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Porch Season Already???

Kids finally back to school after a roughly 23-day break. The DC public schools actually opened Friday, intrepidly, but most of the private schools have been closed since, what, Thanksgiving?

The snow is melting as we speak. Buildings dripping. Slush slushing. The forecast says it'll reach 54 degrees. Check back here later today to see if the experts have declared an early start to Porch Season. We've had some February starts before, but they're rare (last year P.S. opened on March 10), and you'd hate to see Porch Season open up prematurely. Obviously it is hard to imagine anyone porching when there's still ice and snow on the ground. But remember, weather is a psychological event; if the thermometer jumps 30 degrees you may find yourself porching up a storm even though technically it's still the dead of winter.

We'll put our best people on it and report back later.

---

Here's Ezra Klein on Terry McAuliffe:

"If you spend your time with economic elites, you will naturally absorb the perspectives, concerns, and underlying opinions of economic elites. McAuliffe's use to the party has long been that he was better at doing this -- better at hanging with rich people and getting them to like him enough that they donated money -- than anyone else. What no one ever asked is why he was so uniquely adept at that job. And it's worth noting here that McAuliffe hasn't left politics now that his term at the DNC expired: He's chairing Hillary's campaign for president."

This young fella Klein is a smart blogger and thus we don't mind that he got my name wrong in a recent post. I have a weird name, I get it wrong all the time too. Can't even pronounce it. [Correct: Achin' Back.]

But I think he needs more comments. So let's all run over there and comment! Nothing snarky or snippy, of course. We could even experiment with posting comments that are on-point. It'll be a stunt, like standing on your head, or talking and moving backward as though your life is rewinding.

--

Via Klein, here's Amanda Marcotte's Salon piece on the Edwards blogger contretemps. Remind me to keep steering clear of this thing called the "Blogosphere." Nothing but trouble.

Here's an excerpt of what Edwards had to say about the controversy in an interview with Blitzer on CNN:

"I spoke to them directly and personally. They both assured me they had no intention of denigrating anyone's faith. They apologized. They said they would not do it in the future while working for me. I took them at their word and I stood by them because of that....[T]he lesson is we're entering a new brave world with the net and with the blogosphere. And it's a powerful world. It's a world that's going to have a huge impact and should have a huge impact on the way we do politics in America. Because the Net and the blogosphere is grassroots politics at its best. But candidates can't control what people say. We believe in free speech in this country. And this is democracy. People have a right to express their opinions."

--

What I did for Presidents Day.

By Joel Achenbach  |  February 20, 2007; 9:04 AM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: How Big Is a Smithereen?
Next: Einstein's Pickup Line, etc.

Comments

[Pssst. "Ice and snow on the groun(d)."]

Posted by: Tom fan | February 20, 2007 10:37 AM | Report abuse

Porch season!
Rabbit season!
Porch season!
Rabbit season!
Porch season!
Rabbit season!
...and so on, until Daffy's beak explodes.

Posted by: byoolin | February 20, 2007 10:45 AM | Report abuse

D'oh! Another one:
"Klein is [a] smart blogger"

Posted by: Tom fan | February 20, 2007 10:49 AM | Report abuse

The porch...aaahhhh. Ours is cleaned off, with the glider ready to be used in the first rites of spring.

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2007 10:49 AM | Report abuse

All I want is for the snow to melt and the roads to dry so I can have my car washed. I feel so dirty just looking at it.

Happy birthday to yellojkt!

Cheers!

Posted by: Pixel | February 20, 2007 10:51 AM | Report abuse

D'oh! Another one:
"Klein is [a] smart blogger"

Posted by: Tom fan | February 20, 2007 10:51 AM | Report abuse

*sputtering*

There are obscenities on that Klein person's blog!!

How'd they DO that???

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 10:51 AM | Report abuse

All I want is for the snow to melt and the roads to dry so I can have my car washed. I feel so dirty just looking at it.

Happy birthday to yellojkt!

Cheers!

Posted by: Pixel | February 20, 2007 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Ous porch is clean, with the glider ready to assume its role in the rites of spring. I have considered rigging some bicycle inner tubes between a couple of the porch columns in order that a water balloon launcher is available for parched souls that happen by. Given that McMissle laws exist, however, it might be more prudent to be informed before launching.

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2007 10:55 AM | Report abuse

D'oh! Another one:
"Klein is [a] smart blogger"

Posted by: Tom fan | February 20, 2007 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Ous porch is clean, with the glider ready to assume its role in the rites of spring. I have considered rigging some bicycle inner tubes between a couple of the porch columns in order that a water balloon launcher is available for parched souls that happen by. Given that McMissle laws exist, however, it might be more prudent to be informed before launching.

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2007 11:00 AM | Report abuse

Porch? No way. We've been having a cold snap, though not enough to bother new leaves on laurel oaks, new shoots on the avocados, or tough stuff like citrus fruits. Grapefruits are abundant this year--the catastrophic freeze was in California, not Florida.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | February 20, 2007 11:01 AM | Report abuse

SCC: partial double post. The system has demons running amok again. Demons inherent in the system...Demons inherent in the system...I'm being repressed

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2007 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Got it.
I'm going to Ezra's blog now and see what's up.
(By the way, is Moveable Type being glitchy again? Or is that just my 'puter?)

Posted by: Achenbach | February 20, 2007 11:09 AM | Report abuse

And I am one dumb blogger.

Movin' right along:
When I was growing up, some neighbors down the street had a dog called Offenbach. I always thought it was pronounced Often Bark, but if Arkin Bark is pronounced Achin' Back, then, who knows.

Posted by: Tom fan | February 20, 2007 11:10 AM | Report abuse

yellojkt's birthday??? TODAY???

And we don't have the day off?? What gives?

Happy happy, joy joy, yello!

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 11:10 AM | Report abuse

The servers are already porching, obviously...

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 11:14 AM | Report abuse

It's Ockin Bock, actually.

But whatever.

fyi I have posted at Ezra's blog, on the latest item, about Barney Frank.

Posted by: Achenbach | February 20, 2007 11:20 AM | Report abuse

[On reflection, I'm thinking Arkin Bark and Often Bark probably don't have quite the same effect with an American accent as with an Australian one. You guys probably think I'm talking gibberish.]

Posted by: Tom fan | February 20, 2007 11:20 AM | Report abuse

I can't believe we all totally missed this yesterday (from May 31, 2000):

MIT Physicists Split The Smithereen

http://www.theonion.com/content/node/31674

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 11:20 AM | Report abuse

I can't believe we all totally missed this yesterday:

MIT Physicists Split The Smithereen

http://www.theonion.com/content/node/31674

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 11:21 AM | Report abuse

Happy Birthday yellojkt!

>The servers are already porching, obviously...

Two words - load balancers.

Posted by: Error Flynn | February 20, 2007 11:23 AM | Report abuse

Porching Season looms, but it is not there yet. It is after all the height of curling season.

http://www.usacurl.org/events/07MW/m5.htm

and

http://www.usacurl.org/events/07MW/w2.htm

and north of the border,

Saskatchewan's Team Betker is leading the Scott's Tournament of Hearts, the Canadian ladies national championship.

Locally, the R team is still maintaining their seasonally adjusted performance. We're calling it not nearly last place.

Posted by: dr | February 20, 2007 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Error, are you saying we're an unbalanced load?

Posted by: Arkinfan/Ockinfan | February 20, 2007 11:28 AM | Report abuse

dr, we are bracing for the onslaught of the curlers/curling fans at the Briar - thinking I might even have to go watch some of the event live.

Posted by: dmd | February 20, 2007 11:29 AM | Report abuse

I tried to post a comment (possibly a tad snarky, but who can judge these things?) on the Klein blog, but Moveable Type ate my comment OVER THERE! Jeez. I can get that kinda crappy treatment right here; I don't need to go over THERE and get dissed.

(Memo to Klein: Our Hal IT nerd can beat your Hal IT nerd.)

On an important related matter: LoneMule, if you are out there, you may want to consult an attorney. It seems "Mr. Tony," a.k.a. Tony Kornheiser, has appropriated your famed cri d'coeur; his e-mail address for his new radio spot on WaPo radio is "Thisshowstinks@Washintonpost.com" which sounds to me irritatingly familiar.

Although, I suppose, one might hypothesize that Mr. Tony IS the famed Achenblog LoneMule...

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2007 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Thanks for the birthday greeting, Pixel.

If anyone wants to know what I looked like twenty-five years ago, and I don't know why you would, embarrassing pictures are on my blog today.

http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2007/02/birthday-love-story.html

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 11:33 AM | Report abuse

I posted one message over there, and it went up three hours ago.

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 11:36 AM | Report abuse

It's
+3 degrees C here near Ottawa,(using Joel's envelope that's 456 F)so I'm barbequeing chicken 'n ribs for dinner.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 11:40 AM | Report abuse

Happy Birthday yello!

Posted by: dmd | February 20, 2007 11:44 AM | Report abuse

yello, it looks like that sign in front of the school says "Welcome FHSMUM 12" Wha?? Was that something like the Chicago 7? (Or, in the case of my high school, the Ex Lax 5.)

*Belated sigh of relief for Mudge and Dylan*

Before porching season begins in my neighborhood, that 2-foot high wall of slush at the end of the street needs to disappear.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 11:49 AM | Report abuse

I talked some sense into that Moveable Type bot over at the Klein blog and got my post up. Told HIM a thing or two, you betcha. He'll think twice before he quotes our Joel again, that's fer sure.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2007 11:52 AM | Report abuse

The sign says "WELCOME FHSMUN 82" which stands for Florida High School Model United Nations. It was held at the Hi-Q hotel on International Drive in Orlando across the highway from where Universal Studios Theme Park is now.

Those state MUN conventions were wild times. I would tell some stories, but I'm not sure the statute of limitations has expired yet.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 12:05 PM | Report abuse

It's +3C here (using Joel's envelope that's 1356 F) so I'm doing chicken 'n ribs on the BBQ.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 12:11 PM | Report abuse

"What happens at FHSMUN stays at FHSMUN."

Happy b-day, yello.

Posted by: byoolin | February 20, 2007 12:17 PM | Report abuse

Okay, I can't be the first to wish yellojkt a happy birthday, so I'll just be content to be the first to wish Happy Birthday to Mr. AND Mrs. Yellojkt. Hope your day is fabulous!

Posted by: kbertocci | February 20, 2007 12:19 PM | Report abuse

>Error, are you saying we're an unbalanced load?

[snort]

No, I think the WaPo's load balancer is sending the request to multiple servers thinking the first won't respond fast enough. But they all eventually do. Hence, multiple posts.

Just my $0.02.

Posted by: Error Flynn | February 20, 2007 12:21 PM | Report abuse

It will be almost 80 degrees here today. I spent most of the weekend in the yard cleaning-up--I raking up all the red oak leaves before the live oak leaves fall in about a month's time. I can also, finally, bathe the dog. I am finishing raking the last of the leaves this morning.

We were definitely involved in porching season, since Loomispouse pulled out the utility trailer yesterday morning and bought a pallet of sod, doing an excellent job laying about 90 percent of it yesterday afternoon to cover up our sorry excuse for grass in the back yard. The in-laws, the tribe actually, are coming for a week's stay in May so the backyard must look nice...for porching hours.

There were two weekend highlights... spending time at the Borders at the Quarry...such a much wider selection of books than Barnes and Nobles, although B&N has more stores citywide.
Bought three great books--Lucca Turin's latest on scent, he being the subject of Chandler Burr's book, "Emperor of Scent"; Eric Metaxas's book "Amazing Grace: William Wilburforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery"--since the movie of the same name opens Feb. 23; and the one I can't put down and can't wait to pick back up at the first opportunity, British geneticist Bryan Sykes' 2006 book, "Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland."

So, Joel, you were smoking this weekend, a la Jim Carrey? The Helotes brush fire is burning really hot right now--with smoke still pouring from it--I've heard that internal fire temperatire is in the range of 1,400 degrees. (The weekend was too beautiful not to work outside--despite the smoke, and I'm thankful for my meds.) The fire, as reported last night by Kelly Cook of Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, is only 25 percent fought. TCEQ anticipates another two weeks of firefighting. February 25 is the two-month "anniversary" of the fire.

