

I rarely pull out the purple mylar. It would be too intimidating for lesser mortals, although it would be as nothing to the mighty omni. I need to get a bubble wand and a tape measure.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 8, 2006 12:09 PM | Report abuse

Scottynuke

The pictures are absolutely wonderful, and you guys look like you're having so much fun. A great looking bunch of folks. May God bless and keep you always, through His Son Jesus.

Nani and Loomis

Thanks ever so much for your responses. They do a heart good. May God bless more than you can imagine, in Jesus name.

Posted by: Cassandra S | February 8, 2006 12:16 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, AB Junkie.
Nah, those guys weren't paid actors. They were *real*. (If they *were* actors, that would have been a mighty good casting agent. As others have noted, Curmudgeon and S'nuke were, in person, pretty much how we imagined they would be.)

Of course, I'd be lying if I didn't admit to briefly -- VERY briefly -- considering the possibility . . .
;)

Posted by: Tom fan | February 8, 2006 12:24 PM | Report abuse

MUCH fun had at the BPH last nite! here's my pics...

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mortiifera/album?.dir=5323&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mortiifera/my_photos

(might hafta copy the full link)

Posted by: mo | February 8, 2006 12:28 PM | Report abuse

Shalom, shol mubarak, dominus vobiscum and wa, Cassandra

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 12:33 PM | Report abuse

First I have to say the regulars on this blog continually make my day with random pointless antics. Thanks for the laughs...

Anyway, the thing that truely scares me about arranged marriages is the notion that my parents would be choosing who I should marry. Don't get me wrong I love my family and I certainly want their approval. However if my entire future happiness depended on them choosing a guy they saw fit for me to marry it would be a complete mess.

Lets focus for a moment on the myraid of unwanted possibilitys that could come of this type of arrangement...

I could marry the guy my dad saw fit to go on weekend fishing trips with him. Nice but do I want a guy who sole purpose in life is to smell of seafood and discuss religous ideals all weekend with my father.

I could marry the guy my mom thought was so sweet and gentlemanly in high school. Meanwhile once he finished sweet talking my parents he was smoking pot and slapping girls behinds like the gentleman he is.

I could marry the guy my entire extended family thinks is an upstanding citizen with morals and money. Meanwhile he is so old fashioned he actually condones the idea of arranged marriages and oh yea agrees that women and children should be seen not heard.

Made my point yet? The idea of an arranged marriage is nice in theory. That is if you can get used to the idea that your life partner will be choosen based on a few positive attributes backed up with a lifetime of bending all the little attributes that have allowed men and women to be the beautifully different individuals we are today.

Posted by: coffeelover | February 8, 2006 12:36 PM | Report abuse

Cassandra, thank you very much for the very kind words and thoughts. :)

mo, mega thanks for getting the BPH Waitress on film (on chip?)!!

AB Junkie, Dreamer is aplomb personified. *G*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Since my husband and I come from the same small town, in a way I have always known him, or at least of him. I clearly remember the first time he registered on my radar.

My husband's degree is in geology and in his younger days worked for the federal government looking for soapstone deposits across the north. They would drop him off at a point on the map with a tent and supplies for a couple of days, and he would go off and do whatever geologists do. He would be in the field sans haircuts, sans shaving. It was 1972 and he kinda liked the rakish hippie redbeard look he sported on his return. Normally his mother took him to task on his return, but one return was late on a Saturday night. Come Sunday morning, bushman beard, straggly hair and all, he went to church with his family.

A girlfriend of mine had a serious crush on him for a long time, and pointed him out that fine Sunday monring after church as the object of her youthful passion. I thought she was nuts.

Fast forward about 8 years and I understood what she saw.

He makes me laugh even when he looks a little straggly.

Posted by: dr | February 8, 2006 12:43 PM | Report abuse

as for match.com - i know of 4 marriages and two serious relationships that came out of it... (and jw's engagement) - i haven't tried it yet... i think i'm a little scared... cuz yes, i use too many periods of ellipses and !!!!! and i like taquitos (tho not the one's at 7-11 bleh!)

Posted by: mo | February 8, 2006 12:48 PM | Report abuse

Nathanael West may be future kit material, Joel, or perhaps one of his eponymous characters should have his/her own column/blog. But then, maybe I'm just overcome by cyanosis and need a rare steak.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 12:51 PM | Report abuse


...another successful bph gathering :-)
never been to washdc..perhaps one of these
years...:-)
...with yesterdays story of the great bear
rainforest on the pacific coast of canada
followed by the lost world in indonesia it
is a banner day for those of us who thrill
to such places...
...the story in wed wash post describes
the type of experience i would find most
interesting...what an exceptional moment
of discovery and reveal...
..."there are very few places on earth
where there's been so little human impact"
stephen richards-South Australian Museum
...this same region of papua was written
about in late december in the NYT regarding
the activities of an american mining outfit
called Freeport-McMoRan,an open pit gold
mine,and the enviromental destruction and
mayhem it has fostered.
...it is incredible to think that this type
of activity has taken place on the same
island...likely not too far off judging
from the descriptions of where the mine
and this newly seen area are.
...with greed and short term wealth gains
likely being the main drivers of the mine
operations it is an indictment on all who
have been involved with this wanton and
reckless intrusion of open pit mining...
...indonesia has suffered greatly from the
effects of colonization,dictatorial rule
and corruption...one can only hope better
instincts and enlightened long viewpoints
will prevail in papua indonesia...

Posted by: an american in siam... | February 8, 2006 1:10 PM | Report abuse

coffeelover,
That's why I said that arranged marriages wouldn't work in America. In my husband's hometown, the families all know eachother very well. A match is chosen based on the family moreso than on the individual. And from what I've seen, it generally works out pretty well. I grant that that may not be representative of arranged marriages in general. And I don't think it would work at all if the bride and groom weren't both willing participants.

I've been wishing my family could arrange a marriage for my brother. He has been dating someone he met through something like Match.com (not sure if it was that exactly) for two years. Just about everyone who knows him and has met her can see that this relationship should not be, and will eventually come to an unhappy end. The question is, how much of his life will be consumed before he sees what everyone else does.

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 8, 2006 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Alas, another BPH opportunity missed due to time mis-management. Someone asked about Belgian ales... I don't think M&S grill is a good place to find those, but there are several other places in town where they specialize in them. Pizzeria Paradiso (G-town location, only) just opened their downstairs as a beer bar, Beereria Paradiso, and they are featuring a good selection to go with their amazing pizza.

In case anyone is interested, National Geographic Live has a beer program coming up in March with "The Beer Hunter", Michael Jackson (no, not that one) focusing on "The Belgian Beer Diaspora." We will be tasting beers brewed in the US in the Belgian style. Sign up early-- he always sells out.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/nglive/washingtondc/spring2006/single/jackson.html

Posted by: Pixel | February 8, 2006 1:14 PM | Report abuse

Did any of you go home with the waitress, the way you always do?

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 1:17 PM | Report abuse

an american in siam writes, "with yesterdays story of the great bear
rainforest on the pacific coast of canada
followed by the lost world in indonesia it
is a banner day for those of us who thrill
to such places..."

Indeed, aais; indeed.

Posted by: Dreamer | February 8, 2006 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Can't believe I have been in 2 1/2 worth of meetings this morning over here at the Department of Boodle Affairs. The thing around my neck in the photos is the lanyard for my ID badge, which is from a previous job and says "Public Affairs" on it (though I wasn a writer/editor, it was for a PAO shop and I was technically a PAO).

I would be happy to look like John Locke, rather than Friar Tuck, any day of the week.

Actually, at the BPH I passed around a photo from the cruise, showing me in my white dinner jacket and cummerbund, etc., which ought to have been (and I think was) sufficient proof that I am the real Curmudgeon and not a hired actor (it would have been difficult to hire somebody on short notice who happened to have a photo of himself in a white dinner jacket and red cummerbund). So I think we've demonstrated that I am the real Curmudgeon. (Also, had anyone asked, I could have explicated the infield fly rule, which probably would be the acid test.)

So that just leaves scottynuke as the imposter. Which of course he was. Went to the local actor's equity union shop, paged through the resume-and-mugshot book, found a guy who looked plausible, and hired him. Piece of cake. I plan to use him again at future events. The reason I never took umbrage at Dreamer is that she was, of course, dead right.

