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D'oh!

When Joel handed over the keys to the blog, he mentioned that it would be cool if I could find some photos or videos to post on the site. Spice things up a bit.

He also happened to mention that if I posted any photos or videos of him, he would make sure that I never find work in this town again.

So I've found a middle ground. Joel, meet the Simpsonizer:

joel.jpg

The resemblance is uncanny.

I'd also like to take the opportunity to answer all of those who have asked me if I actually look like the cartoon character at the top of the Editorialist blog.

GR2007020500677.jpg

The answer, of course, is no. I am balding, not bald. A much more accurate rendition:

mesimpson copy.jpg

In any event, I would encourage all of you Boodlers to head on over to the Simpsonize Me site. If you so please, post the url to your final rendition in the comments section. If we all can't hang out in the real world, we might as well spend some time together in Springfield.

-- Rob Anderson

By Rob Anderson  |  August 17, 2007; 3:00 PM ET
 
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Comments

First!

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 17, 2007 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Hmmm. Simpsonizing brought to us by Burger King.

Burger King World Headquarters is, regrettably, no longer at a beautiful southern Miami suburban site overlooking Biscayne Bay. The building was stripped to its skeleton by hurricane Andrew in 1992, then refurbished in an open-office style.

Apparently the place was too far from the airport.

Meanwhile, Pisco, Peru is in ruins, the outlook for Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba or Yucatan is not good, and Texans are starting to read the story of Noah and wonder what they've done to deserve a rerun.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 17, 2007 3:12 PM | Report abuse

I had a friend who went to Peru in the 80s and came back with Pisco - a Peruvian paint remover of the finest kind. Talk about leaving things in ruins.

Posted by: byoolin | August 17, 2007 3:16 PM | Report abuse

What a cool idea! Props to Rob! Of course, I am too technologically challenged to actually Simpsonize myself (no Adobe on laptop, no photo on either handy computer), so I'll have to wait until I get home and turn it over to Ivansdad. However, we all know I'm actually Lisa, so just take that as given. Really. Remember the episode where an adult Lisa becomes President? Think of me as that, with less spiky hair. And without the nervous laugh caused by the aging Bart.

Season 10 is out on DVD, y'know.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 17, 2007 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Simpsonize me? Good grief! Who in their right mind would want to look like a no talent silicon enhanced blonde bimbo? Why that Jessica Simpson is... What? Oh, never mind.

Posted by: kurosawaguy Litella | August 17, 2007 3:35 PM | Report abuse

I bet that BK picture database is hilarious to the DB administrators over there.

A treasure trove of humanity.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 17, 2007 3:45 PM | Report abuse

Not that there's anything wrong with spiky hair, mind you. I've tried and tried to get mine to spike, but no. The Boy periodically cuts his (not this year, just "trims") so he can spike it with blue gel. It doesn't look like Lisa's, though. Fortunately he's not channeling Bart either.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 17, 2007 3:45 PM | Report abuse

Rob man that is awesome.

Posted by: Kerric | August 17, 2007 3:45 PM | Report abuse

I couldn't find a picture small enough, or maybe it is just that my head is too big.

I'm sure I would end up a Homer. Back in the day I used to drink a lot of Natty B'oh!

Or is that D'oh!!

Posted by: greenwithenvy | August 17, 2007 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Rob, I made a peachy image of myself, but all I could do is save this to my computer. Since I have no web presence, I have no URL. I am so ashamed. But it was fun.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 4:24 PM | Report abuse

Rob,
You're behind the curve. I Simpsonized myself over two weeks ago when the movie came out.

http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2007/07/homer-riffic.html

My commenters and I are partial to the one on the left.

A blog friend of mine Simpsonized his whole family.

http://www.trustygetto.com/2007/07/ive-been-simpsonized.html

Posted by: yellojkt | August 17, 2007 4:42 PM | Report abuse

RD,

E-mail to me and I can get it on the interwebs. Same offer goes to anyone on the backboodle.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 17, 2007 4:44 PM | Report abuse

Thanks Yellojkt! It has been done.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Heading out--got a hot date! (My wife, and a brace of mai-tais at Szechuan Gardens, followed by some crispy beef and a couple of spring rolls. I lead such an adventurous life.)

Everybody have a good weekend.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 17, 2007 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Jimmy Stewart stamp comes out today:
http://www.indianagazette.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=9412&Itemid=52

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 17, 2007 5:08 PM | Report abuse

Anyone know how to change the hair color on the Simpsonizer? I can't figure that out, or maybe you can't?

Posted by: Aloha | August 17, 2007 5:43 PM | Report abuse

byoolin, Pisco (the drink) is one of the main things (besides the fossil big dead whales) that keeps me going back to Peru.

The drink is named for the now-mostly-destroyed town. Ica region, which includes Pisco, is Peru's main agricultural area, and its wine-country as well (Pisco is made from grapes). The region is, I believe, the world's largest producer of asparagus.

Still not a lot of information coming out of southern Peru. I would not be surprised if the number of homeless in particular skyrockets as more information comes out. Most people in that area live in adobe-and-thatch structures that will not do well in an earthquake.

Several more strong aftershocks today.

Posted by: Dooley | August 17, 2007 5:46 PM | Report abuse

Here's RD all Simpsonized.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/42627063@N00/1152099425/

Posted by: yellojkt | August 17, 2007 5:46 PM | Report abuse

Hey Rob,
Joel wanted you to give us the ability to post inline images in the comments. He told me so. You've got that italics things nearly done, right?

Posted by: yellojkt | August 17, 2007 5:49 PM | Report abuse

Do you think when the Simpsonizer says "minimum size" they mean "maximum?" It wouldn't take my photos. They can't HANDLE the truth!

Posted by: Jumper | August 17, 2007 5:52 PM | Report abuse

Unable to Simpsonize, I posted a recent effort on my blog, http://jumpersbloghouse.blogspot.com/
I realized one day there is no reason to not morph people and cartoon characters. The result is not pretty. It is, however, bizarre.

I could, for example, morph the Simpsonized Joel photo with the one Rob used to achieve it. It would be halfway. Or any other cartoon character of your choice, Rob! Consider this a one-time offer.

Posted by: Jumper | August 17, 2007 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for posting that for me Yellojkt! The resemblance is indeed uncanny.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 6:05 PM | Report abuse

Aloha - I think the hair color is fixed.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 6:23 PM | Report abuse

Bummer, then I will be a fake blond.

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=qwwzekccbcwkzlqrcvenyhawhnrhgybt

Posted by: Aloha | August 17, 2007 6:28 PM | Report abuse

Aloha - I was wrong. If you go to the "hairstyle" section you can change the hair color by clicking on the colormap. If I had known that I wouldn't have allowed myself to end up so prematurely..blue.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 6:30 PM | Report abuse

I see from Aloha that you can link from the site. I feel very stupid.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 6:35 PM | Report abuse

RD, no need to feel stupid, it was purely accidental that I figured out the link. I emailed the image to myself as is offered at the end of your *makeover*, where it says to fill up a friend's email box. The email it sends gives you the link.

Okay, now I need to go back and fix the hair color...

Posted by: Aloha | August 17, 2007 6:46 PM | Report abuse

My Simpsonized image: http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=hzkczlkxgteqqnmdsthiophdqbfrrgob

I don't have Vulcan ears in real life, but it seemed appropriate to the moment.

Posted by: ScienceTim | August 17, 2007 6:47 PM | Report abuse

I thought I killed the boodle, and it turns out somebody forgot to say "new kit!".

Man, things have gone downhill under new management already.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 6:47 PM | Report abuse

Helpful comment: As revealed by Aloha, if you want to get your picture as an URL you have to email it to yourself! So, with thanks and apologies to Yellojkt, I present my updated pic:

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=kmwodvpfjuyqbmxaivjtjzjfmzzdfjho

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 6:47 PM | Report abuse

Gee, Aloha, your picture is kind of ... enticing!

Posted by: ScienceTim | August 17, 2007 6:48 PM | Report abuse

Okay, this is much better

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=geqjgwlpixxaisexdpitrvrzhmgiiwdr

Posted by: Aloha | August 17, 2007 6:50 PM | Report abuse

I'm not a Simpsons fan. Instead I point people to my self-portrait on

http://wilbrodthegnome.blogspot.com/

Which looks just like me... except for the ears and...um.

Well, it's small, humanoid and has brown hair. That's close enough!

Anybody want to be gnomized, e-mail me and I'll get back to you someday.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 6:50 PM | Report abuse

Way cute, Aloha.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 6:52 PM | Report abuse

D'oh!
http://flickr.com/photos/35877650@N00/?saved=1

Posted by: Boko999 | August 17, 2007 6:56 PM | Report abuse

Well, remember, this is a Simpson version of me. The real me is not nearly as good looking.

Posted by: Aloha | August 17, 2007 6:57 PM | Report abuse

Boko - that looks eerily like your picture. And SciTim - the ears are very becoming. The pic seems to capture your impish grin quite well.

This thing really seems to work.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 7:16 PM | Report abuse


I've been Simpsonized--

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=ngusjzqhxyxiarmddfslmbkveijphnhk

And I created my own avatar from scratch last week, but it appears to have expired (?)

http://www.simpsonsmovie.com/sendfriend/kbbme_1772007195819.jpg

Posted by: kbertocci | August 17, 2007 7:20 PM | Report abuse

Stinking thing keeps telling me "try again", "too busy"... Well you know what? I'm busy, too.

stupid fording moron arsehole friggin mudder bugger...

Posted by: martooni | August 17, 2007 7:32 PM | Report abuse

Why does everyone who's been Simpsonized have a receding chin? And other than Boko, really no facial hair? It looks like the guys haven't matured enough to know the meaning of razor? Why does Padouk have a Duncan Doughnut around his mouth? And not a necktie or bowtie in sight (unless it's in your pasta tonight)?

Posted by: Loomis | August 17, 2007 7:39 PM | Report abuse

Disturbingly lifelike:
http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=ocqxxuzxeoykqparhdkmclpfrxxuapkm

Posted by: frostbitten | August 17, 2007 7:46 PM | Report abuse

Okay... so I've tried like twelve times to submit my ugly mug to the Simpsonator, and got nuttin.

Talk about "d'oh". This is just plain old stupidity. Every time I try to upload a pic, it tells me [paraphrased] "sorry, we're just too dang popular, try again when all the more important internet users are finished."

If they're trying to get people to spend $8.00 a head to watch a frigging TV show on the big screen, you'd think they'd at least buy up enough bandwidth and server capacity to allow their movie promo applications to work.

Stupid Stupid Stupid.

Guess what? My $8 is going to buy booze. Eff off, Mr. "Let's-save-a-couple-dollars-on-web-hosting-Groening".

Heck... even Maggie coulda designed a more reliable web app.

Posted by: martooni | August 17, 2007 7:47 PM | Report abuse

ScienceTim-that's how I've always pictured you. You have Mathew Broderick's voice BTW.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 17, 2007 7:51 PM | Report abuse

D'Oh! You're a near Hillary-look alike, frostbitten ;).

Martooni-- I'll chose to believe that you have a chin so manly that they blew a fuse trying to transform it into a chinless wonder. Hence, the automated excuses.

But you can e-mail me your mug and I'll try for something suitably unrealistic and gnomish.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 7:54 PM | Report abuse

martooni - take a deep breath and try again. I think yours could be epic.

Linda- Have you ever *watched* the Simpsons?

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 7:54 PM | Report abuse

Does anyone else get creeped out by the Burger King? I used to laugh at kids who were afraid of clowns. No more.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 17, 2007 8:06 PM | Report abuse

martooni - check your email for a special offer.

Boko - I have long thought "The King" was creepy. Especially as portrayed in the "Wake up with The King" commercials.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 8:09 PM | Report abuse

My bad Simpsonized self:

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=vtevbxsrhqjewxakdybvvubittgombsa

Posted by: Yoki | August 17, 2007 8:15 PM | Report abuse

Guess we're lucky they caught this legal goof in time...

Arkansas: We continue to be unique.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070817/ap_on_re_us/marriage_age_arkansas;_ylt=AmVFG1jrMdi8mNxe4IFnMMZH2ocA

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 8:15 PM | Report abuse

I think that Rob did us a big frivolous Friday favour. This is way fun.

Posted by: Yoki | August 17, 2007 8:17 PM | Report abuse

I think all of the Simpsonized women are alarmingly hot. But, given the source material, how could it be different?

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 8:22 PM | Report abuse

Good one Yoki. I added the dog because Buddy resembles Santa's Little Helper but he didn't show up in the final Simpsonization.

RD- You were right about the high speed internet connection. I have the feeling I'm going to be pulling my hair out when I go home to the *&%$)%^ dial-up.

No dead plants at my sister's yet, all draperies niclely installed and she's home tomorrow so I may be able to put last year's nastiness behind me.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 17, 2007 8:34 PM | Report abuse

Martooni
**Heck... even Maggie coulda designed a more reliable web app.**

I could be offended, but I don't even know what a web app is.

(I've been away for two weeks or so, and next week I'm going in for knee replacement surgery, part deux, so forgive me for not participating.)

Posted by: Maggie O'D | August 17, 2007 8:36 PM | Report abuse

Maggie, my goodness! Hope everything goes well. I understand the recovery is a b1tch but it's worth the effort. Your second, I take it? At least you know what you're in for. Blessings!

Posted by: Slyness | August 17, 2007 8:40 PM | Report abuse

Boko and Buddy999-- nice pix. Buddy looks pretty handsome.

What's his mom, a husky-schnauzer mix? What a cute white face-- worthy of the cartoon Warner Brothers (and Dot, too!).

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 8:45 PM | Report abuse

Maggie O'D, my father-in-law had his knee replaced earlier this summer. He was out on the golf course within six weeks. So I wish you nothing but a quick recovery.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 8:48 PM | Report abuse

I don't believe this. I went to bed, wake up and find 2 new kits. He's working hard b'cuz he's on probation.

Posted by: rain forest | August 17, 2007 8:48 PM | Report abuse

Missed ya around the ol' Boodle, Maggie.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 17, 2007 8:49 PM | Report abuse

The Burger King is pure evil I say. Totally creeps me out.

Posted by: Aloha | August 17, 2007 8:57 PM | Report abuse

Missed the fun again today, not because of Internet difficulties, but because I was really busy at work. I don't have a picture of myself that's close enough to Simpsonize so I'll just enjoy everyone else's.

Slyness, congratulations on the grandmother thing, even if it's once removed. As I think I told you when we met, being a grandmother is terrific, but they grow up way too fast.

Maggie, good luck with the surgery. I know an 80 year old who had it done and she was fine after about a month or six weeks, so I'm sure you will be up and running (figuratively) in no time. I had a hip replacement almost three years ago, it was he11 for the first six weeks, then it got better fast. Of course I worked out to make sure it was flexible and strong, but I think you know that you need to do that.

Posted by: Bad Sneakers | August 17, 2007 9:02 PM | Report abuse

Maggie O'D, I hope your surgery goes well. Check in when you can. When you can't, know we are thinking of you and missing you.

Posted by: Yoki | August 17, 2007 9:03 PM | Report abuse

Strange World; Kerric and SonofCarl and dr, would you each or all be willing to drop me a line at dbioyoki@hotmail.com with the following subject line: Proposed Western Canadian BPH -- ?

That odd punctuation is meant to indicate that I am asking the question, but the subject line need not include the question mark. Or something.

Posted by: Yoki | August 17, 2007 9:08 PM | Report abuse

haha

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=rdmoeggonugzgwuvbowmnclyddqajlwl

Posted by: L.A. lurker | August 17, 2007 9:12 PM | Report abuse

Seriously. Totally hot.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 9:18 PM | Report abuse

Three moonflowers this evening.

This odd person was sighted walking Poodleparkian:
http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=anvfuzocvdonrssnavbgnscjrizoxkyj

Posted by: College Parkian | August 17, 2007 9:19 PM | Report abuse

CP - I've got *four* buds on the moonflower, so I guess it liked the bunnypoo tea. No blooms yet, but all systems seem primed.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 17, 2007 9:24 PM | Report abuse

BPTea, should be bottled. Are the buds about two inches long? They can unfurl on a hot night.

Take care, MO'D. Will be better outside of that tunnel.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 17, 2007 9:34 PM | Report abuse

LAL and CP, love your Simpsonized pics.

Like martooni's, mine didn't go through. The software analyzed the photo for half an hour, then I gave up. I really don't have a suitable picture. By design.

Glad to hear they're working you hard, Bad Sneaks.

TBG and I had a pleasant visit to a local rose garden and then took the tour of the oldest house in the county. I hadn't been in almost 20 years and they've added quite a bit. Afterwards we met Dr. G, Gdottir, and Mr. T for supper at our favorite Italian restaurant run by Greeks. Good, cheap food - it's an unbeatable combination. By their account, SonofG is nicely launched into college life. Tomorrow they wend their way back towards DC on the back roads, where neat stuff is to be found.

Posted by: Slyness | August 17, 2007 9:39 PM | Report abuse

This makes me wonder- if a robot's understanding of humor depends on its programming, should computer science types be handling the job?

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070816-new-robot-thinks-knock-knock-jokes-are-funny.html

Posted by: frostbitten | August 17, 2007 9:41 PM | Report abuse


Cyberspace/Springfield BPH:

http://attachments.wetpaintserv.us/WOw%24%2BJe5rZT7o%24nTLdGVpw%3D%3D54385

I'll check back later to see if more faux Simpsons show up...

Posted by: kbertocci | August 17, 2007 9:53 PM | Report abuse

Frosti, check your e-mail!

Rob, that was so much fun!

Posted by: dbG | August 17, 2007 9:55 PM | Report abuse

kb-a Springfield bph!

dbG-got it-thanks.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 17, 2007 10:12 PM | Report abuse

SCC-So of course it's a Springfield BPH, kbertocci said that-which I would have seen if I hadn't jumped straight to the link.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 17, 2007 10:15 PM | Report abuse

I suspect they know the Awful Expressionless King freaks us all out and they do it anyway. The marketing logic escapes me, but I'm sure they have a theory.

Posted by: Jumper | August 17, 2007 10:17 PM | Report abuse

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=wdjmriaecveqboeyzouqgrdjxtyebjhv

I have loved seeing people!

Posted by: dbG | August 17, 2007 10:18 PM | Report abuse

The only thing I'll say about the Burger King is that he looks awfully like a Jewish guy I know around the eyes (not so much everything else). I think he's probably modelled on a real face, just kind of stylized out a bit.

Which raises the question is Burger King remotely kosher, anyway?

Did the advertising agency that got the contract decide to strike one against cheeseburger eating in a passive-aggressive way?


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 10:32 PM | Report abuse

Talk about an interactive boodle... and nearly 100% on topic.

Spent a wonderful afternoon and evening with Slyness and Mr. T. Lots of fun was had by all. We took off early so that Daughter of G could watch High School Musical 2, but the hotel DOESN'T HAVE THE DISNEY CHANNEL. We think the Tivo at home is set to record. I sure hope so.

I think I really have fallen in love with Charlotte. Great city with so much going on and lots of potential. I have nearly learned to navigate the roads (if you've tried to, you'll understand what that really means). The key? Every road changes names at least once. When someone tells you to take Eastway, they really mean you want Wendover... or Runnymede... or Woodlawn... or Billy Graham Parkway.


Posted by: TBG | August 17, 2007 10:34 PM | Report abuse

I don't have any suitable photos - I even tried one of my kid, the Jimmy Stewart stamp, and Jack Bruce. No joy.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 17, 2007 10:38 PM | Report abuse

The King whose face is made of glue and sawdust got me thinking of horrible meaningless corporate characters, and things like http://news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=856&id=876922007
and Izzy, the mascot for the Olympic games in Atlanta a few years ago
http://www.awn.com/mag/issue1.4/articles/kowalskizzy1.4.html
and Izzy got me thinking of the most stealthy character of all, Mr. Coffee, a corporate branding effort that achieved total invisibility: in the history of the company there has been as far as I know, no actual Mr. Coffee character at all. A name without a face, Mr. Coffee is. A character whose visage resides totally in the mind of anyone who hears the words "Mr. Coffee" and conjures up their own shorthand mental picture. Like I said, a masterpiece of marketing cyberwarefare. And this worries me. Apparently it's the "in" thing among corporations to see themselves as invisible stealth-viruses, players in a Jerzy Kosinski-like scenario of rarified international piracy. Instead of the Bourne Supremacy we have the ad people fantasizing the Burger King Ultimatum. The Carlyle Invisibility. The movie will be a Goodtimes production in association with King Films, a subsidiary of Golan Globeus / Masterworks Productions. A Bright Sky film.

The thing that gets me is the ad people are pulling down 4 zeros more than me, and they have actually convinced themselves they are geniuses.

Posted by: Jumper | August 17, 2007 10:42 PM | Report abuse

Kinda late in the game... but here I am!

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=cpylibeyqsmisozdhnpwutuhdqeglxmq

Posted by: TBG | August 17, 2007 10:50 PM | Report abuse

Woo Hoo, TBG!

If dmd doesn't Simpsonize herself soon, we'll have to do it for her.

Posted by: dbG | August 17, 2007 10:54 PM | Report abuse

Simpsonized at http://jumpersbloghouse.blogspot.com/
I just play a guy who wears a tie on TV.

Posted by: Jumper | August 17, 2007 10:56 PM | Report abuse

That's cute but definitely not as good-looking as the original, TBG.

Yoki, chic 'do and Indian shirt!


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 17, 2007 10:58 PM | Report abuse

Now I'm just getting carried away. Actually, just hanging out in the kitchen...

http://tbgboodler.blogspot.com/2007/08/ive-been-simpsonized.html

Posted by: TBG | August 17, 2007 11:05 PM | Report abuse

It's getting crowded in here--but the more the merrier! :-)

http://attachments.wetpaintserv.us/ml6bShgFk4JYHrrTPwAqDA%3D%3D57006

Good night, see y'all tomorrow--or sometime.

Posted by: kbertocci | August 17, 2007 11:13 PM | Report abuse

Silly Jumper, Joe DiMaggio was Mr. Coffee. Here's an interview with the inventor:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4981135

Posted by: frostbitten | August 17, 2007 11:16 PM | Report abuse

You know, it's really pretty amazing how much these characters resemble the real thing!

G'night all!

Posted by: TBG | August 17, 2007 11:17 PM | Report abuse

"Mr. Coffee and Joltin' Joe DiMaggio"
Thanks so much, Frostbitten, that was totally cool and interesting. I actually worked for Mr. Coffee, and didn't know that! And you answered Simon & Garfunkle's question at the same time.

Posted by: Jumper | August 17, 2007 11:25 PM | Report abuse

I may have to get around to Simpsonizing myself at some point.

Went to see William Gibson this evening at Politics & Prose, he was interesting and quite funny.

"'Neuromancer' was the rock band I never had. I can't play a musical instrument... it was sort of like...what if Robert Heinlein were a member of Joy Division?"

Amazingly, that did not plant a tune cootie in *my* head.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 17, 2007 11:28 PM | Report abuse

TBG, g'nite.

Posted by: Yoki | August 17, 2007 11:31 PM | Report abuse

G'nite, all.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 17, 2007 11:38 PM | Report abuse

G'night bc. G'night TBG. G'night dmd. G'night dbG. G'night all.

Love,
Tgirl

Posted by: Yoki | August 17, 2007 11:48 PM | Report abuse

Now here's an important question that Gail Collins asks in her NYT op-ed column for Saturday:

Cheap-shot break: Mitt Romney's well-manicured suburban lawn was kept that way by illegal immigrants. The workers were hired through a local landscaping company. The Boston Globe tracked some of them down back in their native Guatemala, and they said they worked for $9 to $10 an hour and that Romney had never inquired about their legal status, reserving his interaction to an occasional "buenos días."

I am only bringing this up because there seems to be a modern-day political rule under which people who hire illegal immigrants as nannies become ineligible for public service in any form, while those who hire illegal immigrants as lawn mowers and hedge trimmers get a free pass. I'm sure there is an excellent reason for this that has nothing to do with the fact that the nannies do work normally performed by women while mowing the lawn is a guy's job.

Rob, what do you think?

Posted by: Loomis | August 17, 2007 11:54 PM | Report abuse

Oh what fun looking at all the simpsonized pics. Thanks, Rob! Even though we miss Joel you are doing a good job. I will try to post my version before the end of the weekend.

BTW, we continue to get daily early evening storms with lots of lightening and plenty of rain. This is a semi-arid climate...or used to be. Looks like global warming to me...really. Kind of scary but what can you do. Actually, what can China do.

CP--glad you are enjoying your moonflowers.

Posted by: birdie | August 18, 2007 12:08 AM | Report abuse

Loomis, seriously, have you ever watched the Simpsons? I say no way.

Posted by: birdie | August 18, 2007 12:13 AM | Report abuse

I tried to Simpsonize myself, but it just kept saying please wait...I very much enjoyed seeing everyone's Simpson's selves. I think the Achenblog was just too much for it to handle.

Rob- wow...what a great job. I don't want Joel to be worried about his blogdom, but there's no denying that you have been a most excellent sub. Trapper keepers! PeeChees! Simpsonizing! Just what one wants from a blog.

I cannot count how many times I laughed today as I backboodled! I'm not sure if I laughed harder at omni's 1:11 pod people or k-guy's 12:52. I married the type k-guy categorized.

dooley - a friend of ours spent several months in Peru and came back with a fondness for Pisco sours...I don't know what is in it, but we have developed a real taste for them....I don't ask, I just drink them when he makes them.

Good night all...

Posted by: Kim | August 18, 2007 12:23 AM | Report abuse

I'd Simpsonize myself but I don't have a photo on computer. Not to mention I'm also technologically challenged. It's great looking at all the Simpsonized self.

You did great Rob! You might just pass probation. I'll put in a good word for you.

Posted by: rain forest | August 18, 2007 1:31 AM | Report abuse

Weekend SonofCarl

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=bgarxdmscrplfmluxpqrzrzsdgcshkef

Posted by: SonofCarl | August 18, 2007 2:07 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, friends. The kits are coming in so fast, I don't have time to post a comment or read them for that matter. This is truly remarkable. At the rate we're getting new kits, some of us will begin to look our age. Old. And of course, the topics are a dead giveaway. I don't own a cell phone. I tell people, I can hardly talk on the regular phone, why would I create more misery for myself with a cell phone. I need one. They do come in handy. I wonder if they make them for hearing-impaired folks? You know with a light or something? A pulse, maybe.

I don't like the Simpsons. And don't really need anything to make me look more odd(for lack of a better word) than I already do. Thank you.


Congrats, Slyness. I played the grandmother last night at church. She's still here.


Maggie, good thoughts and prayers for you. I hope everything goes well, and that soon you'll be running around.

Do they really give lasix to horses? That is one pill I don't like.


Moring,Scotty, Mudge, Slyness, and all.*waving*

Hope your weekend is great. I will be at the Center this morning helping to get it up and running for the coming school year. Where did the time go?

We're still dealing with triple digit heat. I hope it's better today.

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 18, 2007 6:31 AM | Report abuse

Good morning.
Wilbrod- The ancecestory of Buddy's mum is unknown. She was so tiny (flat too after the dump truck incident) I thought she was a cross between some class of terrier and a husky.
BTW Buddy was born at the farm were I captured the photo of Osama bin Dave.