I'll try to detail the issues later.

Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2007 12:27 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for the explanation, yello, and happy birthday!

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 12:28 PM | Report abuse

Well -- looks like the Great Helotes Mulch Fire of '07 made the Post today. A section even!! Loomis -- not the best way for Helotes to get national recognition, but here it is . . .


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/19/AR2007021901023.html

Posted by: nelson | February 20, 2007 12:29 PM | Report abuse

jack | You've got a glider on your porch?
Wow, that must be some porch. The wingspan on a glider's must be 20, 30 feet!

Happy B'day jkt. Just try to keep it in your pants. This isn't Klein's blog.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 20, 2007 12:32 PM | Report abuse

Someone just has to slip the servers a bottle of wine.

Seriously, I have familial shaking disorder - a very minor shaking of my hands which bothers me only when I try to write neatly or do very fine embroidery (which is what led me to know this). The standard prescription, I kid you not, is to drink 2 oz of wine. The wine make your brain's hypowhatever send signals to the muscles in your arm in a more relaxed fashion, resulting in less shaky hands. The doctor claims monitoring what happens after you drink a small amount is still the primary diagnostic tool for to separate the familial disorder from other very serious shaking disorders. So slip Hal a bottle of wine, stat.

A little glass of wine makes pretty much everything look better.

On the same note, dmd, it has been told to me by experienced brier goers, hit the beer garden early. It gets awfully jammed in there.

Posted by: dr | February 20, 2007 12:41 PM | Report abuse

Happy Birthday, yellojkt.

Joel, Moveable Type and the Comments (a doo-wop musical group name, I think) has been increasingly flaky for the past week or so, IMO.

I suspect that the current level of usage might be saturating the available MT and comment resources. Is the WPdot com team doing usage and capacity analysis/planning?

Mudge, Mr. Tony's been using "stinks" for a while now, plus I'd bet he and the WaPo can afford better lawyers than our Lone Mule.

I don't remember commenting on this before, but if Norv Turner is the answer, I don't want to know the question. Cant tell you how many people laughed in my face when I told them Norval was now the Head Coach at San Diego. With some reason, I think.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 12:48 PM | Report abuse

EF, I think the back end DB for MT and comments is bogged down, you're right that they need to find a way to distribute the load better.

And every time you hit "submit" to try to hurry things along, your browser creates a new entry to the DB with a new date and timestamp, but reloads the same connection info and comment text from the browser to the DB.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Just wanted to invite everyone over to my backyard before the curling sheet melts. Also, happy Shrove Tuesday to all. And if anyone knows where to get a decent Fasnachts in this town, please let me know.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasnachts

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 1:07 PM | Report abuse

thank_god_its_tuesday

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 1:08 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, that would do it bc.

So what did you think of the race? Killed me that Mark Martin missed it by a hood. He's just too nice of a guy.

I thought Montoya aqcuitted himself pretty well. Just staying out of the crashes there is a win. :-)

Posted by: Error Flynn | February 20, 2007 1:08 PM | Report abuse

Joel

I love the what I did for Presidents day link.

BC-I think alot of these teams are just putting in a one or two year fix at coach,thinking they can't possibly screw up a good team....and they are going to wait till they do and lure Scowlin Cowher out of retirement with Moula Moula Moula

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 1:12 PM | Report abuse

RD, those Fasnachts sound a lot like the Beaver Tails they sell along the Rideau Canal in Ottawa. Shriek Winterlude still going - fax some beaver tails to RD.

Posted by: dmd | February 20, 2007 1:13 PM | Report abuse

I'm with you, EF, I was chanting "C'mon, Mark, c'mon, Mark, c'mon, Mark," all the way from the last green flag.

Considering he started at the back and had a bad car all day, Our Man JPM (and I figured he'd be yours, too) ended up doing all right. He's got more points than Tony Stewart and Kurt Busch right now, doesn't he?

I was pretty disappointed with the 50 lap crashfest at the end. Everybody tries to get to the lead pack, and drive at 11/10ths; no good in a restrictor plate draft pack. I hope Happy Harvick buys Matt Kenseth a nice dinner this week.

greenwithenvy, I was surprised the San Diego GM couldn't wave enough Benjamins at Cowher and Pittsburgh to convince the Jaw to go there now.

I went out with some friends last night, I have no idea how I ended up with all these bead necklaces or where my shirt went. Happy Fat Tuesday, everybody.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Happy Birthday, yello!

The glider we have has winged arms on it, and dates to the 60's, or maybe the 50's. The old timey metal kind, y'know whuttah mean, Vern? Only set us back $30 at the antikew shop on the hill.

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2007 1:44 PM | Report abuse

If TGIF stands for Thank {diety of your choice} It's Friday, I prefer the neologism So Happy It's Tuesday for the second day of the workweek. It helps to say it very sarcastically.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 1:53 PM | Report abuse

I like Pandragon and usually agreed with Amanda Marcotte's take on the religious right and the far right in general but when I read what she wrote about the Duke lacrosse team I realized that she was from the 'all men are rapists, women never lie' school of feminism. That the Edwards campaign allowed this halfwit anywhere near their candidate doesn't speak well of their concept of due diligence.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Tried to post over at Klein's blog but it kept spitting me back. Shame, because I also included some previously unknown facts about the Kennedy Assassination. Oh well. At least I got to see the ad for the heavily-tattooed "Sexy shapeshifting mechanic."

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, bc. The southland doesn't think much of Mr. Turner either. Thec say that Martyball has been traded for Goofball.

http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-simers20feb20,0,605830.column?coll=la-home-sports

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2007 1:56 PM | Report abuse

In defense of Mr. Klein, that something called the "Achenblog" might be written by someone named "Achen" does make a certain amount of sense. And associating too much sense with this blog is a common error.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 1:59 PM | Report abuse

>He's got more points than Tony Stewart and Kurt Busch right now, doesn't he?

That's funny, I hadn't thought of that. What should be really interesting is the road races eh?

Posted by: Error Flynn | February 20, 2007 1:59 PM | Report abuse

In defense of Mr. Klein, that something called the "Achenblog" might be written by someone named "Achen" does make a certain amount of sense. And associating too much sense with this blog is a common error.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Ha, thanks for that link, jack.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 2:01 PM | Report abuse

Happy Birthday Yellojkt, and to Mrs. Yellow too! Great love story, I guess persistence pays off, huh.

As for your MUN meetings, my friends and I were Interact Club members and our state meetings were famous for all kinds of mayhem. My best friends were class officers and National Honor Society members, three of whom were busted for drinking at the IC state meeting and subsequently thrown out of the club. I think my nerd friends were the rowdiest people I knew in high school.

Posted by: Aloha | February 20, 2007 2:03 PM | Report abuse

At least it isn't a Thursday. I never could get the hang of Thursdays.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 2:03 PM | Report abuse

At least it isn't a Thursday. I never could get the hang of Thursdays.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 2:04 PM | Report abuse

This day will henceforth be known as "Double Post Tuesday"!

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 2:17 PM | Report abuse

This day will henceforth be known as "Double Post Tuesday"!

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 2:17 PM | Report abuse

Know what the hardest thing in the world to do is, other than keeping 6th graders absolutely silent while their classmates take a high-stakes test?

Keeping them absolutely silent after they have all finished.

Stoopid rules...grumble, grumble...

Glad that's over with.

Posted by: Gomer | February 20, 2007 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Winterlude ended last Saturday dmd, but BeaverTails are still sold at some of the main venues, there's evens a permanent store in the Market area. Beavertails are pretty much fasnachts in an oval shape, pretty much like a...beavertail. They have all kinds of toppings toppings but my kid,s favorite is the simple cinnamon/lemon/sugar variety. My taste runs to the garlic butter coating though.
*Faxing one killaloe to yellojkt now*

http://www.beavertailsinc.com/en/products.html

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | February 20, 2007 2:19 PM | Report abuse

This is pretty interesting -- has America outlived its narrative?

http://www.amconmag.com/2007/2007_02_12/feature.html

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 20, 2007 2:20 PM | Report abuse

Yello- wonderful story. '82 was indeed a great time. I started an epic romance about the time you and the future Mrs. were getting your picture snapped. (Although in my romance *she* was the redhead.) Alas, mine ended badly (at least for me) several years later. So exactly 20 years ago today I did the only sensible thing I could. I moved 2000 miles from home and decided to pursue alternate phenotypes.

BTW - Love the suit. I think we shopped at the same place.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, SD.

My joint birthday/Fat Tuesday dinner plans include a meat lovers pizza from Pizzeria Uno at the Columbia Mall. Nothing like a little cholesterol to send you into Lent the right way.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 2:23 PM | Report abuse

Class officers
National Honors Society
Model United Nations
Junior Gauleiters of America

Boy, you guys are whacked. Talk about raging against the machine. How did you stay out of jail?
:-)

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 2:24 PM | Report abuse

As for porchin', I'm with Loomis. 80 degrees F (I think that's 11,069 K) is a great day to wash the dogs, shave the cats, mow the lawn, and whip cupcakes at the neighbor's kid.

Not an Indian summer, but maybe an Aboriginal spring?

Posted by: Gomer | February 20, 2007 2:33 PM | Report abuse

[please only post once!]

SD - Those Beaver Tails sound great. I think all cultures linked to Lent have some variation of eggy treat for the day before Ash Wednesday. I have some polish friends who make a similar thing called a Paczki. When I was a kid we simply made pancakes. The best thing about the Fasnacht is that it is insanely fun to say.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 2:34 PM | Report abuse

I like Two for Tuesday a little better then double post tuesday.

There was a radio station in Balmer in the 70's *WAYE* that I think started that whole Two for tuesday thingy.It was a rarity an AM hard rock station.

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 2:36 PM | Report abuse

Prudence demands that I make no comments about anything having to do with Beaver; tail or otherwise.

Thank you.

We return you now to your regularly scheduled Moveable Type eccentricities.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Have a good Mardi Gras Mr. and Mrs. yello. I hesitate to post that somewhat depressing link but it kind of meshes with the on-faith topic of the day. Another prominent woman killed in the name of god.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article1414137.ece

For the record boko999 I had nothing to do with these people in high school. I was with the bad apples smoking the wacky tabaccy in the bush during the Junior Gauleiters and Fascisti Youth club meetings. I was in the rocketry club though, but it was just another way of making lots of smoke for me.

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | February 20, 2007 2:39 PM | Report abuse

And yellojkt, I think we both know what the "nerdiest" activity in high school was.

Many happy returns.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 2:47 PM | Report abuse

Junior Gauleiters of America?

I had a number of friends that were Young Republicans, but my libertarian impulses made me wary of the Reagan Youth.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 2:48 PM | Report abuse

My dad's family called these treats shoe soles. Same thing, different kitchen (grandmas)

Fried dough. mmmmmmmmmmmm

Posted by: dr | February 20, 2007 2:49 PM | Report abuse

bc, your filthy mind has been burned with the vonnegutian meaning of beavers, wide open or not.
We need a return of the wolves and/or Canada lynx around here since the trappers are not interested in trapping beavers anymore because of low fur prices. The critters are building huts everywhere along the river and felling all kinds of trees in the process. The big rodents are slowly destroying the shore of the Ottawa river by deforestation and flooding.

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | February 20, 2007 2:54 PM | Report abuse

I miss Twofer Toosday since leaving the DC area. We don't even have a decent classic rock station in Austin.

Beaver Tails sound dirty to me. Bu tmaybe I am the dirty one.

Out, damned spot, out!

Posted by: Gomer | February 20, 2007 2:55 PM | Report abuse

The clouds above this morning looked like they were going to burn off, then didn't, and now it has clouded over, so no bath for doggie today.

Quick and dirty on the Helotes brush fire, without notes...because of the overcast, the air now really STINKS like dirty gym clothes again--a heavy, oppressive stench.

Oil Mop, the contractor, fought the fire from Monday through Wednesday last week--implementing its Plan B, then stopped for two days on Thursday and Friday. The well testing has been continuous, but the firefighting was halted, by agreement, on Thursday and Friday so the well water in the area could be tested and analyzed (and discussed and debated, and a pullback implemented if water pollution was found?).