(OK, just kidding.)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 1:19 PM | Report abuse

For Belgian beer in DC, you can also try Cafe Belga on 8th St., SE.

Posted by: pj | February 8, 2006 1:23 PM | Report abuse

Looks like a splendid time was had by all at the BPH. Scottynuke,it was fun looking at the photos and finding that some of my mental images of the boodle porchers matched, sort of.

jw, congratulations to you and Kristen on your upcoming nuptials (I feel a song coming on):

Love and marriage, love and marriage
Go together like a horse and carriage
This I tell you brother
You can't have one without the other

Love and marriage, love and marriage
It's an institute you can't disparage
Ask the local gentry
And they will say it's elementary

Try, try, try to separate them
It's an illusion
Try, try, try, and you will only come
To this conclusion

Love and marriage, love and marriage
Go together like a horse and carriage
Dad was told by mother
You can't have one, you can't have none
You can't have one without the other!!

Posted by: Nani | February 8, 2006 1:27 PM | Report abuse

It's good to see that the single boodler conspiracy has been laid to rest for now. At least for Mudge and Snuke...... We should probably make a list of all the boodlers who need to show up at the BPH so that the theory can be completely settled.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 8, 2006 1:40 PM | Report abuse

Just got around to viewing your photos, mo--great job.

For the record, in photo no. 1, of TA, that object in the foreground that looks like an albino spiny sea urchin is most likely the top of my head. (Others have previously likened my dome to that of a spiny sea urchin, which is how I know.) I was sitting next to mo when she took the pix, and this morning I awoke to discover that my right eardrum was badly sunburned. Now I understand why.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 1:40 PM | Report abuse

HAHAHA 'mudge! i missed the showing of the cruise pic! :(

Posted by: mo | February 8, 2006 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Nani - did you see the second set of pics?

Posted by: mo | February 8, 2006 1:49 PM | Report abuse

Like some others I noticed there was a small burp with the Wapo blogs.

I laughed out loud when I saw the error it gave me:

The requested URL /achenblog/2006/02/the_tyranny_of_.html was not found on this server.

That was the webserver protesting about "THE TYRANNY OF HTLM".
Poor thing.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 1:53 PM | Report abuse

mo, I saw the ones Scottynuke posted. Did you post some also? I can't seem to find them

Posted by: Nani | February 8, 2006 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Cur: It is not so important to look like John Locke as long as you think like John Locke (1632-1704). I don't regret the Friar Tuck reference, as your response gave me a hearty guffaw.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 1:58 PM | Report abuse

On Topic: When in my twenties and living in LA, "Dating" was frequently a continuing exercise in frustration because of the Choice Factor. The city has such an enormous population of creative and wealthy people, that it attracts people who come looking for attractive, creative people with money (does that make sense?). Relationships are very difficult to maintain in that environment, because people are always keeping an eye out for someone who is prettier, thinner, richer, more creative, etc.

I was most fortunate to have met a woman from the Upper Midwest who was wholly unimpressed with the LA cult of Generic Glamour and Conspicuous Acquisition. I was also fortunate that she chose me over all those more intelligent, creative, rich, successful people. I hope she feels as lucky.

Posted by: CowTown | February 8, 2006 2:03 PM | Report abuse

JW: Congrats, You look good together.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 2:08 PM | Report abuse

I think I have another Boodleism...

"If it's in the Boodle, it's on-topic."

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 2:12 PM | Report abuse

In light of major portions of this boodle, perhaps this item from The Onion might be in order:

EPA Warns Of Dangerous Levels Of Romance In Air

February 8, 2006 | Issue 42•06

WASHINGTON, DC--Responding to a dramatic increase in cases of starry-eyed gazing and spontaneous poetry, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a general health warning Tuesday for hazardous levels of atmospheric romance across the entire North American continent.

"Early indications of romantic exposure include a flushing of the skin around the face, neck, and chest, accelerated heartbeat, rapid eyelash batting, and sighs," EPA administrator Steven Johnson said at a morning press conference. "Left untreated, the ailment progresses rapidly, leading to aimless strolls, floral purchases, and a form of acute and regressive aphasia in which the victim's speech degenerates into that of a young child."

According to Johnson, teens, recently married couples, and people who have not yet had all of the hope drained out of them by bitter life experience are at the greatest risk.

"We recommend that members of high-risk groups minimize their exposure by staying indoors, covering up, and avoiding old flames, which can react with even trace elements of sexual chemistry to ignite free-floating passions," Johnson said. "Those living in scenic parts of the country are at an especially high risk, and are strongly urged to avoid dazzling sunsets, mountain vistas, fields of wildflowers, and sun-dappled lakes."

In an attempt to control the spread of romance, police and sheriff's departments across the country have blockaded intimate bed and breakfasts, ivy-covered inns, and five-star restaurants.

To stem further contamination, hundreds of municipal-park swans have been shot.
Epidemiological studies have found that individuals in picturesque surroundings are eight times more likely to suffer sudden swoonings, sweepings-off of the feet, and, in some extreme cases, prolonged confinement to bed with other romance sufferers.

Those who consider themselves immune to heightened romance levels should take precautions, as well.

"Jaded urbanites and self-styled 'commitment-phobes' should evacuate the continent if possible, as this group is especially susceptible to ill-advised rebound-type pairings and impulsive phone calls and e-mails that they are likely to later regret," Johnson said.

If romance levels cannot be stabilized, experts are not ruling out the possibility of an "airborne erotic event"--a massive nationwide outbreak of lovesickness.
"This type of sickness comes from ground-level xoxozone, which occasionally causes distortion to the lower frequencies of the visual field, or 'rose tinting,'" Hallmark scientist Dr. Susan McMurrough said.
"It is nearly impossible to detect, as it is generally odorless and colorless. However, in high concentrations, it has an odor like that of Wind Song bath splash."

"Despite centuries of desperate, impassioned research, modern science has found no cure for the periodic springtime scourge commonly known as romance," McMurrough said. "Only three years ago, we were able to isolate an xoxozone sample, but it was lost when all of our scientists abandoned their research duties and eloped."

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 2:17 PM | Report abuse

On topic: I need a date!

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 2:17 PM | Report abuse

On topic, as well: My late spouse was a member of a religious community for 10 years before we met through a cousin I had been dating in Ft. Lauderdale. (No, not my cousin) The marriage of a religious and a sometime heretic was a joyous trip that I remember too well. So many years later the loss of my true soul mate still hurts. I delight in these stories of perfect unions. They also bring back pleasant memories.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Cur: The Onion piece was a hoot. But to bring this back to reality, a second marriage was not successful and I developed an allergy that, with the EPA warning, wisely keeps me indoors during the periodic outbreaks of romance.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 2:35 PM | Report abuse

OK, Eurotrash, how about Oct. 12, 1492? (Rimshot)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 2:45 PM | Report abuse

An aspect of cyberspace relations that hasn't been brought up is MY pet topic, the brain-in-a-vat hypothesis (sorry for the unfortunate mental image there).

Many "people" in the kaboodle are very happy with a social relationship with a group of people who are "virtual"--I am mostly interested in this because it is an entirely new phenomenon in human history. As jw said about internet dating, it really allows us to filter our self-presentation. More than that, it is a social milieu without obligation, so it is friendship, albeit virtual friendship, without cost.

When the first BPH happened, I actually checked airfares. But I kept my wits about me and behaved sensibly. Now I'm sort of glad I don't live in DC because I am more comfortable in the virtual world anyway. There is no risk, no vulnerability, no cost. And the Achenblog is a lot of fun. But since I have friends, family, colleagues, and companions in the real world, I'm not "shopping" the way I would be if I was on match.com. What I AM doing is communicating about subjects that interest me, with people who share a lot of my interests and values, and whom I would not be able to meet in real life.