Loomis- I think it matters who the employer of the illegal immigrant is. As your post points out, the landscapers were working for a contracter. A nanny or house servant is probably employed by the householder. It would be hard for someone to remain even wilfully ignorant about the status of someone raising their children. Sorry. A valiant try.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 18, 2007 7:20 AM | Report abuse

Don't touch that Johnny!! You don't know how it died. The city will send someone by to pick up the carcass.

Posted by: Concerned Dad999 | August 18, 2007 8:08 AM | Report abuse

TBG very important comment first, older daughters review of High School Musical 2, it was good, most sequels s*ck, this one didn't. Technically I can say I watched it too as I was in the room while it was on, but I was reading old family letters and managed to totally tune out the show. Glad to hear you are enjoying your weekend.

dbG as per your request my Simpsonized pic, this is so much better than my real picture - wonder if I could use it for my drivers liscense photo.

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=bfslgwkiwxlqkoiyrmboqagcjsclqggu

Posted by: dmd | August 18, 2007 8:11 AM | Report abuse

Same here dmd, I think this is what the passport office will get next time.

WE should be able to customize the dog, that mutt doesn't look like anything I've ever taken care of.

http://picasaweb.google.fr/ShriekingDenizen/Boodle

Posted by: Shrieking Denizen | August 18, 2007 8:34 AM | Report abuse

Joel must be writing from his time machine (or he's on vacation somewhere near the international date line)...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/17/AR2007081701717.html

And think of the irony of getting this message when trying to post a second comment on an article that encourages "frenetic" page reloading:

"We restrict rapid posting of multiple comments for quality reasons. You have have already posted a comment within the last several seconds. Please try again later."

Posted by: martooni | August 18, 2007 8:39 AM | Report abuse

btw... Mornin' everybody.

(*getting second cup-o-joe*)

Posted by: martooni | August 18, 2007 8:42 AM | Report abuse

G'morning boodle. Watch your faxes for home grown tomatoes, waxed beans picked this morning, and mixed salad greens. Get the water boiling for sweet corn and lock your car doors lest someone leave a gift of zucchini. Yes, every garden in the frozen north is peaking at once and fresh vegies are being exchanged, given, and left anonymously throughout the land.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 18, 2007 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Hello All. Frosti, I have to agree about the garden. Although our tomatoes are just now starting to ripen in more than ones and twos. My Mr. Stripey has almost ripe fruit but they don't look especially striped. The beans are pretty much over, but the cukes go on forever. The sunflowers haven't flowered yet but they are really really tall. I've never planted them before and was looking forward to their huge flowers, guess I need patience (and more sun in that part of the garden would have helped too). Gorgeous day here after a muggy Friday and overnight t-storms. The air is crisp and the temps are in the lower 70's. Perfect weather to plant the hydrangea I bought last Sunday on sale. I aim to have a hydrangea garden eventually, with as many as I can find room to plant. I am crazy about those flowers.

Posted by: Bad Sneakers | August 18, 2007 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Boko, re: your 7:20 a.m. response...

Loomis- I think it matters who the employer of the illegal immigrant is. As your post points out, the landscapers were working for a contracter. A nanny or house servant is probably employed by the householder. It would be hard for someone to remain even wilfully ignorant about the status of someone raising their children. Sorry. A valiant try.

It always amazes me, Boko, what a man can accomplish through surrogacy. Let's take Fred Thompson in Iowa as an example.

This paragraph comes from an article appearing today at nyt.com, written by reporter Susan Saulny:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/18/us/politics/18thompson.html

But if it was a debut, it was an unusual one: Mr. Thompson was shaking hands but, having not yet declared his candidacy, was barred by federal regulations from asking for votes. Nor can he advertise to promote his political ambitions, and so there were no "Thompson for president" bumper stickers or lapel pins to hand out.

Thie following from our own local paper this morning, an article written by Stewart Powell of Hearst:

Former Sen. Fred Thompson, R-Tenn., making his long-awaited presidential campaign debut in Iowa, stoked the buzz at the state fair by privately recruiting activists to help him in the precinct caucuses in January.

Thompson has yet to declare his candidacy. As Loomispouse commented, "It's amazing how he's out [in Iowa] not campaigning."

Posted by: Loomis | August 18, 2007 9:55 AM | Report abuse

Gee, tomorrow's Achenbach today.

Meanwhile, my 10' tall, 15' wide clump of Heliconia collinsiana (big erect banana-looking leaves) is finally popping out a bunch of flowers. It's been putting on a big leaf show every summer, but this will be the first serious flower since it was planted in winter 2003. In its first year, it survived a tree landing on it in a hurricane, then another hurricane. It also put up with being more or less flattened by a tropical storm the next year. A swath of Flaveria (sort of a tropical beach goldenrod with lots of tiny yellow flower heads) is also coming into flower. The plants have been growing vigorously enough to sort of smother anything that gets in their way. Good weed killer, along with African oregano, which grows faster than you can possibly make spaghetti. I have enough to spaghettify hundreds of hungry people.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 18, 2007 10:05 AM | Report abuse

Thinking of Flaveria, one species, F. trinerva, has a truly weird distribution according to the Flora of North America: Near water, saline and gypseous areas; 0-1900 m; Ariz., Calif., Fla., Mass., Mo., N.Mex., Tex., Va.; West Indies; Central America (British Honduras); South America (Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela); probably introduced in Asia (India, Middle East); Africa; Pacific Islands (Hawaii).

"gypseous" means loaded with gypsum, the stuff wallboard is made of. Probably a weed in Hawaii. Could it have come to Massachusetts and Virginia by ship?

Here's a page from a great Miami outfit on the Flaveria I've got: http://regionalconservation.org/beta/nfyn/plantdetail.asp?tx=Flavline

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 18, 2007 10:13 AM | Report abuse

That's lovely, Dave. I understand why you planted it and are glad it's finally blooming. I've been out hacking at the Lady Banks rose, which is trellised along the carport posts and ceiling. Mr. T cuts the new shoots as they threaten to overtake the carport, but it's my job to go underneath and take out the dead branches. The birds love it because it's sturdy enough to support nests but not to support the weight of a cat, so there are seven nests in it now. It's fun to watch them.

Posted by: Slyness | August 18, 2007 10:29 AM | Report abuse

Sneaks-I have one sunflower left from the fancy seeds I planted, it may bloom if we don't get an early frost. The sunflowers the birds planted for me underneath the feeder are heavy with seeds. I'm not much for bright yellow and red as a garden color scheme (that's no scheme it's a conspiracy)but have enjoyed the sunflower, orangey red gladiloa, heavenly blue morning glory combo that chance produced outside my kitchen window. A garden of hydrangea sounds like an idea worth stealing.

Re: why the big deal about undocumented nannies vs. landscapers? Have you ever seen a movie titled "The Lawn Mower Diaries?"

Posted by: frostbitten | August 18, 2007 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Hope this works... A friend Simpsonized me a while ago... :-)

http://home.comcast.net/~polichat/home/ScottySimpson.jpg

Apart from having a shortened weekend due to business travel tomorrow, it's PERFECT here!!!

*weekend Grover waves to all*

Posted by: Scottynuke | August 18, 2007 10:59 AM | Report abuse

frostbitten, it's hard not to like sunflowers. I also like black-eyed susans--we have many varieties here in CO and they even grow along the sides of roads this time of year. Regarding all the rain and lightening, we had it last evening for hours. But as a result the mornings are beautiful--everything so lush and green, the air clean and crisp.

Enjoy your day, everyone.

Posted by: birdie | August 18, 2007 11:15 AM | Report abuse

frostbitten, it's hard not to like sunflowers. I also like black-eyed susans--we have many varieties here in CO and they even grow along the sides of roads this time of year. Regarding all the rain and lightening, we had it last evening for hours. But as a result the mornings are beautiful--everything so lush and green, the air clean and crisp.

Enjoy your day, everyone.

Posted by: birdie | August 18, 2007 11:15 AM | Report abuse

I swear I only hit the submit button once!

Posted by: birdie | August 18, 2007 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Birdie-(my youngest sister's nickname is Birdie BTW)a sentiment worth posting twice anyway. The mad rush to produce seed that wildflowers make this time of year never ceases to please me. I love fall.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 18, 2007 11:22 AM | Report abuse

Speaking of sunflowers, check out Bean standing next to one of ours...

http://www.weefolkoutfitters.com/images/bean_and_sunflower.jpg

Posted by: martooni | August 18, 2007 11:43 AM | Report abuse

great pic Martooni.

For those of you still suffering in DC area heat, or worse, please excuse references to fall. It was 51 when I got up this morning and the temp is screaming up to a quite lovely high of 75-80, with a breeze coming off the lake. Just remember your spring comes a month before mine.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 18, 2007 11:50 AM | Report abuse

Bean is dwarfed. Next year, maybe some climbing beans to scramble up the sunflower stem? I think that's what Native Americans did. The idea of segregating the crop plants by species was alien. And the beans provided nitrogen.

Thinking of nitrogen, a science story this week says that kudzu (very much a member of the bean family) fixes so much nitrogen, it has to be considered a source of pollution.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 18, 2007 11:58 AM | Report abuse

Dave... that ain't a bad idea (the climbing beans). The stalk on that sunflower is like a tree trunk so I think it would handle the extra weight.

btw... that particular sunflower is a variety called "Mammoth" -- sure lives up to its name.

Posted by: martooni | August 18, 2007 12:12 PM | Report abuse

Good afternoon, all.

martooni, Joel's lead time for Outlook is several days (working on the final edit of his piece was probably the last thing he did on his way out the door midweek).

Which is better than the old Rough Draft days, when the lead time was 3 weeks or so.

Still, a deadline is a deadline.

The weather in DC today is just delightful today. For once.

Those of you dealing with rain and floods, and oppressive heat, please allow me to fax you some of the local weather...

Have a good day, all, wherever you are.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 18, 2007 12:36 PM | Report abuse

dmd, perfect! I'd thought your hair would have more red highlights, though.

Ditto on the license. :-)

Posted by: dbG | August 18, 2007 12:43 PM | Report abuse

Is it just me or is it awfully quiet here today?

Hmmm... maybe this is my chance to run around the bunker butt nekkid while waving a pair of scissors.

Posted by: martooni | August 18, 2007 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Maybe we need a new kit?

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 18, 2007 2:08 PM | Report abuse

>It always amazes me, Boko, what a man can accomplish through surrogacy.

Loomis, ever consider there's a large difference between hiring someone employed by another company to do temp. duties in your yard versus hiring a nanny to live in your house, help with your kids, and literally be there all the time? Don't you think you'd be expedcted to know more about the person living in your house than the one blowing leaves across the driveway one day a week 12 days a year?

You are not responsible for making sure the lawn guy does his taxes, but you are responsible for paying taxes on your nanny should he/she work directly for you. Besides any illegal immigration it was mainly the tax issue which brought down most of those people.

So there are both huge fiduciary and scope of work/familiarity issues that should be an obvious difference between the two situations.

D'oh.

Posted by: Error Flynn | August 18, 2007 2:32 PM | Report abuse

Let me hear an "AMEN!", brothers and sisters!

Posted by: martooni | August 18, 2007 2:37 PM | Report abuse

Great pic, martooni.
Unusally cool here in southern Oregon. 75 yesterday and more of the same perdicted. 50 in the mornings. Much better than the 100s we have and usually have this time of the year. Noticablely less forest fires since a couple of weeks ago.
No sunflower seeds sprout under our bird feeders. The doves clean up anything that spills over. I may ahve to try to plant some of those Mammoths next spring.

Posted by: bh | August 18, 2007 2:49 PM | Report abuse

Martooni, you know what they say about running with scissors in the nude.

Pal, just don't trip, okay?

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 2:59 PM | Report abuse

huge fiduciary
AMEN

Posted by: Anonymous | August 18, 2007 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Anyone who wants to play with graphics ought to download sqirlzmorph from http://www.download.com/Sqirlz-Morph/3000-2186_4-10687871.html?tag=lst-0-1
It's good to have some sort of decent photoshop program to prep the images. It's just a fun program.

Posted by: Jumper | August 18, 2007 3:16 PM | Report abuse

Great pic Martooni, what a great looking bean you got there, and the sunflower too.

Scotty - your simpsonized self is fabulous!

Posted by: Aloha | August 18, 2007 3:19 PM | Report abuse

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/17/AR2007081701225.html
Summer Arctic ice melts more than ever before.
"D'oh!" indeed.

Posted by: Jumper | August 18, 2007 3:25 PM | Report abuse

i agree with ef and others that these are totally different scenarios.

on a different subject, loomis, why don't you show some humor and simpsonize yourself? ya know, lighten up and have some fun.

Posted by: L.A. lurker | August 18, 2007 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Howdy. After a long and vicious struggle with my computer, incuding beating the Norton anti-virus thing about the ears and shoulders, I triumphantly installed Adobe Flash and could see everyone's cool Simpsonized selves. However, I still have no photo of my own to Simpsonize. I'll ask Ivansdad for assistance, but I suspect by the time I figure it out we'll be on a new Kit and solving the problem of hunger, or instituting world peace, or something.

We're getting some of Loomis's rain here, but we're happy about it.

I agree with the distinction Error et al made regarding Loomis's "nanny/gardener" question, but it is still a good question. Perhaps the gender distinction lies, as so often, in job division: the woman is more likely to do the heavy lifting on nanny-hiring, involving serious personal fiduciary responsibility, while the man may hire the lawn contractor who hires the illegal workers, with little or no personal fiduciary liability. Therefore the woman nominee/candidate gets grilled about the tax and immigration consequences of her hire, while the man doesn't.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Mr. Rob, Mr. Rob!! Ooooh oooooooooh ooh!!

*holding hand up high*

Mr. Joel always gives us several Kits on the weekend, really and for true!!!

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | August 18, 2007 3:51 PM | Report abuse

I found this very excellent essay at Image journal.
http://www.imagejournal.org/back/021/swander_essay.asp

Beautifully written, and it ends with some gardening.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Bernard (?) Kerick removed himself from the running for Homeland Security chief for not paying nanny taxes. I seem to remember that she was also an illegal alien.

On another topic, pretty much all the presidential candidates have started out with testing-the-water status or exploratory committess. (Hillary called hers a "Listening Tour"...very clever strategy). Thompson isn't doing anything out of the ordinary. He just didn't start super-early like everyone else this election cycle.

Posted by: LostInThought | August 18, 2007 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Fred Thompson-"He's a lawyer, a lobbyist, and a actor. That's two more bad things than John Edwards. Two!"

Fred Thompson- "He smokes! He drinks! He s1uts around!! But there's some bad things about Fred Thompson too."

"He's a lawyer, a lobbyist, and a actor. That's two more bad things than John Edwards. Two!"


redstateupdate.com cracks me up

Posted by: frostbitten | August 18, 2007 6:08 PM | Report abuse

SCC-cracks me up and messes with my cut and paste skills.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 18, 2007 6:15 PM | Report abuse

Wow, Wilbrod, wow! That certainly puts a little knee pain in perspective. I'll never complain again.

Thanks for posting that.

Posted by: Maggie O'D | August 18, 2007 6:22 PM | Report abuse

I really like her writing. I think I'll be looking into that author's books now.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 6:27 PM | Report abuse

I see we have run out of Simpsonizers. It was fun, and helped me to realize how many of the female boodlers are, you know, so vavavoom. (And, of course, I mean that in only a respectful and empowering way.)

This morning was something of a watershed at the Padouk household. My sixteen year old son took his first solo drive. Granted, it was only a few miles to a school car wash fundraiser, but still it made us anxious. Frankly, we were a mess. It was like watching him get on the bus for the first day of school. (Except, when he left for school we were pretty sure he wouldn't be wrecking the bus.) Anyway, we made him call as soon as he arrived and right before he left. We assured him that we would stop doing this. Eventually.

I spent most of the afternoon cleaning out our garage. I do this every Spring. I am quite vigilant. Four hours and a few pounds of inhaled dust later, it now looks, well, less grungy.

I also discovered that over the winter the local rodent population had been using the garage as some sort of love shack. There was evidence of nests beneath several of the shelves. Who knew corrugated steel was such a turn on?

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 18, 2007 6:35 PM | Report abuse

Congratulations, RD, on your offspring's first successful solo flight. May there be many more, and may you eventually learn to breathe while they take place. I've got five years before the Boy is eligible to wreck my nerves in that particular way. I appreciate the opportunity to learn vicariously from you and the other Boodlers with older agents of chaos.

Congratulations also on the garage cleaning. Over Labor Day, or at the end of September, I plan to clean out our shop. It has to be the end of a month so I can hit Big Junk Day. That's where you pile all your large unweildy items on the curb for the city to remove, and casual passersby stop and take almost all of it first. Kind of a free garage sale. It has been over a year since I really went through the thing, so we'll have a big pile. First I'll set off bug bombs, though; currently it is inhabited by wasps (seasonal) and fiddlebacks (eternal). I had to go in there once one winter, and the fiddlebacks gathered around my feet in a semicircle, waiting. I fled before they could advance.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 6:47 PM | Report abuse

Unwieldy. I before E except after C.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 6:48 PM | Report abuse

My characterization:

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=oxmrcxewxyelrhremyrmbjareesaetwj

From prior boodle - I had PeeCee's in junior high and high school.

Posted by: Pacifica | August 18, 2007 6:54 PM | Report abuse

cell phone boodling from Baileys Crossing. Waiting for Bill Gibson to show. I have an enormous pile of books for him to sign. I'm a sf author groupie. Just sad I couldn't hook up with bc and boodle pub crawl Conn. Ave.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 18, 2007 6:56 PM | Report abuse

I viewed pacifica's Simpsonizing (very nice!) but had yellojkt's post in mind -- that will mess with your head.

I just found out the Boy likes Irish punk political music, most of which is like traditional Irish music (which is pretty much all political really) on steroids. Do I have some stuff to inflict on him! He also saw the Jon Stewart "comedy" news show for the first time this week (Karl Rove) and laughed hysterically. I was so proud.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 7:18 PM | Report abuse

Oh, RD, just wait till he's 18 or so and out till 3 ayem. I spent many a sleepless night trying not to worry. I was so glad when my kid moved out because I didn't know where he was! I realize that doesn't make sense, but my mom told me it was easier on her when I was away at college, for the same reason. Good luck.

Ivansmom, you have big junk days every month? Seattle used to do that once a year. My husband would roam neighborhoods and come home with all sorts of stuff. Now you have to haul it to a designated location - not nearly as much fun.

I cleaned off the bookshelves in the living room which become depositories for catalogs, magazines, work-related stuff. Amazing what I found there (tax returns from 2002 and 2003, books I've been looking for, a birthday card suitable for my sister, whose birthday is coming soon).

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 18, 2007 7:19 PM | Report abuse

martooni, that is one great big sunflower, and a beautiful young girl standing beside it.

Slyness, I read that your city lost one of its pioneers, John Belk. The Observer attributed the growth of Charlotte under his leadership. Of course, the only thing I'm familiar with is the department store.

I started reading a new book called "Whoopi" by none other than Whoopi Goldberg. The first chapter deals with "farting", and she calls it wind. I laughed so hard I actually saw stars. The woman is crazy. I don't know if I'll be able to finish it. Hurts something awful to laugh.

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 18, 2007 7:22 PM | Report abuse

Once or twice a week, Thing 2 (18) drives away with Dear Child (4) in the back seat. I no longer panic, and sometimes get giddy at the thought of a few quiet hours.
Thing 1 (the man-child, 21) doesn't take Dear Child out, as she's not allowed into clubs, and apparently, those are the only places he goes.

Posted by: LostInThought | August 18, 2007 7:34 PM | Report abuse

Geez, I go on vacation for two weeks only to discover that there's been an Achencoup.

Posted by: Boodleaire | August 18, 2007 7:38 PM | Report abuse

I love Whoopi-- a very funny gal. If you need a poetry break, try this one out, Cassandra.
http://www.poetrymagazine.org/magazine/0707/poem_179809.html

Just change "Cassandra" for "Patrica" and it could speak to you on your down days ;).

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 7:54 PM | Report abuse

Science Saturday newsflash: Sharks have fingers.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20070817/sc_livescience/howsharkshidetheirfingers

Comments, Dooley? Now I'm worried-- are sharks flipping us the middle finger all the time? What about whales?

Also, how solid is the fossil record of shark evolution, given they have cartiligious skeletons?


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 7:58 PM | Report abuse

I may be reduced to having Mr. T take a picture of me so I can Simpsonize myself. Come to think of it, I can find one of him and see what happens...I should do that!

Older daughter has settled down since her hard-partying college years. There were several occasions on which she prevailed upon her younger sister, who does not drink, to act as designated driver for her. I must say that I am grateful that she and all her friends are very careful about not driving when they have been drinking. It's a relief to know that they are that responsible. Yes, ML, it really is easier when they are away and you don't know what they're doing.

Yes, Cassandra, John Belk did quite a bit for the city, besides run a successful department store. My time with the City was after his, so I never met him, but my impression was that he was a down-to-earth person in spite of the wealth.

Glad you're enjoying Whoopi's book. I look forward to hearing your review of it.

Wilbrod, that was a wonderful essay. I hope that her medical care has improved since then. To go ten months with that kind of pain and not get a good diagnosis does not inspire trust in physicians.

It was a good day in the family. After a month of cold showers, elder daughter has hot water in her condo. It's an older complex with aluminum wiring so replacing the coils in the water heater didn't fix it. Her dad finally figured it out and replaced the breaker, the wiring to the heater, and used the proper wire nuts. Now she doesn't have to come here to take a shower!

Ivansmom, what are fiddlebacks? They sound like something I wouldn't care to deal with. We have earwigs, and they are bad enough.

Posted by: Slyness | August 18, 2007 8:00 PM | Report abuse

I'm back home to the dail-up. I started download Pacifica Simpson at 8:04 and it's 92% done.
sigh

Posted by: Boko999 | August 18, 2007 8:15 PM | Report abuse

For those that are interested:

Barry Bonds just hit number 760.

My Simpson is not too far from how I look - but the hair color is too dark. Imagine that picture with white hair.

Posted by: Pacifica | August 18, 2007 8:27 PM | Report abuse

Cassandra... when Slyness and I met up with Mr. T for dinner last night, one of the first things he said to her was "Mayor Belk died."

I don't know much about John Belk, but many of the buildings, programs and facilities at my son's new home bear the Belk name, including this fantastic program that allows every student at Queens the opportunity to travel abroad after their junior year at no cost...

http://www.queens.edu/news_detail.asp?press_id=1984§ion=home

Posted by: TBG | August 18, 2007 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Slyness, fiddlebacks are brown recluse spiders. Very poisonous. Their bite tends to rot the flesh around the wound. Unpleasant. They are called "fiddlebacks" colloquially because the marking on the abdomen? thorax? looks like a violin.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 8:31 PM | Report abuse

On sharks:

I'm a little surprised that sharks have these genes; I would have expected their first occurrence to be in the sarcopterygian (lobe-finned) fish--the ancestors to the land vertebrates (tetrapods).

HOX genes are responsible for most segmented and branching structures (like limbs in vertebrates). It's surprising that sharks have these particular genes because their limbs show a less developed segmentation and branching than in the sarcopterygians. This sugests that the develpoment of the tetrapod limb was not a completely new genetic development, but more likely a change in degree and timing of expression.

The shark fossil record is better than might be expected. Shark teeth preserve beautifully, and in most adult sharks the vertebral centra and otic capsules also ossify. There have also been a number of relatively complete skeletons preserved in various unusual deposits. For DC boodlers, there is a largely complete Cretaceous shark skeleton on exhibit in the fossil sea life hall at the Smithsonian.

Couldn't get my Simpsonized image to work yesterday, maybe I'll try again later.

Posted by: Dooley | August 18, 2007 8:32 PM | Report abuse

Uh-oh, this is not good:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/19/nyregion/19fire.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin

Posted by: Slyness | August 18, 2007 8:43 PM | Report abuse

Okay, I'll play.

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=eozxtcgqczaoxsfupuavrdbzbdackled

Posted by: LostInThought | August 18, 2007 9:03 PM | Report abuse

http://www.uncommondescent.com/evolution/shark-fins-human-limbs/

Apparently the limb genes originated in the medial fin (back fin) structure, which makes sense.

As Dooley knows, a gene can turn on in other body areas from which it originally evolved. That is called ectopicism. Fruit flies have developed mutations that resulted in legs instead of eyes, eyes in abnormal places, etc. Some are lethal, some not.

Apparently the genes are related to the genes that forms the lamprey back fins (which are feathery...)
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14045413/GT1/8307/

Perhaps the duplicated genes got a retrotransposon that caused them to come under the control of the same (or copies of) the homeobox genes that help develop paired gills and kidney/sexual organs.

All vertebrates urinate and defecate from apertures close to the hind limbs (or remmants).

It'll be a fun puzzle tracing how lateral fins evolved, anyway.


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 9:18 PM | Report abuse

All you ladies look stunning even simpsonized! Of course, you men are handsome too!

I'm taking a break from staring at the things that need packing. A couple of weeks ago my landlord told me he sold "my house". The new owner doesn't want to rent it out so I'll have to move. It's such a no fun activity. Maybe I'll just go bake a cake. Sure beats packing.

Posted by: rain forest | August 18, 2007 9:27 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry to hear that, rainforest. How very disconcerting that conversation must have been. I hope you found a place you like as much, perhaps without a cobra. Enjoy the cake!

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 9:30 PM | Report abuse

Got it to work this time, but it's pretty svelte compared to the real me:

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=mamsdyhndfhirppwjhxrkidjqmigxhjz

"Perhaps the duplicated genes got a retrotransposon that caused them to come under the control of the same (or copies of) the homeobox genes that help develop paired gills and kidney/sexual organs."

Interesting idea, Wilbrod. Ribs could fit within the same pattern, and possibly the skull as well.

I really like the idea that paired appendages could be an example of ectopicism that happened to be selected for because of a conferred advantage (increased stability in swimming.) The earliest chordates (Pikaia, the conodont animals) do not appear to have had paired appendages.

Posted by: Dooley | August 18, 2007 9:30 PM | Report abuse

Brown recluse spiders I'm familiar with, Ivansmom. Not good that you have them all the time. I thought they were shy and typically hid themselves? Yours must be aggressive, or hungry. Or something.

Mr. T just got an email saying that two firefighters died at the Deutsche Bank fire. Deaths fighting a fire in a building being demolished. That is just wrong.

Posted by: Slyness | August 18, 2007 9:46 PM | Report abuse

Dooley, did we go to school together in Philadelphia?

LiT, LAL, wooh! . . . I admit it was disconcerting to find my exact hairstyle as a cartoon.

rain forest, you have my sympathies. Moving is the worst, unless you find a new, wonderful place. Here's hoping for the best for you.

Posted by: dbG | August 18, 2007 9:49 PM | Report abuse

Oh, rain forest! Will it be difficult to find another place? Don't know what the rental market is like in Brunei! Packing and moving are no fun. But I like arriving in the new place and making it my own.

Do you all have those dreams every time you move about finding new rooms behind doors you never noticed before?

Speaking of dreams... I had one last night that created an entire boodle. I only wish I could remember any of it.

Daughter is finally watching HS Musical 2. This hotel in Altavista, Va. (home of the famous Lane Cedar Chests), gets the Disney Channel. I told her last night Disney'd be showing the movie ad nauseam.

Posted by: TBG | August 18, 2007 9:50 PM | Report abuse

Hey, all you locals must check out Tom Shroder's article in the WaPo magazine. He manages to affectionately trash both the Achenblog and Weingarten in the same paragraph.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 18, 2007 9:51 PM | Report abuse

rain forest, moving is indeed no fun. But look at it this way. It will finally motivate you to throw away stuff.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 18, 2007 9:54 PM | Report abuse

Thanks RD! and for you nonlocals...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/15/AR2007081501373.html

Posted by: TBG | August 18, 2007 9:56 PM | Report abuse

760 what?