The fire has about 300,000 gallons of water being poured on both workers and equipment daily, as opposed to the millions of gallons previously going directly on the pile itself. The giant clay-lined pit is now about 2/3 full of water and the burning material is pulled into the quenching pit, so the pit holds the majority of the water used to put out the fire, whatever the tract hoe pulls into the pit. The soggy material is then extracted from its bath, so to speak, and is being removed to a polyurethane-lined area. A question came up last night as to where this soggy stuff will be located or dumped, with no definitive answer except that the drenched debris will be disposed of in "an environmentally frinedly" manner. Anyone's guess.

Sincen no additioanl or further well pollution was found last week, firefighting began again on Saturday this past weekend, and is ongoing--now daily, with continuous well monitoring twice a day.

Kelly Cook of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality found this past week that the depth of the pile underground, on the north end, is 15-20 feet deep, and may go as deep as 25 feet. There was much Q&A at the meeting on Feb. 12 about how far below ground level the pile of debris extends and how that hole came into existence or whether it was pre-existing (my line of questioning--which is why Stuart Birnbaum, the geologist on Helotes City Council, may have offered to teach or coach me about some basic geology of the area).

Cook also believes (assumes) there is a fracture or fissure below the pile that allowed water contaminated with soot, ash and creosote to filter into the aquifer and pollute the two nearby private wells during the time when millions of gallons were being hosed onto the blaze. The local paper reported that on three different occasions the San Antonio Water System sent letters of concern to TCEQ. I asked Cook last night for the dates of the letter and the content. Cook said that he would photocopy and mail them to me. We'll see. These are public entities involved and the letters should be public record.

I want to exchange e-mail with the young toxicologist with a masters degree from Louisiana before I speak or write anything on air pollution associated with the fire. Two local elementary schools kept kids indoors one day last week as a precaution.

Last week, Helotes Mayor Jon Allan said that he would join Birnbaum, the geologist on the City Council, and raise the issue of environmental protection with legislators and Gov. Perry. Last week, Allan's mood seemed belligerent; last night it appeared conciliatory. Last night, Allan said it was a wood and water issue and I had to piggyback off that, saying that when major big-box retailers, such as home improvement stores and giant consumer electronic stores are allowed to build directly over the aquifer recahrge zone, then a potential fire on those premises could be more devastating than a giant brush fire, a topic that Express-News Metro columnist Carlos Guerra has written about fairly consistently and passionately for some years now.

The question is whether or not there is to be any morbidity reporting or followup. Mayor Allan said last night he will insist on it, no matter how high a level he has to go--he even mentioned the CDC. I spoke with Kyle Cunningham after the meeting, she with the San Antonio Health Department, and she said there is one epidemiologist who is interested in compiling a morbidity report, but she, the epidemiologist, doen't want to tackle the morbidity (illness) report unless it can be done well. Does the local county entity have the budget for it and the staffing and, most importantly, the desire? The health impacts are still hugely important, as the county is continuing to pay for shelter for Helotes-area families at local hotels.

On Feb. 12, my question was whether San Antonio Mayor Phil Hardberger, who also sits on the SAWS board, was politically grandstanding when SAWS decided to turn off the water for several days when Oil Mop was ready to go ahead with Plan B. My interview about 10 days with Stephen Gladstone of the Texas Department of Public Safety leads me to think so, but I'll wait until I get the copies of the SAWS letters to TCEQ from Kelly Cook.

Have no doubt that the smoke still emanates from the Helotes fire. On Feb. 12th, on my way to the Helotes town hall forum, I could see the towering plume, a purplish color against a rose and apricot sunset, standing out in sharp contrast to the clouds obscuring the setting sun, a sight which could be seen for miles. That night, the 12th, there were also reports of the smoke from the fire, the first day Plan B was begun, reaching the University of Texas San Antonio campus, about six miles away.

It would nice is someone would look at the fire historically, given the time it has gone on, and create a timeline of activities and events. There are now several different versions of stories, so an agreed-upon historical timeline from all parties involved would be helpful, useful, and informative.

Each week, the Helotes City Council continues to pass seven-day disaster declarations. It will be nice for a return to some normalcy--to go outdoors and breathe fresh air and to stop my medications.

Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2007 2:56 PM | Report abuse

bc (cross-posting from my comments),
I already explained the Crisco. Cha gio, mmmmm. She has heard my "Hot Blooded" cover many times.

The nerdiest high school activity has to be either math team or chess club. I quit the math team my senior year to focus more on my social study club duties. Chess club was completely out of the question. I wasn't a total dork.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 2:59 PM | Report abuse

can somebody explain my Ads by Google
Clinton's new girl friend
How Bill's friendship with Canada's Belinda Stronach is making waves
www.thefirstpost.co.uk

Presidential Dollars
High Grade Presidential Dollars & First Lady Gold Certified by NGC
www.moderncoinmart.com

Say No to Hillary
Learn why in the VRC's "Complete Dossier on Hillary Clinton" - Free!
www.ConservativeBookClub.com

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 3:01 PM | Report abuse

Now Yellojkt. We both know Debate was the ubernerd activity. I'm quite proud of that. In fact, it was in Debate that I originally met the girl I started dating in 1982. And, now that I think about it, in addition to having your hair, and your figure (cheap shot!), she was almost exactly the same age as you. And from the South. Perhaps you have an unknown twin sister? You don't happen to have a strawberry birthmark on your left-

Oh skip it.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 3:07 PM | Report abuse

Happy birthday to you and your better half, yello! Celebrate well, especially since this is Shrove Tuesday!

Hmmm, gotta decide what I will give up for Lent. I'd say chocolate but I don't eat much of that anyway...

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2007 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Now Yellojkt. We both know Debate was the ubernerd activity. I'm quite proud of that. In fact, it was in Debate that I originally met the girl I started dating in 1982. And, now that I think about it, in addition to having your hair, and your figure (cheap shot!), she was almost exactly the same age as you. And from the South. Perhaps you have an unknown twin sister? You don't happen to have a strawberry birthmark on your left-

Oh skip it.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Now is as good a time as any to re-plug the Helltoes fire on Digg.com:

http://digg.com/environment/Texas_Town_Fumes_as_Mulch_Mountain_Burns_On/who

Go digg it and give it the importance it deserves.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 3:09 PM | Report abuse

Yello, did you carry a slide rule hanging from your belt, or are you from the post-slide rule era?

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 20, 2007 3:11 PM | Report abuse

omni, I think you need to talk to Shrieking Denizen about those ads.

Yeah, I was aware of the Vonnegutian aspects of th

yellojkt, a likely story.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Slide rule? Is that where you're not allowed to slide into first base?

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Slide rule? Is that where you're not allowed to slide into first base?

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Now everyone is afraid to post.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 3:23 PM | Report abuse

SCC: "Yeah, I was aware of the Vonnegutian aspects of those semi-aquatic rodents."

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 3:24 PM | Report abuse

You lost me bc, but that's alright as my day is over.

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 3:24 PM | Report abuse

You lost me bc, but that's alright as my day is over.

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2007 3:24 PM | Report abuse

I have to say that MUN is nerdier than Debate because MUN involves endless research, giving speeches, wearing three-piece suits, AND role-playing obscure foreign countries.

In the early 80s, I bought much of my clothing at Merry-Go-Round because that was the only place I could find dress clothes in a 29 waist. I have since outgrown that sartorial problem.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Must...

Only...

Post...

Once...

*focusing on a single "Submit" click*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Must...

Only...

Post...

Once...

*focusing on a single "Submit" click*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Must...

Only...

Post...

Once...

*focusing on a single "Submit" click*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Slide rule:that is where you take all of your mothers wax paper to use on those big metal sliding boards!!

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Demmit.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 3:29 PM | Report abuse

bc, Error, JPM has more points than Tony Stewart and Kurt Busch put together.

*still sobbing quietly in corner over Mark's missed-it-by-that-much moment*

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 3:31 PM | Report abuse

It's okay Scottynuke. It happens to the best of us.

I'm going outta town tomorrow but when I get back I sure hope this here doohicky is uncomflobulated.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 3:32 PM | Report abuse

Hi Cassandra, and everyone,

Great news on the Mudgekin.

RD, debate as ubernerd? Please. Three word reply: 20 sided dice.

If any of you know what I'm talking about, you probably also resent encroachment on your status as the ruling class on Nerdopia (with or without a +5 sceptre of power).

Okay here goes - hitting submit once.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 20, 2007 3:35 PM | Report abuse

Second try to post this:

OK, I promised you guys some movie reviews and thus shall it be. (These are now out on DVD, which is how I saw them.) (And this here boodle needs some livenin' up, so maybe this'll do it.)

First, "The Departed," with Jack Nicholson, Leonardo DiCaprio and Matt Damon, 'mongst others, and directed by Martin Scorsese. A really terrific flick (though a violence, bloody gore and naughty-word warning for those of squeamish tastes and refined sensibilities) with lots of tension and a couple plot twists at the end I obviously can't talk about. I'm not normally a DiCaprio fan, but he was really good in this, perhaps in part because there was no pretense at casting him as a leading man type with a love interest; if anything, he was a blue-collar guy who came from a pretty dysfunctional family, and tried to rise above it. Matt Damon was also excellent (it won't spoil anything to tell you he's the bad guy; you learn this about three minutes into the movie). Nicholson is excellent, as always, and quite convincing as a ruthless, possibly semi-psychotic Irish mafia chief who controls Matt Damon's character and sort of adopts DiCaprio as a protege.

The rest of the supporting people are all excellent, too, especially an actress I never heard of named Vera Farmiga as the love interest. She plays a police psychiatrist who happens to be counseling both Damon and DiCaprio (and because of this kind of reminds you of Lorraine Bracco's Dr. Melfi character on The Sopranos). Farmiga isn't classically beautiful by any means, but I'm a sucker for the non-classical types. There's been some talk about Mark Wahlberg, who has a minor supporting part, but he eats up every scene he's in. Virtually every one of those scenes is with Martin Sheen (who plays Wahlberg's boss), and I had a little bit of trouble not seeing him as President Jed Bartlett, but he does a heavy Boston accent very well. I also had a little trouble with Alec Baldwin's cameo, seeing him as the guy on 30 Rock. But those were very minor parts. One of the other supporting parts is a character called Mr. French, who is played by a veteran British actor named Ray Winstone (who I am pleasantly surprised to learn is going to be the title character in the movie version of Beowulf, of all things, with Crispin Glover (Marty McFly's dad in Back to the Future) as Grendel. Don't know how that's going to work out, but Anthony Hopkins is playing Hrothgar, and Angelina Jolie of all people is the voice of Grendel's mother, and John Malkovich is Unferth, if you can believe it. Neil Gaiman co-wrote the screenplay; I only hope he used John Gardner's "Grendel" as the source instead of the original Beowulf. It's in post-production now).

The plot is one of those mirror-image things: Damon and DiCaprio are both Massachusetts State Trooper detectives. Damon is the allegedly squeaky-clean go-getter who ambitiously climbs the ranks, but meanwhile he's a "mole" for Nicholson, tipping him off to police raids. DiCaprio goes undercover, fakes being kicked out of the force and sent to jail, etc., to build his cover, and he becomes one of Nicholson's trusted assistants. So each has infiltrated the other's outfits, and each side begins to realize there is a mole or snitch in the ranks. Each is given the job of ferreting out the other, and Scorsese builds a ton of tension in this as the two guys track each other. And that's as far as I can go with that, but take my word, it's a nail-biter. I haven't seen enough of the competition to tell yet if it's Best Picture material, but it could be.

Next movie: in 2005 a little flick came out called "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada," which starred and was directed by Tommy Lee Jones. The only other non-Hispanic major actor in it is Barry Pepper (singers/musicians Dwight Yoakam and Levon Helm, formerly of The Band, have non-singing cameos; Yoakam is a bad-guy local sheriff jerk and Helm is an old, blind recluse). It is a "small" movie, but very, very good, and in its leisurely way pretty intense. Jones plays a (modern day) Texas rancher whose best friend and protégé is the young title character, "Mel" Estrada, played by Julio Cedillo, an illegal alien working for Jones on his ranch.