So, thank you, Joel and fellow A-bloggers. You make my life more interesting.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 8, 2006 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Cur, that's the date of your birth? (Back at ya.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 2:54 PM | Report abuse

kbertocci, that's a good point. One of the things that frustrated me about internet dating was something I called "email death". Say you're in the pre-first date stage--just exchanging emails. But you're still talking about semi-personal stuff. And then the emails just stop (I was guilty of doing this just as often as it was done to me, by the way). You're left wondering, "Was it something I said? Did I offend them? What's wrong with me?" The truth is they probably met someone else, or lost interest, or got too busy at work to start dating someone, or a million different reasons. But when you're communicating with a person who isn't really a person but a collection of emails and an impression of a personality (which may or may not be correct), it's so easy to just turn it off, and ignore that there's a real person out there who's feelings probably are going to be hurt.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 3:05 PM | Report abuse

Snuke (that's your nickname? OOooookey-dokey, it's now Mudge and Snuke, I guess),

how is that you come to own the auto dealership and the seafood restaurant? And where the heck were you with the antenna in the background (bood-i-ful country, though)?

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Pixel - When it comes to beer and the name Michael Jackson, it is "that one." He's the King of Beer and doesn't even moonwalk.

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 3:10 PM | Report abuse

nani, et al... a reposting of the second collection of bph photos

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mortiifera/album?.dir=/5323&.src=ph

(these are not scottynukes pics)

Posted by: mo | February 8, 2006 3:12 PM | Report abuse

KBert,

I wonder if what is happening now isn't a "democratic" second wave similar to what happened at the time of the humanists of the 15th century.

At that time, many intelectuals, many who never met, shared ideas and philosophies resulting in an expantion of Western thought.

People are able to voice oppinions that they never would in real life. Not that these are always enlightened, but the fact that dialogue happens will in the end create some new dynamic to our thinking. After a while one doesn't believe what one is thought to believe by one's culture.


At least that's what I hope.

(I hope I made some sense.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Two interesting Japanese films about relationships-
Samurai Rebellion stars Toshiro Mifune (natch) as a mid level samurai retainer in a loveless arranged marriage who is compelled by his lord to marry his eldest son to the lord's discarded mistress. This is hard to swallow, but he chokes it down and then is delighted to see a loving relationship actually develope between the son and his new wife! He is elated to see his son have the kind of marriage he never had. Then the lord changes his mind and asks for the girl back. Father and son open up a can of samurai whupass. Hilarity does not ensue.

Double Suicide is a much less conventional treatment. The married protagonist is in love with a courtesan and seeks to leave his wife for her. After many struggles, they decide that the only way they can be together is in death. Twist #1: the same actress plays the wife and the courtesan (you can go a long way with the old whore-Madonna thing here). Twist #2: the film is presented as a bunraku puppet play. This is a traditional Japanese theater form with large puppets (sort of like mannekins) manipulated on stage by masked puppeteers dressed all in black. Except here the live actors take the place of the puppets, with black clad figures silently gliding about the scene dictating their actions. It's hard to describe how strangely effective this is at getting across the concept of fate, destiny, karma. The total effect is impressive, but demands concentrated attention.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | February 8, 2006 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Bayou and Pixel: I'm now drinking a Leffe Trippel. Devine.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:16 PM | Report abuse

LindaLoo, I take it you've wandered beyond the BPH photos... *L*

Snuke's fine with me... Gimme an eyepatch and call me Plissken.

As for the dealership and the burger joint and all, I was enjoying my birthday and it was marvelously funny to find those places at that point. Strangers bought me big presents!!! *LOL* And I'm thinkin' SciTim will recognize the huge radio telescope at Green Bank, WV. Largest movable thing in the world, the pic doesn't do it justice.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 3:16 PM | Report abuse

ET: Cur's birthday is actually January 2, 1492, the day Boabdil surrendered Granada to Elizabeth and Ferdinand. I know it makes him older than October 12th, but he is just trying to shave a little off his age.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Ah, yes, ET, the 15th century. I remember it well. Seriously, a friend always introduces me as her 500 year old friend. Apparently I am not sufficiently aged to qualify as Mel Brooks' "1000 year old man."

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 3:25 PM | Report abuse

Linda,

Totaly off topic.

When you did your genealogy research, did you ever reach my part of the world?

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:27 PM | Report abuse

I wrote the police brief on the surrender ceremony in the Granada DeNada-Bugle & Inquisition Advertiser that night. Couldn't get Boabdil's damn lawyer to return my carrier-pigeon requests for comment. I wrote under the byline Cid El in those days. If I had only thought to turn it around...

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Siloh,

You're only half a milenium old? You sound much wiser.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Both ET and kbertocci made sense. With cryogenics, an entire future government may consist only of brains-in-a-vat, not just the ones that are there now.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Cur, I was thinking for something to reply to your last post. But honestly that was so funny I couldn't find anything to top it.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:35 PM | Report abuse

ET, Cur and I are contemporaries, but memory fails me, Cur, was it Averroes or Avicenna that was Boabdil's lawyer? Yes, they were both doctors, but also wore other hats. Quite stylish, as I recall.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Did anyone see the story that Tony K is going to be doing Monday Night Football next year? Sounds like a great idea to me, I'd watch the games just to listen to him for 3 hours.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 3:44 PM | Report abuse

This is when I feel like a foreigner.
Tony K, monday night football? *smile*

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:47 PM | Report abuse

"This is when I feel like a foreigner." Match.com? I've been married for longer than most of you have existed-36 years this May.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | February 8, 2006 3:52 PM | Report abuse

"I've been married for longer than most of you have existed..."

...in this physical manefestation, at least.

Posted by: jw | February 8, 2006 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Oh, and that's T.K. Stackmoney to us "littles", jw.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | February 8, 2006 3:57 PM | Report abuse

KGuy,

You must have met your wife ttrough match.writeletter.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Eurotrash writes:
Linda,
Totaly off topic.
When you did your genealogy research, did you ever reach my part of the world?

Eurotrash,
I'm trying to stay off the blog and be neither an Achenbloghog nor Acchenaddicted, which I clearly AM!

I'll try to be brief (oh, what a challenge). I received a Rotary Undergraduate Fellowship in college and had about a year to plan the trip. I flew over to Europe about two months after my 21st birthday. Spent a summer at the Goethe Language Institute in Prien am Chiemsee (improving my spoken German), this during the time when the summer Olympiad was under way, missed Oktoberfest (fool!), and studied for a year at the Academy of Fine Art in Stuutgart.

Traveled to Sweden twice to see my Swedish boyfriend (Papa Henning and Claes drove me back to Stuggart on one of the legs of one trip), and Claes and I spent a week in Graz together. Spring break, I traveled on a fairly large student tour by bus to southern France, and boarded a tramp steamer and saw Spanish ports and the Canaries. Before that, three of us from Goethe Institute traveled by car though southern France, across northern Italy, through Yugoslavia, and had just crossed into Greece before the *romance dynamics* of the pair I was traveling with completely fell apart. So I never saw Greece or Turkey--the original plan. I had an invite to sail the Swedish Isles with Claes during what would have been the second summer, but had to go forego this adventure so I could return home, make enough money as a lifeguard to return to Humboldt State.

Let me gently emphasize that family stories and genealogical knowledge were not carried down through the generations by my family members. So, after so much effort and sleuthing and so many happy and fortuitous accidents in meeting or discovering those who could help me with information, I can now say without any doubt whatsoever that the Plantagenets, Merovingians, Carolingians, and Capetians are my ancestors. If only I had known at 21 what I know now--my trip would have been completely different.

And in hindsight, I really am truly glad that I had the European trip that I did. I long, long, long to go back to Europe, but doubt that it will ever happen.

The closest I ever got to your part of the world was when our airplane full of passengers landed in Amsterdam on the way over. We unloaded and loaded passengers, sat in the plane for about 45 minutes to an hour, were served a small box meal there, and brought on more travelers before flying on to Frankfurt and arriving in the middle of the night. The red roofs of Amsterdam were amazing when seen from above. I'm afraid I reached your part of the world only on paper, via my research, Eurotrash.

I must stop, I'm giving myself a bad case of Wanderlust.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 3:59 PM | Report abuse

jw, I saw the Mr. Tony announcement this AM just as the 404 fun began (coincidence? hmmm).

I try to listen to his radio show if I'm out & about during the day, and I'll definitely listen to his 5 minute bit on "The Sports Reporters" on WTEM AM 980 this evening. If his spot hasn't been overtaken by ESPN events, that is.