Posted by: LTL-CA | August 18, 2007 10:02 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, RD & TBG. It is good to know that we rank higher than a root canal, or so I prefer to interpret the analogy.

Slyness, our fiddlebacks are shy and hide as a general rule. I think in the shop they've reached critical mass.

"High School Musical II" was not as bad as one might have expected from a sequel that was purely market-driven (or market-drivel?). It has another wholesome story line and once more redeemed the (same) antagonists in the end. I am very pleased to see the musical movie form resurgent, even if I can't remember the songs afterwards. Also, it has a dance number on a baseball field, incorporating the game. Who could complain? I did point out to the Boy that, as it is set in Albuquerque in summer, these kids are doing all this dancing etc in 100 degree heat. Verisimilitude, not so much.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 10:04 PM | Report abuse

TBG - Don't you really want to know what the "not feasible" Weingarten idea was?

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 18, 2007 10:06 PM | Report abuse

I feel for you rain forest. It is just amazing how stuff just seems to bubble up...you can think you're almost done with a room and then...bubble,bubble, there are 4 more boxes worth. Good luck and I hope you find a lovely new place.

Hubby is watching the Redskins...I haven't heard any howls, so I think it might be going well.

RD - My son has had his license since April. I am just to the point that he doesn't have to call me every single time he arrives at whatever destination. He is gainfully employed at Harris Teeter and he doesn't have to call me when he arrives there...it's about 5 minutes from the house. However, he just got off work and is going to a friend's house across town...I am waiting, waiting. Even though he is a good kid and has done well driving, it's a nightmare.

Hubby and I went to see "Death at a Funeral" tonight. It was hilarious. It starts off slowly to set everything up and it was a little silly in spots, but we both agreed that it was the funniest movie we've seen in ages. The most recognizable star in this British flick is Matthew McFayden (sp?) the guy who played Mr. Darcy in the most recent adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. If you watch Masterpiece Theatre or British movies you'll recognize a lot of the cast. Anyway, hope you all will try to catch it, it's very funny.

I've been blathering on as my pic is being Simpsonized, but it's still analyzing and I don't want to be a boodle bore. I've enjoyed seeing everyone's likenesses.

Posted by: Kim | August 18, 2007 10:10 PM | Report abuse

Thanks to TBG, here's my Simpsonized self:

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=jgxpiepeepvuejmnqbgeoedmqqhuopmj#

rain forest, good luck on the move. There is much to be said for cleaning out, but moving sucks.

Posted by: Slyness | August 18, 2007 10:12 PM | Report abuse

Oh You can't bounce a meatball
Though try with all your might
Turn on the radio
I want to fly a kite
GOOD EVENING FRIENDS!
(One down and only 15 CDs of Looney Tunes to go, then on to the complete Pinky and the Brain collection. I love Amazon.)

Posted by: Boko999 | August 18, 2007 10:13 PM | Report abuse

TBG: //Do you all have those dreams every time you move about finding new rooms behind doors you never noticed before?//

Umm (assent). And at the top of staircases I've never seen before. Whole wings, different furniture, totally new houses and cities. Except I have this dream every few months, never when I'm moving.

Posted by: dbG | August 18, 2007 10:22 PM | Report abuse

Is there a site that will South Park us?

Who knew we'd keep ourselves so amused without Joel?

Posted by: dbG | August 18, 2007 10:23 PM | Report abuse

I often have the undiscovered room dream. Often coupled with the forgotten aquarium dream.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 18, 2007 10:26 PM | Report abuse

dbG... of course the answer is YES...

http://www.sp-studio.de/

Posted by: TBG | August 18, 2007 10:29 PM | Report abuse

I had already South Parked myself. Not as easy to share, though. If anyone wants to send them to me at boodler [at] mac [dot] com I'll be happy to post them on my blog.

I added my South Park image to yesterday's post...

http://tbgboodler.blogspot.com/2007/08/ive-been-simpsonized.html

Posted by: TBG | August 18, 2007 10:39 PM | Report abuse

Hey, some guy named Achenbach has a piece in Outlook tomorrow about journalism, the Internet, bloggs, etc. Check it out at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/17/AR2007081701717.html

(This guy Achenbach at the bottom of his piece even has the nerve to invite people to come comment on it on "his" blog. Bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha. "His" blog, jeez, that's a good one.)

OK, meanwhile, I have pretty good news to report: the Redskins whipped the Steelers 10-3 in the first half (the only half that counted) of tonight's game, which is still continuing with about 7 minutes left as I write this, and the Steelers have added two field goals, and still trail 10-9. They may in fact eventually win it, but it doesn't matter. The Skins' defense was awesome in the first half, and it looks like they will have an awesome year if they can whip the Steelers' first string, which they did. The offense looked only so-so, against the 4th-ranked defense, so that's somewhat understandable. And Gibbs insisted on some conservative play-calling featuring a lackluster running game, and the Steelers knocked Campbell out with a kneee injury that doesn't look too serious.

But I think we're gonna win some games this year.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 10:40 PM | Report abuse

Of course, the downside to watching the Skins was I've had to listen to Joe Theisman all night, and I'm about ready to puke.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 10:42 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, Ivansdad watched the first part of the Cowboys game, decided they didn't look too bad, and abandoned it. I think of the exhibition games as the time they allow all the good players to be injured so they can't start the regular season. Of course, I also collapse in helpless giggles when they announce the Nose Tackle.

I mean, really.

Vaya con queso, and fondue.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 18, 2007 10:45 PM | Report abuse

Thank you all. I've looked at a couple of places but haven't found what I like. I'm looking for a small house with a big compound. The small house part might be difficult. In local culture, extended families stay together so a lot of houses have 2 living rooms. Even when a house started out "small" it gets extended to the size of another living room. They need it b'cuz they hold private parties quite a bit and relatives visit each other a lot. The houses here have no basement and every house has a small storage room. That's the only surprise room as it can be in different parts of the house. The average family has 5 kids. My neighbour has 7 kids!

You're right RD, it's time to throw away stuff. I'm a hoarder so there're going to be a lot of stuff that gets thrown away.

Ivansmom, we've got spiders that look like fiddlebacks but I don't know if they are. I let them go if I'm in a good mood but not otherwise.

Posted by: rain forest | August 18, 2007 10:58 PM | Report abuse

'Night, Ivansmom, and fondue to you, too.

The Skins' 3rd string defense just had a great goal-line stand, keeping the Steelers out of the endzone after 1st down on the 3-yard line (they may still lose if the Steelers kick a field goal, but it's still a major victory. And it's their second major goal-line stand of the game, too). So I really don't care if the Steelers kick this field goal or not; I've seen what I want to see.

Field goal's good, they lead 12-10 with 1:31 left. It's a moral victory for the Skins. Backup QB Todd Collins named player of the game.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 11:02 PM | Report abuse

36-yard pass, Skins on the 25-yard-line, well within the FG kicker's range. 29 seconds.
Penalty, now of the 30. Still OK.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 11:05 PM | Report abuse

Mudge - you seem to be taking it better than my hubby.

Posted by: Kim | August 18, 2007 11:06 PM | Report abuse

TBG, you are not letting your freak flag fly, although that is a lovely SP rendition of yourself!

Check Yahoo. I just sent one. The site you came up with was far better than the one I found. Anyway, "Dang. I hate it when my mask hides my tiara."

Posted by: dbG | August 18, 2007 11:09 PM | Report abuse

Ugly ending. Offensive pass interference, a couple incompletes, then a tipped pass and interception. 12-10 the final.

But still a great game for the Skins.

1st string: Skins win, 10-3
2md string: Steelers win, 6-0
2&3rd string: STeelers win, 7-0.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 11:11 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Dooley!

I can visualize it for only part of the skull, though-- the jaw bones that arose from the gill arches, I would think.

This handout speaks of "the three skulls" of modern vertebrates.

http://users.rowan.edu/~holbrook/CompAnatLab2.pdf

The cranium itself tends to be dermal bone (secreted under the skin), rather than cartilage -> bone replacement.

I suppose the scapula could also be a similar cousin, also forming as "dermal" bone.

In sharks and teleosts. the pectoral girdle is behind the gills.

Here's the thing. The (2-chambered) heart is also AHEAD of the pectoral girdle.
Thus, their hearts are actually in an area homologous structurally to our neck region.

I wonder if this indicates that the line leading to teleosts and tetrapods acquired an extra segmentation in the gill/neck region?

If this occured after forefins evolved, then the fore fins should have doubled as well.

Therefore, there should be vestigates of ectopic fins around the bottom of the ribcage in early necked tetrapod ancestors (literally sexapods).

As it happens, there's a six-finned fishy tetrapod ancestor that fits the bill.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eusthenopteron

The lineage quickly lost the surplus mid-body fins, apparently.

But would the doubling of the body parts also double the hearts, leading to the double circulatory system (leading to 3, 4 chambered hearts) in tetrapods... or instead, did the neck heart then become the trachea?

Posted by: Anonymous | August 18, 2007 11:12 PM | Report abuse

Correction:
2&3rd strings: Steelers win 3-0.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 11:13 PM | Report abuse

That last post was by me, of course. Rare of me to forget.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 11:19 PM | Report abuse

SCC: That last non-sports-related post.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 18, 2007 11:20 PM | Report abuse

"Pectoral girdle"? Boy, I haven't seen anybody wearing one of those things in years. Decades, even.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 18, 2007 11:23 PM | Report abuse

Just checking in--I had my second mosaics class today--what fun and my new hobby. My plan, once I get good enough, is to do a picture of birds (naturally) at a birdbath similar to one done in 5 BC!

Now that all kids are finally in college or past college hubby and I have more freedom to try new things. And in another 4 years will actually have some free cash although I won't believe it til I hold those greenbacks in my hands.

Martooni, LOVED the 11:22 AM picture of child and huge sunflower...awesome and made me smile. Always :-) Hey, maybe my second big mosaic project.... The boodle is great for generating ideas dontcha think?

Mudge, Broncos lost to Dallas but not too bad a game and minimal injuries.

Posted by: birdie | August 19, 2007 12:07 AM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I think you're right about the mandibles (which came long after the cranium.)

However, I think the cranium itself is a good candidate, as well. The axial postcranial skeleton is basically a series of vertebrae with a pair of ribs, one one each side. The cranium is similar (from back to front--basioccipital and two squamosals; basisphenoid and two parietals; presphenoid and two frontals; vomer and two maxillae.) Seems to me like a continuation of the vertebrae-rib series. The ossification centers may have shifted--they're know to do that.

Hadn't thought about this with respect to the heart before. One thing to consider though, is that the number of segments anterior to the shoulder girdle is highly variable (~10 in mammals, ~50 in some dinosaurs and pleisiosaurs.) Even if you do get additional segments, the addition is not necessarily complete, so you might not get the extra appendages.

Eusthenopteron is actually tetrapodal, although it looks hexapodal in lateral view. The last fin is not paired--it actually sits on the midline. The coelacanth (Latimeria) has the same arrangement.

If I understand correctly, you're suggesting that the four-chambered heart is essentially a combined pair of two-chambered hearts. That's a cool idea, although I still favor a single heart with later divisions. The reason is that the four-chambered heart is a very late development in tetrapods--they first occur about 150 million years after the first sarcopterygian fish, and independently in two different groups.

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 12:13 AM | Report abuse

I knew something was up when a black Porsche Boxster with gold upholstry pulled up next to us at the light in Seven Corners, Falls Church. Both people driving were decked head to toe in Steelers gear. The driver was a cute woman in her twenties. The passenger was much older with a good bit of grey already showing. My wife and I got into a spirited daughter/trophy debate.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 12:16 AM | Report abuse

Well, I went ahead and Simpsonized myself.

http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=etqpbsmovlduatrdwufpacieqbibflrc#

I didn't see any Gladiator outfits, so I wore the next best thing.

Didn't get a chance to see the Washington NFL Franchise play except late in the 4th quarter, and, well... it could have been worse.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 19, 2007 12:33 AM | Report abuse

I'm sure I'll regret this post in the morning, but...

Just a very quick, very late drive-by to say that as far as I'm concerned, musicals in all shapes and forms S U C K.

Every dang one of them.

They are sickeningly cute when they're not being sickeningly melodramatic, and totally asinine all of the time. They also tend toward the ultra-stereotypical and have no basis in reality (even in the Hollywood sense). I think the only reason for the existence of musicals is to provide work for actors and actresses who are so desperate that they can't even find work in pr0n. That, or they're even dumber than the buckets of rocks they call their "agents".

Just my two cents.

Rock opera, on the other hand, is only slightly less silly, but at least has some redeeming qualities (thinking The Who's "Tommy").

Oklahoma (the musical, not the state), is simply ridiculous. I have gay friends who, having been subjected to it, came very close to sleeping with women afterwards. When a flaming queen says "My God... this is just *too* gay", well...

Posted by: martooni | August 19, 2007 12:39 AM | Report abuse

Oh... I was finally able to "Simpsonize" myself last night.

Apparently, it requires a Windows(tm) PC. Like the lazy programmers at my bank, those behind the Simpsonizer are too stupid to realize that Firefox on Linux is able to do everything that Firefox on XP can do (and probably faster and more efficiently).

I resorted to using Son-of-Mrs.-M's PC (he's been AWOL all summer) and instead of getting the "busy" message I was getting every time I tried on my Linux PC, it loaded right up. It got the beard right (almost), but even I couldn't drink enough and/or squint hard enough to find any similarity between what it came up with and what I really look like. I guess they never completed the "long-haired leaping gnome" module (and if they did, they somehow confused "long-haired leaping gnome" with "six-pack-abbed Flanders with a five-o'clock shadow and a ponytail"). My Simpsonized self looked like somebody who would get beat up by basket weaving majors at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.

Posted by: martooni | August 19, 2007 12:59 AM | Report abuse

Dooley-- just to play devil's advocate here...

The two hearts have to have a common opening to share blood flow, otherwise the lung is on a completely different circuit than the rest of the body, and no oxygen is passed.

2 hearts could fuse to form one heart with 3 chambers. This might be easier to have the pacemaker function controlling both halves develop-- (which is a problem with 4 chambered hearts-- they need coordination!)

The three-chambered heart of amphibians with a single large undivided ventricle, is unlikely to be the ancestral form. They may need a heart that can be pacemaked through to their gill/lung metamorphosis far more than they need efficient hearts.
They breathe through their skin as well as their lungs/gills, after all.

So, taking the present smooth, large third ventricle of amphibians as the ancestral model could be like arguing that whales' limbs indicate an earlier stage of tetrapod evolution because they only have 2 limbs, not 4.
http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/jun99/929744043.Zo.r.html

In fact, the hearts found in reptiles are quite diverse and different.

Crocodilians in fact have an unique 4-chamber heart design that allows the lungs to be bypassed on dives.

This heart lacks an aortic arch, while the reptiles with three-chambered hearts DO have aortic arches.

Turtles have a three-chambered heart and their ventricle actually has 3 partitions. I have a suspicion that this heart can't beat very fast without going into arrhythmia and shutting off blood flow-- this design would seem to cause a lot of turbulence at higher speeds.

However, this heart fits their slow lifestyle and keeps their blood better oxygenated than the amphibian model.

http://faculty.weber.edu/jcavitt/reptilian_circulatory_system.htm

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 1:05 AM | Report abuse

The article about Ralph Ellison that Shroder refers to is really, really good:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/15/AR2007081501365.html
I don't know that I've read Invisible Man, although I know of it (and I have read the science fictiony The Invisible Man). Will have to add that and his posthumous works to my list.

martooni, that's a pretty broad generalization. Les Miserables is amazing and an exception to your rule, IMHO. I'm not a big musical fan, but I wouldn't write them all off. Oklahoma and Showboat are hard for me to take, having been forced to study them in high school.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 19, 2007 1:14 AM | Report abuse

shroder's article describes my life right now.

speaking of procrastination, i've south-parked myself.

Posted by: L.A. lurker | August 19, 2007 1:28 AM | Report abuse

I too procrastinate. I baked an eggless and milkless chocolate cake. It turned out okay despite being eggless and milkless.

Eggless and milkless chocolate cake

2 cups sugar
3 cups flour
2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
½ cup cocoa
¾ cup oil
1 tsp vanilla
2 tsp vinegar
2 cups cold water

Sift all dry ingredients into a bowl
Add liquid in order given
Pour cold water over all.
Mix thoroughly
Pour into a greased & floured 9 x 13" cake pan
Bake at 350 F for 35-40 min

Posted by: rain forest | August 19, 2007 1:43 AM | Report abuse

Following from Joel's article about blogs vs newspapers, if page hits are what count, then newspapers are run by the people who assign articles to journalists. I want the Paris Hilton article, not matter how trivial, because the page hits will prove I'm the best journalist! (Same thing happens at my IT work in a mortgage bank -- in the past few weeks there have been a lot of changes to the underwriting subsystems, but not to the larger systems that push the data around, so depending on which you happen to work on, you may be viewed as essential or lazy.)

Posted by: LTL-CA | August 19, 2007 1:53 AM | Report abuse

Rain Forest, that recipe sounds like the Crazy Cake that I heard about on NPR the other day. How does it taste?

Posted by: Aloha | August 19, 2007 2:42 AM | Report abuse

Here's the cake, it's called Wacky Cake. Sounds like yours RF!

Mary Carole Battle's Mother's Wacky Cake

1 1/2 cups flour

1 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup cocoa

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 tablespoon white vinegar

6 tablespoons cooking or salad oil

1 cup cold water

In an 8-inch- or 9-inch-square cake pan, sift the dry ingredients. Make three holes; pour the vanilla in the first, vinegar in the second, and oil in the third.

Pour the cold water over the mixture, and stir until no longer lumpy. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes. If desired, top with seven-minute frosting (below).

Posted by: Aloha | August 19, 2007 2:46 AM | Report abuse

Yes Aloha, the wacky cake does sounds like the one I baked. Surprisingly it tasted alright. It doesn't have the nice egg flavour and richness of milk but it's not bad at all.

Posted by: rain forest | August 19, 2007 3:26 AM | Report abuse

I assume the Washington Post has some sort of financial arrangement with Burger King. I mean the paper wouldn't be promoting Burger King for free, right? Doh.

Posted by: miamibob | August 19, 2007 5:56 AM | Report abuse

martooni,

Broadway musicals follow Clarke's Law just as closely as any other entertainment genre. Part of the problem is that the format is fairly limiting. I just saw two musicals in New York, a big blockbuster and a very edgy newcomer.

http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2007/08/les-awakenings.html

My son particularly liked "Spring Awakenings" because even though it's set in 1890s Germany it is about horny and/or depressed teenagers, which he finds particularly relevant at his stage in life.

We were cleaning his room and listening to "The B1tch of Life" from the soundtrack and he observes that the song is about masturbation. My wife was mildly confused, but I just said, "Yeah? Of course it is."

Here is one verse, judge for yourself:

'She said, "Give me that hand, please, and the itch you can't control.
Let me teach you how to handle all the sadness in your soul.
Oh, we'll work that silver magic,
Then we'll aim it all the wall."
She said, "Love may make you blind, kid, but I wouldn't mind at all."'

That's about as far from a surry with the fringe on top as you can get. The very young actors are all very talented, not a weak voice in the bunch. The end of Act I isn't very far from pr0n if it weren't done so tastefully in that 70s era rated M way.

Tell me the type of entertainment you like and I'm sure I can posit some dated examples of lameness. Sure, 90% of Broadway is cr@p, but it's the 10% that can speak to the soul.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 7:19 AM | Report abuse

SCC (not mine, the lyrics page I cut and pasted from): "Then we'll aim it AT the wall"

You can hear that verse and a lot more excerpts here:

http://www.springawakening.com/spring_awakening_music_and_video.php

My favorite song (and they have the full version of it on the website) is "Totally F*$@ed" because I have been there.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 7:23 AM | Report abuse

Morning, friends. We're trying to get clothes, shoes, everything on to go out the door for Sunday school this morning. Spongebob and Diego are trying to slow us down a bit, but we shall endure.


Hope your weekend is going great. Mine so far has been a bit slow, but busy.

It has cooled down some, not a lot, but some. Temps should be in the 90's today. Still got the humidity though.

Could someone give me the address of that restaurant that caters to the boodle porching hour in the District?

Have a great day, folks. I'm going to try hard to do that myself.

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 19, 2007 8:15 AM | Report abuse

Rain forest and Aloha, Thanks for those recipes! My daughter is allergic to eggs, so we are always looking for good egg-free things to make.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 8:26 AM | Report abuse

There are two McCormick & Schmicks in DC. This the Boodle approved one:

McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurant
1652 K Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20006
(202) 861-2233

http://www.mccormickandschmicks.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=content.display&pageid=96&areaid=29

I figure if WaPo can shamelessly shill for BK, I can post a link to a chain seafood house.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 8:27 AM | Report abuse

American musical theater is like opera. As Richard Gere said in Pretty Woman (about opera and I'm paraprhasing) "if you love it at first sight you will always love it, if you don't you may come to appreciate it but you will never love it."

Good morning boodle. Had to slip on a hoodie this morning as I refuse to fire up the gas fireplace to "take the chill off" before Labor Day.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 19, 2007 8:29 AM | Report abuse

Martooni, _Moulin Rouge_. The plot may be ridiculous, but the music is wonderful.

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 8:48 AM | Report abuse

dbG - I love Moulin Rouge. The rendition of "Your Song" always makes me all whoozy. Are you familiar with the rest of Baz Luhrmann's Red Curtain Trilogy? His "Romeo and Juliet" may offend some purists, but I found it so engrossing that I watched it twice in a row. And "Strictly Ballroom" is a great date flick.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 9:02 AM | Report abuse

I will admit it.. I LOVE MUSICALS! I'm glad my daughter shares my affection because she is my theatre buddy. My son hates anything to do with musical theatre which is funny because he used to be in them.

I have added dbG to the South Parked page; she has her freak flag flying, that's for sure...

http://tbgboodler.blogspot.com/2007/08/weve-been-south-parked.html

yellojkt... Are you familiar with the Barenaked Ladies song "It's Only Me" ? I never thought about what it was about until they mentioned in concert that it's about masturbation. I guess I'm just not looking for that when hearing a song, but a line like "They say you'll never love another 'till you love yourself/
Well brother, I'm in love with eveyone I see" should have been a clue.

Here are all the lyrics...

http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/PrintLyrics?OpenForm&ParentUnid=12DE08E6AF3DE9EE48256B57000FB131

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 9:03 AM | Report abuse

RD, No, I'll have to check them out. I love all the (other) ballroom movies, too!

TBG, no offense? :-)

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 9:10 AM | Report abuse

I also used to enjoy the Disney animated musicals of the 1990s.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 9:16 AM | Report abuse

Morning everybody. Hey, Cassandra. We're moving slow this morning, skipping Sunday School because our class is having a brunch after church...

My high school had a wonderful theater department. They staged Carnival, Camelot, and Oklahoma the three years I was there. Oklahoma didn't work for me because the girl who played Laurie (quite well) was in my English class and had been reading the part of Blanche DuBois from A Streetcar Named Desire and I couldn't keep the two parts separate. It was jarring. She was one of those disgustingly fabulous people with perfect pitch and everything else on a genius level. She went to Oberlin, IIRC. I wonder where she is now.

Posted by: Slyness | August 19, 2007 9:33 AM | Report abuse

>the woman is more likely to do the heavy lifting on nanny-hiring

This is where I confused about all the gender-bashing. Does this mean high-powered women are more likely to screw up hiring their nanny than high-powered men? Or that the women are more likely to be appointed to a public position? And if so, does that mean women are doing well now or does it mean they just lost out on the lucrative private CEO money?

Whoever hired the nanny, wouldn't both parents pretty much know the deal when it came around tax time? If anyone were checking records wouldn't it come out no matter what the gender of the job applicant?

In other words, is it always us evil b@stard penis-packing jerks keeping the saintly "I didn't bother to check the background of the woman living with us" women down? Or is it just that people do things like stiff the govt. for tax money and get caught at it?

I get so confused.

Posted by: Error Flynn | August 19, 2007 9:38 AM | Report abuse

TBG, love it!

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 9:42 AM | Report abuse

"Whoever hired the nanny, wouldn't both parents pretty much know the deal when it came around tax time? If anyone were checking records wouldn't it come out no matter what the gender of the job applicant?"

To be honest, Error.. in my family my husband wouldn't know who is watching the kids or mowing the lawn. I always say if I died today the family would be evicted because my husband has no idea where to send the mortgage payments. But he counts on me and trusts me to take care of many of the details of our lives.

But that's my family. I know it's not the case with everyone.

I think Ivansmom's point in saying women bear the heavy lifting is that more times than not, if the mom is going to work then she is the one hiring the babysitter. I said "more times than not" which isn't an editorial on whether that's right or not.

It's a pretty much accepted fact that more moms stay home to watch kids than dads. And if Dad is a governor, for example, chances are very good that he's not staying home to watch the kids--or mow the lawn.

Am I defending Mitt Romney? Yikes.

I think the difference still is that the lawnworkers are contractors and it's up to their employer to keep track of their status. I can't be held responsible if the person waiting on me at Target is illegal. Why should I have to know who is mowing my lawn?

And, by the way, I happen to like you "evil b@stard penis-packing jerks." So sue me.

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 9:50 AM | Report abuse

Yah, what TBG said.

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 9:55 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

Re. musicals, my kids loved the recently released film version of "Hairspray," though when we saw another movie recently they showed a preview for a musical based on the music of the Beatles:

http://www.acrosstheuniverse.com/

My oldest daughter's eyes became the size of dinner plates, and when the trailer was over, our eyes connected in the darkened theater and she said to me with a beautiful impish smile, "You *are* taking me to see that, right?"

Of course I am, my darling daughter.

Of course I am.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 19, 2007 9:56 AM | Report abuse

My take on the nanny thing is less about the gender of the person doing the hiring, or even the nannying, but more about the nature of the relationship with someone who is in the home and we assume well known to the employers. "How could you know she wasn't here legally? She wipes your baby's butt."

Posted by: frostbitten | August 19, 2007 10:02 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if we have a mortgage. I guess we must. I really should ask my wife about that.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 10:07 AM | Report abuse

bc.. I saw a version of Romeo and Juliet last year at a local Alexandria theatre that was set in the 1960s, using black and white families rather than Montagues and Capulets.

They played Beatles songs in the background to set up each scene and it was amazing to see how well the songs fit into the story.

That Across the Universe looks interesting.

I mean, living is easy with eyes closed, man.

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Actually, going back over the posts, it seems as if there are three distinct points being made.

The first is a distinction between directly hiring an illegal and working with a firm that hires illegals. And I think the responsibility becomes increasingly diluted the further from direct contact one gets.

The second point is that in many families women are much more tuned into the subtleties of certain aspects of financial life than are men. I plead an enthusiastic no contest to this.

The third, and, I believe, original assertion is that people pay more attention to illegal nannies than illegal landscapers because nannies are women, and are therefore subject to the sort of profound sexism that defines our society. I would issue my response to this assertion, but there are ladies present.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 10:15 AM | Report abuse

Excellent analysis RD.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 19, 2007 10:20 AM | Report abuse

The best musicals lately are often blatantly self-aware. I saw an off-Broadway one a while ago called "The Musical of Musicals: The Musical" where each scene is a parody of a different Broadway writer or team. WAAAAY ouroborosian.