Early in the movie there is a bit of confusing cutting back and forth in time, but it won't ruin anything for me to tell you up front that Pepper plays a vicious jerk of a Border Patrol cop who semi-accidentally shoots and kills Estrada. He hides the body (the first burial) but begins to come apart at the seams from guilt. When the body is found Jones wants the killing of his friend investigated but no one else does, so Jones gets ticked off, pretty much as only Tommy Lee can. The body is "properly" re-buried a second time in a manner against Jones' wishes; he'd once promised to take Estrada back to his home town in Mexico to his wife and kids and folks, if anything ever happened to him. It takes a while to get all this set up and in motion, and the remainder of the movie is Jones' quest to find/punish the killer as well as dig up and return his friend's body to his little home town in Mexico (the third burial), all while avoiding a police manhunt (it seems Jones has kidnapped Pepper). And it's at this point that the film starts to get really good. Various complications ensue, but they aren't hilarious, although there are some nice, funny moments here and there. I really liked the movie, but I have a suspicion it might have gotten more attention if it had a better title--or at least if Melquiades had a more easily pronounceable/recognizable name. But it's definitely a good couple of hours' entertainment (but not for the kiddies).

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2007 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Nerdier than having a slide rule was wearing a holster at the belt for a big HP calculator. Having a big pen with multiple tips in different color in the pocket protector was also well regarde in the nerdier social circles.

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | February 20, 2007 3:40 PM | Report abuse

The Boy's Athletic Association at our high school thought that the student council's money should be used to build bleachers so the students would be comfortable as we went out to admire the football team's prowess. I claimed the vice presidency of the latin, chess, and fencing clubs and other longhairs from other clubs were able to tie up and disrupt council meetings so that the jocks couldn't get a vote on their ridiculous proposal. We were untouchable outside the school were the athletic pukes would have to deal with us and the rest of the experimental community but there were a few close calls during class changes and in the locker area. It's amazing how a straight razor in the hand of a 5'5" 90 lb. freak can back up 3 6', 180 lbs goons. It also helped that their best player was a head.
I was finally thrown out of high school for distributing copies of a CUSO publication called "Student as a N__ger"
Ah the '60s.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 3:40 PM | Report abuse

It's only appropriate mention of Grendel, Beowulf et al would come AFTER the reference to 20-sided dice.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 3:43 PM | Report abuse

SD I had one of those pens. Still do.

And HP? Please, TI, like, totally ruled.

Now I gotta plane to catch.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2007 3:47 PM | Report abuse

I reluctantly confess to not getting the 20-sided dice reference (at a guess, Dungeons and Dragons? I was never into that stuff). Back in my day we only had six-sdied dice, and were gratful for even that many. A pair of 20-sided dice would have royally screwed up Monoploy and Parchesi. Please to esplain, Lucy?

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2007 3:49 PM | Report abuse

'Mudge, you dealt with REAL Dungeons and Dragons, so you get a pass on the reference to the paper version.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2007 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Three hoorrahs for "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada" Mudge. I am surprised this movie hasn't collected more accolades and/or prize. I suspect the very Texan Mr. Jones is not in the "beautiful people" club out there on the Left Coast.

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | February 20, 2007 3:56 PM | Report abuse

I love my TI 85

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 3:58 PM | Report abuse

I'm showing my age, but I did debate and was a complete high school nerd. It was excellent training for a shy introvert, if painful at the time. I learned to use a slide rule in high school chemistry my junior year...

Calculators came out when I was in college, in the early 70's. I recall the first ones being rather pricy, in the $60-70 range.

Amazing how fast calculators replaced slide rules: a cautionary and predictive tale for today's rapid changes in technology.

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2007 4:00 PM | Report abuse

I was going to give my 2 cents to the blog, but then I got thinking. So I've been doing some base calculations using your envelope JA, just to find out what my $0.02 Canadian is worth and it turns out that I am a multi-millionaire ($3,005,067 to be exact) so the heL L with that I' never giving away my 2 cents again.

Posted by: Kerric | February 20, 2007 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Correct guess. You pretty much have to be within a certain age range as the whole schmeil went from obscurity in the late 70s, to Public Menace in the 80s, and back to obscurity when eclipsed by video game versions. Too bad, actually, as it involved a great deal of imagination and creativity.

Tx for reviews; I should do a review of my reading while loafing around recovering.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 20, 2007 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Today's geek-measuring contest has inspired my with blog-fodder for weeks. I am totally HP having seen the light after owning a malfunctioning TI-55-II. My current calculator is an HP-48G, the last of the red hot RPN machines.

I still have all my dungeon dice include the two 20-sided, and the 4, 6, 8, and 12 sided ones as well. I have commemorative brass 6-sided ones for show. I also own the first edition of the AD&D 'Deities and Demi-Gods' Manual complete with the Melniboné mythos that had to be removed for copyright infringement.

I speak fluent nerd.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Kerric, that was great.

I wonder how quickly JA's envelope will replace today's technology. (Although maybe members of Congress already are using it.)

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2007 4:19 PM | Report abuse

I'm one of those people who need to be able to refer one thing to another to get even a basic understanding of a mathematical concept. Slide rules demonstated that you could use logarithims and reciprocals to descibe the simplest.... assbackwards as usual.... sorry I'm lost.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 4:20 PM | Report abuse

*scurrying to check calculator*

TI-35 Galaxy Solar. Purchased 1987 for Stats class.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 20, 2007 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Kerric, did you get that answer with a sliderule? If I recall, if you read the durn thing wrong, it could give you some spectacularly incorrect results.

I thought I was the nerdiest of the nerds in H.S. but you guys are making me question that categorization. I did student government just for the entertainment value, was NHS 'cuz apparently I was too smart for my own good, was in band because it was more fun than sports (OK, the klutziness came into play). But you...I'm in awe.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 4:38 PM | Report abuse

My calculator: an HP 12C from 1986. I love the reverse notation of the HP--keeps Raysdad from borrowing it!

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 4:47 PM | Report abuse

I dunno, yello, I think what we need are some definitions.

Off the top of my head, here are some of the categories of high-school students:

Geek, Dork, Goober, Jock, Freak, Stoner, Dweeb, Nerd, Head, Prep.

****
Warning! Liberal use of stereotypes and generalizations ahead!!!
****

[My experience took place before the ascendancy of the computer geek.]

The social demographics in my high school went something like this:

Geek: Chess club, National Math Scholar Finalist, National Honor Society. Generally a males-only category. Went on to study electrical/computer engineering, robotics, computational fluid dynamics, astrophysics.

Dork: Social Studies Club, Audio-Visual crew, Key Club, National Honor Society. Males of the species might adorn themselves with taped up birth-control glasses. Co-ed. Likely to study software engineering, plate tectonics, medicine.

Goober: Same as dork, but not quite as smart and usually annoying. Probably just late-bloomers. Could end up in a wide-range of careers.

Dweeb: Same as Goober; perhaps smaller in stature. Male.

Nerd: Indistinguishable from Dweeb.

Jock: Football player party boy. Not especially gifted in the IQ dept. aka MeatHead. Male. (career predictions omitted)

Freak/Stoner/Head - Dope-smoking, scraggly-haired, Camaro, Trans-Am or GTO- driving, cig-smoking, Vo-Tech attendees. The female of this species had big hair and possibly studied cosmetology. Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, etc.

Preps: Their clean-cut appearance cleverly disguised less-than-savory predilections (from adults, anyway). Chameleon-like, they moved about with ease among the other groups, who good-naturedly made fun of their clothing and music choices (New Wave was on the rise) whilst jointly* partaking of illicit substances in the back parking lot. Tennis, baseball, swimming, football, golf. Poly-Sci majors who often went to Law School and maybe ended up in politics.

*No pun intended

We didn't have any true punks, and goth hadn't yet arrived in our little town. For whatever reason, girls didn't have as many overt labels, but that's an entirely different discussion.


Posted by: Pixel | February 20, 2007 4:49 PM | Report abuse

Porching--Not quite yet. I was chasing after the cat on Sunday when he decided to roam a bit. He ran back towards our house, and I started after him across the "white stuff", rather than go around on the shoveled sidewalk. Got half-way between houses, and started to slide, and wound up slowly but ineveitably sliding down this very slight gradient about 30 feet to, you guessed it, the shoveled sidewalk. At least I stayed upright. The kitty just sat over in the flower bed watching with what I am sure was great amusement.

Posted by: ebtnut | February 20, 2007 5:00 PM | Report abuse

Pixel, one of my biggest problems in High School was that I fit into and participated in each of the above groups, including the punks (hey, the Pistols, Ramones and Clash were around in my era, 77-81).

And therefore, not completely accepted by any.

Well, I was/am tall enough to avoid Dweeb and Nerd by your definition.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 5:01 PM | Report abuse

Well done, Pixel!

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 5:02 PM | Report abuse

Hmm, I'm suspicious of Pixel's list's absence of women, since I have learned since H.S. that women are even more ruthlessly clubby then men.

My smallish town football team included a lot of groups, so the boundaries were a bit blurry. There was a D&D club, but my group didn't join. Truly the hobby that dareth not speak its name.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 20, 2007 5:08 PM | Report abuse

The other hobby that dareth not speak its name, that is.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 20, 2007 5:14 PM | Report abuse

Pixel | We would have called Preps cops

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 5:20 PM | Report abuse

You know what I found to be most interesting about high school is that most of the popular people (prom kings and queens, cheerleaders, football players, etc.) ended up being blue collar workers, overweight and sometimes really young parents and grandparents. Is there some sort of correlation with being beautiful and this specific lifestyle?

Posted by: Aloha | February 20, 2007 5:20 PM | Report abuse

Britney Spears has checked herself into rehab.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 5:27 PM | Report abuse

A good D&D dungeoun master can't be replaced by a computer. When AI can replace a human then, maybe. Hellabalooza, I was an old fart in my twenties when I started playing and we were lame compared to the stuff the youngsters were imagining.
We used to play wargames on huge boards and you had to write down what each unit was going to and then dice roll for each one. Ripped 9 hand Hearts games were more fun and led to fewer arguments.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 5:34 PM | Report abuse

From your list here are the high school activities I was in that match:

Geek: National Math Scholar Finalist, National Honor Society [also Mu Alpha Theta - a math honor society and a member of the Chemistry Formula Balancing Team]

Dork: Social Studies Club, National Honor Society [We had a Beta Club also. Key Club was for rednecks at my school.]

Preps: Their clean-cut appearance cleverly disguised less-than-savory predilections (from adults, anyway). Chameleon-like, they moved about with ease among the other groups, who good-naturedly made fun of their clothing and music choices (New Wave was on the rise) whilst jointly* partaking of illicit substances in the back parking lot. [I wore polo shirts two days of the week, concert softball jerseys two days a week and country and western flowered yoke shirts at random intervals]

Other credentials include Computer Explorers which put me in close proximity to several Freak/Stoner/Heads, go figure.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 20, 2007 5:39 PM | Report abuse

Pixel.. great breakdown of high school social strata, but you forgot the band dorks and my kids' group: the drama geeks.

At my kids' school there is an incredibly high proportion of kids in the drama department that came from the Gifted & Talented elementary school program.

Tells you something, doesn't it?

They ain't called Drama GEEKS for nothin!

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2007 5:42 PM | Report abuse

Porch season! Egads, I'm posting from Tampa where porch season will soon be over to be replaced by unspeakable heat and humidity. In the frozen north we have at least another month of being able to use the porch as a second freezer, then a week or two of mere refrigeration, before it is porch season.

Belated good wishes to Mudge, Dylan and fam.

I wonder what would happen if one could convince teens that high school is not the most important, best, most interesting, or even most fun time of their lives.

Posted by: frostbitten | February 20, 2007 5:42 PM | Report abuse

That was me at 5:39. Like you couldn't tell. Band, drama, orchestra, and choir are their own separate subcultures as well. Then you have all the language clubs. I understood that bootleg sangria was very popular at the state Spanish conventions.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 5:47 PM | Report abuse

Incidentally, TBG, on a Belated Boodle Butt-in, I loved your Mason City detective work.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 20, 2007 5:48 PM | Report abuse

TBG, interesting about the drama geeks. Ours were sort of a smattering of the other groups (except jocks, of course), but heavy on the stoner/freak. And of course the Prep chameleons.

frostbitten, I echo your last paragraph. People actually tried to tell me that high school was the best time of my life, which I found to be a depressing thought.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2007 5:50 PM | Report abuse


Please tell me you're making this up.