'mudge, et. al, you guys are cracking me up with the 15th century bits.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 8, 2006 4:00 PM | Report abuse

Indeed, jw. (Have you been reading Tom's book?)

Who knows how old "you" *really* are.

Posted by: Tom fan and Dreamer | February 8, 2006 4:03 PM | Report abuse

Scottynuke... I've been to the Greenbank National Radio Astronomy Observatory (is there anyone out there?). What a cool place. My kids loved it. I smiled when I saw the picture of you standing there in front of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope.

We visit that area of West Virginia nearly every fall. Believe it or not, there's a lot to do there, especially in Pocahontas County. You'd think that Pocahontas County would be in Virginia and then you remember that it was--until 1863.

Do you remember that back then, Mudge?

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 4:09 PM | Report abuse

Hi Linda,

If you have Merovigian and Carolingan ancestors I must have crossed distant relatives of yours. (I might be one, who knows?)

And the Wanderlust is contageous. I want to follow in your footsteps.

Für meine Arbeit muss ich nachste Woche nach Frankfurt gehn. (Eigentlich nach Bad Homburg, ein kleines Stadt in die nähe)
Wann ich auf den ring von Frankfurt fahre dann denke ich immer das ich in America bin. Die "skyline" errinert mich nach die von Philadelphia.
(My written german is bad by the way.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:10 PM | Report abuse

Don't encourage us, bc. Nobody wants to hear a couple of old f**ts talk about their youth. But, Cur, as you were on the police beat, did you ever meet Cardinal Mendoza and that jerk Tomas Torquemada. They were part of the LUPA at the time (Latin Usage Policing Agency) and gave it a bad name.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:11 PM | Report abuse

Well, now you made go and dig out my old clips. Here's the original story (keep in mind that I had to write some of it in Castillian dialect to keep Izzy and Ferdy happy):

El Chico bids burg a big "adios," flees to Fez in fast felucca

Town's mayor mourns Moor who is no more

By Cid El

Granada, Jan. 2--King Boabdil of Granada, 32, lived up to one of his many nicknames, El Zogoybi, "the Unfortunate," earlier today when he relinquished the Moorish claim to this ancient city after a 10-year reign.
Boabdil, also known as Abu'abd Allah Muhammad XII, El Chico, Three Fingered Bobby, and the Dildo From Bilbao, left the city this afternoon in custody of law enforcement officials sent by Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand. The law dogs had strict orders "to boot that thnot-nothed little pretender outa my kingdom," according to Castillian palace officials in Madrid.
Palace officialth thaid Ferdinand and Ithabella had ithued a decree to Boabdil to vacate the premitheth three yearth ago. When El Zogoybi refused to thay "Thi," the royal couple'th Cathtillian tholdierth laid theige to the cathle of Granada for sixth long monthth before thupplies ran out and the thtout Moorthe had to thurrender.

Boabdil glimpsed his final view of Granada late in the afternoon as Castillian officials led him away. The spot, now known as el ultimo suspiro del Moro, the last sigh of the Moor, has become a tourist attraction for visiting Goths and Visigoth, who are known to the Castillians as Gothth and Vithigothth. As he looked upon Granada for the last time, the swarthy Moor is said to have burst into tears, and he was then reporached by his mom, who reportedly said, "Weep as a woman for what you couldn't defend as a man."

Boabdil reportedly had a difficult relationship with his mother, and a Moorish spokesman said there were "issues" between them.

Boabdil's lawyer, Juan de la Cochranos, of Averroes, Avicenna, Cochranos and Goldfarb, of Seville, was unavailable for comment. Cochranos, a well-known defense mouthpiece, is famous for once defending a client by telling the jury, "Eef ze gauntlet, eet does not feet, zen, you must aqweeeet."

The ex-king is reportedly headed for his manor house, Las Alpujarras in Andalusia, before gathering up his gear and heading into permanent exhile across the Big Pond, to Maghreb, Fez, North Africa.

## 30 ##

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 4:11 PM | Report abuse

So Shiloh and Mudge,

You are partly responcible for the whole Arab - Europe hating thing.
(I know you could have saved southeren Spain for the, at that time, much more advanced arabs.)

Don't tell me you were in Poitiers aswel?

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:14 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, I am not worthy. (*makes Wayne like bows to you.)

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:16 PM | Report abuse

TBG, yep, that's a wonderful area near Green Bank, we really enjoyed the whole observatory. On the way there we passed the tourist trains and all sorts of things. Wonderful vacation spot, I'll be going back regularly! :)

'Mudge, you failed to answer the burning question -- Did Bobadil refuse to "do it without the Fez on?"

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Bayou Self,

The waitress was probably with the Russians.

I watched Scrubs last night and was laughing so hard I had to wonder why I haven't seen it in the past two years. I'm glad the janitor isn't stalking JD as much anymore. And Mandy Moore is about the cutest thing on the planet that isn't a panda bear cub.

On the Florida gun law:
When I worked in Florida I had a coworker of dubious mental stability. Many of the employees would bring guns in for show and tell every now and then. This guy left his in his desk for a week. We figured that by standing on his chair he had a clean shot at 6 of the 10 employees.

We went to the boss to complain and the gun guy said, "But the gun is perfectly safe, I keep the clip in the glove compartment." Boss gave him 24 hours to take the gun home and leave it there.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 8, 2006 4:21 PM | Report abuse

'mudge, isn't it pronounced "Cathtillian"?

To quote Gene: "I'm laughing here."

bc

Posted by: bc | February 8, 2006 4:30 PM | Report abuse

yellojkt, please don't start recommending Scrubs to everyone or you know the show will get cancelled!

Posted by: TBG | February 8, 2006 4:31 PM | Report abuse

ET, are you referring to the Battle of Poitiers in 1356, or to the earlier battle, better known as the Battle of Tours (that was also against the Moors, v. Chuck "Boom Boom" Martel), in 732?

If you mean Tours, then hell no! Just how old to you think I am, anyway? Jeez. 7-freakin'-32. I mean, c'mon, dude.

I missed Poitiers and a good bit of the Hundred Years War--I was out sick with a pretty bad case of bubonic plague, and the trots. Man, I was miserable. You have no idea.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 4:33 PM | Report abuse

The too familiar sound of the Barthelona lithpse brings back such memories, Cur, and your dialectical spelling was perfect. Was your piece illustrated? I have a redodo commemorating the day, but it is far too large and heavy to forward. I am also suffering again from the pain of laughter that erases the painful memories of old times in Granada, and can't lift the damned thing.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:33 PM | Report abuse

This seems to have some sort of on-topic-ness, and it's too damn silly to ignore!! *L*

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060208/od_afp/germanyswedenscience_060208200822;_ylt=AhqMkT5EvpahQigiQBzmq9EFO7gF;_ylu=X3oDMTA5bGVna3NhBHNlYwNzc3JlbA--

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 4:35 PM | Report abuse

Is owning a gun considered normal everywhere in the US, or does it vary from state to state? (I see texans carrying guns but not people from Massachusetts for one reason or another.)

In most of europe hunting guns are legal and many people in rural areas have those. But automatics or semi's are rare.


I'm dubious about private gun ownership. I don't believe I need one for my protection against robbers. Just give them the money and the car keys I say. And what would a puny gun do against the state. They have tanks.

Then again sometimes I think it would be nice to have a replica Baker rifle (and18th century rifle) but I know that I would fire it once or twice and just put it away. Guns are only fun if you have something to shoot at.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Oh, scotty, that link has me doubled over. Oh the opportunities for comment! But as Nixon once said, "We could do it. But it would be wrong."

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, Shiloh, we ran a nice woodcut next to the story. I think one of the Krauts or the Dutchies in the graphics department did it. Guy name of Durer, if memory serves. Had a thing for hands, so that's what we called him.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 4:44 PM | Report abuse

"Boabdil's lawyer, Juan de la Cochranos" ... ah, that's priceless.

yello - Yes, she most certainly was. But how was I to know?