The snicker song from my youth was Atlanta Rhythm Sections' "Imaginary Lovers". At one time I was going to make a mix tape called Onan's Greatest Hits, but I think Dave Marsh beat me (no double entendre intended) to the punch.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 10:28 AM | Report abuse

Thanks frosty!

Regarding "meta musicals." I suspect this is becoming something of a cliche. Most hip new musicals seem to enthusiastically break the fourth wall, at least in places. The best example that I can think of is "Spamalot," and the delightfully self-aware "The Song That Goes Like This."

http://www.lyricsondemand.com/soundtracks/s/spamalotlyrics/thesongthatgoeslikethislyrics.html

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 10:52 AM | Report abuse

There's the point of frequency amd emotional intimacy, too.

I probably would see a Target employee once a month (although others of you may shop there more frequently), a lawnmower once a week (in our case it's Loomispouse), and a nanny (if one worked outside the home with small children and can afford in-home chjild care) about five days a week.

With the Target cashier, it's unlikely I'll have the same cashier twice, let alone remember his or her name. The lawnmower is someone you probably know on a first name basis. (The sisters next door throw parties and invite their yard man/gardner.) Your nanny you should know and trust pretty darn well.

If the grass dies, you just buy more sod and lay it. Your kid is your emotional link to the future, your flesh and blood (unless adopted). You better know darn well the person you hire as a surrogate parent(s)--personal fiduciary responsibility or personal fiduciary liability aside. I'd be curious to know how many high-profile male spouses actually hire the nanny? Anyone know of any instances or examples?

Bye (technically celebrating our 22nd wedding anniversary today).

Posted by: Loomis | August 19, 2007 10:53 AM | Report abuse

I guess I'm willing to give Mitt the benefit of the doubt in this case.

As far as hiring practices for companies I do business with go, I leave that up to them. If they're doing something illegal and I'm aware of it, I will discontinue my business with them.

My great grandparents spoke very little English (even after 60 years here) yet were in this country legally, so I don't use fluency in the English language as a reliable barometer of legal immigration status. But, that's just me.

I would also venture to say I believe that almost everyone in this country has done business with, had services performed by, or benefitted from - either directly or indirectly - workers who are here in the US illegally.

This seems to me to be the state of things in this country at this time - illegal workers are a reality that our government has managed to do very little about (despite some noise from Congress and the White House), simply because there's little agreement about exactly *what* to do, and we citizens seem to have acquiesced to that indecision by and large.

I'm not willing to criticize anyone for something I wouldn't know if I were guilty of myself. Ok, that's an ugly sentence, but I think you know what I mean.

bc


Posted by: bc | August 19, 2007 10:58 AM | Report abuse

As long as we're taking Devil's advocate positions...

Crocodilians in particular have unusual hearts, not really 4-chambered, more like "3-and-a-half". As you say, there really is nothing else like it. A current, popular idea is that modern crocodiles had endothermic ancestors with fully 4-chambered hearts. This was lost when crocs adopted an amphibious lifestyle.

Turtles are weird in all kinds of ways, including their skeletons and fossil record. I wonder, though, if sea turtles have the same system as land turtles. Sea turtles have a much more active lifestyle.

I agree that modern amphibians are probably not a good model for Devonian amphibians. They're highly specialized, and occur pretty late in the fossil record.

The large variety of hearts in reptiles would tend to support a "single heart" origin. It looks like hearts can throw up partitions any old place, thus the high diversity.

I don't know about valve coordination--interesting idea. Is it actually all that hard to change the timing? I don't know.

Don't get me wrong--I think the "two-heart" origin could have happened, I just don't think it actually did happen (at least in the line leading to amniotes--there are some weird amniote competitors in the early Permian, and no one knows WHAT they were doing!)

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 11:00 AM | Report abuse

Incidentally, "evil b@stard penis-packing jerks" is available as a boodle-handle.

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 11:02 AM | Report abuse

Mornin' all...

Dang... was I in a bad mood last night or what? I didn't mean to slam musicals so harshly, but to be honest, I really really really can't stand them. They're like fingernails on a chalkboard to me.

On a completely unrelated topic (and as far off-Kit as possible), I have a question for the knitting/crocheting Boodlers: Can anyone point me to some good online resources (as in free) for patterns and instructional stuff for crocheting? This is *not* for me (Jesu forfend) but for Mrs. M. She has decided that she would like to make things of the crocheted variety for profit (I *hope* for profit, otherwise the baby hat she made last night is a warning).

Send me some good links and I may even retract my bashing of "Oklahoma".

Off to install a new entry door (of the non-fairy variety) for a neighbor, which means I get to play with my Sawzall(tm) and get paid for it.

Peace...

Posted by: martooni | August 19, 2007 11:04 AM | Report abuse

SCC-"jerk", not "jerks", except for multiple-personality boodlers.

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 11:04 AM | Report abuse

In re: the vetting process, it doesn't matter how often you see the person, where you see them (in your kitchen or in your local Target) or what they do for you. It matters whose employee they are. If you hire a nanny/chauffeur (Zoe Baird's problem), you ar responsible for the W-2s. If you contract through an agency/company, pay that company directly, they are responsible for the W-2. The exposure is the employer's.

bc...my grandmother's English could be entertaining. She thought in Italian, then translated to English..doesn't work so well. (ya dead fish).

Posted by: LostInThought | August 19, 2007 11:19 AM | Report abuse

Crazy cake! Thanks, Aloha and Rainforest! I owe you a solid! My mother bemoaned losing her crazy cake recipe, and at the time I never thought to use the internet to retrieve it. Nor did she. I note some discrepancy in the vinegar amounts on the various online recipes. I suspect the one with (3 tsp. = 1 tbs) of vinegar (not 2 tbs, and not 2 tsp) is correct. The internet is worse than Wikipedia for recipes. I went searching for the older "real Colonel's cole slaw recipe" online, and since I worked at Kentucky Fried Chicken in high school and college, I knew a whole bunch of them were flat out wrong. I finally used memory and the ones that resonated that I did read online, to come up with a fair approximation. The net let me down in that case. {I emailed mom the crazy cake recipe immediately this morning.}

I realized a while back and then had my thought verified by some experts, that dreams of houses are metaphors for our own selves. Finding previously unknown rooms in oneself is a provocative idea. I've been dreaming of the same imaginary house for years. It morphs and changes and for a year or two, I would just visit a field of ashes: my house had burned down! I'm not sure when that happened or what that meant. But workmen were building greenhouses in the yard, and my mansion now reexists in my dream life. It's a 5 storey building with an airplane hangar on the third and fourth floors. (There is a huge diamond in the 5th floor kitchen I hid in a jar of peanut butter. I always know it's there if I need it.)

Posted by: Jumper | August 19, 2007 11:50 AM | Report abuse


yj: "Aim it at the wall" - ? A little lacking in subtlety, I'd say. I'd also say nobody needs to write another song about that subject because it's been done, by the best:

Rosie, you're all right
You wear my ring
When you hold me tight
Rosie, that's my thing
When you turn out the light
I've got to hand it to me
Looks like it's you and me again tonight
Rosie

--Jackson Browne

http://www.guntheranderson.com/v/data/rosie.htm

=====

martooni, there are lots of sites with instructions for crocheting. I'm sure most of the boodlers learned to crochet before the internet was invented. It helps to have a mentor, especially when things go wrong. But I taught myself crocheting out of a book--after having been taught knitting and embroidery by my mom and great-grandmother. This site has complete instructions including good illustrations:

http://learntocrochet.lionbrand.com/

====

I really liked the Shroder editorial; "self-loathing" (someone else's) always cheers me up. But unfortunately I followed up with Weingarten's supremely depressing article about conformity. Why do people say they value "liberty" when in fact most of us are too intimidated or lacking in imagination to exercise even a tiny fraction of the freedom we possess?

There you have it, my complete set of comments for the day. Now I'm off to clean my hovel.

Posted by: kbertocci | August 19, 2007 12:12 PM | Report abuse

I think the junior high version of reptilian hearts was that they were imperfect mammalian hearts. Poor, underdeveloped herps.

In the herp department, the movie "Rescue Dawn" has a bit of interesting predation.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 19, 2007 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Lion also has lots of free patterns:
http://www.lionbrand.com/

I haven't used these, but they look good:
http://crochet.about.com/

http://www.crochetpatterncentral.com/

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 19, 2007 1:03 PM | Report abuse

Martooni, I am not a crochet peep, but I would start with a pattern like the one listed here for infant caps.
http://www.warmupamerica.com/Jul06_kit.html The hardest thing to get a handle on is size and guage.

I knit a rounded "fruit cap" for new babies and people adore it. In boutiques, such a cap goes for 30-40 buckaroos.

Mrs. M could make money with caps in delicious tutti fruitti shades, with a green leaf atop; could also be a Weeoutfitter option. For real babies, not fairy babes. I bet someone else here with highly cranked crochet chops will say more.

She can use leftover yarn for a a way-special magical mojo cap of many shades...a sorta Joseph's Coat of a cap. Or rainbow cap. Or higglety-pigglety cap. Or Jackson Pollack cap...

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 1:04 PM | Report abuse

But if we had let Jackson Browne have the last word on that topic, we never would have gotten that classic Divinyls song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTneO6UgRuM

Enjoy your Sunday afternoon.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Self abuse is wrong

Posted by: Dynamo Humm | August 19, 2007 1:32 PM | Report abuse

Dooley, okay doing some further homework.

HAND controls early heart and lymph node development in fruitflies to humans, but does not control chambering. (Fruitflies's hearts are simple tubes that contract-- literally zero chambers).

So, diversity exists whenever function is diverse.

Squid have three separate hearts-- two paired gill hearts, and a pump heart (all one-chambered).
Snails have a two-chambered heart.
http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/A/AnimalHearts.html

For the fish-tetrapod evolution,the accepted view would be a split between the atriums, which would seem to involve novel genes for causing a division through the heart.

http://physrev.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/83/4/1223#D.%20Lower%20Vertebrates

But then, they suggest the right ventricle formed from the conus arteriosus instead of a split in the ventricle (akin to the lizard septum).

Beats me, fusion of 2 early heart tubes seems more likely, or a looping and fusion of one heart tube, rather than forming an artial septum.

My question would be, if this is how the 3-chambered heart evolved, why haven't partially divided 2-chambered hearts been identified in fish yet?

Lizards have a good example of a three-chambered heart that has a partial septum, showing that reptiles have considerable diversity but tend to have partially divided ventricles as well.

You were asking about sea turtles-- their heartbeats are 29 beats at rest and drop to 0.8 (one beat every 9 minutes) on a dive. Some turtles even die of heart attacks while digging and laying eggs because of the exertion involved.

They work nowhere near mammalian heartbeat range except for the very large mammals.

Elephants have a resting heartrate of 28-39 beats per minute, and blue whales have a heartbeat of 4-8 beats per minute for hearts the size of a small car. A mouse has 500 heartbeats a minute (bpm).

Birds can have 1,000 bpm for a 4 chambered heart as well, so this heart is very versatile in function (the size of the respective chambers need to be finetuned, that's all).

Crocodiles have a resting heart rate of around 15 beats/second but with exposure to heat, their hearts can shoot up to 65 beats a minute very briefly as they adjust, with an new heat activity threshold of around 30 bpm.

Intelligent designers hotly dispute the current model of heart evolution.

While they are biased, they do have good points about the complexity of the present 3-chambered hearts versus fish hearts.
http://www.ideacenter.org/contentmgr/showdetails.php/id/1113

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 1:36 PM | Report abuse

Is it possible to Simpsonize your South Parkian self? (This is eerily close to my job, but also far much more fun).

I tried. Apparently my feathers, passementerie and light sabre foiled translation. Perhaps a more simple image would work.

I leave this exercise to the reader.

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 1:40 PM | Report abuse

Boy, was that some rain we had last night. We are okay, trees all standing as far as I know, the dog came back, and power only out for a couple of hours. West of here, though, whole towns are underwater. Just devastating. We had wind gusts of over 60 miles an hour; I couldn't watch out the window, because those trees sure looked unstable.

Martooni, think "Sweeney Todd". Demon barber kills, cooks, eats & sells patrons. It is the only musical Ivansdad really likes.

Nice recap of the nanny/gardener discussion, RD. An interesting thought: Oklahoma just enacted very tough provisions re: illegal immigrants. Nobody knows exactly how they'll work, but they provide for penalties to employers who knowingly hire illegals. Arguably this could be extended to homeowners, for example, who know or should have known that the people mowing their yard were illegal, even if they're hired by a contractor. We'll see what happens.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 19, 2007 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Traveling on business onna Sunday brings out the worst in me...

:-)

And "Musical of Musicals?" Blatant rip-off of "Forbidden Broadway."

*stuck-in-Dulles-and-crossing-fingers-for-no-delays Grover waves*

:-)

Posted by: EvilB@stardPen1sPackingNuke | August 19, 2007 3:04 PM | Report abuse

Dynamo,
Don't eat any yellow snow.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 3:05 PM | Report abuse

Just wildly speculating...

"My question would be, if this is how the 3-chambered heart evolved, why haven't partially divided 2-chambered hearts been identified in fish yet?"

Because it is a unique mutation in the tetrapod (or sarcopterygian) line. Nearly all living fish are actinopterygians. The only living sarcopterygians are the few species of lungfish and the coelacanth (plus their tetrapod descendants.)

"Beats me, fusion of 2 early heart tubes seems more likely, or a looping and fusion of one heart tube, rather than forming an artial septum."

I think all of these are worth consideration. I don't know that the extra segmentation would show up in a fossil in a recognizable way. And the Physiological Reviews article (nice find, by the way) seems to have some embryological evidence to support it.

Another thing that occurs to me--obviously a two-chamber heart is perfectly adequate for fish, as better than 99% of the living species have them, yet one line evolved extra chambers. Ancestral lungfish apparently had a lung+gill stage. I wonder if double oxygen source could be the selective pressure behind the double atrium (regardless of it's origin?)


Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 3:06 PM | Report abuse

What Dooley and Wilbrod say:

fusion of 2 early heart tubes...

I wonder if double oxygen source could...

What Yoki hears:

Blah blah blah heart blah blah blah source...

Posted by: Yoki | August 19, 2007 3:19 PM | Report abuse

I think 0.8 beats per minute is actually 1 beat every minute and 15 seconds. Unless I missed something.

Posted by: Jumper | August 19, 2007 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Yoki, but so sciencey-sexy isn't it, the talk of heart chamber phylogeny recapitulates ontology...or the reverse of that.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, isn't it nice that Wilbrod and Dooley can have this discussion, even though you and I really *don't* comprehend what they are talking about? I love to eavesdrop.

Posted by: Slyness | August 19, 2007 3:28 PM | Report abuse

"sciencey-sexy"

Don't hear that often, but I like it!

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of illegales, Those woking in the packing houses of Kansas, Texas, Nebraska etc., can't all be legal.

Check out this story in the AP headlines today. http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/T/THE_CHANGING_PRAIRIE?SITE=CARED&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT.

Dodge city, KA is now almost completly latino.
PS: the story can't be linked.

Posted by: bh | August 19, 2007 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Dooley, that's pretty much why I think the 3-chambered heart evolved, and that the early stages were 4-chambered-ish.

The lungfish in fact has a 4-chambered heart-- both atriums and ventricle are partially divided, helping separate the circuits.
http://www.whozoo.org/Anlife99/lashawn/africanlungfishindex4.htm

It would seem reasonable to suggest that this is more likely to be closer to the ancestral heart adaption to tetrapods than the amphibian heart model.

Also, embryogenesis supports the double-heart theory for vertebrates other than fish-- more accurately, two endocardial tubes form (unlike in fish).

http://people.uncw.edu/ballardt/bio316/circulation.pdf

My idea a double heart arose due to a duplication of the neck/gill region is that-- a idea.

An extra heart controlling blood flow to the gas bladder in an ancestral lungfish line may have served a function, such as to regulate the gas bladder.

This separate blood circuit to the gas bladder may first have served as a reservoir to help expel carbon dioxide from the blood in poorly oxygenated water.
I.e. exhalation was the first use.

Oxygen is less soluble in water than CO2 so when water becomes hypoxic (such as when it gets heated or muddy), then just filtering more water through the gills would cause a greater CO2 build-up.

That had to go somewhere-- what better than the gas bladder?

But the problem was to prevent oxygen from being wasted too-- hence a separate loop to the gas bladder to remove carbon dioxide from unoxygenated blood and feed it back to the heart before it pumped it through the gills to the rest of the body.

When it got full the fish would just surface and burp it out and get some extra air.

This would have given fish an edge in areas with algae blooms, or high concentration of fish respiration, organic debris, giving them an edge in feeding and exploiting subpar habitat.

Diaphragms and other breathing mechanisms could have evolved later.



Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 3:56 PM | Report abuse

It isn't just nice that Dooley and Wilbrod can discuss these things here, it seems to me to be the very essence of Boodlehood. And science-sexy indeed! Also, lost-in-admiration marvelous.

Posted by: Yoki | August 19, 2007 3:59 PM | Report abuse

SCC: should have been 0.088. The author forgot that essential 0 before the .08, so I misread it. Grr.

Yoki, just sing the spam song to yourself. Although I do hope you got the "fish burping" part. :).

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 4:02 PM | Report abuse

But which heart can evolve better as a seat of love, affection, and fidelity....and forgiveness?

I keep wanting to quote a line from Holmes' poem about the many-chambered nautilus...but as Yoki says, lost in admiring thought.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 4:04 PM | Report abuse

I thought the brain was responsible for love, affection, and fidelity....and forgiveness.

Hmmm
NARF

Posted by: Pinky999 | August 19, 2007 4:31 PM | Report abuse

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2007/08/18/financial/f100501D69.DTL&hw=Dodge+city&sn=001&sc=1000

Posted by: Anonymous | August 19, 2007 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Try this link on the remaking of Dodge City etc, into latino towns via the meat packing industry.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2007/08/18/financial/f100501D69.DTL&hw=Dodge+city&sn=001&sc=1000.

Posted by: bh | August 19, 2007 4:35 PM | Report abuse

I aksually undirsand whut Dooley n Wilbrod r talkin abowt an am engoyin it.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 19, 2007 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Cp-- good question. Many fish engage in parental care.

And I'm not even touching that poem to try and parody it. The rhyme and meter are too hard.

Wait, I lied.

THIS is the tale of hearts, which, poets feign,
Sail the Darwinless main --
One venturous bark that sings
With sweet farewell pulse to ocean kings
In gulfs hypoxic, where it harsh fate brings,
And coral reefs bleach bare,
Where the cold lungfishes rise to burp their gassy air.

The heart amphibian is not Charles' girl;
Wrecked is that dream of pearl!
And every chambered cell,
Where it dual breathing life was wont to dwell,
As the adaptions shaped by life's impel
Before thee lies revealed, --
Its irised atrium rent, sunless ventricles sealed!

Eon after Eon beheld the silent toil
That spread this lustrous coil;
Still, as they reptile grew,
They left the past year's dwelling for the new,
Stole with soft step land's shining archway through,
Built up the idle shores,
Stretched in their last-found home, and knew the old no more.

Thanks for the heavenly message brought by thee,
Child of the wandering sea,
Cast from her lap, forlorn!
From thy fled twins a clearer beat is born
Than ever Triton pulsed in grief to mourn!
While on mine ear it rings,
Through the deep caves that part I hear a voice that sings: --

Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul,
As evolution rolls!
Leave thy low-vaulted past!
Let each new temple, nobler than the last,
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast,
Till thou at length art free,
Leaving thine outgrown pulse by life's unresting sea!

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Hmm, some lines rang a bit differently from how I intended it.

I could title it "The Chambered heart", but that's too easy.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 4:49 PM | Report abuse

The Eastern Shore of Delmarva is experience a similar demographic change, driven in part by chicken body-parts processing.

I have eaten three white peaches today, bought on Eastern Shore but likely from S.PA.

Strange skies and the rain STILL slides North leaving us very dry. Deer are crossing Route One at dusk, desperate for Hosta crowns and water. Usually, they wait until about 2 AM. This morning I woke to find a fawn dead on the side of the road. I know that white-tailed deer are really a blight now numbers-wise, but the brindle coat really tugs at the heartstrings.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 4:49 PM | Report abuse

And am always flabbergasted, Wilbrod, at your poety-mimicry versification. Can you get a gig with that prodigious skill?

And yes, I really wonder about the origins of love and affection, etc., within our deep brain structures (nod to Brainiac-Pinko099). In flights of fancy, I might think that emotions are experienced at a cellular level. And that God inhabits the deep nano-spaces within and between matter.

Pardon the theology grafted upon the sciencey twigs here. Off to swim; perchance to trimmer be.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 4:55 PM | Report abuse

They really do wait?

It's always seemed to me whitetails are always very active at dusk or right after dark.
If they only ran around roads at 2 AM, there would be fewer deer-car fatalities. Maybe you have brighter deer out in your parts.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, they wait because the traffic is still heavy into wee hours. But lately, I see them darting out earlier and earlier. The pond in the woods and streamlet are both bone-dry.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Hmmm...Mr. T and I saw deer three times in daylight hours during our wanderings last weekend in the mountains. They must be thirsty.

Posted by: Slyness | August 19, 2007 4:59 PM | Report abuse

CP, I guess such work on mimicry can serve as an apprenticeship to writing original poetry that is better in style.
Whether poetry pays, is another matter altogether.

Our limbic system in our brain works to coordinate everything that is felt, I think.
Yes, hormones and other aspects of emotion are felt in every cell.

Our own stomach has its primitive nervous system and is known to churn in anxiety and will signal when it's not feeling good.

The vagus nerve runs from brain through abdomen parallel to our spine, endlessly branching into every vital organ, and it will slow your body into relaxation.

The vagus nerve is what horses nibble on as they groom each other's necks in friendship.

But at the most rudimentary level, our neurons transmit messages in form of food bits-- glucose, ions, monoamines, etc, and our other cells likely do the same in somewhat lesser degrees.

So yes, you can see emotion as being felt in every cell.


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 5:02 PM | Report abuse

"An extra heart controlling blood flow to the gas bladder in an ancestral lungfish line may have served a function, such as to regulate the gas bladder."

Yes!

"This separate blood circuit to the gas bladder may first have served as a reservoir to help expel carbon dioxide from the blood in poorly oxygenated water.
I.e. exhalation was the first use."

This could work, as long as the swim bladder was in the return loop to the heart (a safe assumption if it's homologous with lungs). From that point, it's easy to switch to lung rather than gill respiration.

I like it, especially because it's a simple functional explanation for a relatively complex structure.

Still doesn't help in deciding between one- and two-heart origins, though.

Looks to me like Figures 19-19 to 19-21 in your embryology reference are showing secondary partitioning of a single atrium, rather than the fusion of two atria.

A two-heart origin would mean that the 4-chambered heart is the primitive condition for tetrapods. But in living groups, 4-chambered hearts only occur in unrelated endotherms. The secondarily-ectothermic naked mole rat has a 4-chambered heart, so it appears that ectothermy does not automatically cause the loss of chambers (even crocs haven't completely lost the 4 chambers after 200 million years.) Yet, none of the living ectotherms (except those mentioned above) have a full 4-chambered heart, in multiple unrelated groups. Since fossil bone histology indicates that endothermy is derived for tetrapods, it follows that 4-chambered hearts are also derived (otherwise we would expect see fully divided hearts in at least some ectotherms that don't have an endothermic ancestor.)

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 5:12 PM | Report abuse

"our neurons transmit messages in form of food bits"

My family certainly communicates largely through the use of food.

Must be dinner time.

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 5:17 PM | Report abuse

secondarily-ectothermic naked mole rat has a 4-chambered heart says Dooley but do mole rats love?Sheesh what is science FOR anyway?

Posted by: Anonymous | August 19, 2007 5:18 PM | Report abuse

Mole rats have a bee-like hive structure, with a single breeding queen. Would-be queens ascend to the throne by killing the existing queen.

Is that love?

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 5:37 PM | Report abuse

Just as long as they ain't nekkid mole rats.

I heard stories.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 5:39 PM | Report abuse

I've seen those stories. That Kim is so Possible.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 5:49 PM | Report abuse

My younger child, the geek, has a new computer (which she built herself). She decided to name it Antikythera, after this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_mechanism

Waaay kewl.

Posted by: Slyness | August 19, 2007 5:50 PM | Report abuse

But the early model wouldn't have been a completely divided 4 chambered heart-- that's not even what lungfish have.

All right, lets' look for an alternative explanation in the carbon-monoxide dump theory that would led to 3 chambered hearts.

If squids could develop gill hearts that don't pump blood, it's possible a secondary atrium developed near a valve (kind of like an aneurysm) between the lung and heart, to increase pressure for forced gas removal from the lung.

In Diseases of Fish, Paul Bowser mentions that "Various references describe the heart as either a 2-chamber or 4-chamber organ. The primary chambers are a single atrium and a single ventricle. The blood is collected by the sinus venosus prior to entering the atrium. Once pumped by the muscular ventricle the blood moves through the bulbus arteriosus. A major component of the bulbus arteriosus is fibrous connective tissue, which acts as a "shock absorber" when the blood is pumped by the ventricle."

http://www.afip.org/vetpath/POLA/99/Diseases_of_Fish.htm

Likewise, some claim the reptilian heart can be seen to have 4 chambers.
http://library.thinkquest.org/C003758/Development/reptile.htm

Thus, the bulbus arteriosus could have evolved into the left atrium; in fact it contributes to it in mammals, but not fully.

Still, the challenge is to figure out how the pulmonary artery developed from this model. It would become very useful as the lungs evolved.

But how? The pulmonary artery seems to run horizontally between the lungs, through the aorta and have a branch down to the heart to the right ventricle.

Again, this could be a partial fusion of a "lung heart" equalizing pressure between the two lungs, with the main heart. This would explain the partially cleft ventricle as a result.

...now I want to dissect the next fish that I catch to take a look at the gas bladder and heart hook-up, and see how the swim bladder's vessels connect to each other and just if it's anatomically possible for the gas bladder vasculature to hook up with the heart.


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 6:16 PM | Report abuse

Is little Rob going to appreciate all this talk about gas bladders on his watch?

Posted by: CB | August 19, 2007 6:42 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod and Dooley... your discussion about whatever-the-heck you're discussing is bordering on the obscene... bulbous arterialwhatsits and horses nibbling on vaguses (or should that be "vagii"?), not to mention all the pumping and such...

In other news... real door installed successfully today for the neighbor and it was a real bugger. Had to cut through several decades of linoleum layers (was like a mini archaeological dig) to get the dang thing to fit. Ended up having to shave and sand the guano out of the header, but it's in there and looks amazingly perfect. And it turned out to be a cash job (woohoo!).

I'm now debating whether to make some more hot-selling fairy doors, settle down in front of the tube with a bottle of cheap wine, or swig the whole bottle of wine and take a nap. I think I can pull off the nap and tube-sitting simultaneously, so that's where I'm leaning.

Peace...

Posted by: martooni | August 19, 2007 6:53 PM | Report abuse

btw... thanks for the crochet links. Mrs. M found some good stuff (well, she says she did). As long as those baby hats aren't for a "new" M, I don't care.

Posted by: martooni | August 19, 2007 6:56 PM | Report abuse

Good for you, Martooni. And I'm think I'm done. Later maybe we'll let Dooley discuss fish skulls, always a favorite of cartoon cats.