>Chemistry Formula Balancing Team

You're right, TBG- I forgot about the Bandies. Most of them would have easily fit into the Dork/Goober category.

It was a small school- lots (most) of us dipped our toes into many ponds :-) For instance, I could throw a mean frisbee while wearing a cheerleader uniform.


Posted by: Pixel | February 20, 2007 5:56 PM | Report abuse

whilst jointly-very impressive, for an American

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 5:57 PM | Report abuse

Aloha, I suspect the phenomenon is related to why those kids were popular in high school to start with - strong early hormonal development, adult bodies, sexually attractive not only to their lesser-developed peers but to adults as well. Also, manual labor jobs offered a lot of freedom for after-hours pursuits, and one could be an "adult" right away by being a worker. Same with early motherhood (instant adult status).

". . .and that's all we heard about Brenda and Eddie, can't tell you more 'cause I've told you already, and here we are waving Brenda and Eddie goodbye"

Posted by: Anonymous | February 20, 2007 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Geekiness is one thing many of us on this blog have it common, I imagine.

I was middle-of-the-pack in a highly competitive group of very bright people. There were 12 national merit finalists in my class. Members of the geek pack got full ride scholarships to places like UNC and Duke. About a year after we graduated from college, we had a reunion party. I was the only one not in grad/law/med school, and I went to grad school the next year.

Best years of my life? I never worked so hard ever again, as I did in my sophomore and junior years in high school.

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2007 6:05 PM | Report abuse

The Tampa Museum of Science and Industry ran a science competition every year for local high schools. Events included:

Photovoltaic Car Racing: very small cars that had to compete on speed and distance.

Species Identification: They flashed pictures of common plants and animals and contestants had to name by Latin nomenclature.

Balsawood Bridge: Still a science competition perennial.

Chemical Formula Balancing: My specialty. I was a redox zen master.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2007 6:08 PM | Report abuse

Freak/Stoner/Heads in Canada drove Bugs, bikes or maybe old StratoChief ex-cop cars.
What you described was the booze crowd. Most of us were in the five year Arts & Science program. Big hair? You mean like Grace Slick. Janis?

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 6:08 PM | Report abuse

in highschool? drama geek here (and yes tbg i was in GT) - and goth/punk... one of my best friends who had a wicked mohawk is now a TEXAS RANGER! whoa! i used to always get the same comment from the preps "are you going to a funeral?" cuz i always (and still) wore only black... and i rowed on the crew team for two years (a lot of the "alternative" types rowed crew)

'mudge - i spent the weekend in your old stomping ground, philly! had a great time and yes, i had a cheesestake...

Posted by: mo | February 20, 2007 6:11 PM | Report abuse

All through the '90s I kept getting livid that the news organs kept referring to computer people as "nerds." After all, computers were the coming thing. I decided to fight back. My first retaliation: for almost a year, I saved up an expression I had coined, and when talking to my sister the journalist one day, I casually whipped it out: I referred to some columnist as "ah, he's just another journalism nerd." (George Will, probably)

Well that piqued my sister right well. "What did you say?"

"A journalism nerd - you know, they don't know anything about the real world - cars, electricity, carpentry - all they can do is opinionate." So she got all ticked off, and I confessed. I said journalists shouldn't call computer enthusiasts nerds if they didn't want it right back. She learned something that day.

Soon after, at the art gallery, I was talking to the owner, about computers (most artists - not all - are futurists of one or another stripe) a lady said, "What, are you guys computer nerds?"

I said, "Do you know how to use a telephone?" And she of course said yes, so I said, "So, then, you are a telephone nerd then, right? Using a computer is about as far out or nerdy as using a telephone."

Posted by: Jumper | February 20, 2007 6:28 PM | Report abuse

Hey.. what's up with Wilbrod? She doing OK? We haven't seen her around for a few days.

Hi Wilbrod! *waving arms like Grover*

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2007 6:29 PM | Report abuse

When I look at the different ways that teenagers split themselves off I like the goths and 'scater kids. Both groups recognize that Britney and what is offered by mainstream society is a fake.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 6:29 PM | Report abuse

"I suspect the phenomenon is related to why those kids were popular in high school to start with - strong early hormonal development, adult bodies, sexually attractive not only to their lesser-developed peers but to adults as well. Also, manual labor jobs offered a lot of freedom for after-hours pursuits, and one could be an "adult" right away by being a worker. Same with early motherhood (instant adult status)."

Very interesting theory, not hard to believe. I'd say, yes, most of those popular people were attractive and very adult looking compared to the rest of us scrawny kids. It strikes me as a shame that some of these people I knew in high school didn't make it a point to go to college. A couple of them seemed incredibly bright but worked hard at not letting people know that lest they lose their social status.

I don't necessarily think that one's life in high school is a good indicator of what one will be like as an adult. One of the most drugged out guys in my class is now a minister in a very devout Christian church. Go figure.

Posted by: Aloha | February 20, 2007 6:30 PM | Report abuse

I had a great time last summer putting together the alumni directory for my 30th HS reunion. It was great to see how successful the "losers" are now.

Many of them sent in their info, but very few of them went to the party. (FYI: I didn't go to the party, either; I wonder where that puts me?)

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2007 6:37 PM | Report abuse

I used to be all screwed up on drugs.
Now I'm all screwed up on Jesus.
Were's the stretch?

The disparagement of people who work with their hands and in the trades exhibited by some here is despicable.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 6:43 PM | Report abuse

Yargh... is anyone else having refresh issues? Every other time I try to refresh the boodle, I get a blank page. I can see the main achenbloog kit page, and the old boodles, but if I try to refresh the current boodle it goes blank.

No longer does it just eat my post's, now its eating my achenblogability.

What am I supposed to do stuck here at work if I can't lurk through the boodle?

Posted by: Kerric | February 20, 2007 6:43 PM | Report abuse

I'll take a carpenter over a Fung Shie consultant any day.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 6:47 PM | Report abuse

No offense meant Boko, just my observations of people I know.

Posted by: Aloha | February 20, 2007 6:52 PM | Report abuse

You go, Boko! I agree.

Also, it *is* Umbrage Tuesday.

Posted by: Wheezy | February 20, 2007 7:02 PM | Report abuse

Its part of the double post issue, Kerric.

All you highspeed types just need to have more patience. I don't beleive I have double posted still. Possibly one way back last week, but with dial up at home I am used to waiting ages for things to upload, post, submit.

Posted by: dr | February 20, 2007 7:03 PM | Report abuse

I'm one of the people that went for the hard labor career (several, actually - I had a lot of energy) instead of college after high school, Boko, so I don't think I'm disparaging them - especially since I found my peers to be smarter and more entertaining company than the college-bound crowd. I didn't return for the bunch-o' degrees +doctorate until my 30s - when my body started to kind of wear out, and I knew if I wanted to survive, I'd have to use my noggin instead.

Posted by: sevenswans | February 20, 2007 7:03 PM | Report abuse

The Movie Dazed and Confused pretty much summed it all up for me.pretty accurate account minus a few things.

The 70's show when they sit around in the basement in a circle was really how it was for a lot of us

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 7:04 PM | Report abuse

Not you Aloha. The person you were quoting. When he/she/it can build or fix their own house, car, or anything else that makes their life possible they'll be able stop making 'the cry of the simp.'

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 7:04 PM | Report abuse

I've noticed some browsers work better than others. This boodle has disappeared in Safari but shows up in Firefox.

Go figure.

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2007 7:05 PM | Report abuse

Is Martooni around? How much damage did your ice dam cause. Did you get the problem stopped yet?

Posted by: Wheezy | February 20, 2007 7:08 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of dong one's own construction, car repair, etc., anyone remember the full prelude to the Heinlein quote, "Specialization is for insects?"

Posted by: sevenswans | February 20, 2007 7:12 PM | Report abuse

SCC: "doing" (!)

Posted by: sevenswans | February 20, 2007 7:15 PM | Report abuse

Bobby Heinlein? The spaceman's Ayn Rand?
One can only hope that it was in someone's self interest to eat them.
Hey, Wheezy do you know Johnny Winter? The greatest living guitar player.
You are in Texas ain't you?

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 7:37 PM | Report abuse

Hey, Boko. No, I'm in the Midwest. Our local paper used to carry Molly Ivins, that's how I first read her. Not because she was local to me. I've never heard of Johnny Winter (hanging head at own ignorance).

Posted by: Wheezy | February 20, 2007 7:51 PM | Report abuse

Not knowing something means that you have something delightful to discover. Lucky you.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 8:03 PM | Report abuse

Boko
I agree johnny is a great guitar player,but greatest living?I could throw a few names out there too,a few that come to mind Dicky Betts,EC,Mark knoffler,Carlos,David Gilmore,Bruce.

A few newer or not as well known ones,Joe Satriani,Eric johnson,Jon Pertucci,steve Vai,Joe Bonomassa,jonny lang,Kenny wayne shepard.

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 8:15 PM | Report abuse

I hope Arkin isn't lurking because what I'm about to say may sound like we mil-family types don't get civiians or care much for them. Living in the military world puts you in a betwixt and between world with regards to blue collar/white collar. Even folks like the husband, with advanced degrees and an office job, spend a lot of time doing physical stuff. I've become so used to the duality it's hard for me to see men dressed in suits and ties and not think "what a silly costume," or "bet he can't even run a couple miles." All of this despite feeling that it is probably sillier for the husband to wear his camouflage uniform to the office every day.

Posted by: frostbitten | February 20, 2007 8:23 PM | Report abuse

Found it:
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."

Heinlein isn't a favorite of mine by any means, but the quotation is often used in other contexts, and is something of a geek/nerd mantra (right up there with the Star Trek quotes)

And FWIW, on top of all the other non-starters on his list (hog-butchering, etc), I can't cook.

But if you must take offense no matter what, Boko, go for it - Happy Umbrage Tuesday!

Posted by: sevenswans | February 20, 2007 8:30 PM | Report abuse

Well of course it's a matter of taste but how many of people you mentioned have produced Muddy Waters albums? Lemme write down some of the people you've mentioned.
Joe Sartriani rocks but he's not there IMO.
My New York girlfriend used to call the Allman Bros. the Dickie Betts band. We'd fight.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 8:31 PM | Report abuse

Well of course it's a matter of taste but how many of people you mentioned have produced Muddy Waters albums? Lemme write down some of the people you've mentioned.
Joe Sartriani rocks but he's not there IMO.
My New York girlfriend used to call the Allman Bros. the Dickie Betts band. We'd fight.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 8:33 PM | Report abuse

I want to love ya
and treat you right
I want to love ya
every day and every night
We' be together
With a roof right over our heads

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 8:41 PM | Report abuse

Proud member of the Harrison Junior High chess team. Won the state team championship in ninth grade (ok, it was Indiana) and got our picture in the local paper. Wore our complete geekdom like a badge of courage.

Got a problem with that?

Posted by: bill everything | February 20, 2007 8:47 PM | Report abuse

Of course it is all a matter of taste.I did see Johnny Winter at a small venue in Winchester Va several years ago....Great show.

I also like John Lee Hooker,Tinsley Ellis,Keb Mo,Buddy Guy,Gary Moore.

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 8:47 PM | Report abuse

Of course there's Johnny's brother Edgar Winter and the early 70's stoner masterpiece "They Only Come Out at Night" with the instrumental monster "Frankenstein" and the Rick Derringer tune "Free Ride."

Did appreciate Johnny bringing Muddy Waters back to a younger audience with "Hard Again." I have the 9-CD complete Chess recordings which is well worth the price. Until the the early-to-mid sixties there were very few LP length blues albums. Mostly singles. This puts it altogether.

Posted by: bill everything | February 20, 2007 9:03 PM | Report abuse

When killing a pig with a 22. make sure you keep the end of the barrel tight against its head. It's not the projectile but the expanding gas that scrambles its brains. Dying gallanty is beyond me.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 9:06 PM | Report abuse

I must say, I tend to agree, somewhat.