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 4:44 PM | Report abuse

ET, like Cur, I missed the events at Potiers. My travels took me east and I eventually settled in China until the middle 18th century. I was then living under the Chinese name Lang-shi-ning as a painter of pictures in the European style. They became hot sellers under the nom de plume Guissepe Castiglione (SJ) in Europe. It amused me that the Academy of Fine Art in Stuutgart could not understand the drapery in Chinese art of the period.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, I'm soooo sorry. I should have know you would have intervened in 732 if wou weren't incapacitated by not being born then.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh, you should have known that the Academy of Stuttgard wouldn't get Dadaist art at that time. As always you wanted to push the boundries to much. But thats typical of a 300 something person. You just didn't know your boundries.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:48 PM | Report abuse

and at the mention of the cutest baby panda cub i'll post the pics i took when i saw him (and esp. for mostlylurking)

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mortiifera/album?.dir=/e848

Posted by: mo | February 8, 2006 4:49 PM | Report abuse

Cur, Albrect was a hack artist - he did portraits on the street, for God's sake.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:50 PM | Report abuse

Well, why do think we hired him on the Granada DeNada-Bugle & Inquisition Advertiser? That rag paid bupkis, just like today. Half the staff were typical newsroom types: winos, drunks, absinthe-drinkers, etc.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 4:56 PM | Report abuse

When I acclimatize to the 21st century I will get one of those digital cameras, photograph the redodo and some of my Chinese period pieces and post them to the net. Let them speak for themselves, so to speak. Dadaist, indeed!

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:57 PM | Report abuse

Siloh, I guess "Guissepe Castiglione" is the name of a real artist. I missed it, so disregard my stupid dadaist comment.

(I googled him.)

By the way: For me this is the most high brow silly conversation I ever have had.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 8, 2006 4:57 PM | Report abuse

SCC 1: Forgot my nic.
Scc2: Shiloh.

Note to self: only drink one Leffe trippel (8,5%), not two when boodling.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 4:59 PM | Report abuse

I am giggling helplessly here...

To answer your question about gun ownership, ET, it does depend on the area. Rural, red-state areas tend to have more gun owners than urban blue-staters.

Posted by: Slyness | February 8, 2006 4:59 PM | Report abuse

The art of Will Cotton is getting my attention lately. He has a thing for pastries. And women.

http://www.willcotton.com/paintingscans/pretty.jpg

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Cur, you have again perfectly described the media industry. The more things change, we have learned, the more the stay the same.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Bayou: My two favorite things. Thank you very much.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 5:01 PM | Report abuse

I don't do SCC under the presumption that boodlers can perceive intention. My errors have stood the test of time.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 5:04 PM | Report abuse

Slyness (and everyone else)
Tue story:

In Europe I'm would be classed an semi agressive driver. I try to be nice, but driving slow on the fast lane peeves me and makes me talegate you.

But when I hired a car in the US I drove like your average 80 year old grand mother. I was so scared that if I was to agressive, the person I "affronted" would put out his gun at the next trafic lights.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 5:07 PM | Report abuse

Just to throw my two cents in late in the game about this whole match.com business. What I liked the most about the experience (other than meeting the love of my life naturally) was that I went out with people I never in a million years would have gone out with. I'll admit it, I went through somewhat of a 'meathead jock phase' and that was what I was drawn to (no judgments, please). That was what I was used to and that is what I was looking for. That wasn't who I should have been going for but that is usually how it works.

JW, as you call him, was the complete opposite of what I was looking for and had we met in a bar I don't think we would have spoken. He did indeed play in the band and actually likes math - two points that my family and friends kept getting stuck on. "Math team Kristen? Really?"

I think online dating is successful because it allows you to find similarities before finding things you don't like about someone. Even if I hadn't found my future husband, match.com would have been a success for me because it opened my eyes to what I hadn't been allowing myself to see.
Maybe people who knock it are just afraid that they might discover their 'type' isn't their 'type' after all. JW isn't what I was looking for but thankfully I found him because he is what I should have been looking for all along.

Posted by: kristen | February 8, 2006 5:09 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh, I don't do scc's aswel normaly. (I make 20 stimakes a scentence and when I SCC I often make new mistakes.)

But not nick-ing is a crime against Boodlamity.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 5:10 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for weighing in, Kristen!

("JW, as you call him" -- ha ha!)

[JW, lets hope none of that gets quoted out of context when you hit the big time, e.g., "JW isn't what I was looking for" :)]

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 5:16 PM | Report abuse

SCC entry:
"let's" [that does look weird, though; but so does "lets" -- I dont know whats wrong with me today]

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 5:18 PM | Report abuse

ET, I just returned with a Jack Daniels (45%)and tap water (0%), two of the innovations that appeared in America shortly after that great unpleasantness during the term of President Lincoln. I have enjoyed them for a long time, except for a period called prohibition, but will cease to boodle after the second one. You are well advised on limitations.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 5:20 PM | Report abuse

You have DisMcArthyism syndrome Achenfan.
A temporary realignement phase of your neurones.

There is something I wanted to tell you. It might sound corny: the pictures show you to be a realy nice person. I must admit I had this mental picture of Evil Incarnate, but there you were, the total opposite.

Corney phase ended.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 5:24 PM | Report abuse

It is boodle-olatry that is the sin,ET venial, however.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 5:26 PM | Report abuse

Euro - Didn't you see the picture where she ripped off the mask?

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 5:26 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh, there you have to prove the cliché we have about Americans. We do 8,5%, you do 45%. Always has to be bigger.


It's time to hit the sack anyway. It's getting late over here. See y'all.

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 5:27 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, Euro. (But are you looking at the same pictures I'm looking at? Because really, to quote Kramer [from "Seinfeld"], "Look away -- I'm hideous." Not to mention those evil red eyes . . .]

Posted by: Achenfan | February 8, 2006 5:28 PM | Report abuse

See, one drink and i'm already beginning to slur my commas.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 5:29 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh: Wus!

Dreamer, I'm going to get me the complete Seinfeld episodes on DVD. It used to run on Belgian tv, but I don't remember to much of it except that it was too funny.
(They constantly do reruns of Who's the Boss, but never of Seinfeld or my favorite off all times Frasier)


P.S. Didn't I say I was going to bed?

Posted by: Eurotrash | February 8, 2006 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Durer wiked wabbits.

I go away for an hour and Eurotrash is speaking auf Deutsch, which I understood completely. Frankfurt=Philly. Hmmm, have to think about that one.

Kristen joins us...incredible.

Mudge recalls a former reincarnatio--as a reporter from the 15th century, while drinking absinthe...I skimming quickly through his ancient clip.

We have a woman dressed up as a pastry, not unlike the onions, lettuce and tomato and hamburger bun of the SuperBowl ads.

Hell breaks loose in the art world, Dada is mentioned, jw has already peed on a toilet seat to restore equilibrium to the world,

and Eurotrash tries to break off in order to go to bed.

And Achenfan yesterday, or was it the day before, thought the Boodle was becoming the Theater of the Absurd?

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 5:50 PM | Report abuse

"Becoming?"

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 8, 2006 5:56 PM | Report abuse

SCC: Stuttgart

Murdered it twice in my 3:59 p.m. post. Hellvetter u.s.w.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 5:58 PM | Report abuse

SCC: IS

NOT: becoming
she said in an aside to Bayou Self

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Reductio ad absurdum, certainly, Loomis. My language at shul was Aramaic, not much spoken these days, and a polyglot later,thus the extension of error in some spelling and speech. It's difficult to remember it all as one gets older.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 6:31 PM | Report abuse

P.S. Loomis, I liked your aside to Bayou Self, it reminds me of the antistrophe chorus in Greek theatre, a wonderful invention.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 6:55 PM | Report abuse

Ye gods, we're closing in on 400 comments again!

At what point do we declare this a Perpetual Boodle and give JA the week off?

And I also understood Eurotrash auf Deutsch, aber Frankfurt a.M. erinnt mich nich von Philly... Dallas, aber natuerlich!

And Durer, of course, was big in Nurenburg... Which perhaps explains Nurenburg best of all.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 7:57 PM | Report abuse

I'm also sending word to Tertius to have 'Mudge and Shiloh enrolled as undiscovered Howards. I'm sure Lazarus Long can help Shiloh with the extended memory thing...

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 8:10 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh,
I don't know who you are or where you're located (and don't particularly care), but I am so delighted that you are here on the Achenblog.