I enjoyed the comparative anatomy and physiology lesson I researched in the last 24 hours.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 6:58 PM | Report abuse

Let me know how that fish dissection works out, Wilbrod.

Off to dissect a pork loin with pineapple glaze...

Posted by: Dooley | August 19, 2007 7:02 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I'm laughing at (and with, and agreeing with) your 3:19. My eyes glazed over by the second post.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 19, 2007 7:03 PM | Report abuse

CB, after experiencing an initial panic over the Achenblog being broken, Rob'll eventually figure that he should have posted a newer, more high-brow kit for the weekend.

And so he should have. On the plus side, maybe we'll attract some cardiologists to the Achenblog.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 7:03 PM | Report abuse

Interesting piece by Jaron Lanier on science, religion, God.

"The idea of God (or gods) also served in ancient times as a way to apply the clan-centric cognition of the human species to the problem of comprehending the dynamics of the world. In the Hebrew Bible, for instance, God is the "King of the universe," so God served at least two duties: as clan leader and as explanation of reality. Thus when scientists tell believers they're flat-out wrong, we think we're making a point about nature, but I think we're often heard as giving the primal message, "We elite persons reject your clan status."

Read more here http://discovermagazine.com/2007/sep/jarons-world-peace-through-god

Also, finally had a chance to watch the Bill Moyers' Journal piece about Karl Rove. Among other interesting points he wonders "Who turned the Attorney General into a partisan sock puppet?" Nooo, he didn't say sock puppet. Which in a round about way brings us back to one of today's previous topics-and the song My Dingaling.
(maybe not appropriate for work)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG2o5AMASDw

Posted by: frostbitten | August 19, 2007 7:08 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, that's GOOD. You shouldn't miss your Sunday afternoon naps, you know, especially with the strenuous task of watching Sunday night football coming up.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 7:10 PM | Report abuse

Good article, Frostbitten.

I wonder about those who reject more complex and vague ideas of God for simpler truths such as "the bible explains it all", though.

I feel they're actually isolating themselves from the community of Christian thought through the ages if they focus on being novice readers of the bible without reference to the thinkers of the ages.

Worse, this isolation is often reinforced by taught supicision for the older forms of Christianity to the point they attempt to convert other Christians to "christianity".

Is it all about belonging? And if so, how can other christians make sure everybody feels connected with christian tradition and doctrine, even if they may disagree with it?

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 7:21 PM | Report abuse

Today I put new carpet in the rabbit's palatial habitat. They had shredded the old stuff. But do I get any thanks? No. They just sit there waiting for raisins.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 19, 2007 7:41 PM | Report abuse

Oh Lord Save us Dick Davis!, RD, you said raisins in same sentence as rabbits. We had rabbits, too, long ago and far away. My little siblings, when in the creepy-crawler phase upon a few horrid occasions, would mix up rabbitty scatty spheroids for raisins.

Oh my, now I need a cleansing image.

Naked mole rats?

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 7:50 PM | Report abuse

Why Slyness, how perfectly boodlian of your dot. She can compete with Martooni and others for hardware monkey top prize. Wow.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 7:53 PM | Report abuse

This was reprinted in the Sunday paper here:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/11/AR2007081101390.html
Interesting observations about "heart" from the recipient of an artificial heart.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 19, 2007 7:55 PM | Report abuse

Good article, Frosti. Wilbrod, I think Christianity's essential message is total inclusiveness but human nature makes it difficult for us to consider people not like us as equals. Rejection of those whose beliefs do not accord with certain groups is the pernicious sin of fundamentalism.

Posted by: Slyness | August 19, 2007 7:55 PM | Report abuse

High School Musical 2: Sing Along Edition on right now!

Posted by: yellojkt | August 19, 2007 8:03 PM | Report abuse

Because it was a rainy day here, I went to a movie - Becoming Jane. It was ok - has some nice moments (Austen explaining irony, for instance). There was a gaggle of giggling girls who LOL'd at the parts that I thought were mildly amusing. And given that not much is known about Austen's life, I didn't feel that it took too many liberties - seemed believable and repectful of her, and has some nice performances. Slyness, YMMV.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 19, 2007 8:03 PM | Report abuse

Frosti, thank you for that article, which included a link to the writings of the late-great Stephen Jay Gould. Here is a clip of what he says:

"The net of science covers the empirical universe: what is it made of (fact) and why does it work this way (theory). The net of religion extends over questions of moral meaning and value. These two magisteria do not overlap, nor do they encompass all inquiry (consider, for starters, the magisterium of art and the meaning of beauty). To cite the arch cliches, we get the age of rocks, and religion retains the rock of ages; we study how the heavens go, and they determine how to go to heaven."

I would tell SJG that religion might be more about joy and justice, but that conversation will have to wait, until the internet extends into celestial nodes.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 8:08 PM | Report abuse

Glad for your comments, Mostly. I'm still thinking about going to see it. The local movie reviewer got a couple of things wrong in his review - saying Anne Hathaway was much too pretty to be Jane, f'instance. She may not have been beautiful like her sister but was considered pretty. And P&P didn't come out of her romance with Tom Lefroy; First Impressions, the first iteration of P&P, was written before she was 21.

Sometimes I think I'm turning into a scholastic over Austen. It's such a pain when people get elementary facts wrong!

Posted by: Slyness | August 19, 2007 8:09 PM | Report abuse

Mostly, great find!

Many heart attack patients will experience a flatness of spirit for a year or more after an initial heart attack. It's sparing energy in order to heal, as well as psychic depression.

I wonder if this artifical heart can in fact speed up and slow down in response to emotion.

Physical arousal is part of our emotional experience; in fear our blood flows to our legs; in anger, our upper body-- head and arms flush with blood. So with that familiar rhythm missing, the brain must feel so off balance all the time.

It's possible that directed cognitive therapy and feedback to his heart to help restore might help him rediscover his other emotional cues and feel less "flat."

I also wonder whether his blood pressure is being kept on the low side; acute apathy and depression can correlate with blood pressure drops, which can easily happen as the body changes position.

This is the first time I've seen the bible so heavily quoted in an WaPo article, BTW.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 8:19 PM | Report abuse

Fascinating article about the artificial heart, so thanks Mostly and Wilbrod, for link and commentary.

Mystery where love resides. We are so much more than the sum of our parts. Perhaps, we are so fearfully and wonderfully made.

Back to school for P.G. County, so we have the major Sunday night blues all up and down the block. Me too. Oh, give me that ol' time calendar of Labor Day to Memorial Day.

No moonflowers this evening to lighten the mood, but tomorrow could be a great evening for such scented, unfurling wonders. Counter-clockwise, is the action, I believe.

Sleepy here. Will hope that PBS can whisk away the blues with something or other.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 19, 2007 8:31 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Wilbrod... when my Bro' in Law had bypass surgery in the spring, they told him that cases of depression after heart surgery are directly related to whether or not they need to pump the heart artificially during the surgery. In Bro' in Law's case, the surgeons were delighted they managed the entire surgery "off pump" and were expecting little or no depression.

I can imagine if having your heart pumped artificially for a short while during surgery can affect you so adversely, then having an artificial heart all the time must be pretty harsh.

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 8:36 PM | Report abuse

What is the meaning of beauty please?

Posted by: Boko999 | August 19, 2007 8:58 PM | Report abuse

Boko.. the meaning of beauty? That's easy...

http://attachments.wetpaintserv.us/ml6bShgFk4JYHrrTPwAqDA%3D%3D57006

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 9:23 PM | Report abuse

Can't be, TBG! dmd is missing.

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 9:26 PM | Report abuse

Howdy again. I didn't know rabbits like raisins. That's very cute.

I enjoyed the discussion between Wilbrod & Dooley even though my comprehension level was like Yoki's. Very Boodleish, particularly when coupled with nekkid mole rats. Also, Slyness, congratulate your daughter on her skills and taste. That Antikythera is one cool machine.

Ivansdad and the Boy saw "Stardust" yesterday and liked it a lot. Back to school here on Tuesday but the Boy is looking forward to it.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 19, 2007 9:37 PM | Report abuse

Oops. kbertocci's got a few to add, I think.

Karen?

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 9:39 PM | Report abuse

TBG, news about your intrepid freshman? How's your daughter doing with it?

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 9:41 PM | Report abuse

Daughter doesn't go back to school until the day after Labor Day. We call it The King's Dominion Law here in Virginia: can't start school until all the lifeguards are finished for the summer.

So she still has two more weeks of flashlight tag and sleepovers. The neighborhood kids have a traditional campout in one yard on Labor Day weekend. Boys in one tent; girls in another.

Speaking of Daughter of G... she has dubbed our new three-member family dynamic as The New & Improved Family.

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 9:45 PM | Report abuse

The Freshman is happy and getting settled. He and his two roommates stayed up until 5 this morning talking and laughing. He met with his advisor and registered for classes today and is very excited about them.

I'm doing OK until someone asks me how I'm doing. His little sister is excited right now as her world-traveling buddies are all coming home from their summers away visiting extended families in far-flung areas: Bolivia, Ethiopia, India. She hasn't had time to miss him yet.

Posted by: TBG | August 19, 2007 9:50 PM | Report abuse

To quote Yoki, "You done good." :-)

Posted by: dbG | August 19, 2007 9:54 PM | Report abuse

I wouldn't expect Miss G to put on a show of missing him. If she wants to talk, she know his phone, e-mail, Myspace, facebook, etc.

What she will NOT miss is having to share a bathroom, etc.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 10:06 PM | Report abuse

TBG - Daughter of G cracks me up! What a great line! Glad to hear your son is settling in well.

My daughter and I went school shopping today. As we were leaving a store, I turned to look at her and said mournfully, "I always thought shopping with my daughter would be fun." This is her first year out of Catholic school, so it's her first year of going to school without wearing a uniform. It is not an overstatement to say that she is drunk with happiness about the possibilities....but her idea of what we're going to bankroll and my idea are two different things. I'm exhausted.

Posted by: Kim | August 19, 2007 10:08 PM | Report abuse

Good going, TBG. I like the idea of New & Improved.

Schools around here start mid-August, some of them earlier, and let out by the end of May. We are lucky that the Boy's school waits until Tuesday to start. As I get older and the summers get hotter, this early start makes no sense to me. With August temperatures in the 90s or 100s, and our aging school infrastructure so lacking, we're paying huge amounts of money just to get the schools livable, much less cool enough to think. It would be much better to start after Labor Day and go into June. Of course, nobody asks me, and they don't seem to listen when I tell them anyway.

Vaya con queso, Boodle. Fondue.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 19, 2007 10:11 PM | Report abuse

I was amused by this comment a couple of days ago -

"I had a hard time spending $34 on my cell phone, there's no way I could bring myself to buy an iPhone. I hate phones. If I don't know the number calling, I screen. I don't mind admitting it. If it's important, they'll leave a message and I can call them back at a better time. I don't much like being at my phone's beck and call.
Posted by: Sara | August 17, 2007 01:11 PM "

--------

Sara, you've already bought into the hog for at least two legs and a butt. If you screen, then you ARE at your phone's beck and call.

A lot of folks, myself included, just don't answer phones when we're not expecting calls. No screening, no screaming, no second thoughts. I make a note that the phone rang, and get to it whenever I get to it, usually fairly soon - minutes or hours later, depending upon circumstances. If my parents in Georgia undergo some horrendous tragedy, they probably should call someone other than me if they need immediate assistance. I'm sure that 911 operators are almost the only people on earth who should feel a compelling need to pick up immediately on unplanned-for phone calls. (psst... don't start in on me about kids & ill relatives. Those calls aren't exactly 'unplanned-for', are they now?)

I've felt bad about missing calls that held missed opportunities, and have been very glad to have missed calls that held inanity & misfortune. Somehow, most times, lack of instant availability works out OK.

Posted by: Bob S. | August 19, 2007 10:18 PM | Report abuse

Maybe keeping her in catholic school WOULD be cheaper, Kim. But it's nice to think you can make a teen girl happy that easily.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 10:19 PM | Report abuse

Do we think the Simpsonizing is all done? I was waiting for that moment, to produce the "final" version of the Springfield BPH. Will do it before I turn in tonight--we're packing for the college launch right now (Flight at 9 a.m. tomorrow--nothing like waiting till the last minute...)

Posted by: kbertocci | August 19, 2007 10:30 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, as I was reading Mostly's artificial heart link, I was thinking similar things to what you wrote subsequently.

As it turns out, the Jarvik 2000's pace is externally controlled by the patient or can be controlled by a computer.

From the Jarvik Website:
"Control of the Jarvik 2000 FlowMaker® is placed in the hands of the patient. Jarvik 2000 patients must therefore monitor both themselves and the device to some degree. Unlike the natural heart, mechanical devices do not "know" with certainty when patients exert themselves and need more oxygen-rich blood to the muscles; neither do they know when patients are sleeping and need less. Depending on the heart's condition and the patient's level of activity, the output (i.e. rotor speed) of the Jarvik 2000 can be adjusted to accommodate patient needs using a small, external controller.

We believe that the manual-control approach of the Jarvik 2000 FlowMaker® remains the safest approach to regulating a VAD. Some other heart rotary assist devices have automatic control systems in which a computer determines the speed of the pump. This works in some circumstances, but there can be situations in which the computer can make a mistake and run the device at a dangerous speed because it does not have enough information about the patient's condition.

With the Jarvik 2000, Patients receive guidelines for making adjustments to the pump's speed, but over time, they learn to adapt the settings to their individual health conditions. Improvement in heart function, for example, can prompt gradual changes to their settings. Most patients need only to adjust the pump speed occasionally, and they often "feel" the need to turn the pump up when exercising or down when at rest or going to sleep. The five speeds of the Jarvik 2000 FlowMaker® afford the patient a considerable range for rest and exercise but does not permit unsafe extremes."

Seems to me that keeping a heart in a highly controlled "safe," conservative operating range may prolong life quantity but possibly not quality, be that heart mechanical or the 3/4 pounder we were born with.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 19, 2007 11:06 PM | Report abuse

There speaks he who may follow speed limits on highways, but who truly loves racing cars flat-out, bc.

Another story, this one on pronouns.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070817205522.htm

Apparently to the brain they're more than nouns that have lost their amateur status. No word yet on the impact of pronouns on hearts.

Old Man Cardio, he just keeps pounding on...

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 19, 2007 11:38 PM | Report abuse

TBG, here you go, suitable for framing:

http://attachments.wetpaintserv.us/JSkXHez9H3dB4hgq9GZ9nQ%3D%3D65855

Of course, with Photoshop / Illustrator, it could be a lot more interesting. All I have is Acrobat, WordPerfect and Paint. We do what we can with what we have. Feel free to edit. And if I forgot anybody, let me know.

Posted by: kbertocci | August 19, 2007 11:39 PM | Report abuse

kbert - beautiful! Thanks!

Posted by: Bob S. | August 20, 2007 12:16 AM | Report abuse

I think that everyone who needs to know what I look like (Simpsonized) already knows.

Posted by: Bob S. | August 20, 2007 12:17 AM | Report abuse

That's great, kb! I'll have to stop being so shy about getting my picture taken so I'll have something for opportunities like this.

And hi, Bob S - I was wondering where you'd disappeared to. Anybody heard from Wheezy?

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 20, 2007 12:20 AM | Report abuse

mostly - I promised myself (I think that I've already broken my promise tonight) that I'd try to limit my comments to those that might actually be interesting to someone other than myself. I've found that it limits my scope severely!

Posted by: Bob S. | August 20, 2007 12:23 AM | Report abuse

You judge yourself too harshly, Bob S.. Although if you posted before midnight EST, it'd help.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 12:28 AM | Report abuse

Thanx, Wilbrod. I'm working (slowly, ever so slowly) on being the person I'd like to be.

Posted by: Bob S. | August 20, 2007 12:35 AM | Report abuse

This is for Wilbrod, addressing a point from weeks ago: Do you remember my (poorly-stated ) analogy between "weird life" and "non-Euclidian geometry"?

In your reply, I think that you essentially provided the explanation of my point that I hadn't bothered to include. You pointed out that "non-Euclidian" refers to any non-plane geometry which involves adjustments to Euclidian axioms regarding parallel lines. The term "non-Euclidean" doesn't seem to include any refutation or replacement of Euclid's work. Likewise, "weird life" is a term which refers to extensions of, rather than replacements for, standard biological mechanisms/paradigms.

That was the point I was trying to make - That the terms are useful (and somewhat amusing) mostly only to those who are grounded in the original framework. To others, it may (quite inaccurately) seem to be competing theories.

Posted by: Bob S. | August 20, 2007 1:17 AM | Report abuse

'Morning, Boodle. Looks like I'm the first one up and about this morning. There's nothing much on the front page to take umbrage about, so no rant this morning. However, we DO have a front page alert, since Joel's Outtlook piece (which I'd expected to be posted by now as a new kit) is highlighted under the Outlook header.

Watched a good movie with my son last night on DVD: "Glory Road," about Don Haskins, the white coach who put an all-black basketball starting team together for the 1966 NCAA final game against Kentucky, and what that team went through. Great story, well done. The team was fromTexas Western, a little "mining" college in El Paso, which doesn't come off too well as a garden spot of the U.S. I didn't know the famous coach Pat Riley was one of the Kentucky players, but he was. That game is now rated as "the most important game in basketball history," since it first introduced black players in teams that never had themn before.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 5:30 AM | Report abuse

Happy Monday, Mudge. My pastor is from Alabama. He says that the underpinnings for segregation in college football in the South were knocked out the night an African-American player (from California, IIRC) starred on a team that beat the heck out of Bear Bryant's team. Does anyone recall the team and player? 'Cause I don't.

Posted by: Slyness | August 20, 2007 7:00 AM | Report abuse

Rain swung by in the night. However, I stuck a chopstick in the ground; the soil remains bone dry.

However, the air is lush and cool. Happy first day of school to PGians. I expect we are lead-off district, schedule-wise. The advantage is clear in December, since children finish their semester finals before the holiday break.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 20, 2007 7:26 AM | Report abuse


*Hanging up the "Welcome back, Joel" banner in the empty, quiet Boodle Bunker, (adding streamers and balloons), just in case the boss is returning today*

Posted by: kbertocci | August 20, 2007 7:27 AM | Report abuse

Morning all!

kb... I trust you got your fine daughter off to the airport in time?

Thanks, too, for your excellent Springfield BPH. I wonder where Rob will take us today?

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 8:27 AM | Report abuse

The High School Musical 2 was just awesome. Cute and wholesome and lots of women in bathing suits pretending to be high schoolers. My son and I were discussing the homoerotic undertones in the "Hey Batter, Swing" number, but other than that just your typical Beach Blanket Bingo throwback where people randomly break out into song for no reason.

Lisa de Moraes says it was the most watched cable show ever and the most watched TV show all summer.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/19/AR2007081901416.html

And then right after the sing-along version of HSM2, they had a special two-part Hannah Montana. Tweener overdose.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 8:37 AM | Report abuse

TBG--yep, Alice is off, should be boarding the plane very soon. She's doing that millipede smuggling thing again; the creature is "disguised as a salad" in a plastic container full of lettuce with holes in the lid, in one of the cargo pockets of her very baggy pants. I don't know how many times she can get away with that. She'll be arriving at an empty apartment -- her idea of heaven, except that the DSL won't be up and running until later this week. They have WiFi on campus though, so she can just hang out over there--her apartment is only about a block away. She'll have a week to settle in before classes start on the 27th.

Did I miss the memo about how long Achenbach's vacation is? Do we have subs scheduled all this week, or what?

Posted by: kbertocci | August 20, 2007 8:42 AM | Report abuse

kber, I don't think he said. Do we allow for privacy about vacation plans? After the debacle last year over the trip to France, I wouldn't blame him for never saying another word.

BTW, has anybody seen Superfrenchie lately?

Posted by: Slyness | August 20, 2007 8:51 AM | Report abuse

I was wondering about Eurotrash... has anyone seen him lately?

Eurotrash... you out there? The Boodle says "hi."

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 8:52 AM | Report abuse

This boodle's heading toward 400 comments. Someone in the DG area should give this Rob person a sharp, well placed toe jab in the ribs to wake him up.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 8:58 AM | Report abuse

SCC DC area... sheesh

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 8:59 AM | Report abuse

I'll ponder something important and profound. As soon as I post it there will be a new Kit.

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 9:00 AM | Report abuse

I went and cruelly fisked Joel's Outlook piece in case you need something to read until Rob finds out where to get coffee today.

http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2007/08/fisking-achenblogger.html

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 9:10 AM | Report abuse

Curmudgeon's been Simpsonized...

http://attachments.wetpaintserv.us/kQ7P0RkCNIYJhvY66E8RJg%3D%3D7052


Posted by: kbertocci | August 20, 2007 9:13 AM | Report abuse

Yes, that's me--and more than a little flattering, perhaps. Thanks to Karen for posting it.

I just finished reading the Ralph Ellison piece in the Post magazine (tough to read that last page without...uh...[clears throat]...um. well. yes. Anyway, the writer, Will Haygood, and the subject, Adam Bradley, will be online for a chat at noon today. The good news is that Bradley and Ellison researcher John Callahan have put together what appears to be Ellison's second novel, carved out of thousands of pages and 40 years of work, which will be published next year. Can't wait.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 9:20 AM | Report abuse

I know where to get coffee today. Starbucks opened 20 minutes ago in "town"-a mere 42 miles away. I know, I know, some prefer the Scottish coffee, others some guy Tim, it's more than I should spend, and all that. And yet, I find myself almost chanting grande, two pump mocha, extra hot. I will be there this afternoon and will proudly carry my cup into the meeting I have to attend. I hope the statement I'm making is "I need this to stay awake in your dumb old meeting, so make it snappy."

Posted by: frostbitten | August 20, 2007 9:22 AM | Report abuse

Frosty, that is a 84 miles round trip for burnt-coffee-beans coffee! It's coffee with a serious carbon footprint.

Loomis, wath out for those Texas camels.
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/08/19/asia/AS-GEN-Australia-Killer-Camel.php

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 9:29 AM | Report abuse

Frosti that coffee sounds good, could use a few extra doses of caffeine right now myself.

Just reading an article on the "three Amigos" summit today and tomorrow up here. I suggest Shriek and Boko whip up the road and report on the meeting for us. I am sure they could sneak through the security :-).
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20070819/montebello_summit_070820/20070820?hub=Canada&s_name=

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 9:33 AM | Report abuse

Morning!

Love, love, love the Simpsonizing! Sorry to miss the Springfield BPH. Was busy mucking out the house after a lovely weekend in the country.

TBG, congrats on the successful launching and the New and Improved.

Mudge, we discovered that Stone Mountain winery is only a 15 minute drive from the country place (and visible on our morning walk up the road). You're right--good wine, and worth a far longer trip.

Posted by: Raysmom | August 20, 2007 9:37 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

I've been promising myself I'll read that Ellison piece, and write something myself about Joel's Outlook column (spent some time talking about that with Scottynuke yesterday).

Hopefully, I'll catch up at some point...

bc

Posted by: bc | August 20, 2007 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Well, if Mudge doesn't feel like ranting, I certainly do! I hate IKEA! Man, I hate that place. There is no such thing as a quick trip to IKEA. Once you are in the door, it is "abandon hope all who enter here" or at least abandon hope of ever seeing your car in the next two hours. Rats in a maze is the only metaphor that comes to mind. Whatever it is that you want is waaay in the furthest reaches of the store, traffic is one way, and there you are, egged on by directional arrows on the floor and signs suspended from the ceiling that promise "this way to checkout" but in fact only lead to a further maze of bunkbeds and placemats made in China but all with Swedlishese names like "gippa" and "junko". By the time you do get to the line to check out, you've forgotten why you came in the first place, but you are newly resolved never to come again. I am told that IKEA creates a "shopping experience" where one can linger and browse. Listen, I've got a couch for lingering and a computer for browsing. I just want to get a little clip-on light to go above the work bench in the garage. Is that too much to ask? Oh, and by the way, the store name is pronounced in Swedish i-kay-uh, not eye-key-uh. Whatever you call it, I call it k-guy hell!

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 9:47 AM | Report abuse

There, there, K-guy. There, there. (Hope you feel better now.)

Actually, I have never once been in an Ikea store. Never. (Only reason is lack of proximity, I suppose. Although now that I've heard from K-guy, maybe that's a good thing.)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 9:53 AM | Report abuse

I went into the Ikea at Potomac Mills once. It didn't do much for me, kinda like Crate & Barrel and Pottery Barn. Neat stuff, but I don't see anything I need at a price I can afford.

Posted by: Slyness | August 20, 2007 10:01 AM | Report abuse

I love musicals, I love IKEA. What can I say? I also love the names they give their products ("gippa" and "junko" are great renditions, k-guy!).

My favorite: their trio of wooden mixing spoons is called Mixa. Any biologists out there will recognize that as a prefix.

To a Greek kid, it just means "snot."

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Ikea sells great meatballs with Lingonberry sauce. Yummo.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 10:03 AM | Report abuse

Yes dmd, Arbusto and Calderone are coming to town. Hopefully the motorcade-induced traffic jams will be over by the time Mrs. Denizen is leaving her office that is located on airport's ground. Her Tim is the airport's Tim, so close she is.

The Château Montebello has been emptied of its guests to receive the 3 amigos. I never stayed there (not in my price range, by a large margin) but the Mrs. and I had a most excellent celebratory dinner at the hotel's restaurant. Good stuff I'm telling you. The smoked trout salad in appetized was remarkable.

I don't know what to what kind of fashion disaster Mr. Harper is heading but it could hardly be worst than what happened at the last summit in Mexico. Fox was fine in his white linen tropical suit, Arbusto looked relaxed in his outfit but our fashioned-impaired PM was packed like a sausage in his clothes. The strange fishing vest he wore on top of his polo didn't help.
http://www.insurancebroadcasting.com/040306-p5.jpg

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 10:06 AM | Report abuse

How is it that Florida, the land of disposable furniture, hasn't had a single Ikea store until now?

One of the kind-of-astonishing things about living in a resort town with lots of rich snowbirds is that there's several upholstery shops, lots of floor tile stores, a gallery that sells serious pieces of glass, and a frame shop that induces museum fatigue with its unbelievable assortment of moldings. Amazingly, some handsome ones are actually made in Columbia, S.C. by an outfit that can apparently do all the millwork for your high-budget traditional-style house.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 20, 2007 10:07 AM | Report abuse

Shriek I highly recommend the Caribou at Montebello.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 10:16 AM | Report abuse

Morning, friends. I'll bet the last dollar by the time I get this comment posted we will have a new kit. Oh, well.

I am off this afternoon to the Summer Fun program party and backpack giveaway. Cake and ice cream will be served, and school supplies given. I can't wait. The g-girl and I should have lots of fun. Wish my grandsons were here too.


Going to be another hot one today, and temps predicted to be in the hundreds again this week. Don't forget to check on the elderly and those that live alone if it is still hot where you are.

As for the nanny piece that's being discussed here, I guess it is kind of like when African-Americans worked in the homes of White people here in the South. Not much thought was given to the person doing the labor because that person was not perceived to be on an equal basis with the person employing him or her. And it was most often a "her". Men did the outside work. And in these cases, Social Security was the culprit, in that many of these employers did not deduct that money. When time for the person to retire, there wasn't any money in there. It seems lessons were not learned in that situation, and here we are into the future and the same kind of mistakes being made.

What is the root of such a problem? There has to be a root. Don't you think?

Got to go.

Thank you, Slyness.