Posted by: C.Morris | February 20, 2007 9:06 PM | Report abuse

I must say, I tend to agree, somewhat.

Posted by: C.Morris | February 20, 2007 9:07 PM | Report abuse

I must say, I tend to agree, somewhat.

Posted by: C.Morris | February 20, 2007 9:08 PM | Report abuse

I've had the boodle refresh problem for awhile now - I'm using an old version of Firefox. Usually I go somewhere else, come back, and it's fine. You must have persistence to be a boodler (persnicketyness, too).

I have Babel from the video store, so will be able to go to the Oscar party having seen all the Best Pic nominees, and many of the other films. Mudge gave a nice synopsis of The Departed, which I liked very much, and I haven't seen a lot of Scorcese films. It took me about a half hour to get used to the foul language, though. I loved The Queen and Little Miss Sunshine. Letters From Iwo Jima was good, very interesting view of WWII from the "other side" (and I liked it better than Flags of Our Fathers, which I found kind of confusing - and heaven knows, I prefer a direct approach!). The movie that really knocked my socks off was Pan's Labyrinth - no major nominations except for Best Foreign Film. It was beautifully done, although brutal and sad - but uplifting too. And it had a message even I could get (blind obedience to authority is bad, very bad).

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 20, 2007 9:25 PM | Report abuse

It's been a long time since I have read either author (which I once did extensively), but I don't actually see much similarity between Heinlein and Rand, beyond the anticommunism. Or is that enough?

My favorite Heinlein story is Universe. When he was on his game, he could write as well as anybody.

I don't have a favorite Rand piece. The day I stopped reading her and her disciples was one of the smartest days of my life.

Posted by: Woofin | February 20, 2007 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Johnny Winter is playing a couple of places with Leon Russell next month - a "co-bill", whatever that means (maybe they're not playing together - I have a couple of videoclips of Edgar Winter with Leon). Anyway, that's in Albany and Westbury, NY.

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 20, 2007 9:38 PM | Report abuse

I take that back. I do have a favorite Rand piece, her first novel, We the Living. It's actually, almost, like, a real, you know, novel. And it gives more insight into what was actually buggin' her than all her other stuff put together.

Posted by: Woofin | February 20, 2007 9:50 PM | Report abuse

If I could sneak across the border I would love to see the Shuffling Hungarians in Syracuse NY.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 9:52 PM | Report abuse

Grrrr... watching the latest installment of the Frontline series "Secrets, Sources & Spin," where the Bush cabal repeatedly accuses WaPo and NYT journos of treason for reporting on extraordinary rendition, secret CIA prisons and NSA wiretapping. For some odd reason, they're suddenly talking about steroid use in major league baseball, but whatever.

Comments:

Stoners turning to Jesus (or becoming cops)- common.

Uber-geeks turning into successful, desirable, highly mate-able adults- common. After all, a big brain turns out to be the most seductive organ of all.

The Winter Brothers: Fascinating and talented albino siblings. Present day nearly unknown guitar god - check YouTube for someone named Patrick Walden.

Big hair: Not Grace and Janet- I'm talking 80's hair- think "Fountainhead".

Heinlein: Hey, what's the matter with Heinlein? Pixel (the cat who walked through walls) was a favorite character of mine.

High school popularity is indicative of nothing wrt future success. I know brilliant people who had breakdowns in college and never recovered. I know burn-outs who have become extremely successful businessmen/women. We all grow/learn/discover differently.

I have always liked to hang around with people who challenge me, who are smarter, who make me think new things or view them from a different perspective. That's what I love about you lot :-) (I used to like to ski with the boys, too-- otherwise, how would I ever improve???)

Unfortunately, I could hang around with yellojkt for several lifetimes and never, ever balance a chemistry equation.


Posted by: Pixel | February 20, 2007 10:10 PM | Report abuse

Boko -

I want to love ya
and treat you right
I want to love ya
every day and every night
We' be together
With a roof right over our heads

Did this Johnny Winter (he's the almost albino guy, right? guess I have heard of him) do reggae? Because then he's all right by me.

You're right, Woofin, giving up Reading Ayn Rand was probably a good idea. Not that anyone should NOT Read Ayn Rand, but enough's enough, right? Like when I decided not to read any more Steven King - decided that polluting my own brain was a worse sin even than polluting my lungs by smoking.

I had a dork boyfriend for about a month when I was 17 who used to type up Ayn Rand quotes on densely packed pages, front and back, and give them to me. He was very earnest. I gave him up and went on to the socialist love of my life who loved science, reggae, the downtrodden, and me. It was a great trade, let me tell you.

Posted by: Wheezy | February 20, 2007 10:13 PM | Report abuse

If *Tim were here (I believe he's in Hawaii), he'd be all over the Heinlein stuff, thins being Umbrage Tuesday and all.

greenwithenvy, I'm with you on the guitar gods and blues heroes, though I'd add Clapton on both lists. Oh, and being in DC, I got to see the late great Danny Gatton once in awhile.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 10:26 PM | Report abuse

You guys are true humans. You make me ashamed.
The wonderful thing about tiggers
Is that tiggers are wonderful things
Their heads are made out of rubber
And their tails are made out of springs

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 10:28 PM | Report abuse

I've never read Ayn Rand, having had a good friend in high school who was really into her stuff. I heard enough about it to know that it wasn't for me.

I was in my middle thirties when I realized that all my favorite authors are women. Not that I don't read books written by men, but I go back to Austen, Dorothy Sayers, Alcott. I haven't completely figured out why.

G'night everybody!

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2007 10:30 PM | Report abuse

If you like short stories you can't beat Alice Monroe.
Then there's the two Margarets, Laurence and Atwood.
Too Canadian?

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 11:01 PM | Report abuse

You say it's your birthday. Well, it's (not) my birthday too! HBD, Yello!

Bad news on the YouTube front. A pianist named Nora is majorly beating you and my black lab trio. Sigh. Don't drink anything when she starts using both hands (so to speak).

http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/16736728.htm

Posted by: dbG | February 20, 2007 11:11 PM | Report abuse

EC (Eric Clapton) was in greenwithenvy's original list - to which I have to add, of course, George Harrison, Jimmy Page, The Edge (who does a whole different thing with guitar, IMO). And Roy Buchanan - I once heard Roy Buchanan at a DC club - couldn't see him, but could hear him just fine.

I read some of Ayn Rand when I was a kid - so long ago that I can't remember much, but I didn't agree with her politics. I liked Heinlein too - Stranger in a Strange Land - but I can't remember much of what I read of his, either (and the politics probably went undiscovered by me). I've only read Pride and Prejudice by Austen - Mary McGrory raved about her, so I've got to get some of her books and read them...when I have time...

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 20, 2007 11:11 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I missed EC on greenwithenvy's list. Apologies.

Ha, mostlylurking, I saw Roy Buchanan a couple of times too, with that guitar sitting way up high.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2007 11:23 PM | Report abuse

I'm old enough to remember the Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show, I had the She Loves You/I Saw Her Standing There 45. I'm a huge Beatle freak but George Harrison was not a great guitar player. Hell, I love Keith Richards (he showed Chuck Berry where to put it) but even he is not in the same universe as Johnny Winter, Eric or Jimi.( I saw Led Zep do Dazed and Confused in Vancouver in '71 so much for the bow weilding Page) C'mon.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 11:36 PM | Report abuse

Omigod, Frank Zappa. Now there's a fine musician. My mother, a conservatory trained pianist, loved him except for the rude words.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 11:45 PM | Report abuse

What's Roy Buchanan's best album? Amazon is just a click away.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 20, 2007 11:52 PM | Report abuse

I was thinking about it on my way to work....Jimmy Page,Jeff Beck,Smokin Joe Walsh,Eddie Van Halen is pretty good too.

Oh Zappa....What a surprise I had when I saw him the first time.....The man could wail on a Guitar...

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 20, 2007 11:53 PM | Report abuse

Remember The Fugs? Alan Ginsberg, Ed Sanders and the boys?
I wandered lonely down the street one day
Who should I see, slithering my way
Slum Goddess from the lower east side

Posted by: Boko999 | February 21, 2007 12:10 AM | Report abuse

Hi greenwithenvy and Boko... I'm still at work. Glad to see someone else is still around.

*Still waving arms like Grover*

Posted by: TBG | February 21, 2007 12:12 AM | Report abuse

TBG

I just got work.....sad to say I got 7 hours left

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 21, 2007 12:17 AM | Report abuse

Stay calm, breath deep.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 21, 2007 12:23 AM | Report abuse

It is actually kinda funny,here I am after midnight,drinking coffee and getting on with my work.I have sort of gotten used to doing these shifts....well maybe not...If I had a choice I guess I would be sleeping...like most everybody else

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 21, 2007 12:27 AM | Report abuse

It is actually kinda funny,here I am after midnight,drinking coffee and getting on with my work.I have sort of gotten used to doing these shifts....well maybe not...If I had a choice I guess I would be sleeping...like most everybody else

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 21, 2007 12:28 AM | Report abuse

ooops

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 21, 2007 12:32 AM | Report abuse

Yep, I am here in Hawaii. We just finished our first day with work at the summit. I have kind of a headache right now.

I'll leave the Heinlein stuff alone, for the most part. I read a lot of Heinlein when I was a younger sprat, but I grew tired of the misogyny and the 1D characterization. His juveniles were not bad for that genre, however. Still, very "Boy's Life"/survivalist/super-technician oriented.

I did not participate in most of those nerd clubs, because I wasn't social enough. I did join the Chess & Go club. I was the founding President of the War-Games Club, where the only war game was D&D (hardly a war game). I was the President because SOMEbody had to be, and I was willing to write the morning announcements for the club. The only morning announcements that were funny. The only morning announcements that started being censored. I was very proud of that.

I was mostly not part of the organized nerdery. Does that make me less of a nerd, or an uber-nerd?

Oh, yeah, and I joined the National Honor Society. The only time in High School when my grades dropped below the Honor Society requirement was when I was in the stupid club, so I got kicked out. Much of the problem was that the Honor Society faculty advisor was my history teacher, who was a very, very boring person. I earned my C's, fair and square, because I couldn't stand his class, so I earned my dismissal from the Honor Society. Really, history teachers must cultivate a special talent to make themselves dull. History is about war, death, sex, power, power, sex, and war. Also death, sometimes under embarrassing circumstances. All the stuff that dominates the gossip rags and the newspaper (albeit, presented with different style and intent). How can you make that stuff dull? By emphasizing the memorization of the dates and names, rather than telling the stories.

Oy.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 21, 2007 12:38 AM | Report abuse

Nobody mentioned Duane? Dickie's a great guitarist, a songwriter, an arranger... whom nobody can deny. But Duane always seemed to go right up to the edge and look over... makes the hair on my neck stand up.

Posted by: Woofin | February 21, 2007 12:47 AM | Report abuse

Yes,yes,yes how very interesting.
It's only midnight here now.
How could you be finishing?
What are you trying to observe?
Would it mean anything to us?

Posted by: Boko999 | February 21, 2007 12:52 AM | Report abuse

Sorry I didn't mean to be so preemptory it was TBG's fault

Posted by: Anonymous | February 21, 2007 12:55 AM | Report abuse

Hey Science Tim, how's the weather up at the summit? Is it as windy up there as it is down here near sea level? We've been getting whipped around like crazy these last few days.

As for the National Honor Society, most of my friends were members but there were two of us who pegged ourselves as "almost honor grads" because we fell just short of that magic 3.5 GPA. We didn't mind though, we got to go to all their parties but never had to do the work to get the grades.

Posted by: Aloha | February 21, 2007 12:55 AM | Report abuse

So where does football/wrestling/track/National Honor Society/Varsity Club/Science Club/School Newspaper fit in?

Posted by: Dooley | February 21, 2007 1:23 AM | Report abuse

These days the magic GPA seems to be at least 7.5. Back in the dark ages when I went to school, universities seemed to pay attention to your relative standing in the school and the school's relative standing in the state, and teachers' recommendations, rather than "objective" numbers. I wonder what happened to that way of looking at things.