Why do I say this? You explained so beautifully the concept of the billboard in advertising to RD Padouk in the Cindy Sheehan kit. Saved me some typing on that one. That and lots of little humorous reasons as well. Bayit shalom, I think they say.

While I'm going out on a limb and it is an art limb: pj, that slate grey knit top you wore to the BPH? Well, it flattered you immensely--showed off your broad shoulders and made your features just pop, in a very visually pleasing way. O.K., it's just the college art major/grad in me speaking. Oh, and I never would have pulled together as quickly as you all the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee who have legal degrees. You don't post often, but I love it when you do. So much you can teach us about music.

and that bc guy, he's always smiling at those BPHs. Radiantly, I might add--that broad smile just charms the heck out of me.

Bis morgen.

Posted by: Loomis | February 8, 2006 8:12 PM | Report abuse

The trials of sustaining a boodle, scotty, are a test. Joel may know when a new kit is coming, but history has shown they we all look for sirius signs from the heavens. Nuremburg was a transitory moment, the transit of - I don't know-maybe sirius..
Better Venus than Mars was the old saying.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 8, 2006 8:35 PM | Report abuse

I always preferred Rothenberg o.d.T. to Nurenburg's Old City, except of course for Kristkindelsmarkt...

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 8, 2006 8:43 PM | Report abuse

Linda, the reason bc was smiling was because he was blasted out of his gourd on Jack Daniels. We had to keep propping him up whenever he tried to slid under the table. We've tried to hide it from the rest of the boodle, but...well, I'm beginning to think we're just enabling him by not telling you all the sorry disgusting truth. Forgive me, bc; it's for your own good.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 9:01 PM | Report abuse

re: the NRA and Florida

Hey, back in October I was posting on the boodle about the "meet force with force" law that the NRA had sponsored in the Florida legislature.

http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1116246912951

This law says if someone is threatening you, you have a legal right to kill him. It passed in Florida and the NRA wants it to go national. They use Florida as a testing ground, and that's what they are doing with the parking lot law Joel mentioned.

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/13816841.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp

Of course, having "JEB!" Bush for governor makes Florida a friendly environment for the NRA. I always drive respectfully, not out of fear, but I do assume that every other driver on the road is packing heat. It's a safe assumption.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 8, 2006 9:11 PM | Report abuse

Quick backslide here. I've thought a lot about the whole T-shirt/bumper-sticker question. It comes down to the issues raised in the SuperBowl kit. I'm sick of seeing advertisements. I don't care if they are for a good cause or not. I am tired of being sold something. I am suffering from extreme persuasion toxicity. I hate billboards even if they are favoring the adoption of puppies. I am beginning to feel like the woman in William Gibson's book "Pattern Recognition" who becomes nauseated by logos. I feel poisoned by slogans, even those I agree with. Please not attempt to enlighten me on this or I shall be forced to retreat once more into my well defended Zen garden. And I have too much work to do.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 8, 2006 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Good lord, 'mudge!

I'll admit I had a fair amount to drink over the 6 hours (!) I was there, but credit me with more sense than to mix JD and Y* lager on a work night.

As far as smiling a lot - eh, I'll plead guilty to that. And laughing a lot, too.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 8, 2006 9:33 PM | Report abuse

Dear RD Padouk:

"Blow up your tv
Throw away your papers
Go to the country
Build you a home

"Plant a little garden
Eat a lot of peaches
Try to find Jesus
On your own"

--John Prine

http://www.lyricsdirectory.com/index/J/John%20Prine/John%20Prine%20-%20Spanish%20Pipedream%20(AKA%20Blow%20Up%20Your%20TV)%20lyrics.htm

Posted by: kbertocci | February 8, 2006 9:38 PM | Report abuse

kbertocci - If only I could....

Sorry if I sounded a little "ranty" but it's been one of those days... Wish I could have gone to the BPH. Probably woulda done me some good.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 8, 2006 9:48 PM | Report abuse

Denial, bc. Pure denial. But Ok, if that's how you want to play it. *wink, wink*

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 8, 2006 10:39 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for a great boodle today!

mo, especially, thanks for the panda pics! So cute, even when he's sleeping - and it looked like a beautiful day.

jw, glad to see ya. I've been wanting to nag you to blog more, and now you have - well, boodled, at least. Kristen, Hoya Saxa!

What a fantastic BPH. pj, I would probably give you a run for your money for speaking least - I'd be dissolved in giggles all night and redder than Tom Fan's eyes (or jw's cheeks). I don't even know what a spectrometer is...but I am really impressed by omni's bubble wand. It has its own little slim bubble stuff container? Kewl...And we're only hearing the highlights - no wonder you attracted a crowd. bc, I heart you too. Glad to see TA was there, since she hasn't been here so much, and TBG - and of course Tim and Mudge and Scottynuke.

I was really glad that mo held the sign right side up. I was tired of standing on my head...

So were you all having so much fun that no one was sad about Achenfan moving? I have to admit, I forgot till now - we'll miss you, virtually and in the flesh!

(If I forgot to mentione anyone who was there, a thousand apologies!)

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 8, 2006 10:44 PM | Report abuse

Yes, we will miss the immediate presence of Achenfan and all of her various guises. I'm sure she will still boodle with the motley lot of us; it'll just take a while for us to see each other's posts. But I think we can handle this. We won't like it, but we'll make it work.

Best of luck to you and to Mr. Achenfan, my dear D!! Thanks for bringing us all together both virtually and physically and I'm sure we will be together again.

pj

Posted by: pj | February 8, 2006 11:48 PM | Report abuse

I have enjoyed reading the boodle tonight...so much energy. And Omni's bbbbbbbb was outstandung. And the pix reveal non-threatening fun, really smart...of course...people. Bye!

Posted by: FF | February 9, 2006 12:26 AM | Report abuse

,,,ding.

Posted by: FF | February 9, 2006 12:29 AM | Report abuse

This boodle is becoming a timewarp. From the 700's to the present and into the future - jw & Kristen's wedding date - Congrats. Loved the Panda pic's as well as the BPH ones, Mo. I love the Panda sleeping in the little dishpan.

Wonderful place, lifts the spirit! Thanks to all of you for your creativity. On to Pluto - maybe we can have some conversation from there.

bdl

Posted by: boondocklurker | February 9, 2006 4:44 AM | Report abuse

Doing my part to make it a 24-hour kaboodle:

News flash: Bill Nye the Science Guy got married!

(somehow I thought that was appropriate celebrity news for the A-blog...)

Posted by: kbertocci | February 9, 2006 6:25 AM | Report abuse

MORNING NEWS BULLETIN

For Release at Will

The Achedemy Award nomination for best news story by a screen writer goes to CURMUDGEON for his work on the Surrender of Granada.

Curmudgeon had previously been nominated for a Lily Pulitzer prize for the same piece, but declined the nomination because it clashed with his tie.

#30#

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 6:29 AM | Report abuse

CORRECTION

An article in yesterday's Granada DeNada-Bugle & Inquisition Advertiser incorrectly referred to King Boabdil of Granada's lawyer, Juan de la Cochranos. That should have been been Juan Y de la Cochranos. He is known as Juan Y to his friends. The Granada DeNada-Bugle & Inquisition Advertiser regrets the error, mainly because Juan Y is a lawyer. Otherwise, the Granada DeNada-Bugle & Inquisition Advertiser would just say, "Feh."

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 9, 2006 6:37 AM | Report abuse

'Mudge, Shiloh, was it cold back then?

I'm always hearing it was colder then.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 9, 2006 7:23 AM | Report abuse

Historic Note:

The prestigious Granada DeNada-Bugle&Inquisition Advertiser -after more than 500 years in print - was closed down by General Francisco Franco on December 7, 1935.

Then editor in chief, Senor Cojones Grande Curmudgeon was widely quoted as saying: "This is a day that will live in infamy."

Senor Cur, as he later became known, emigrated to the USA where his tie caught the eye of the president at a White House celebration of Alexander Hamilton's birthday in January of 1941. Reaching up to flick the newsman's tie, the president said "This is a tie that will live in infamy." The two of them clicked.

Later that year, as PPS (Presidential Press Secretary), Curmudgeon worked his own quotation into a presidential radio address following the events of December 7th.