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 20, 2007 10:16 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if Rob isn't on one of those govt. boondoggle work schedules that features an "RDO" or whatever. We haven't heard from nor seen hide nor hair of the kid since what? Friday morning? He's either sacked in, or still down in Ocean City tring to sober up and find some sunburn lotion.

Slacker. I mean, what is that young generation coming to?

Harrumphhh.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 10:23 AM | Report abuse

Whaddaya mean submission error? Let's try this again:

SCC: Tring=trying

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 10:25 AM | Report abuse

Rob left three posts on The Editorialist between 8:20 and 8:24. He must be out looking for some coffee.

RDO? Random Day Off?

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 10:30 AM | Report abuse

Posting 4 kits in 2 days probably pretty much wore hime out. Poor Rob.

But I thought Harper looked like the quintissential Canadian. Fish out of water in hot weather is what that outfit said to me.

Posted by: dr | August 20, 2007 10:32 AM | Report abuse

I'll also admit to loving Ikea. Raysdad redid our kitchen with their cabinets, which required many trips, some of which were for things like a *single* cabinet knob or shelf. k-guy's right--there is no obvious quick way to go directly to what you need. Although I did find a workaround for the kitchen department.

One of my favorite Ikea names is for the cheap wooden shelving units we put in the garage--Gorm.

Posted by: Raysmom | August 20, 2007 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Shrieking writes, "Frosty, that is a 84 miles round trip for burnt-coffee-beans coffee! It's coffee with a serious carbon footprint."

Now, now, you know I wouldn't drive all that way just for the coffee. I have to attend the meeting so I am also picking up two bookcases for the community technology center, taking electronic equipment to the only solid waste facility in the county that takes it (for 3 families, including my own), grocery shopping, and picking up some school stuff at the district's admin building (though I'm not an employeee) so the teacher who lives even farther away than I do doesn't have to. Umbrage, grumble, grumble. You call it burnt, I call it nectar.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 20, 2007 10:48 AM | Report abuse

I love Ikea, 5 minutes after opening on a Wednesday not between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Any other time it is indeed the ordeal that K-guy described.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 20, 2007 10:52 AM | Report abuse

Mornin' all...

It's raining and chilly here (59F) -- and dark, too -- but that's fine with me. I'm in the mood for dreary. It's just been too dang sunny and hot around here lately.

This weather's also perfect for comfort food -- just wiped out a big plate of butter-smothered potato-and-cheese pierogi and now I'm eyeing up Mrs. M's leftover meatloaf.

All I can say about IKEA is that I've found them sorely lacking in the quality department (at least when it comes to their furniture). Form definitely trumps function and "cool" trumps sturdiness.

I do like their meatballs, though.

Time to go play with power tools... my little fairy doors are selling like hotcakes (thanks again, CP, for turning me onto a great [and fun] cottage industry).

Peace...

Posted by: martooni | August 20, 2007 10:58 AM | Report abuse

Ah, love! What a romantic anniversary we had yesterday.

We screwed most of the morning, and well into the afternoon. We screwed on the kitchen tile. We screwed on the carpet in the master bathroom. Fer cryin' out loud, we even screwed on a ladder! We screwed until we were dripping with perspiration. We screwed until we were practically worn out. I know I screwed more yesterday than I have in the past year combined--without a doubt.

Yes, Loomispouse gave in to my wishes. For my anniversary gift, we went with hard wear. Um, hardware. I received a new kitchen faucet (to be installed later today) and just as important, new cabinet and drawer knobs in the kitchen and master bath. The old chrome silver and gold ball knobs came original to the house, and the finish was gone in many places on most of them. It was time, as I pointed out to Loomispouse about two weeks ago, to replace all of them.

We made six trips to the hardware store this weekend--three on Saturday and three on Sunday. I accompanied Loomispouse on four of them. We brought home nine different knob styles to try out. Given all the experimentation, I guesstimate we screwed well more than 100 times over the weekend--and at least 92 times on Sunday!

Ain't love grand?

Posted by: Loomis | August 20, 2007 10:59 AM | Report abuse

>It's raining and chilly here... -- and dark, too<

Martooni, get out of the shower and turn the bathroom light on.

Jeez.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 11:01 AM | Report abuse

SCC 46 new knobs

Posted by: Loomis | August 20, 2007 11:03 AM | Report abuse

*ripping eyeballs out of head*

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 11:05 AM | Report abuse

T.M.I.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Well thank you, Curmudgeon, for the passable imitation of Cecil Kelloway as Dr. Chumley in "Harvey", but you forgot the beer. Dr. Chumley specified "There, there" and beer.
As regards the IKEA experience, I have seen numerous analyses of male and female patterns of consumption which characterize men as hunters and women as gatherers. Man goes to store for nails. He strides purposely into hardware store, finds nails, makes purchase, returns home (only to discover three other things he needs, but that's another story). Woman goes shopping to get placemats. Strides into store and picks up sale circular to see what's on sale, looks at purses, tries on four dresses, looks at shoes, buys placemats, gets baby gift for friend, buys sheets, goes back to try on one dress again and buys it, then back to shoes and purses to see what might look good with new dress but decides against new shoes so close to fall, buys purse, eats snack of meatballs and lingonberry sauce, returns home (only to discover three other things she needs, but that's another story).

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 11:07 AM | Report abuse

*faxing 'mudge some mindbleach*

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, forget the eyes, take the whole head.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 20, 2007 11:12 AM | Report abuse

RD, my thought exactly.

Posted by: Slyness | August 20, 2007 11:15 AM | Report abuse

Try to think of butterflies and cute puppies 'Mudge; it helped me a bit.
It wouldn't have if I weren't under the spell of a massive dose of anti-histamine though. (The ragweed season has officially opened yesterday).

Leona "Taxes are for little people" Helmsley just died. Very rich.
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/08/20/leona-helmsley-is-dead-at-87/index.html?hp

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 11:19 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if these were the Phillips kind or the slotted kind they were using. (Just go with me on this.) I like the Phillips kind for drywall, but the slotted kind, while lacking stability, do allow greater torque. Now the brass kinds are good for fancy work, but they are pricey (stay with me folks) and bend. Now I like the manual kind of driver when doing precision work, cause, you know, I dislike power tools. (almost there.) And Craftsman makes a whole lot of nice ones that are guaranteed.


Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 11:22 AM | Report abuse

Ikea's furniture all screws together with Allen Keyes while every Canadian knows Robertson's has better head.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Being a Canuck I go with the Robertson screws.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertson_screwdriver

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Just in case:

"Snowden was wounded inside his flak suit. Yossarian ripped open the snaps of Snowden's flak suit and heard himself scream wildly as Snowden's insides slithered down to the floor in a soggy pile and just kept dripping out...Yossarian screamed a second time and squeezed both hands over his eyes...

"I'm cold," Snowden wimpered. "I'm cold."

"There, there," Yossarian mumbled mechanically in a voice too low to be heard. "There, there."

Yossarian was cold, too, and shivering uncontrollably. He felt goose pimples clacking all over him as he gazed down despondently at the grim secret Snowden had spilled all over the messy floor. It was easy to read the message in his entrails. Man was matter, that was Snowden's secret. Drop him out a window and he'll fall. Set fire to him and he'll burn. Bury him and he'll rot, like other kinds of garbage. The spirit gone, man is garbage. That was Snowden's secret. Ripeness was all.

"I'm cold," Snowden said. "I'm cold."

"There, there," said Yossarian. "There, there." He pulled the rip cord of Snowden's parachute and covered his body with the white nylon sheets.

"I'm cold."

"There, there." (End of chapter 41 "Snowden," pp. 463-4)

Also works as mindbleach.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Aren't Robertson's the ones with the square inset? (Focus. Must maintain Focus.) Yeah, they are cool if you can find em'

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 11:28 AM | Report abuse

SCC a better head.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 11:29 AM | Report abuse

Mudge - I know you are trying to help. But now I am really going to have to skip lunch.
Time for a nice pleasant walk. Maybe I will meet some of my woodland friends.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Yo Slappy!!! New kit or we ain't gonna be responsible.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Famous G family lore:

Mr. G's grandmother walks into the hardware store and says, "My daughter needs a screw."

Flustered, she tries to get out of it: "Just a little one!"

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Catch-22, a book I loved made into a movie I hated. So very very few film adaptations really do the original material justice. My personal favorite film from a great book is "The Tin Drum", with the miniseries "Lonesome Dove" a fairly distant second.
All things considered, I think I still prefer Dr. Chumley's prescription.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 11:36 AM | Report abuse

That was very funny, Loomis. Congratulations on an anniversary weekend well spent.

Kurosawaguy, I am more like the "hunter" shopper than the gatherer, particularly in malls. If I must enter one, it is because I need a particular thing from a particular store. In big stores, I shop for particular things from specific departments. Then I leave. I seldom browse. Ivansdad is our shopper par excellence. He knows where sales are and which stores are best for what items. He does the school supply shopping.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 20, 2007 11:44 AM | Report abuse

Hey, who turned on Autumn?

Posted by: Dolphin Michael | August 20, 2007 11:45 AM | Report abuse

During WWII the Ottawa General Hospital was declared Dutch territory so the Crown Princess could be born on Dutch soil.
Maybe we should declare Hangar 11, were Bush will be arriving, Dutch soil and call it The Hague.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 11:45 AM | Report abuse

I posted a comment on Editorialist asking Rob to come and play.

Loomis.. glad to see you've joined in on the Gutternalia! That was hilarious.

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 11:46 AM | Report abuse

Wait just a daggone minute...

Are you guys reaching for the mindbleach over Mudge's remark about me in the shower?

If so, I'll have you know that I always shower fully clothed (cuts down on laundry costs and saves water).

The only time you'll catch me nekkid is when I'm out in the shop with my power tools making fairy doors.

Posted by: martooni | August 20, 2007 11:49 AM | Report abuse

I believe Arbusto's coming with a posse of men that are believed to be armed and dangerous Boko. In addition, the US doesn't sign any agreement regarding the International Tribunal (or Court?). Good idea though but it ain't gonna fly.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 11:50 AM | Report abuse

No, I don't think that was it, martooni.

Posted by: Kim | August 20, 2007 11:50 AM | Report abuse

Laughing, Boko, at "Slappy."

Unfortunately, when I go into a supermarket for "just one item," I become one of those gatherers. Otherwise I'm pretty much a hunter-shopper.

I dunno, K-guy; I have mixed feelings about Catch-22 the movie. Granted on the whole it is a failure...but. There are so many "buts." First, can we not agree the original novel is/was basically unfilmable? So any Hollywood version was doomed to fail.

But second, there were individual moments of it that worked. Bob Newhart as Major Major, Richard Benjamin as Major Danby, Jack Gilford as Doc, and to some extent Buck Henry all "worked" for me. Arkin was a great Yossarian. But Jon Voigt as Milo and Orson Wells as Gen. Dreedle didn't. The rest-so-so.

The opening flight sequence of the B-25s taking off remains one of the great sequences of flight (which I've since seen copied, to the point of cliche, but ya gotta give C-22 credit). I think overall the death of Snowden scene worked. Most of the rest didn't. Hated the Milo Minderbinder stuff.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 11:56 AM | Report abuse

I have a couple of Robertson screwdrivers at home. I forget what project made them necessary. Definitely a Good Idea but overwhelmed by Phillips.

I managed to spend much of yesterday screwing and glueing a modest backless teak bench that came as a kit.

Movies? Rescue Dawn. Excellent acting, especially by the supporting actors. Christian Bale was described by a critic as going from chipper to starved. Definitely. Everyone looked starved. How's that for devotion to art?

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 20, 2007 11:58 AM | Report abuse

TBG, your grandmother's remind me of an incident in a lab I worked years ago. Dr. Hill (unreleted to Benny...) a Brit freshly arrived in Canada comes into the receptionist/administrator office and asks her for rubbers. The straight-laced admin assistant curtly states that she doesn't stock such item in the stationary office. Dr. Hill insists, surely this lab stocks rubbers, anybody working in the lab would nedd rubbers eventually, etc.
It turned out that the pink rubber erasers are shortened to rubbers in Pom-speak. Separated by a common language they say.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 12:02 PM | Report abuse

My parents tried to be open-minded about child-rearing and the timing of one's education in worldly matters (it was the sixties and seventies, y'know), so I read Catch-22 when I might have been a tad young to fully appreciate it. I had to quiz my father vigorously to explain things like the job description of Nately's inamorata, and to define for me a vigorous all-purpose verb that kept popping up, occasionally as an intensifying gerund. In both cases, he referred me to the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, a reference work which he had selected for our home on the basis of it having vulgarities -- so we could look up "English as She is Spokeâ„¢."

Posted by: StorytellerTim | August 20, 2007 12:05 PM | Report abuse

This is such a late comment to the boodle, but I Simpsonized my whole family one day while I was bored at work. Gave myself a dog (Santa's Little Helper). My family is pretty good looking as Simpsons.

Posted by: Sara | August 20, 2007 12:24 PM | Report abuse

I just got a NASA press release, one of the rare ones that delivers something like actual news about what the agency is for. Voyager 2 is 30 years old, today. Voyager 1 launched on September 5, so it's not quite there yet. The two spacecraft continue to function and to perform what is called the Voyager Interstellar Mission. Voyager 1, although it launched later, was put on a faster trajectory and reached Jupiter first (hence its designation as "1"). It is significantly farther from the Sun than Voyager 2. They are roughly 3 times the orbital radius of Pluto from the Sun. V1 entered the heliosheath a year or so ago, and V2 is coming up to that point within the next year, probably. The heliosheath is the turbulent region interior to the shell created by the Sun's magnetic field, separating the region dominated by internal plasma from the region dominated by external plasma. Once the spacecraft has traversed the heliosheath and the heliopause (the outermost part of the heliosheath), it will truly be in interstellar space.

Posted by: ScienceTim | August 20, 2007 12:29 PM | Report abuse

There is one circumstance when just about everyone who would be characterized as a "hunter shopper" switches teams. This is what I call the Treasure Hunt. The Treasure Hunt may be an antique store, a flea market, yard sale, auto wrecking yard, but it is always a great heap of disorganized stuff which holds the promise of potential gold. We recently found a wonderful place in Baltimore called Second Chance Architectural Salvage which is such a place- five warehouses full of doors, windows, columns, stained glass, light fixtures, clawfoot tubs, shutters, toilets, mantlepieces, marble countertops, doorknobs, hardware, flooring-all of it pulled out of old buildings slated for the wrecking ball. We found a pedestal sink made the year I was born (1948) in perfect shape for $105! The key is that there must be a lot of stuff and it must be in a chaos of clutter. This serves a dual purpose. It convinces you that the thing you seek might well be in here somewhere, 'cause there is so much to sift through, and secondly, that if you only devote sufficient time and attention you will find what others have overlooked.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 12:29 PM | Report abuse

The trouble with some books--and movies, too, I guess-- is that although they may be great works, they exist in a moment in time --and without that context they just don't seem quite so special. I suppose as Tim has pointed out, Catch-22 might seem that way to him, as Catcher in the Rye does nowadays to many college kids forced to read it who who ask WTF was all the fuss about?

But yes, this is where we old farts play an important role, explaining and "witnessing" the tenor of the times when various works of art or social events happened. (And if you don't get it, you don't get it, which might make an interesting slogan for, say, a newspaper ad.)

The Wiki entry says that Catch-22 gave the language a new catchphrase, which is true enough but falls way short of the mark. It not only gave us a catchphrase, it also gave us an outlook, a viewpoint, black humor and ironic detechment; it helped legitimize and explain the antiwar movement. It was a book "everybody" read and knew, and could discuss in shorthand; you didn't have to explain who Snowden or Nately or Major Major were, just like once upon a time everybody knew who Holden Caulfied and Seymour Glass and Franny and Zooey were, or Jake Barnes and Nick Carraway, or Lord Jim, or Huck, Jim, Becky and Jim.

And yeah, having to look up dirty words in the dictionary pretty much takes all the fun out of it.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 12:33 PM | Report abuse

That should be "as she is spoken." If thats their trademark phrase, I hope they never release a Grammar text.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 12:43 PM | Report abuse

On the contrary, looking up the dirty words in the dictionary gave me extraordinary powers against my 4th- and 5th-grade colleagues, who lacked such an excellent tome or the knowledge to use it. My father tells me that my parents were repeatedly addressed by the teacher on the worrisome issue of my terrorization of the class bully, based on my knowing the definition of his favorite verb. Granted, I didn't understand the definition -- what the heck is "sexual intercourse"? -- but I knew that I could wield those mighty syllables like a magic spell to shield me from harm and flay my enemies.

In retrospect, I see that that kid had an emotional problem that required treatment, perhaps just a reasonable response of frustration and anger instigated by an unrecognized learning disability. Fills me with guilt whenever I think of him. He was decent to me on my first day in a new school, but his problems overcame him. Still, he could be a danger, and the magic definition was my path to survival.

Posted by: StorytellerTim | August 20, 2007 12:49 PM | Report abuse

Curmudgeon, I know some of my generation who LOVE catcher in the rye-- the teen angst, the awkward scene with the hooker, being thrown out of school and nowhere to go and not knowing what to do next.

I never really got it. But I'm no Holden.

I have yet to read catch-22, but I'm fairly sure that as I should know all the swear words...

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 12:50 PM | Report abuse

"English as She is Spoke" is a reference to an unintentional humor book of the 19th century.

Posted by: StorytellerTim | August 20, 2007 12:50 PM | Report abuse

More about English as She Is Spoke:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_As_She_Is_Spoke

Posted by: StorytellerTim | August 20, 2007 12:52 PM | Report abuse

I still have a lot of catching up to do (8/18 10:10PM), but having Simpsonized myself, I'm quite anxious to get that out there: http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=xcfaufkmgirqmtuqrzhxeoflillvmori# (jeez, What Am I Drinking...

Posted by: omni | August 20, 2007 12:56 PM | Report abuse

I lost a coffee in your honour this morning Loomis. And not just in the metaphorical sense. Happy Anniversary!

But no one does cheap bookcases like Ikea. You don't shop there, you go on adventures there. If you come to the House of R, your wine, juice and water will be served in glassware from Ikea. If it can't be washed in the dishwasher it does not belong in the house. And if it does, its in a cabinet hiding.

Posted by: dr | August 20, 2007 12:57 PM | Report abuse

Thank you. If Rob doesn't start a new kit, we must boodle to babelfish word assemble, no?

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 1:01 PM | Report abuse

OK, well just noticed that Rob has a guest Kitter this morning: one Nick Baumann.

Maybe Nick can borrow the keys to the Achenblog?

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 1:08 PM | Report abuse

Yes! Is much tastings at IKEA.

Also, I pocket time machine kitchen when moneying squishy bed baby and rag shelf which I read across.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 1:08 PM | Report abuse

And what a drag: http://simpsonizeme.com/ecard.php?lang=en_us&code=tyrqdkfkelghkkusxyothuxkmuexcytm#

Posted by: omni | August 20, 2007 1:12 PM | Report abuse

You just sound like me in your 13:08 Wilbrod, you have me worried Babelgnome.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 1:16 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I think you missed my point--or perhaps you are demobnstrating it. I'm sorry you didn't "get" Catcher in the Rye. But it isn't simply a book about "teenage angst." In it's time it was a shocker; people wanted to ban it. And kids (probably about age 15 or 16 and above)swore by it, and quoted from it like they cite YouTube stuff nowadays. Yes, some of your friends may have liked it--but it isn't about "liking" (or "loving) it. It's abou being shocked and having your sock blown off by it. I doubt any of your friends had their socks blown off by Catcherin the Rye in this day and age.

And I suspect you're gonna have the same experience with Catch-22 if/when you get around to reading it. Whether you like it or not, it ain't gonna knock your socks off. And thereby is the experience you'll miss that I'm talking about. (And it's not remotely about the dirty words, which aren't used all that often anyway. The book that did that was Norman Mailer's "The Naked and the Dead", published in 1948, when I was 2 years old.)

Books like CITR and C-22 and TNATD, or albums like Sergeant Peppers, or movies like Dr. Strangelove, or the first Playboy magazines aren't just one-on-one experiences between the work and the reader/viewer; they are also cultural experiences. And that's what can't be easily replicated decades later.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 1:16 PM | Report abuse

The top two posts on PZ Myers blog may be intersting to some Boodlers.

Love as chemical reaction.
...valued human properties such as love and attachment and awareness of others are a product of our biology -- emotions like love are an outcome of chemistry, and can't be separated from our meaty natures.
.....Now I know some people are peculiarly offended by the idea that something like love can be reduced to "just chemicals", but I'm not one of them. I find it absolutely wonderful that beautiful human feelings are not the product of ineffable invisible spirits, but are a consequence of our splendidly earthly humanity -- hug someone, and little peptides tickle regions of their brains, and they feel good and happy, and they might just hug you back ... and that's all right with everyone. Who we are is inseparable from what we are, and we're all complicated conglomerations of intricate biochemistry with a long, long history of natural change, and we should revel in that. Share some chemistry with your neighbors today!
-PZM
'http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/2007/08/your_mamas_soul_doesnt_love_yo.php#more'

Silly internet quizzes.
'http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/'

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 1:21 PM | Report abuse

Mudge... when my daughter realized our hotel didn't carry the Disney Channel and she couldn't watch High School Musical 2 on Friday night she said, "Oh my God! I'm going to miss the cultural experience of my generation!"

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 1:22 PM | Report abuse

Looks like no new kits until Joel comes back from his secret mission or until someone notices the angry rabble banging on the cell bars.

I would go back to the theory that four times in two days just wore poor Rob out except a youngster like him usually recovers pretty quickly.

Plus that whole metaphor reminds me of Loomis's home improvement projects. More mindbleach, please. I'm happy for ya, Linda, but there is such a thing as oversharing. Never thought I would say that.

Besides, my hovercraft is full of eels.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 1:23 PM | Report abuse

"You don't shop there, you go on adventures there." In the words of Inigo Montoya: "You keep sayin' tha' word. I don' think it means what you think it means." Please to recalibrate your expectations if a effing trip to effing IKEA is your notion of adventure. Adventures involve excitement. Adventures involve risk. Adventures involve mystery. Adventures do not involve clever inexpensive solutions to your storage problems.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 1:24 PM | Report abuse

TBG I don't know about your household but my daughter has been talking (seemingly) nonstop for the past several days on two topics, HSM2 and the Narnia series. She has already filled me in on the massive amounts of money the movies have made, the music, characters etc. It is the first glimpse of her entering the "all knowing" teen years, when in her mind I will be reduced to a blathering dimwit. Thank goodness her birthday is coming as she will now have a new obsession.

To all of you who have journalistic backgrounds. The older child discovered an older IBM selectric at my dad's place. She is fascinated, it has keys, no corrector and hums loudly when turned on and she has been typing madly for the past two days (review of the Narnia Series). She thinks it will be easier to type on this machine than go downstairs and plug her laptop into the printer (too much work). Kids!

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 1:32 PM | Report abuse

>I would go back to the theory that four times in two days just wore poor Rob out except a youngster like him usually recovers pretty quickly.Adventures do not involve clever inexpensive solutions to your storage problems.<

Laughing, K-guy. But you'll never make an advertising copywriter with an attitude like that. (Laughing again at the notion of you -- or me -- trying to work on Madison Avenue.)

Posted by: Curmudgeons | August 20, 2007 1:33 PM | Report abuse

A lot of books can strike kids or teens that way, Mudge-- they're not necessarily 100% hip with all the modern-day issues or culture.

"A Martian Odyessy" probably knocked my socks off or more than it did its original readers, because I read it at a young age.

I can think of a long list of true classic SF written during the Depression which I enjoyed as a kid.

There's a great article about the Hardy Boys and how the author realized that today... they suck. And that they probably sucked back then, too, but he didn't realize.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/05/AR2005120501092_pf.html

In contrast, I always knew these books sucked even from a little child.

So, I'll say the emperor is buck naked.

"Catcher in the Rye" was and remains the "Hardy boys" of skid-row teen novels. If I remember right, we never even found out why Holden was thrown out. For all we know, it was for playing music on his armpit or forgetting to say "yes sir."

I also propose that J.D. Salinger wrote again under various pseudonyms--mainly in the "true confessions of teens" genre. All this stuff about him being a recluse is a lie. She's a woman who had her grumpy old uncle do the photo ops.

Turns out her publisher convinced her that the public would be disappointed if a woman turned out to have written about the deepest bits of a teen boy so well and book sales would hit the skids faster than Holden did.


Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Adventures involve excitement. "Oh my Gawd!!!! It comes in RED!!"

Adventures involve risk. "What will Mr. G say if I come home with THAT?"

Adventures involve mystery. "Will it fit in that space between the fireplace and the wall?"

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 1:43 PM | Report abuse

The notion that a visit to IKEA can be an adventure is just plain silly. For true adventure one must go to Costco.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 1:45 PM | Report abuse

You just don't get it, Wilbrod. You're not even in the ballpark.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 1:46 PM | Report abuse

TBG, all I can say is recalibrate, baby, recalibrate. Adventure is riding in a hot air ballon. Adventure is hitchhiking. Adventure is quitting your job and moving to a new place where you know no one. Adventure is whitewater canoing. Adventure is arriving alone in a country where you don't speak the language and no one speaks yours. Adventure is getting married at 22. Adventure is becoming a parent for the first time.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 1:53 PM | Report abuse

I have to go with Mudge here. It is nearly impossible to fully appreciate or evaluate any piece of creative art without considering the context. I know we've touched on this before with regard to Elvis.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Adventure is that consulting company that formed after Arthur Andersen went belly-up.

Posted by: byoolin | August 20, 2007 1:54 PM | Report abuse

It may be Loomis' relentless screwing (and unscrewing but that is basically screwing counter clockwise) that made Robbie boy run away, his hands on his ears and screaming nah nah nah nah nah.
I don't like shopping at Ikea anymore than other hunting-type shoppers but I believe we have 3 Bĭlly bookcases, a Phăintiń couch, a Ffőrdinġ love seat and Sķǖatt end tables.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 20, 2007 1:55 PM | Report abuse

K-guy. Your point is well made. But please realize. Many of use here are simple folk. You know, suburbanites. Our life's can be drab and plain lacking in the rush of adrenaline. Please do not deny us the right to get a little bit of a thrill in exploring unknown retail establishments. For then what would we have?

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Our life's? I mean our lives. Speaking of adventure and drama, I have a budget meeting to go to.

Oh, the thrill.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 1:58 PM | Report abuse

For the second time today, I am with you, RD. Can't just run into Costco and get what I need. Absolutely have to have the time to wander about and look at all the cool stuff.

Posted by: Slyness | August 20, 2007 2:00 PM | Report abuse

IKEA. Hmph.

Costco. Feh.

You want REAL adventure? Two words:

Canadian Tire.

Posted by: byoolin | August 20, 2007 2:07 PM | Report abuse

I don't know, kurosawaguy; there've been times in my life when the search for an inexpensive solution to storage problems could have counted as an adventure. I agree with the spirit behind your observation, though. With the possible exception of hardware stores or treasure troves such as you described earlier, shopping at a BigBoxOAnything shouldn't count as adventurous. Bookstores also excepted, of course.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 20, 2007 2:07 PM | Report abuse

Harummph. Costco. There's another place I don't go anymore. Have you ever found yourself in Costco staring at the 55 gallon drum of extra extra virgin olive oil or the case of 24 dozen boxes of Q-tips and thinking "Yeah, I know it's a lot, but look at how cheap it is!"