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 21, 2007 1:29 AM | Report abuse

Can they tell when an apparent fluid flow on Mars happened before or after the planet got closest to the sun and dust storms swirled everything up?

Posted by: Boko999 | February 21, 2007 1:30 AM | Report abuse

We'll be observing wind on Titan (again) and looking for changes in the structure of the upper atmosphere. The latter issue arose for the first time with our observations of two years ago that were contemporaneous with the Huygens Probe entry -- it became clear (to us) that the uppermost region of Titan's atmosphere had changed -- a decrease in the downward settling rate of molecules formed by photolysis in the REALLY uppermost atmosphere, so that the molecule to which we are sensitive (ethane, which may be the material of polar clouds in the deeper atmosphere) was able to build up its concentration in the upper atmosphere.

The actual observations will be this coming Saturday and Sunday. In the meantime, we will be working on making our instrument ready to perform. We are limited because we cannot work at night. The instrument already is at its working position on the telescope. Since other researchers will be using the telescope at night this week, we can't be in a position from which we might interfere with their work. So, no technical work at night until Saturday, when we need to shift completely to a night-time schedule. Ugh.

It seems to be pretty windy here at 9000 ft. elevation. The winds at 14000 were relatively mild when I was there, several hours ago. According to the Mauna Kea weather center web site (just google those keywords), the wind speed remains modest. Temperatures are hovering near freezing, but humidity is extremely low -- less than about 5% relative humidity! So, no snow, no fog, no black ice. Let's hope these conditions persist through the weekend. We haven't had humidity this low for a Titan run since 1993.

Boko, I think that the only information that they have about the time of fluid flow on Mars is the ancient stuff (couple billion years), plus those gullies that were observed to change recently. They have a 2-4 year interval on consecutive observations of the gullies. They've been happy enough just to find evidence of change that is within the past million years, so I don't think anyone is splitting hairs about whether it was 2 years ago, or 2 months. Either way, it is geologically recent.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 21, 2007 2:46 AM | Report abuse

Watched Babel - it's very good. I was almost tempted to watch bits of it again, but I should get to bed. Very interesting takes on various cultures - very tense and sad, but a bit hopeful too.

greenwithenvy, I don't envy you working the hours you do. I never could get used to that shift - 3 am and I need to be asleep. Good luck to you.

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 21, 2007 2:52 AM | Report abuse

Good luck to you, too, ScienceTim!

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 21, 2007 2:56 AM | Report abuse

Very interesting stuff Science Tim.How long have you been doing this?When you are talking about Titan,you mean Jupiter's largest moon.It has been suggested that Titan is the size of some on the smaller planets and could have been a planet a long time ago.Have you heard about that theory?

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 21, 2007 3:13 AM | Report abuse

Titan is Saturn's largest moon, not Jupiter's. It's the only satellite with a substantial atmosphere (by "substantial" you could mean, for example, "dense enough for a parachute to work"). I have never heard any claim that Titan might have independently orbited the Sun and was captured by Saturn. Capturing other orbiting bodies actually is a rather tricky proposition and doesn't happen all the time. There is strong evidence that several of Saturn's and Jupiter's tinier satellites are captured asteroids, but the big ones are believed to have formed around the same time as the primary body. By "believed", I mean that there is no evidence to suggest a need for a radically different hypothesis than the obvious null hypothesis, which is that the satellites formed in a process somewhat like the formation of the planets orbiting the Sun. I am sure that the dynamical-astronomy people have much more to say on the subject, with much greater detail and accuracy, but the bottom line appears to be that you must furnish compelling evidence if you expect to persuade anyone that Titan or the other large moons were delivered by a significantly different process.

There has been a suggestion that Titan might become a habitable world when the Sun enters its red giant phase in about 4-5 billion years. Ralph Lorenz (aka, "Dr. Titan" -- check him out on Amazon) has a paper which argues that Titan will remain too cold to support water-based life. If it warmed up enough for water to thaw, it would also encounter the problem that it is too small to gravitationally hold onto a warm atmosphere. It would just bleed away into space. Titan is substantially smaller than Mars.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 21, 2007 3:52 AM | Report abuse

I thought Mars was under more or less under continual observation. More Robots!
So you're looking at clouds on Titan. Now that's hard. In the optical? Or at some funny place on the spectrum where us monkeys can't find bananas?
Don't bother answering, get some rest.
Kurt would be proud.

Posted by: Boko999 | February 21, 2007 4:17 AM | Report abuse

Morning all!! *taking up the Grover-arm-waving banner*

:-)

Pixel -- Blert!

yellojkt, I'll see you your Deities and Demigods and raise you an original AD&D Monster Manual, Dungeon Master's Guide AND a Rogue's Gallery (stapled, with original Gary Gygax illustrations!!!). And don't get me started on war games such as Sixth Fleet, Panzer Leader and Panzer Blitz. How else would I have ended up ASKING to be a tank crewman??

And I'm shocked, SHOCKED no one in this crew has included Alex Lifeson in the guitar god pantheon! :-O

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 21, 2007 4:59 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, friends. I see the boodle has been fixed. Tried to post yesterday, and got a blank white page. Glad everything is back to normal. Is that a word(normal?) that can be used here?

Happy Birthday, yello and mrs. yello. I read your page, what a wonderful love story. I am always in awe of folks that make it last.

As to porching, I sat outside yesterday in my little space for awhile. It was a bit chilly, the wind was blowing pretty strong, but it was nice. I just needed to be out in the air. Inside is so stuffy at times. Everything looked so gray and dead, can't wait for spring and all those flowers. I thought about some of my neighbors that have moved to another sphere, and I miss them. And I thought about how time does move on, and how change does take place. I also thought about my place in that whole scenario, and for a moment, I was sad.

Today is a busy day for me. Maya Angeleou is suppose to speak at the Senior Citizen center here, but not sure about that. I will try to peep, I am not a member. It would be nice to hear her. I was informed that they (the center) aren't sure if she is coming.

I also have the Bible studies, and the children this afternoon. Have a good day folks.

During high school one of my teachers insisted on my induction in the honor society, although I flunked home economics. For those of you that don't remember home eco, it was a course that taught cooking, sewing, all the womanly arts. I was awful in this class because I was already doing that stuff at home, did not want to do it at school. Anyway, my teacher found out that my grade in this subject had been changed because I completed the course during the summer, making me eligible for the induction. School officials and the honor society wanted no part of me, so my mother came to the school and insisted. I still did not do it, because one had to do whatever those in the society requested of you. You know, if they said roll over in the dirt, one rolled over in the dirt. I didn't like that, so I got out, and got out fast.

Time for the water. It's gotten a tad warmer here. Hope it's warm where you are, if not, at least you don't have ice and snow. Both are so messy.

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ. Peace.

Where, oh, where is Ivansmom?

Posted by: Cassandra S | February 21, 2007 5:21 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, friends. I see the boodle has been fixed. Tried to post yesterday, and got a blank white page. Glad everything is back to normal. Is that a word(normal?) that can be used here?

Happy Birthday, yello and mrs. yello. I read your page, what a wonderful love story. I am always in awe of folks that make it last.

As to porching, I sat outside yesterday in my little space for awhile. It was a bit chilly, the wind was blowing pretty strong, but it was nice. I just needed to be out in the air. Inside is so stuffy at times. Everything looked so gray and dead, can't wait for spring and all those flowers. I thought about some of my neighbors that have moved to another sphere, and I miss them. And I thought about how time does move on, and how change does take place. I also thought about my place in that whole scenario, and for a moment, I was sad.

Today is a busy day for me. Maya Angeleou is suppose to speak at the Senior Citizen center here, but not sure about that. I will try to peep, I am not a member. It would be nice to hear her. I was informed that they (the center) aren't sure if she is coming.

I also have the Bible studies, and the children this afternoon. Have a good day folks.

During high school one of my teachers insisted on my induction in the honor society, although I flunked home economics. For those of you that don't remember home eco, it was a course that taught cooking, sewing, all the womanly arts. I was awful in this class because I was already doing that stuff at home, did not want to do it at school. Anyway, my teacher found out that my grade in this subject had been changed because I completed the course during the summer, making me eligible for the induction. School officials and the honor society wanted no part of me, so my mother came to the school and insisted. I still did not do it, because one had to do whatever those in the society requested of you. You know, if they said roll over in the dirt, one rolled over in the dirt. I didn't like that, so I got out, and got out fast.

Time for the water. It's gotten a tad warmer here. Hope it's warm where you are, if not, at least you don't have ice and snow. Both are so messy.

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ. Peace.

Where, oh, where is Ivansmom?

Posted by: Cassandra S | February 21, 2007 5:22 AM | Report abuse

Thanks for the great birthday wishes from everybody. It's the best virtual cyber party I have ever had imaginary friends throw me.

High school honor societies are no less political than any other organization. I got into a feud with the president of our honor/service club because they were kicking people out for lack of participation. I found out the president's grades had slipped and got her kicked out as well. It was a total a-hole move on my part, but I was on a high-horse crusade.

Have a good day, Cassandra. Enjoy Maya (if she is really coming).

Posted by: yellojkt | February 21, 2007 5:53 AM | Report abuse

ScienceTim, regarding Titan's atmosphere, I feel I should point out that there's no "me" in "ethane."

Think about it.

Regarding great geetar pickers, I have only two words: Charlie Byrd.

Er, OK, two more words: Django Reinhart.

(And Segovia wasn't half bad, either. But Charlie Byrd was the guy who put me away. Had my very first "legal" beer on the night of my 21st birthday listening to the Byrdman at the Showboat Lounge in DC. So yes, a sentimental favorite. And the man could play.)

'Morning all. 'Morning, Cassandra. Really hope you get to see/hear Maya.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 21, 2007 6:28 AM | Report abuse

Morning Cassandra!! I'll keep my fingers crossed for you and Maya to cross paths today.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 21, 2007 7:21 AM | Report abuse

*Waving back to Scotty and TBG*

Tim, good luck with your observations. And Cassandra, I hope Maya shows up and you're able to sneak a listen.

I'm happy to report that this morning at 5:30 a full 7 days after the sleet stopped falling, a plow came down my street.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 21, 2007 8:38 AM | Report abuse

Raysmom;

A slushplow??

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 21, 2007 8:42 AM | Report abuse

Scotty, with this morning's temperatures more like an ice pile-topper.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 21, 2007 8:48 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, everyone.

*Tim, thanks for the updates, I'd really like to hear how things are going up there. It's pretty cool that you guys are still doing visual observations through optical telescopes. Well, obviously the data are recorded digitially and processed and enhanced by data processing tools, but still...

Mudge there's no "me" in ethane, but there is an "ethan". Put that in your hookah and smoke it.

Cassandra, I hope you get to see Maya as well. That should be memorable.

Raysmom, shame on you, getting plowed at 5:30 in the morning. Or lucky you, depending on how you look at it ;)

bc

Posted by: bc | February 21, 2007 8:55 AM | Report abuse

I would add that no one mentioned Yngwie Malmsteen in the pantheon of guitar gods.

Don't look at me, I'm not nominating the guy. He plays like he's getting paid by the note.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 21, 2007 9:01 AM | Report abuse

Obama Does Hollywood
From MoDo's NYT Select column today:

Barack Obama has made an entrance in Hollywood unmatched since Scarlett O'Hara swept into the Twelve Oaks barbecue. Instead of the Tarleton twins, the Illinois senator is flirting with the Dreamworks trio: Mr. Geffen, Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey Katzenberg, who gave him a party last night that raised $1.3 million and Hillary's hackles.

She didn't stand outside the gates to the Geffen mansion, where glitterati wolfed down Wolfgang Puck savories, singing the Jennifer Hudson protest anthem "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going." But she's not exactly Little Miss Sunshine, either. Hillary loyalists have hissed at defecting donors to remember the good old days of jumping on the Lincoln Bedroom bed.

"Hillary is livid that Obama's getting the first big fund-raiser here," one friend of hers said.

Who can pay attention to the Oscar battle between "The Queen" and "Dreamgirls" when you've got a political battle between a Queen and a Dreamboy?