Thusly does history repeat itself, ad nauseam.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 7:26 AM | Report abuse

It was much colder, Scotty, but began to warm up rapidly after the severe winter of 1776.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 7:28 AM | Report abuse

Morning, guys. We here in my small town wake up to a dusting of snow, mind you snow! My sister called me at seven o'clock to tell me there is snow, and she was so excited. I looked out the window and sure enough just a dusting of the white snuff with tiny flakes still falling. I had to go outside and look at this wonder. Yesterday it was warm enough I didn't need my jacket, today we have snow!

Posted by: Cassandra S | February 9, 2006 7:52 AM | Report abuse

Snow here in rural N. Central Florida would not surprise me. We have a projected overnight low of 28 and this morning have a heavy rime of frost. My spinach sprouts may not survive the night.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 7:59 AM | Report abuse

All that, while D.C. remains brown in mid-February...

MUSTA been colder back then...

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 9, 2006 8:06 AM | Report abuse

Historic Note 2:

Avicenna & Averroes, the senior partners in the firm, later had Juan Y de la Cochranos booted for unseemly conduct with a secretary. Out of work, Juan Y joined an expedition to Florida in 1525 and is credited with the discovery of Las Islas Sabines, or Cedar Islands, and a nearby river. The lawyer/explorer was later recognized for his expeditionary work and the river was named after him. Centuries later, a songwriter by the name of Stephen Foster wrote the celebrated tune "Way Down Upon the Juan Y River." The spelling became corrupted over time.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 8:13 AM | Report abuse

I'm an early morning riser (5:30 a.m. on the dot)but hate those first few moments it takes to actually get out of bed. This morning I woke to raindrops on the tin roof, looked at the clock and it was only 3:00 a.m. Oh joy! Oh bliss! Two more hours of delicious sleep accompanied by the soothing sounds of rain.

Posted by: Nani | February 9, 2006 8:21 AM | Report abuse

Yes, Cur, I know you wrote the lines "Juan Y, how I loved ya, how I loved ya, my dear old Juan Y." Who could forget.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 8:24 AM | Report abuse

On private gun ownership: a retired Navy SEAL colleague of mine makes a convincing case for it by describing his work in Bosnia while the UN was investigating allegations of "soft" ethnic clensing. They soon discovered that the "hard" kind was going on as well, and one day they went on a trip to investigate a rumor of a mass grave in some village. The whole way they kept passing through villages filled with trigger-happy mujahideens. His point with this story was that whenever society starts to crumble, either micro (New Orleans) or macro (the Balkans) the division of power is always between those who have guns, and those who don't.

Not that I'm saying things are going all Thunderdome any time soon, but in a worst case scenario, you want to be on the right side of the barrel. Just ask those people in the unmarked mass graves.

Posted by: jw | February 9, 2006 8:25 AM | Report abuse

Hani, maybe this song was about you, about you. Hmmm. This morning I have frost on a cold tin roof - the cats are inside.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 8:30 AM | Report abuse

jw, I wrote about guns and the 2nd amendment in The Debate blog by Emily, q.v.,so won't repeat it here. But, sen you and Kristen Congratulations and Best Wishes in advance of May. She writes well, as well.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 8:34 AM | Report abuse

In the case of societal collapse along the lines of David Brin's "The Postman" I have resigned myself to being the first victim of the roving hoards. Here are my typical gun control rejoinders:

The Bill of Rights has 10 amendments. Lets respect all of them. (It seems #4 is getting treated pretty roughshod lately.)

No one knows their spouse or relatives well enough to leave a loaded weapon in the house.

You have a right to a gun. I have a right to avoid you.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 9, 2006 8:37 AM | Report abuse

Scottynuke, I recall that the 17th century was called a mini-ice age because it was so consistently cold. So yes, it was colder then.

jw, remind me not to live in a crumbling society. The only gun I've ever held was my father's WWI service revolver, a Colt 45. It was very heavy. I hope I never have a need for a gun, but I wouldn't shrink from using one if I had to.

Posted by: slyness | February 9, 2006 8:47 AM | Report abuse

I was down in Savannah
Eatn' Cream and Bannanas
When the heat just made me faint
I began to get crosseyed
I thought I was lost
I'd begun to see things as they ain't.
As the relatives gathered to see what's the matter
The doctor came to see was I fine.
But the doctor said give him Alachua
band music,
It seems to make him feel just fine.

So if you ever get sickly
get sister run quickly to the dusty closet shelf
and pull out a washboard; and play a guitar chord
and do a little do it yourself.
call on your neighbors to put down their labors
and come and play the hardware in time
cause the doctor said give him Alachua band music
it seems to make him feel just fine

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 9:08 AM | Report abuse

Fact:
At about this time, Mr. Colt, Hartford's unabashed sales promoter, raised the distinctive onion-shaped dome, topped with a cast-bronze rampant colt, over his factory, thereby assuring that every Hartford resident and visitor who saw the dome would ask about it and hear the Colt success story.

Trivia question:
Here's a trivia question for the Boodle--ties into the Colt .45 post, jw's post, discussion about gun control and so much more:

Why was the top of the Colt Armory in Hartford, Conn. built in the shape of an onion, and why is the onion blue?

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 9:17 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh, I think you're on to something with that comment about the winter of 1776:

The first Continental Congress met in 1774, and with everyone busy with the War for Independence and establishment of Government (and of course the documentation that went with it; unsurprisingly it remains uncompleted), made for a rather ineffectual body until reformed under the Constitution which was ratified and implemented in 1788-89.

Now, look at this graph:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c1/2000_Year_Temperature_Comparison.png

How can anyone of sound mind not reach the conclusion that Global Warming is directly attributable to the US Congress? The more it meets (and the more hot air is generated), the worse the situation becomes.

A Modest Proposal: US President George W. Bush must engage his broadening Emergency Powers and suspend and disband both the House and Senate in order to Save the World from this Terrible Threat, and he must do it by Summer 2008 in order to have the desired effect. He must do this for our own good, despite protestations from pink-shirted flag-burning atheist liberals that believe that one man (and his Administration) cannot be trusted with unchecked powers of Government.

'Chillin' with Da Man Who Will Save Us All', coming to a TV near you in the Summer of 2008.

Chillin', indeed.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 9, 2006 9:18 AM | Report abuse

After my home was broken into a few years ago, I was paranoid and suspicious of all unfamiliar people driving or walking by. It never occurred to me, nor did I ever contemplate having a gun. One afternoon while shoveling a mountain of mushroom compost onto the veggie garden, a man I'd never seen before walked by and called out "Hey little lady, don't you have a man to do that for you?" Out of the blue I heard myself reply "Yeah, he's inside cleaning his Uzi". (There's no man in my house). He walked quickly away.

Posted by: Nani | February 9, 2006 9:20 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh,
Are you any relation to David Levy Yulee, father of Florida's railroads? Shalom.

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 9:23 AM | Report abuse

SCC: there's no man **or gun** in my house

Posted by: Nani | February 9, 2006 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Today's WaPo op-ed on the politics of science:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/08/AR2006020801991_pf.html

oh, the truth-twisting and unmitigated manipulation...

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 9:35 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh, you're on the right track with the Stephen Foster song lyric, but unfortunately you are repeating something of a bawdlerized urban legend. Many people don't know it, but Stephen Foster was severely dyslexic. He was originally writing about what happened to Juan Y de la Cochranos after he was disbarred; so far, you have the story about the disbarment correct. What you left out was that Juan Y moved to the Kingdom of Sicily and once again attempted to practice law. He became attorney for an early ancestor of Al Capone, a certain Luigi Capone. Capone ran afoul of Pope Urban Rey Newel, who ordered both Capone and his lawyer to be executed for crimes against the Church. The two men were shackled together, taken out into the Mediterran, blocks of fine Italian marble (reportedly from Michelangelo's studio, though this may be apochryphal) were strapped to their ankles and they were thrown overboard to sleep with the pisces. Writing about this event several centuries earlier, Foster wrote, "Weighed down, Capone Y Juan Y swiveled, far far from Rome." However, when he first performed the song, his dyslexia kicked in, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 9, 2006 9:35 AM | Report abuse

Well, there you have it - it's cold everywhere in boodledom today. It's 30 degrees in DC and we're due for some snow this weekend. Surely we can all see now that global warming is just a figment of the left's imagination.