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 2:14 PM | Report abuse

How about this place for adventure? We stumbled on it on Saturday...

http://charlotte.creativeloafing.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A56606

I must say that the stuff in the picture is MUCH NICER than anything I saw there on Saturday.

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 2:14 PM | Report abuse

Exactly. So sit down and tell us all about those days, Mudge.

In fact, those days of banning are still here.

Here's how Catcher in Rye stands in the number of challenges.
http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bbwlinks/100mostfrequently.htm

Judy Blume is the number two most banned author. She's written very well on menustration, religious identity, teen sex, and lots of other taboos, with taste.

And she speaks out against censorship. http://www.judyblume.com/censors.html

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 2:18 PM | Report abuse

I like kurosawaguy's list of true adventures. However, I've moved to a strange city where I knew few people without a job. Twice. There is only so much adventure one lifetime can hold.

Costco, Sam's and Trader Joe's count as adventure in other states. Here, they can't sell wine.

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 20, 2007 2:19 PM | Report abuse

Trader Joe's???? NOW you're talking adventure.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Have you ever found yourself in Costco staring at the 55 gallon drum of extra extra virgin olive oil or the case of 24 dozen boxes of Q-tips and thinking...

"Why.. I can keep those drums of olive oil on my new Skøl bookshelf and the Q-tips in my Fhåtso bins!"

:-)

I hear ya K-guy. My husband hates those places, too. Well except for Costco, but that's just because they carry those great spinach-stuffed frozen ravioli.

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 2:22 PM | Report abuse

New Kit!!

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 2:23 PM | Report abuse

This is one of many instances when I've thought that k-guy and my hubby are kindred spirits. You sound just like him. No matter what I've bought at Costco, when I arrive home he shouts, "My God, do we have enough ketchup? Please tell me you got ketchup!"

I love Costco. I just got the coolest Sago palm there yesterday.

Posted by: Kim | August 20, 2007 2:24 PM | Report abuse

Where, Boko? This sounds like a tease.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 2:25 PM | Report abuse

I can't find it, either, Boko. Was that an announcement--or a desperate cry for help?

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 2:29 PM | Report abuse

Maybe if you wish hard enough...

Posted by: Raysmom | August 20, 2007 2:31 PM | Report abuse

Ha Ha. You looked.
I think this is a good time to go out and cut the grass. I hope I don't have a terrible accident.

Posted by: Nelson999 | August 20, 2007 2:31 PM | Report abuse

I don't see the new week's folder being created yet. Maybe it was a mirage... dying of thirst... must get kit....

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 2:35 PM | Report abuse

OK, you want the truth? You can't handle the truth! Adventure is donning your Washington Redskins cap and jacket (this means you Curmudgeon) and walking into Hub and Lil's Bar outside of Chickasha, Oklahoma on a Saturday night this fall and ordering a chilled glass of their best chardonnay. I guarantee you all the adventure you can handle, because whatever adventure the Native Americans don't supply, the Dallas fans will. (The wine order is just to draw attention.)

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 2:38 PM | Report abuse

k-guy just did me a huge favour. He has made me feel adventurous! I've never felt this before. It is great. I've done every one of the things he mentions with the exception of hot-air-ballooning and marrying at 22. I was 23 when I married.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 2:40 PM | Report abuse

k-guy, Mudge can get a similar experience much closer to home. Same attire, just go to an Iggles and cheer for the team playing the Iggles.

Posted by: Raysmom | August 20, 2007 2:41 PM | Report abuse

In the Achenblog Big TOP

1) In this ring the Willy Gnome Wilbrod battles the Mighty Mudgeon Pirate in a nerf-sword contest;

2) In the other ring, watch the Scavenger Hunt Clowns: Can you guess which Big Shopping Experience?

a) Canadian Tire
2) ee-KAY-ah
3) Costco/Gemco/Sam's Club/Price Club

Posted by: College Parkian | August 20, 2007 2:42 PM | Report abuse

CP,
My local version of 3) is BJ's. Seriously.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 2:45 PM | Report abuse

Okay, so now Leona Helmsley dies of -- get this -- "heart failure" which makes me wonder if it was from the failure to have a heart. Of course, I would think much the same thing about Cheney.

As for IKEA, I used to go now and then with friends when I was in Sweden. I've also been known to venture down to Dale City in more recent years (although it's been at least 15 years since I've been there (or less if IKEA hasn't been there that long)). It's on my list to go sometime in the near future so I can stock up on some nice cheese and especially my favorite -- Kalles Kaviar. Great on toast, on a soft boiled egg, on a baked potato. Yummsers!

That's all from here. Do carry on with what you were doing.

Posted by: firsttimeblogger | August 20, 2007 2:46 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, you've been to Hub and Lil's? No kidding? One of my favorite places when we lived in Oklahoma. The other was Wild Horse Mountain Barbeque south of Sallisaw, a grubby little dump with the best ribs in the state and a hot sauce that makes me sweat even now just thinking about it.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 2:46 PM | Report abuse

My adventures these days are along the lines of seeing Dear Child go upstairs wearing a blanket as a cape, then a minute or two later hearing her counting backwards from 20 (a proud moment) and then running as fast as I can when she ends it with BLASTOFF!

How long do I have until she's thinking about getting up on the roof of the garage to see if a hefty bag doubles as a parachute?

Posted by: LostInThought | August 20, 2007 2:50 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I'd agree that Weinbaum's "A Martian Odyssey" will blow the doors off off of a 'tweener - if you can convince them to actually read it.

Heck, I still think it's a great story; rather quaint at this point, but still great.

I think SciTim, omni, and yellojkt would agree with us on this.

Adventures, hmm. I've had a fair amount of those...

I wrote one about washing my car last winter...you can read it here, if you haven't already:

http://www.10thcircle.com/10/?p=168

BTW, I still do not see this new Kit you speak of. I 'spect it's JA's Outlook piece.

bc

Posted by: bc | August 20, 2007 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Not familiar with Weinbaum. Cut a corner off my Geek Chit.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 2:55 PM | Report abuse

I have been near-frozen, near-dehydrated, near heart-attacked, near-dragged-out-to-sea, near-electrocuted, near-poisoned, near-broken falling from a tree, near crushed in a bicycle-car head-on collision, near crushed by a dumptruck (same incident), near "failed to thrive" (as an infant), hit by a couple cars (different incidents), lost on a 26 mile walk in non-English-speaking L.A., bicycled through a hurricane, bicycled down volcanoes (both active and extinct), and a variety of other stuff that I can't recall right now. All those things seemed not so out-of-the-ordinary at the time, I was just embracing the moment. It's how you tell 'em. Sometimes its nice to embrace the moment of an exceptionally successful trip to IKEA with the ScienceSpouse and ScienceKids, just to break the tedium of life-threatening adventure, especially if it's a trip in which nobody yells at someone else or declares that they have been verbally abused in their choice of preferred desk. A splendid and bucolic joy is mine, on those occasions.

Still, you gotta hear my Dad tell about the big dog. Or the time he asked Frank to hold the rope. Or the outhouse-tipping incident. Pure gold for adventure stories.

Posted by: StorytellerTim | August 20, 2007 2:55 PM | Report abuse

They ain't no New Kit. Unless it is a big secret and everyone sees it but me.

Kurosawaguy, your description of adventure at Hub & Lil's sounds more like foolhardiness to me. Granted, I've never been to that particular establishment, but the ilk is familiar. Best I can say about Hub & Lil's is that it seldom figures in the criminal cases I see (unlike, say, the Chat 'n Chew in Lawton).

Posted by: Ivansmom | August 20, 2007 2:57 PM | Report abuse

You don't know Murray Weinbaum? Oh. My. Goodness. I don't recall "A Martian Odyssey" but I feel certain that I read it. Practically everythign from the 40's and 50's that was good enough to get anthologized, I've read.

Posted by: ScienceTim | August 20, 2007 2:59 PM | Report abuse

YJ -- Is BJs a Hoco (Howard County, MD) shopping exclusive?

As for K-guy's adventure list: I married at 22. Not sure about the others exactly but perhaps these count as adventures:
1) at 13 floated the Kootenai River three weeks before it was dammed (touched Canada!);
2)earning my Open Water lifeguard cert. at 17, despite being really-really-really afraid of ocean surf swimming;
3)at 5 tugging on the coat-tails of Emmett Kelly, the Clown, when he showed up at the Ursuline Orphanage;
4)At 19, riding my bike between Monterey, CA and across the Golden Gate Bridge AGAINST THE WIND.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 20, 2007 3:00 PM | Report abuse

The lawn tractor's engine has seized.
Karma or bad maintenance?

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 3:00 PM | Report abuse

On-topic for the Kit That Hasn't Happened Yet:

This week's _New York Review of Books_ has an excellent article by Russell Baker called "Goodbye to Newspapers?" - it's a review of these two books:

1) When the Press Fails: Political Power and the New Media from Iraq to Katrina
by W. Lance Bennett, Regina G. Lawrence, and Steven Livingston
University of Chicago Press, 263 pp., $22.50

2) American Carnival: Journalism Under Siege in an Age of New Media
by Neil Henry
University of California Press,326 pp., $24.95

***
Here are some excerpts:

"Murdoch at the Journal is a dark omen for journalists everywhere. When the sign in the shop window says 'Everything For Sale,' it is often followed by 'Going Out Of Business.'"
...

"How the Internet might replace the newspaper as a source of information is never explained by those who assure you that it will. At present about 80 percent of all news available on the Internet originates in newspapers, according to John Carroll's estimate, and no Internet company has the resources needed to gather and edit news on the scale of the most mediocre metropolitan daily."
...

"Blogging is a more interesting development, perhaps because bloggers are so passionate about it. It is a valuable restraint on careless and sloppy journalism, for the vigilance of the bloggers misses not the slightest error or the least omission, and the fury of their rage is terrible to bear. Committed bloggers insist that they are practicing journalism just as surely as a correspondent like John Burns is practicing journalism when reporting on the Iraq war from Baghdad for The New York Times. Anyone wishing to debate the point must be ready to argue all night and well into next week."

***

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/20471

Posted by: kbertocci | August 20, 2007 3:02 PM | Report abuse

I've been to the Slurp 'n Burp in Pullman, WA. Does that count?

Posted by: StorytellerTim | August 20, 2007 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Shopping at IKEA in Sweden trumps about ten-hundred trips to IKEA in North America.

Word.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 20, 2007 3:03 PM | Report abuse

And Bokobuddy, thanks for the biochemistry of love reference.

Love is also a set of molecules seeking and finding each other. The lock-key enzyme metaphor is over; now they teach active-site engagement.

Still sounds sciencey-sexy to me.

Off to forage; and then pick up CPBoy from first day of high school. Hey, TBG, our buddies are exactly five years apart on the thresholds of life sequence. We both got freshboys.

Posted by: College Parkian | August 20, 2007 3:07 PM | Report abuse

According to their website there are nine BJ's in Maryland and nine in Maryland as well as over a dozen other states. There store brand is Berkley & Jensen. I buy the dried cranberries in the two pound bag.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 3:09 PM | Report abuse

Hub and Lil's is pretty much your standard issue small town bar on the outskirts of a town that's nothing but outskirts. A cool dark refuge from the heat in the late afternoon. Neon beer signs in the windows and over the bar. Quiet most nights, especially Friday night in high school football season, but on Saturday night it can take on a little "knife and gun club" vibe. C&W music on the box (no Dixie Chicks, no thank you!). Floors a little sticky. Restroom makes me glad to be a man and not a woman. Folks let you be as long as you (1) don't play music when Judge Judy is on (2) don't cheer against the Sooners or the Cowboys (3) don't use words like "redskin" or address anyone as "chief".

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 3:19 PM | Report abuse

I was about halfway through the second paragraph when I thought this is gonna be good. Then I looked up and saw the author is Joel. A masterpiece I believe. A particular fave was the penultimate para.

Posted by: omni | August 20, 2007 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Here's a nice photo of your Commander in Chief and ours.
http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/248037

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 3:30 PM | Report abuse

CP, I went to Ikea's web site to find the location of their Stockholm stores. I'm pleased to report that the directions to one included the phrase "Avfart Kungens Kurva." Then looking it up in the Swedish-English dictionary spoiled it for me.

Posted by: Raysmom | August 20, 2007 3:30 PM | Report abuse

I think yello meant for one of those Marylands in his 3:09 post to be Virginia. If you look, you'll see that every state on the Atlantic has a BJ's as do Pennsylvania and Ohio.

Posted by: omni | August 20, 2007 3:33 PM | Report abuse

That's cheating Boko, using the GG.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 3:34 PM | Report abuse

Vick the Dog Killer pleads guilty (not much choice since his buddies had already cut deals.)
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/20/AR2007082000898.html?hpid=topnews

Arbusto has landed but only long enough to board Marine One and fly off to Montebello. So no traffic hang-up today, great. His last visit in Nov 04 was brutal. The Iraq thing had been going on for a while and there was so many people lining the airport highway wanting to salute him with one finger.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 20, 2007 3:39 PM | Report abuse

My greatest adventure was when I left for college. My mom put me on a bus in Tacoma, Washington headed for Claremont, California. I traveled to college by myself, armed with naught but a suitcase, a typewriter, and a plate of Snickerdoodles.

I had never actually seen the campus, and secretly feared I was the victim of a cruel practical joke. Perhaps the college didn't really exist?

Like all good adventures, this seems insane to me now.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Vick's lawyer says Vick "wants to get back to the life he had before these issues."

I think he means Vick wants to get back to the life he had before he got caught.

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 3:44 PM | Report abuse

I enjoyed your Hub & Lil challenge, K-guy, despite the fact that I don't own a single piece of anything with a Redskins logo on it, and don't drink chardonnay (ask the BPHers: I'm strictly a Tom Collins/black Russian/caipirnha kinda guy, and maybe a Corona once in a while). But I would guess the Hub & Lil experience might be akin to being a 19-year-old Yankee-raised college student who goes into the merchant marine, is assigned to the engine room crew, and finds himself sailing up the Sabine River into deepest, darkest East Texas, and who of a Saturday evening wanders into Rae-Ann's Bar & Grill at the corner of Bowie and Pearl streets in Beaumont Effing Texas with 20 bucks in his pocket and lookin' for love in all the wrong places.

Although I gotta say, having a quadruple bypass when they saw you in half like a butterflied prawn and staple you together again like the shipping department at Ikea boxing up a barcalounger for shipment to Pago Pago was definitely an adventure I coulda done without (though I admit I did sleep through the best parts of it). The part where I almost bled out on the floor in the corridor outside the X-ray dept. was memorable. If you've never seen a pool of your own blood a yard and a half wide it concentrates the mind wonderfully.

Got a BJ's club in Waldorf, and a Sam's Club. No Costco. No Ikea. No Trader Joe's. We are benighted, I tell ya.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 3:44 PM | Report abuse

I've only done one adventure on k-guy's list. Do the following count as acceptable substitutes? Finding oneself on a runaway psychotic Arabian horse with one's helmet in one's hand. Being both pilot and navigator on a British highway, complete with roundabouts. Owning four dogs in a suburban house with no fenced yard. Saying yes to a marriage proposal after only 3 weeks of dating. Eating my mother's cooking (except for the Black Raspberry Pie).

Posted by: Raysmom | August 20, 2007 3:47 PM | Report abuse

Sorry dmd. I don't understand.

Posted by: Boko999 | August 20, 2007 3:50 PM | Report abuse

I love Ikea because they gave my kid a job, with medical benefits, even - he's been there about 8 years now. They seem to be a pretty good employer, for retail. As for the shopping experience, the stores are set up like a maze so you have to go through the entire store - but there are shortcuts through secret doors. I learned to go in the exit, because I like all the kitchen gadgets at the end of everything. And they have cloudberry jelly - what could be more enticing?

Some of us have to pick our adventures carefully, or we would be overwhelmed by the very tedium of our mundane existence. I, for one, am glad my life is not so "interesting" these days, having been somewhat adventurous (or stupid) in my youth.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 20, 2007 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Mudge you got an IKEA about 18 miles from you just about due west.hehehe

Posted by: omni | August 20, 2007 3:52 PM | Report abuse

Got another one up in College Park near CP, omni, but I don't ever get up that way much. The one 18 miles west takes 90 minutes to get to; the one north takes nearly an hour. Too far to go, even for thrills like that.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Sorry Boko, I thought your link would be Harper & Bush, forgetting that the GG is technically Commander in Chief (just without any ability to do anything, unless she wanted to start a whole constitutional crisis). So I thought you were being cheeky and posting a picture of the very beautiful GG not the homely Harper.

After I posted my comment I did a "I could of have a V-8 slap". Sorry

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 3:55 PM | Report abuse

RD Padouk
Claremont as in Mudd? That's a very neat college cluster, though elite enough that I probably couldn't have gotten in. Bus all the way from Tacoma sounds like a Really Long Trip.

I need to visit Rancho Santa Ana Botanical Garden sometime.

My last shopping adventure was to Nordstrom, of all things. Delayed consequence of once having worked next door to one.

Palm sales are more fun. Searle Brothers wholesale nursery in Broward County and the Palm Society sale at Montgomery Botanical Center in Miami, particularly. Not to mention that everyone needs a cycad, or two, or three. Especially since they have names like:
Zamia variegata (spotted leaves)
Encephalartos ferox
Encephalartos horridus
Dioon spinulosum
Dioon edule http://www.floridata.com/ref/D/dioo_edu.cfm
(Tortillas? Really?)
We can't easily grow the "sago palms" (Asian cycads in the genus Cycas)because they're attacted, usually fatally, by a scale insect that has unintentionally been spreading around the world.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 20, 2007 4:15 PM | Report abuse

Now Trader Joe's is a different animal and I don't wish to lump TJ's with BJ's, Costco and the rest. For one thing, there is the matter of scale. I haven't ever been in a Trader's Joe's that I couldn't throw a medium sized cat from one end to the other. Second, TJ's is the home of the "pretty darn good bottle o' cheap red wine", always a fave at our house. And of course their Triple Ginger Ginger Snap Cookies (we like to smear them with mascarpone and make little sandwich cookies) are sufficient reason for the existence of the place all by themselves.

Posted by: kurosawaguy | August 20, 2007 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Okay, all you continent dwellers are making me jealous. We don't have an Ikea, Trader Joe's, BJ's, Target, Whole Foods, Pottery Barn, Crate and Barrel, Bath and Body Works, Nordstrom's (just got a Rack), and sadly, no McCormick and Schmicks.

Target has said publicly that they will be here in 2009, a promise they better come through on or there will be riots in the streets. Whole Foods has been under construction for over a year now but they've found some bones believed to be those of ancient Hawaiians where they're digging so that has been stalled. Walmart ran into the same problem when they built their store in Honolulu and they're still in litigation over that.

I peruse catalogs and websites drooling over the bargains and variety of products available to all of you on the continent. I buy a lot through the mail but shipping costs keep me from truly having access to all the great shopping that's out there. For some reason, online retailers don't believe that we're a part of the 50 United States. They tack on a good $10 to $20 to ship to us over water. Damn them!

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 4:32 PM | Report abuse

But, Aloha, you're in Paradise! (I've been to Hawaii only once, to Maui, which I was disappointed to say reminded me a lot of Seattle, except for the wonderful weather, beautiful warm water, palm trees, gorgeous flowers, etc, etc).

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 20, 2007 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Kguy, my bad, but that IS about as adventurous as I get. It explains the state of my life and my Achenaddiction in one fell swoop.

About 8 years ago, the Canadian Tire store up the road from the office closed. The franchise owner built a bigger store in the north of the city. In very short order, a brand spanking new Canadian Tire store will be open.

We can hardly control ourselves. Even the shop crews are waiting expectantly.

Posted by: dr | August 20, 2007 4:41 PM | Report abuse

Our Head of State is way prettier than your head of state. Neener neener neener.

Posted by: dr | August 20, 2007 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Aloha,
I think I noticed that Maui is perhaps a bit worried about more huge stores. And local groceries are sweating Whole Foods. Trader Joes would seem a better fit.

I formerly lived within walking distance of a TJ store. Cheapest milk in town, plus all that nice French cheese. And for the frozen-food slob in me, enchiladas. Nori Maki. However, the Japanese grocery near the office was the most interesting food place--nice bentos, plus you got to see whatever cool old Land Rovers were being worked on at the dealership on the way.

I'm making a first visit to Maui in a couple of months. Haleakala, silverswords, wet forest, dry forest, Pandanus forest (at Hana), fish, whatever. Since I live in something of a resort town, the wall-to-wall hotels and condos aren't too appealing. I may hide in Hana.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 20, 2007 4:43 PM | Report abuse

The irony of there being no Trader Joe's in Hawaii is pretty thick. The ones around here tend to hire clerks with too many piercings to work an espresso machine at FourBucks.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 4:47 PM | Report abuse

What is the non-Rovestorm record for number of comments. This one is 495 with no end in sight.

Posted by: yellojkt | August 20, 2007 4:49 PM | Report abuse

The first Trader Joe's in this area opened last Thursday. I thought I'd wait till the crowds die down a bit before I go. We already got Nordstrom's and Neiman Marcus and Tiffany's. They are in the mall, right across the parking lot from McCormick and Schmick's.

Posted by: Slyness | August 20, 2007 4:52 PM | Report abuse

Yes, I live in paradise, it's true. But, paradise comes at a cost, like $5.00 for a gallon of milk, $2.69 heads of lettuce, $4.00 cereal boxes, $3.19 for a gallon of gas, etc. Plus, there's no good furniture to be bought in this land that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Even the stuff that costs an arm and a leg isn't very good.

Maui is thinking of putting a moratorium on big box stores as are the other islands, which is a really good idea. Oahu, on the other hand, has already gone to hell in a handbasket when it comes to development so I say, if we're gonna build ourselves to oblivion, we might as well bring in the GOOD stuff.

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 4:52 PM | Report abuse

We had the "boodle gone bad" from a couple of years ago when Joel was on vacation. Close to 1000 comments. When the boodle was very young.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 20, 2007 4:53 PM | Report abuse

I think we referred to that as the dark times.

Posted by: dr | August 20, 2007 5:02 PM | Report abuse

500th!

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 5:04 PM | Report abuse

501!

Posted by: bh | August 20, 2007 5:10 PM | Report abuse

BTW, Yoki, I've been meaning to tell you for quite some time I've always enjoyed how you refer to your spouse (or he refers to himself) as Himself, i.e. Himself went to the store, etc.

Just sayin', tha's all.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 5:11 PM | Report abuse

If I remember correctly, Hawaii, Alaska (and Puerto Rico?) are hurt by a law that essentially requires everything from the mainland to come on US-registered ships, and discourages foreign ships from coming to Honolulu.

Those milk and cereal prices are not far from what we have in Florida. Milk's gone through the roof lately. And there's the pizze cheese crisis. We need to convert to eating east Asian foods.

At least we have decent continental US shipping rates. Kind of surprisingly, vendors from the UK seem able to ship to us pretty cheaply, too. And it's been a delight to have a few items sent from Japan. Shame that Hawaii and Alaska don't get better treatment.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | August 20, 2007 5:12 PM | Report abuse

Why thank you, Curmudgeon. Himself does not refer to himself that way; it is a very Irish affectionate moniker that goes a long way back in my family.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 5:20 PM | Report abuse

You sure about that law, Dave? Cuz I don't think we have many (or almost none) American-flag ships left--and certainly not enough to accomplish that job.

In any event, I don't think Hawaii/Alaska prices are caused by American-flag shipping rates per se; rather just ANY oceanic shipping costs money.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 20, 2007 5:21 PM | Report abuse

Well, shipping law or no shipping law, it just burns us up how we're considered "overseas". Well, literally, I know we are but sheesh, we're still American soil and a STATE! My biggest pet peeve is when non-residents say, "Back in the states..." when referring to the Continental US.

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 5:28 PM | Report abuse

First time I was in Hawaii, a local said something about "over in the states". I said "Ooh! Ooh! I thought we weren't supposed to say that, but you said it!" She was a little sheepish and suggested that it was out of habit from dealing with tourists. She was a lot younger than state-hood.

I can be a really petty and childish fellow sometimes. I would like to think that I have grown since that incident. Sadly, I fear that much of that growth has been horizontal.

Posted by: ScienceTim | August 20, 2007 5:34 PM | Report abuse

Raysmom, yeah, those count, too. I've had my share, including a few on SciTim's list-- but not too many.

SciTim, that list explains way too much about why you are how you are.

When you run short of french fries, just never stick batteries in your ears again, okay?

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 5:34 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I didn't mean to jump on your band wagon. Just when I got back from town and logged on I noticed there were 500 comments.

Posted by: bh | August 20, 2007 5:43 PM | Report abuse

I think standards were much more lax back then Dave of the Coonties. And yes, it was a very long trip. I arrived at college exhausted, dehydrated, and a bit aromatic. I never did this again. In the future I always took a proper aircraft. This may have added a bit to my college debt, but after that trip I figured it was money well spent.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 5:52 PM | Report abuse

And thanks for reminding me of Rancho Santa Ana Botanical Garden. I remember it had an amazing number of lizards per square foot. As in, like, twelve.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 5:55 PM | Report abuse

Wow, this is getting ridiculous, it's taking me forever to scroll down the comments to read the latest. My hand is starting to hurt.

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 5:58 PM | Report abuse

I picture Joel right now on a beach somewhere, looking lovingly at his family and the waves and thinking, "I'm sure glad I left the blog in Rob's safe hands."

Then on another beach somewhere else, Rob sits up and says "Doh!"

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 5:59 PM | Report abuse

Trader Joe's Dark Chocolate Truffles.

'nuff said.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Aloha, except for the head of lettuce, those prices are pretty much the same as here in SoCal.

Posted by: LTL-CA | August 20, 2007 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Nordstroms is a Seattle institution. I knew women who would go there just for the shoes. The customer service used to be legendary. I bought two oxford cloth shirts there in 1986. I wanted to propose to the saleswoman.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 6:04 PM | Report abuse

RD and all, stop with the Trader Joe's torture already. There's not one up here and when you get onto the chocolatey stuff...

I want to run out to the local grocery store and get the blackest, least sweet chocolate I can find.

Good weather for it, come to think of it. So I will.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 6:07 PM | Report abuse

TBG - CPboy is still in the tell-mom-about-school mode. Whew!! That was easy. Big bonus points for me since I arrived to pick him up -- discreet two blocks away -- with a carton of chocolate milk. Tomorrow he starts riding his bike. NO BIKE RACK! STILL! However, he will lock at a buddy's house. He will have the same advisory teacher (new and improved name for homeroom) for four years. And, she is AB FAB!

Yoki, the Irishism of himSELF and herSELF could carry a bit of rolled eyes as in "she who must be obeyed." But, not always. My favorite Irishism include:

+such a bold boy
+just after being (past tense construction)
+silky, just silky (elegant and sleek; said to have come from the idea of selkies or magical seal people sort of like merpeople)

Posted by: College Parkian | August 20, 2007 6:07 PM | Report abuse

>The lawn tractor's engine has seized.
>Karma or bad maintenance?

Boko, there's a difference?

Posted by: Error Flynn | August 20, 2007 6:20 PM | Report abuse

Slyness, I think you'll like Trader Joe's. It took me a while to warm up to it but now there are things, like peanut butter, that I won't buy anywhere else. I have heard from someone who has inside knowledge that cheese bought there should be eaten quickly as it isn't always very fresh. I've found this to be true. Their frozen vegetables are very good, as is their bread. Not all of ours carry wine, but I see people buying the stuff by the case in the ones that do sell it, so it's either pretty good or a great deal or both.