Posted by: Loomis | February 21, 2007 9:02 AM | Report abuse

Joel,
You gonna touch Oscar before Sunday night?

Posted by: Loomis | February 21, 2007 9:06 AM | Report abuse

bc;

Or by the 1/128th note, apparently.

Raysmom;

Sno-cone maker??

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 21, 2007 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Joel,
You gonna touch Oscar before Sunday night?

Posted by: Loomis | February 21, 2007 9:08 AM | Report abuse

What about Steve Howe.

Vera Farmiga kinda reminds me of Cate Blanchett (haven't seen Departed, but she was in the remake of 'The Manchurian Candidate').

In highschool I was such a loner that I wasn't in any definable group. I was invisible.

Now my Ads by Google are
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Still not making sense!!!

Posted by: omni | February 21, 2007 9:15 AM | Report abuse

Loomis, that 9:08 is a very inappropriate question to pose to make on a public board.

He's a healthy, life-affirming man with 5 days between now and then. Hello?

bc

Posted by: bc | February 21, 2007 9:17 AM | Report abuse

SCC: please remove "to make" from my 9:17.

I guess I was too shocked - shocked, I say - to form that sentence well.

Thank you.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 21, 2007 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Somehow, Junior Brown has slipped under the great guitar player radar. Make that the gitbox player radar.

The sky is squalling. Look at the rain fall down.....

Posted by: jack | February 21, 2007 9:27 AM | Report abuse

Gee, bc, all I meant is whether Joel would be writing about Oscar...A little touchy today, are we, bc?

No worse than the Jim Carrey clip that Joel linked to at the end of this Kit, which I think also borders on the questionable, if one were prudish...

I would love to touch the subject of Oscar between now and then. I have my favorites in each category of nominees and have kept my powder dry on the subject of the Academy Awards, thinking and hoping that Joel might blog about them...

Posted by: Loomis | February 21, 2007 9:35 AM | Report abuse

Boko, I would say "You're Not Alone" is one of Roy Buchanan's best albums.

I remember a friend once dragged me to a Roy Buchanan show. I'm pretty sure it was Achenbro. "No arguments, you are going."

And was I grateful! What a mighty guitar player Roy was. He could play with both hands or either! He took his pickin' hand off the guitar to take a drink, and just tapped the chords with his left hand on the neck. Seamlessly.

Achenbro used to sound a lot like Johnny Winter. They didn't let him jam out enough on the Rox Diamond CDs I have heard.

Johnny is extremely dexterious on the gitbox. Enough so to put him in the top 5 easily.

Posted by: Jumper | February 21, 2007 9:38 AM | Report abuse

My Clinton google ads are back...

Posted by: omni | February 21, 2007 9:39 AM | Report abuse

bc, is that a favorite euphemism, to "touch Oscar?"

Posted by: Raysmom | February 21, 2007 9:43 AM | Report abuse

bc, is that a favorite euphemism, to "touch Oscar?"

Posted by: Raysmom | February 21, 2007 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Guilty as charged.

Jumper, you're a friend of the RockinAchenfamily?

Of the departed local DC guitar legends, I'm more of a Danny Gatton fan, but I'd seen enough of Buchanan to appreciate what a great guitar player he was.

Tom Principato, also pretty darn good local guy.

I believe someone mentioned Stevie Ray Vaughan, but I'd add that his brother Jimmie is underappreciated IMO.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 21, 2007 9:49 AM | Report abuse

Raysmom, most guys have (or have been given) a nickname for, er, you know.

"Oscar" is a common one, as is "Little Elvis."

Stopping now. No good can come of this particular topic.

[bc, trying to contain his mirth]

bc

Posted by: bc | February 21, 2007 9:54 AM | Report abuse

So how does one pronounce "RockinAchen"?
(RachenOckin, perhaps?)

Posted by: Tom fan | February 21, 2007 9:57 AM | Report abuse

Even the Episcopalians have umbrage Tuesday...

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/21/us/21episcopal.html

Posted by: jack | February 21, 2007 9:57 AM | Report abuse

I've been trying to find a working link to some of guitarist Pat Buchanan's music online. He won Country Music Award '06. But Pat started out with rock. I remember him and two friends jamming a 20 minute version of "Down By the River" in the back of a van. On acoustic guitars, of course. I still get shivers thinking about it.

But he didn't end up living in a van down by the river. I think. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Posted by: Jumper | February 21, 2007 9:58 AM | Report abuse

Jumper, he must have gotten himself Back! On! Track!

Posted by: Tom fan | February 21, 2007 10:05 AM | Report abuse

Apparently, smouldering detritus in Heliotes (sp.?) isn't the only thing ailing the Lone Star state. There are problems with a nuclear facility as well. LindaLoo, this link's for you...

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-pantex21feb21,0,7548495.story?coll=la-home-headlines

Posted by: jack | February 21, 2007 10:07 AM | Report abuse

Smouldering Detritus is still available as a 'boodle handle. (Only those with very low self-esteem need apply.)

Posted by: Tom fan | February 21, 2007 10:21 AM | Report abuse

Interesting article in the NYTimes regarding on-line behavior:

******
Flaming has a technical name, the "online disinhibition effect," which psychologists apply to the many ways people behave with less restraint in cyberspace.
******

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/20/health/psychology/20essa.html?em&ex=1172206800&en=169b24bf57b052b1&ei=5087%0A

Posted by: kbertocci | February 21, 2007 10:22 AM | Report abuse

BTW, Loomis, I forgot to add another movie review yesterday: I finally got to watch "The Black Dahlia," and decided upon reflection that I didn't like it very much. Granted, Brian DePalma had a big problem in trying to telescope a lot of material from the Ellroy semi-novel (which I liked a lot) down into a 2-hour movie, but by and large I think he was unsuccessful. The technical aspects of the movie were very good: the lilleau, costumes, scenery and general 1940s setting and a little film noir. But I think he largely missed the major themes of the book, especially the obsessive quests to find out who the Dahlia was, who she "really" was (her personality, etc.), what happened to her. As you are aware, they changed how Aaron Eckhardt's character dies, and I think that was a mistake to omit the long period of time his character went missing, and Bleichert's trip to Mexico. And oddly enough, I don't think they played up enough just how shocking this murder was in the context of its time; in the movie I get the sense this was just "another" murder of a "working" girl, and not near as sensational as it was in the novel. And the whole three-way relationship with Blanchard and Kate and Bucky just didn't have the snap it did in the book. In all, it was just "Black Dahlia Lite," and didn't do it for me. I had had higher hopes.

Incidentally, I'm reading Withold Rybczynski's terrif biography of your relative Frederick Olmstead, "A Clearing in the Distance," and just this morning on the bus was giddy and delighted to learn that when he was 21, Olmstead spent a year "before the mast" on a cargo ship sailing to Canton, China, and on the harrowing return voyage came down with scurvy. So the next time I find myself suffering similarly, I shall raise my caipirinha high to the memory of ol' Fred. (I found myself identifying with him in more ways than just that. Seems in his youth he was falling in and out of love with various ladies about every 20 minutes; I seem to recall a similar period in my own life, with pretty similar results, too.)

If Joel doesn't...er..."touch" Oscar (in the most innocent possible way, of course), I think we should proceed without him. So bring it on: who's yer picks? Methinks Mirren, O'Toole, Hudson and Scorsese have locks on him.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 21, 2007 10:26 AM | Report abuse

I'm definitely an oddball, I have more restraint online than offline.

Posted by: omni | February 21, 2007 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra, here is to hoping Maya Angelou does arrive and that you do get to hear her.

My eighteenth birthday I went to the bar with my mom and some other ladies we worked with. We were the dining room and kitchen staff in our small town hotel. It was very busy in the bar due to a bonspiel and a hockey tournament in town, and the boss, on seeing a bunch of staff walk in, pressed us to work. So the night of my eighteenth birthday was spent filling and refilling the beer cooler and selling offsale beer. I don't think I got to have a drink till well after my birthday was over. When I compare that to the tie that yello wore to his birthday fete, my small town roots stick out all over the place.

Posted by: dr | February 21, 2007 10:26 AM | Report abuse

question for you chemistry peeps - i was in a hot tub on sat where the chlorine was CLEARLY too high (it burned my throat and eyes) - i was only in for about 10 minutes because it was too hot as well and the chlorine was really bothering me but apparently it was long enough for the chlorine to ruin my bathing suit - my question is... it also had a reaction with my silver jewlery turning it kind of beigey - i was able to clean most of it with a silver cleaner but it is still funny looking - anyone know what kind of chemical reaction happened? (and if there are any medical affects of that high a level of chlorine?)

Posted by: mo | February 21, 2007 10:29 AM | Report abuse

Some silver chloride was formed, along with other chlorides among the metal ions other than silver that are in your jewelry. I think, though, that silver chloride darkens your skin rather noticeably. I seem to remember someone putting silver chloride on door knobs in school to blacken the victim's hand upon opening a door.

Posted by: jack | February 21, 2007 10:37 AM | Report abuse

i addressed the oscars on my blog...
http://www.mortiifera.com/?p=99

i predict:
best picture - the queen
best actor - o'toole
best actress - mirren (she took the globe and streep has already won a bunch of oscars)
supporting actor - murphy
supporting actress - hudson (duh, of course!)
best director - toss up between eastwood for "letters from iwo jima" and freers for "the queen"
and best animated - happy feet...

but i'm not making any bets...

Posted by: mo | February 21, 2007 10:38 AM | Report abuse

Let me add Dave Mason to the list of oft-forgotten guitarists. I saw him on a double-bill with Leon Russell a couple of years ago. I really went for Leon, who didn't impress me live. Dave Mason was not only terrific but I had forgotten how many great songs he wrote.

By the way, my space music is up on my site under "PodCast".

Peace out.

Posted by: Error Flynn | February 21, 2007 10:39 AM | Report abuse

speaking of achenbro - lookey at this little "gem" i found

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acJrTUbbzss

Posted by: mo | February 21, 2007 10:50 AM | Report abuse

Australia is banning the use of the incandescent bulb, or rather making the bulb guidelines so stringent that they no longer meet the energy standards.

http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/story.html?id=3cee6722-d28e-4099-8360-df469778e439&k=25342

First off note that Australia is not a Kyoto signatory, and they are actually doing something in a common sense way that every single person will end up conserving energy. We need more of the end user programs in Canada.

I do have to ask if anyone knows much about flourescents over all impact on the environment. Locally we are supposed to send them to recycle, versus ordinary disposal for regular bulbs.

There is also the matter of light. We use a these bulbs wherever we can, in fixtures and lamps and I am sorry, they don't provide as much usable light. As a celing fixture the big 4 ft fixtures are wonderful, but otherwise I end up turning on more lamps than I would with incandescents.

Posted by: dr | February 21, 2007 10:51 AM | Report abuse

Speaking of "space music" and guitarists...

A little of Jeff Beck's "Space Boogie," anyone?

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 21, 2007 10:51 AM | Report abuse

NEW KIT!!

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 21, 2007 10:57 AM | Report abuse

mo, "Free" chlorine oxidized your bathing suit as well as your jewelry.
The beige staining of silver was, most likely, the formation of insoluble silver chloride on the surface. Silver halides (chlorides, bromides and iodides) are the salts that makes the black phase in B&W photograph btw. It may also be the reaction of silver's alloying elements (most likely copper) if your jewelry wasn't sterling silver. The reaction of formation of silver chloride is reversible. So put the jewelry on a piece of aluminium in a strong solution of sodium bicarbonate (Cow brand). Use an Al plate or Al pan for eample. Wrapping the silver parts in Al foil is also an option. Wait a day and the surface should return to its shiny status without losing any silver as would would by polishing it.

jack: silver nitrate is the skin staining salt. It is an oxidizer that attacks the skin then darkens to silver oxide&chloride on exposure to light, pretty much the same as photographic paper does when printed in the dark room.

I have no clue on health effects of chlorine.

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | February 21, 2007 10:58 AM | Report abuse

I wanted to add someone to the guitar gods list actually 2,from my favorite bands.

Toy Caldwell from the Marshall Tucker band(deceased)

Buck Dharma from Blue Oyster Cult(still performing)

I need to check out the new Kit

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