Oh, but wait, now the evangelicals are saying global warming *is* real. What to think, what to think.

From today's BBC article on the evangelicals' global warming ad campaign:

"The newspaper advertisement - signed by mega-church pastors like Rick Warren, author of the bestseller The Purpose-Driven Life, heads of Christian colleges and missionary organisations - puts saving "God's green earth" on a par with traditional evangelical concerns like abortion and gay marriage. "With God's help global warming can be stopped for our kids, our world and our Lord," the advert says.

And it calls on Congress to do more to encourage companies to reduce carbon emissions, advocating a market-based approach to curb emissions through a cap-and-trade bill."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4695320.stm

What's that about politics and strange bedfellows?

Posted by: ABJunkie | February 9, 2006 9:43 AM | Report abuse

I rely upon the deterrent value of other gun nuts to defend my property. My house was burglarized once when my wife went out about an hour to buy groceries. The burglar(s) had obviously staked out the property. They were very thorough is ransacking the bedroom and would have found a gun if I had owned one. I thank God that:
a) My wife did not get home until they left.
b) There was no gun in the house for them to use on her if she had surprised them.

"I keep my guns locked in a case, my gun is well hiddden, never keep the ammunition in the same place as the gun, she could have used the gun in her glove compartment if she had suspicions....yadda, yadda, yadda."

The point: The one major crime I have experienced, owning a gun would have been counter-productive.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 9, 2006 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Every time I read something about this admin in the paper I get a sicker feeling than I had before. echfeh

Posted by: omni | February 9, 2006 9:44 AM | Report abuse

'mudge, et. al.

Your lyricism reminded me of a story of Dr. Asimov's from 'way back when, called "Death of a Foy".

I did a little googling, and found it on the Web.

http://www.michaelhanscom.com/eclecticism/2004/01/the_death_of_a.html

Oddly, I remember the character "Ray" in this rendering as "Dwayne". Still works out more or less the same.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 9, 2006 9:49 AM | Report abuse

Speaking of being near the Suwanee River:

Travis McGee's still in Cedar Key
That's what ol' John MacDonald said
My rendezvous's so long overdue
With all of the things I've sung and I've read
They still apply to me
They all make sense in time


But now I'm incommunicado
Drivin' by myself down the road with a hole in it
Songs with no vibrato
Takin' the long way home

Posted by: yellojkt | February 9, 2006 9:50 AM | Report abuse

Nani, I love the sound of rain on the roof. Early in our married life our home had a tin roof, and it is still a sound I miss.

'This is the winter of our discontent.' A quote maybe, or a close to quote, but no one could really be happy with this winter. I have about 2 inches of frost piling in the shade but no snow. The temps have been like early spring all winter, just above freezing or just below freezing. While the weather is a treat because I don't have to live in full parka mode, I know that this spring I am going to lose more of my big spruce trees in the forest out back. That saddens me to no end.

Posted by: dr | February 9, 2006 9:53 AM | Report abuse

I very very highly recommend John Sayles film Men With Guns (and everthing else this wonderful writer-director has done). For those of you who feel you must be armed to feel secure, I recommend the Mossberg 12 gauge pump shotgun. Nothin' says "Get the bleep outta here!" like the familiar sound of a pump shotgun cocking. Plus, they know you can't miss! But before you rush out to purchase a weapon, I also recommend that you spend an evening on a police ride-along or in an urban ER waiting room. See what a gunshot wound looks like because you commit yourself to inflicting one.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | February 9, 2006 9:53 AM | Report abuse

EVERYTHING else

BEFORE you commit

dope slap!

Posted by: kurosawaguy | February 9, 2006 9:57 AM | Report abuse

yellojkt says:

"In the case of societal collapse along the lines of David Brin's 'The Postman' I have resigned myself to being the first victim of the roving hoards."

Khalil Gibran has a prayer that goes like this: "Make me, oh Lord, the prey of the lion, ere you make the rabbit my prey."

When I read that Gibran passage, at about age 14, I thought it represented my viewpoint pretty well, and I showed it to my father, who could usually be counted on to agree with me about everything. He was horrified and tried hard to dissuade me from my belief. Today I empathize with him because believing this for myself is easier than putting my child in the same situation. NEVERTHELESS, I actually do believe it and have taught my daughter to believe it as well.

I have not resigned myself to being a victim--I have confidence in my ability to run and/or hide.

Meeting force with force is not the enlightened way.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 9, 2006 10:00 AM | Report abuse

In order to make life easy for myself, and why else am I here?, I will henceforth speak in the language of Lawrence Welk. A sample-

I ver ver highly recommen John Sayles film Men Witha Guns (and everthing else this wunnerful writer-director has done). For those of you who fill you mus be armed to fill secure, I recommen the Mossberg 12a gauge pumpa shotgun.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | February 9, 2006 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, you're making me laugh: Juan Y de la Cochranos, ha!

I have written much about my father's side of the family, but little about my mother's. Suffice it to say that one of my (maternal) cousins, W.H., worked with Philip Vannatter before Vannatter became linked with Fuhrman that fateful day at the Rockingham Mansion.

When living in Indiana, I was much tempted to pay Vanatter a visit in Vevay. (alliteration not intended). He didn't make it into ofice as Switzerland County sheriff in 2002, but we'd moved back to Texas by then.

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 10:06 AM | Report abuse

k-guy, LTNS, where ya been?

And omni can provide the bubbles for your Welk-speak.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 9, 2006 10:12 AM | Report abuse

SCC: Philip Vannatter--one l, two n's, two t's

ofice: office

Oy vey, feh, whatever...

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 10:14 AM | Report abuse

I have posted a little kit, and apologize if the spelling, grammar and all that word stuff is screwy. Technological problems combined with mental ones. Nothing good can come of that.

Posted by: Achenbach | February 9, 2006 10:16 AM | Report abuse

Speaking of looking at gunshot wounds before you inflict one...

I congratulate the WaPo for giving us its photo series on shrapnel wounds that ran last Saturday. I read a short time ago that if Americans could see the war wounded and dead (this is important)--both American and Iraqi, that Americans would have asked for troop withdrawal and war's end long before this. I think ABC News starts its series on same on today's newscast.

I think another SOTU gimmick a la Joel's Kit last week would have been a display of the budget deficit numbers increasing, as displayed on one of those digital electronic monitors, behind Bush's head as he was delivering his SOTU. What's the cost of the war as recently reported by the WaPo?

$100,000 per minute, as I recall.

Posted by: Loomis | February 9, 2006 10:24 AM | Report abuse

mostlylurking and pj:
(and anyone else I've left out)
Thank you so much for your nice words -- you're too kind.

Posted by: Achenfan | February 9, 2006 10:32 AM | Report abuse

Brrr. It'll only get into the upper 60s today here in my part of Texas.

Oh, there's a new Kit.

Posted by: Bayou Self | February 9, 2006 10:34 AM | Report abuse

Loomis: Not related to either Judge Augustus Steele, or his business partner, David Levy Yulee, Florida's first US Senator. I now live in a county, Levy, named for Yulee - but, knew his grandfather back in Morocco when the family left Granada in a hurry.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 10:44 AM | Report abuse

dr: If I remember, the way Bill wrote it was "Now" is the winter of our discontent. He really did a scam job on Richard III. Dick was really a pretty decent guy. The War on Roses gave him a bad rep, kind of like the present War on Terrorism, know what I mean?

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 10:55 AM | Report abuse

P.S. Sorry for all the name dropping, but I really had a few friends once upon a time. I've been out picking baby spinach leaves before the freeze tonight, got enough for a good spinach salad for lunch. Life goes on.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 9, 2006 10:58 AM | Report abuse

Let me just add to the weather report that in Seattle after a month and a half of rain and the somewhat warm temperatures thereby, the sun has been out, daytime high temperature near 60 (F), cold at night leading to frost in the morning. Crocuses and snowdrops are blooming, clematis is growing. Even my hardy fuschias have new green growth, and that seems unusual.

San Francisco, where my son just moved, was 70 degrees today, and I hear LA was in the 80's. Just sayin...

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 9, 2006 9:45 PM | Report abuse

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