Do you think Rob lost the keys to the Kit? It does seem odd to be over 500 comments, then again, considering how little time we spend on topic, how much does it really matter?

Posted by: Bad Sneakers | August 20, 2007 6:21 PM | Report abuse

Trader Joe's has some good cheap wine and some cheap wine that is truly dreadful. If you like hearty red wine, try the Italian Bastardo Red (yes, it does mean that). It's my favorite pizza wine.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 20, 2007 6:32 PM | Report abuse

bh, there is tons of space on my bandwagon. Hop on whenever you feel the impulse.

My favourite Irish-ism of all is to describe someone, not in the least ironically, as "a darlin' man."

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 6:43 PM | Report abuse

I'm sure Mudge died when he heard that, Yoki.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 6:49 PM | Report abuse

TJ's has some real gems, like an Argentine malbec from a bodega you've never heard of that's wonderful and quite cheap. A couple of decades ago, if you found one you liked a lot, you went right back and bought a case, because there likely wouldn't be any more -- some sort of close-out.

Posted by: LTL-CA | August 20, 2007 6:53 PM | Report abuse

I worked on 2 Trader Joe's here. Haven't shopped there yet. Will they have reasonably fresh truffles?

In re. Wilbrod and Dooley's heart-to-heart discussion, ponder the humble tooth. It's final position in the jaw is determined by the stress imposed on it from its opposing members. The jawbone flows plastically over time. So must embryological development use existing form in addition to DNA to achieve final form. "strengthen the weak spot" genes help determine form. The fact of pulsation itself helps finish the form of the embryonic heart. Similarly, areas in trees under (gravitational or wind) stress secrete a hormone that increases growth in that spot. Neat. Just a thought.

Now I'm trying to order flowers online to be delivered in another city. My sister the journalist got a fellowship out of state to study at a prestigious University. My browser does not like the florist websites. "Encryption certificates expired or inactive!" it screams. "Cookies must be enabled! Turn on Javascript!" the florist website commands. I, who hate wasting gas and making pointless trips, will probably just go to the florist personally to do this. It's her birthday and they are on the road to the new casa. She is, by the way, the only editor to catch and banish the word "smegma" from the humorist's column one time. That was over the line in her view for a family paper. Ironically, they wrote a feature later about the incident and in explaining their decision to not use the word in the newspaper, they used it several times.

Posted by: Jumper | August 20, 2007 7:00 PM | Report abuse

CeePee... when Son of G came home from Kindergarten, we sat at the kitchen table with Oreos and milk while he told me all about his day; he declared we should do that every year.

We did.

So before I left him in Charlotte, I gave him a package of Oreos with instructions to call me after class on Wednesday (their first day of classes).

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 7:03 PM | Report abuse

TBG that is such a nice post, hope you have a lovely chat on Wednesday.

Jumper you could always call a florist direct in your sisters area. I have done this before, look up the local florists then call them, saves all the wire fees and you can select which flowers they receive.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 7:09 PM | Report abuse

Engaging in the dangerous activity of drive-by boodling:

Mudge,

I believe Dave of the Coonties is correct about shipping to Hawaii. Any shipping between the mainland and Hawaii must be on U.S. ships. My limited research says it is in Section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also know as the Jones Act, which prohibits foreign carriers from transporting goods between two U.S. ports. That means that products from China and Japan, for example, must go to California or Washington(the larger port) before they can be shipped to Hawaii (the smaller port). This may have made sense at one point but it I don't think it does now.

For Mudge and also for kurosawaguy, I read an interview with Joseph Heller about the movie version of Catch-22. He said he felt bad for Buck Henry, who was writing the script. He figured that at some point Henry must have said "Oy vey, there's no *story* here." There are vignettes, so Bob Newhart is good as Major Major, but no cohesion overall.

Posted by: pj | August 20, 2007 7:24 PM | Report abuse

Thanks dmd. It's a done deal now, though. My lord they sell some tacky flower arrangements. Had to search to find something elegant. Most of it looks like a candy store or Dale Chihuly glass.
http://images.google.com/images?num=20&hl=en&safe=off&resnum=0&q=dale+chihuly+glass&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi
Don't get me started! But I found a couple of good'ns and promised to send smoked pig - carolina barbecue - later when they get homesick - a promise I have no intention of fulfilling. Although with dry ice, hmmm...

Posted by: Jumper | August 20, 2007 7:25 PM | Report abuse

Quick, everybody click on the ads at the top! I sense the Achenblog is under scrutiny from the Higher Ups.

Posted by: Jumper | August 20, 2007 7:33 PM | Report abuse

Jumper I had an amusing conversation with an Aunt at my Dad's funeral. She has spent the best part of 50 years working with flowers, the local garden club and judging flower arrangements, even going overseas to do so. She was distraught about the arrangement that was sent in her name, and proceeded to critic every detail that was incorrect for me, as well as assessing the other arrangements. My Dad would have been amused.

She also dried several of the flowers from the arrangement my Dad had prepared at my moms funeral and placed them in a nice shadow box frame, he never got to see this, but we did display it at the funeral home when he died and it will find a special spot in my home. It was a simple gesture but ment so very much.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 7:41 PM | Report abuse

Say, CP, can you and do you sing? I do sing from time to time, but then people beg me to stop so I do. One of the finest old, very old, folk songs is The Selkie Lover. I know the words and tune, but cannot actually reproduce them using my god-given pipes.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 7:43 PM | Report abuse

TBG, that is simply wonderful. I'm a little choked-up. SonofG chose his mother well.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 7:46 PM | Report abuse

On a cool grey August day up here, what do I find in my mailbox when I got home? The Sears Christmas Wish Book.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 7:46 PM | Report abuse

Sorry to kill the boodle with the mention of the Christmas catalogue.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 8:11 PM | Report abuse

dmd, that is funny (the catalogue, not the flower-arrangement). The flower-arrangement story is not funny, it is touching.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 8:23 PM | Report abuse

Jumper, yes you raise valid points.

Angiogenesis (growth of blood vessels) is guided by hypoxia gradients and growth factors are secreted in response to that, and also NO (nitric oxide) plays a function as well.

Still, reptiles have conical teeth, dogs have canines, and we have flat molars long before forces come in play. That's because the teeth buds are different to begin with, and its up to plasticity to influence it.

Once a trait becomes fixed and key to survival, there is an increased tendency to canalize that trait; make it less plastic, and that can be very difficult to reverse.

Therefore, carnivores, especially the canids, ursids, and their kin have a specific paw with unretractable claws designed for walking, standing on prey to tear it, or running, not manipulating objects. The thumbs have become dewclaws, impossible to oppose.

The panda literally could not just reverse that evolutionary process to regain a working thumb for the key job of eating bamboo.

Instead, wrist bones on the outside of the wrist came under pressure to form a pseudo-thumb.

http://www.athro.com/evo/pthumb.html

This is also kind of why we don't breathe air through gills, but breathe with modified gas bladders instead.

I do wonder how the heart moved down from the gills to between the lungs (ex-swim bladders), don't you?

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 8:32 PM | Report abuse

pj-thanks for the info on the Jones Act. I knew there was something about that law that I had heard about recently. This from the Honolulu Advertiser, 7/10/06:

The Merchant Marine Act of 1920, commonly known as the Jones Act for its sponsor, U.S. Sen. Wesley Jones of Washington state, was drawn to protect domestic cargo shipping from foreign competition, help sustain a domestic shipbuilding industry, and have a domestic fleet capable of assisting the military in times of war or national emergency. A similar law, the Passenger Vessel Services Act of 1886, provides related protection to domestic passenger ships.

Basically, it seems the act was created to protect American interest in domestic shipping. What it has done here in the islands is make a huge shipping monopoly for Matson Shipping Company who has 2/3 of the market. A smaller company, Horizion, has the other 1/3. It also has a lot to do with unions who don't want local jobs to be lost. The whole article is here: http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2006/Jul/10/ln/FP607100337.html

What it comes down to is, I can buy a really cheap piece of furniture from Target online but they probably won't ship it or won't ship it for less than twice what I pay for it. Sigh.

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 8:33 PM | Report abuse

Woo hoo, Washington state! Just kidding, Aloha - that sucks. And it makes me wonder how moving manufacturing overseas can be so cheap - but I suppose those guys find a loophole, or a tax deduction, that makes it pay for them.

And yeah, the prices you quoted aren't a lot more than for Seattle. That's what surprised me on Maui - I could have been shopping at my neighborhood Safeway - they even had the same brands. We did find some wonderful fresh pineapple at a swap meet or somewhere, I think.

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 20, 2007 8:47 PM | Report abuse

According to this WaPo headline, Arbusto has taken to shoplifting neckwear: "Bush Seeks to Boost Canadian, Mexican Ties."

I wouldn't put *anything* past that guy.

Posted by: Curmuidgeon | August 20, 2007 8:57 PM | Report abuse

Well, it seems we have caught up with Mainland prices (or maybe you all have caught up with us). Now, if we could just catch up with wages, we'd be all set. I doubt if that will happen though.

One nice thing, we can grow our own tropical produce pretty much year round. Right now, we're being bombarded with mangoes. Can't even give the stuff away anymore. Alohaspouse has been growing Manoa lettuce these last couple of months. They're doing nicely now that he's figured out how to keep the slugs and snails from devouring the seedlings. Great to have fresh greens and not have to pay the big bucks for it.

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 9:14 PM | Report abuse

Loomis, that was hysterical. :-)

Kim, I forget which comedienne used to say that no matter how bad things got, she took comfort in the fact that she'd never have to go shopping with her mother again!

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 9:18 PM | Report abuse

Aloha- How much is 7-11 getting for pork hash dumplings these days? When we lived on Oahu they were only 50 cents each and I was addicted.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 20, 2007 9:28 PM | Report abuse

Wow, frosti... how does one actually first TRY a pork hash dumpling from 7-11? Sounds like it takes guts!

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 9:36 PM | Report abuse

Pork hash dumplings???? Mercy...what on earth are those?

dbG - yes, I suppose my daughter didn't enjoy shopping with *mommy no* either. We actually had a much better trip this afternoon. For my son, no has always meant no...he didn't and still doesn't really challenge that too much. With my daughter, no has never been no until at least the 3rd or 4th time. But she is a really good kid and I just try to keep focused that her go-get-em personality and attitude just needs a little moderating influence. That would be me.

Whew, thanks for letting me vent...

Posted by: Kim | August 20, 2007 9:38 PM | Report abuse

That's nothing, TBG! When you come up here, we're going to make you eat Scrapple.

Pan fried by a Canuckistani.

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 9:39 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, Kim, didn't mean to cast aspersions on you. It's just something I think myself sometimes. :-)

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 9:40 PM | Report abuse

Aloha!!!!

Growing your own greens! you can save so much money that way. I have slugs here, as well and fear actually planting my seeds.

Posted by: Dolphin Michael | August 20, 2007 9:41 PM | Report abuse

dbG - no, I didn't take it that way.

How was that cup of joe this morning, Frosti? It was this a.m., correct?

Posted by: Kim | August 20, 2007 9:44 PM | Report abuse

Since Rob was only scheduled for 2 days, I guess we're on our own.

Department of Self Delusion:
Does anyone else have to pay themselves to get themself to do something?

I'm finding it to be very effective. The "adult" in me feels that things like a new house heater and whole-house air are necessary before, let's just say, a very expensive toy the "kid" in me wants. The "kid" also prefers to lie around all weekend watching movies to getting things done around the house.

So now I have a cash fund, untouchable for necessities, growing at a decent pace for the expensive toy. I paid myself $58.21 last weekend, and it was worth every penny. For example, the first workout of the week is hard to get to, so that's $10. in the kitty. The others aren't a problem, so they're free.

Tell me I'm not the only person who does this. :-)

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 9:50 PM | Report abuse

Sounds wonderful to me! I tend to always allow myself some miscellaneous spending money per month. I've been thinking about rewarding myself, too, but like you said, the kid in me would rather laze around.

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 20, 2007 9:57 PM | Report abuse

dbG... perhaps when you've "earned" enough incentive money, you can bid on this...

http://cgi.ebay.com/WEtv-Princess-Diana-Catherine-Walker-Designer-Gown_W0QQitemZ290148990656QQihZ019QQcategoryZ39633QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Posted by: TBG | August 20, 2007 10:00 PM | Report abuse

While the kid in me works cheap, there is 1 drawback--time to reward. I don't think I can wait more than about a year without just giving up and doing the adult thing with the money.

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 10:00 PM | Report abuse

dbG, you are making me laugh. I do exactly the same thing! I would rather play Spider-Solitaire and recreationally cook, of a weekend, than clean the house and do the laundry and well, all that stuff.

We need to replace our hot water heater within the next three months, so I've been putting a dollar here and a dollar there into the water heater envelope; otherwise, I would buy lamb racks.

Well, it works for me.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 10:01 PM | Report abuse

Sounds like a great idea dbG, I have little willpower and just tend to reward myself just for being me :-). That may explain for more negatives than positives in the bankaccounts.

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 10:02 PM | Report abuse

TBG, Geez, swing for the fences why don't'cha? :-)

Yoki, exactly. The reward is instant gratification, even if the goal is further away.

Wilbrod, :-)

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 10:04 PM | Report abuse

dmd, truly. I know.

I will say my standards aren't tough, but to make it into the money jar (glass block, actually), it's for doing something I don't want to do at the moment.

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 10:07 PM | Report abuse

So if you were going to pay yourself for doing things you don't *want* to do, what would those things be, and how much would they cost?

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 10:13 PM | Report abuse

A "pork hash dumpling" is just a Chinese dumpling, like a pot sticker that hasn't been browned. Not really adventurous at all compared to goat kabob at a Jordanian truck stop, or the spam musubi also available at 7s (grilled spam on rice wrapped in seaweed).

Kim-I didn't get my coffee until 2:00PM, but it was done to perfection and well worth the wait. I was lucky to get an experienced barista, brought in just for the start up phase of this store. None of the other people working there has ever been to a Starbucks.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 20, 2007 10:14 PM | Report abuse

dmd, precisely! I, too, usually think that being me is fabulous enough to reward. Sadly, in my now-aged condition, I've learnt that I may, just may, be wrong about that. From time to time. Not all the time, though.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 10:16 PM | Report abuse

125,000 for a dress, thats just nuts. dbG would look smashing in it though. I cannot do the glass jar just too tempting, I have to have money taken directly from my pay and my bank accounts - if I don't see it I am OK. I should also say that when I treat myself most often it is to a new plant, some dirt or a garden tool, or a nice tablecloth (I have a wierd table linen, bath towel, bed sheet obsession).

Yoki when you get the new water heater just be careful they are much more sensitive now, our new one shuts down if it senses explosive vapours. We found out the hard way after the husband painted the basement floor with oil paint - burned out the sensor, no hot water for five days until the vapours subsided and the part could be replaced. Did I mention he is a great cook though :-)

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Okay, it's not going to work for you two precisely because you ARE fabulous enough to reward for just being who you are! I salute you! :-)

For me, this night owl *has* to go to bed right now, and that's worth transferring the ~$.89 sitting on top of the washer to the glass block. I can be bribed.

Posted by: dbG | August 20, 2007 10:19 PM | Report abuse

See, I go both ways.

G'night dgB. Sweet dreams.

I am like my grandmother. She once said to me, "I am a happy person who likes money. Give me thirty dollars, and I will spend it and feel good. Give me three thousand dollars in my wallet and I will spend it, and feel just as good. Not better. I am just as happy with thirty dollars as with three thousand."

It was a good lesson for me, sitting at my grandmother's knee. Now I take only thirty (and sometimes three) dollars.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 10:29 PM | Report abuse

I am off to bed but I will answer the question on things I need to be (or would like to be paid to do)

1. Cooking
2. Ironing (this would be expensive - I really don't like ironing)

Posted by: dmd | August 20, 2007 10:29 PM | Report abuse

I've never thought of rewarding myself like that. The paycheck *is* the only reason I go to work, of course, so I feel pretty empowered to do whatever the heck I want to with it. Which is mainly indulging myself with plants, yarn, concert tickets, movies (but no popcorn! now that even matinees cost so much). I also have the towel/blanket/sheet obsession. I owe myself a bunch after this weekend, for cleaning off bookshelves and the bills/important papers filing system (the top of the bookshelf).

Posted by: mostlylurking | August 20, 2007 10:37 PM | Report abuse

Okay kids, this is the final version of the whole Simpsonized gang, everybody who could make it this time around, including latecomers Curmudgeon and Omni. The rest of the boodle is there in spirit, of course, just like at all the BPH gatherings.

http://attachments.wetpaintserv.us/VRgc%24X1HBzvwJV3QSXL1kQ%3D%3D68031

Now, I'm off to dreamland.


Posted by: kbertocci | August 20, 2007 10:52 PM | Report abuse

That $125,000 dress comes with free shipping.

Night all. I hope someone has a kit all prepared to be posted before I stop by in the morning.

Posted by: frostbitten | August 20, 2007 11:21 PM | Report abuse

I tried to simpsonize and had a rather handsome still all composed, and it wouldn't send to my mailbox. Suffice it to say that putting the cat into the animated still was the coup de grace. I laughed to myself.

School has opened without a hitch. Off to the races.

Posted by: jack | August 20, 2007 11:28 PM | Report abuse

Frosti I believe pork hash dumplings (or siu mai) are going for 60 to 70 Cents these days. I haven't actually bought any from 7-11 yet but I do buy the spam musubis there for my kid's summer lunches. Beats getting up in the morning to cook the rice myself.

Yes, fresh greens are the way to go. I'm hoping Alohaspouse keeps up the garden.

Posted by: Aloha | August 20, 2007 11:36 PM | Report abuse

I wrote a small kit to change the subject. Shall I post it in the comments?

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 11:42 PM | Report abuse

yoki, go for it.

Posted by: L.A. lurker | August 20, 2007 11:52 PM | Report abuse

Why not?

Reflections on Aging

#1 moved out three weeks ago.

I ask and answer questions.

Who is #1? Is she ready?

Who am I, without two children at home? Am I ready? What about Himself? Is he able to let go?

On reflection, all of us are anxious for the day. It is time for #1 to make her own life, and time for us to let her go.

She is strong and clear.

Who am I now? I don't know. I will know.

Posted by: Yoki | August 20, 2007 11:55 PM | Report abuse

I'll let Mudge answer that.

I suspect he'll say they go away, come back, go away, and keep coming back and everytime the relationship changes... less responsibility, more worry, more pleasure (sometimes).

Posted by: Wilbrod | August 21, 2007 12:09 AM | Report abuse

I chuckled when I followed the link about "English as She Is Spoke" posted by Storyteller Tim. That is how we speak on a daily basis. Actually, it's much worse with us.

Bn and My are multi-ethnic countries. The national language is Bahasa M'sia. We study English as a second language. It's also the language of business. Every ethnic group has their own language and dialects that they speak among themselves. I think the ethnic Chinese has the most dialects around here - 6 main ones. For an ethnic Chinese, it is not uncommon to use two languages and 2 dialects in 1 sentence. We grow up speaking a mish mash of languages and dialects. A lot of times we don't even know whose language or dialect a word or phrase we've borrowed from.

Sometime we try to be funny and add a Malay prefix or suffix to an English word or an "s" to a malay word to denote plural.

We absolute mangle everybody's language and dialects. We are quite fair in that sense. The problem with speaking the way we do is we won't make any effort to become proficient in a dialect or language because the other party knows what you are saying even though it's all mangled up.

Posted by: rain forest | August 21, 2007 2:50 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, friends.

Ah, Loomis. If you got it, I guess you flaunt it. I had to go back and read that post twice because I thought I had certainly misread that.

I'm up so early and more than surprised there isn't a new kit. I guess I get to keep that last dollar.

Bad news this morning in my little corner of the world. In the county seat yesterday, man set another man on fire. Doused this individual with gasoline in the lower body, and set him on fire. That individual laid out in the road for forty five minutes before anyone found him. He was still alive when the police got there, and told who did this horrible crime to him. He died later.

And if that wasn't bad enough, a man beat a two month old baby. The child is physically and mentally permanently disable because of this beating. I don't know if the baby will make it.

There are some bad people in this world. We know this, but when these things happen, it is still shocking.

Party was fun, just so hot outside. We were inside, and the children loved their bags. And the ice cream and cake.

I hope the folks in the area facing the hurricane are going to be okay.

I saw your area, Ivansmom. A lot of water. Glad you and family are okay, too.

To the washroom today. It will take most of the day.

Morning, Mudge, Slyness, Scotty, and all.*waving*

Thanks for the address, yello.

I am so glad you guys are here. I still pray for all.

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 21, 2007 4:25 AM | Report abuse

Forgot to mention the health news out this morning concerning the virus that causes obesity. If you get a chance, read it. Very interesting.

Of course, those of us that are fat can't get away with saying "I have the fat virus" as an explaination for being fat, but it does explain some things. As the guy said in the article I read, the buck stops with the individual or the fork rather.

Posted by: Cassandra S | August 21, 2007 4:30 AM | Report abuse

'Morning, Boodle. This is comment No. 577. I think that warrants an early-morning "hrrmph," don't you?

Busy day today. Gotta drop off my truck at the dealership for some routine maintenance and a minor repair; then my wife has to run me to the bus stop. Then off to Georgetown for a hearing test and then a doctor appointment checkup. Probably get to work about noon--and then leave early, about 4, to catch an early bus home to go to my grandson's birthday party. The 5-year-old has chosen for his birthday bacchanalia Famous Dave's (chain BBQ rib place) for the event, which is fine by me. Amount of work I expect to get done today: minimal.

Plus, it's been raining all night here, and is raining now. Which we need desperately.

Plenty on the front page to grumble about, but I'm on deadline: gotta jump in the shower, etc.

Yoki, Wilbrod's 12:09 is probably close to what I'd say about your 11:55. Except I'd answer the yes-or-no questions a firm "yes," And you know who you are. Life goes on. I reckon Herself can come up with a fine old Gaelic proverb to that effect.

See yuns about noon.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 21, 2007 6:08 AM | Report abuse

Of course, one hopes there will be a new kuit by then. Right, Rob?

Rob? Rob?

Anybody seen the new kid?

Somebody go look in the stockroom; maybe he's napping. Scotty, check the bunker for me, wouldja? bc, call the kid's dorm room and see if he slept in.

Anybody got the phone number to his mom's house?

Oh, wait. Anybody know if he's got a girlfriend? Could he and Helen have met up...? Maybe he's...

Um.

*&%$# kid will probably show up with his shirt on inside out.

*departs grumbling but with a knowing, envious, grin*

Posted by: Curmudgeon | August 21, 2007 6:12 AM | Report abuse

In his initial kit Rob said he'd be appearing for 2 days only.

I think we're alone now.

All I have to say is #^&@* ____ (insert name of bank here. Just pick the one who has the worst IT processing in the KNOWN UNIVERSE, from whom you'd never accept a credit card after you interface with them). Been up and busy since 4, I hate them.

Posted by: dbG | August 21, 2007 6:40 AM | Report abuse

This would not be the financial institution I work for. Just one we do an enormous amount of business with.

Posted by: dbG | August 21, 2007 6:42 AM | Report abuse

Morning, everybody. Cassandra, that's terrible. Being burned is an awful way to die.

I'm amused by all the ways people make themselves do stuff they don't enjoy. If there's something I REALLY don't like to do, I make Mr. T do it. ;-) Most of the time, though, I get around to chores when I'm in the mood. Last week I was glad I had cleaned out the cabinet under the kitchen sink before the dishwasher died. I would have been embarrassed for the installer to have seen what it looked like before I cleaned it.

Posted by: Slyness | August 21, 2007 7:11 AM | Report abuse

Mornin' and may your coffee be strong but not bite! The clouds in the sky -- and my cuppa -- portent a good Tuesday.

All the new information about understanding the "malnutrition" in this county fascinates. Today's WaPo includes this:
"Obesity and the Influence of Others" by Carol Graham, Ross Hammond and Peyton Young

Dr. Young, now at Oxford, was a professor of mine in graduate school. He taught me worlds about how to look at data for both problem assessment and analysis of rational, workable policy options.

Yoki -- such a pome you wrote about children leaving. I add this image: they walk in an ever widening circle out from us, and the next mystery is that we cease being that center. Gradually? Poofily? I cannot tell. Your mileage may vary.

The other metaphor is that like Monopoly, they swing around to GO often, for some cash and comfort and comestibles. And, as TBG says, leave a trail of Oreo crumbs so they can find their way through a dark wood.

ML's comment about Ikea as an employer is right. They offer benefits AND tuition help to part-time employees. UPS does this, too. Many students I know balance work and school with help from such employers. Go big Yellow/Blue! Go big Brown!

Posted by: College Parkian | August 21, 2007 8:11 AM | Report abuse

I think the guest blogger ran off with the passwords and is now operating Achenblog in the Cayman Islands. This is what happens when you give the keys to the kingdom to an opportunist.

Actually Rob was signed up for all of 2 days.

Me: Still on vacation for one more day. But I'm going to post something really interesting by my friend Bill Powers. It's related to the Outlook piece. Please stand by.

Posted by: Achenbach | August 21, 2007 8:30 AM | Report abuse

Excuse me if I am a little distracted this morning. For when I awoke I suddenly realized that instead of one teenager at home, I now have two.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 21, 2007 8:32 AM | Report abuse

I thought Rob did a great job by the way.

Posted by: Achenbach | August 21, 2007 8:33 AM | Report abuse

Enjoy the rest of your time off Joel!

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 21, 2007 8:35 AM | Report abuse

Hi, Joel--we're missing you but I'm sure everybody is happy you get to go on vacation once in a while.

Posted by: kbertocci | August 21, 2007 8:40 AM | Report abuse

And not to worry. We will have the place all cleaned up when you return. Because I'm pretty sure all the stains will come out. And that one thing is replaceable. And the nice police were, like, real understanding. Besides the whole "Moose Incident" has gotten blown way out of proportion. So don't worry. Everything is fine.

Posted by: RD Padouk | August 21, 2007 8:45 AM | Report abuse

I posted first in the new kit. HAH!

Posted by: omni | August 21, 2007 8:56 AM | Report abuse

Gack...SCC:kit=>boodle. So sorry.

Posted by: omni | August 21, 2007 8:59 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

A few comments re. nothing in particular (and will likely be subsumed when Joel posts a new Kit):

Jumper - re. your 7:00 PM last night: some engineers have a saying that in the final analysis, every solid material is essentially rubber. Things shift and move and change amd flex under conditions. And living bone is one hell of a condition. Interesting stuff that you and Wilbrod and Dooley posted.

pj, thanks for your 7:24 PM last night re. the Jones Act. Now I know where the phrase "I got a Jones for..." came from.
For those of you suddenly afflicted with a tune cootie for "Basketball Jones," I apologize.

TBG, I'm sorely tempted to harvest the Boodle for everything you've written re. Son of G growing up and going to College, and save it for when I have to face that myself two years from now. And if I surreptitiously published it, it might help pay those tuition bills...

(Note to WaPo.com lawyers, Joel, and TBG: Just kidding with that last. Really. [bc laughs nervously]).

Now, where's that new Kit, Joel?

bc

Posted by: bc | August 21, 2007 9:06 AM | Report abuse

Yep Joel, the youngster has lots of potential. 2 kits a day, oh my!

Posted by: shrieking denizen | August 21, 2007 9:14 AM | Report abuse

There is a new kit. Omni was right.

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