Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Any Given Tuesday

We like to think of the presidential campaign as a chain of events, a more or less linear process in which, if all goes as planned, chaos will inexorably give way to order. Pundits attempt to impose some narrative coherence upon the tangle of data points from the contested turf. Momentum is discerned. Opinions are polled and duly calibrated. Balloting results are contextualized. Over time, a narrative takes shape, one that ideally makes some kind of logical sense.

But go talk to voters, and things get a little more convoluted.

"Bama -- Obama -- whatever the Democrat is, the black guy, he don't impress me much," said Phil Blackman, 52, approached as he was strolling down a sidewalk near the state capitol in Austin last week, holding a cup of coffee from Starbucks. A Democrat and retired diesel mechanic, Blackman was still early in the learning curve, as Texas prepares for its primary. But he had his opinions.

"I don't think we're ready for a lady president. If I was to vote, I'd vote for McCain. McCain. McCain, he seems like, I dunno. When is the vote, the 19th?"

Actually, March 4.

"Bama, that guy, what's his name -- I want to say bin Laden -- Obama. Odama. Where you get a name like that to be president?"

So now everyone's a political junkie, and not every opinion is fully nuanced and evidence-based. At our peril we smooth out the eccentricities, the rough edges, of public opinion. We make a mistake when we imagine the electorate as a single sentient organism.

Reporters are paid to follow the campaign, but normal people may have time to pay attention sporadically, or out of the corner of one eye. Perhaps they get most of their news from one radio talk show personality. For some folks in Texas, the campaign is like a circus that only now is getting ready to come to town.

Primary season offers a demonstration of what you might call states' rights. The voters today in Wisconsin are not beholden in any way to the results from the Potomac Primary or Super Tuesday. Neither are the voters in Texas or Ohio obliged to maintain any candidate's momentum or lack thereof.

In a long campaign -- and this is certainly the longest campaign since Genghis Khan was stumping his way across Asia -- a candidate on a roll can suddenly slam into a brick wall. That's not meant to be a prediction for how Obama will do today in Wisconsin. Just a reminder that anything's possible. It's the equivalent of the Any Given Sunday rule in the NFL.

[Cross-posted to the Trail.]

More politics:


Interesting essay in the WSJ a few days back by Elizabeth Wurtzel about the presidential race and the special kind of hate that some people (particularly women, Wurtzel contends) have for Sen. Clinton.

Earth news:

Here's a depressing piece in the NYT about fishermen in Jamaica poisoning a stream. It's tragic, and it's not really just a Jamaica story: It's a tale of what happens when you have a completely unregulated free market.

By Joel Achenbach  |  February 19, 2008; 11:56 AM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Crawford, Texas
Next: Weird Science Getting Weirder

Comments

Hi, Cassandra, Hi, Martooni.

Posted by: daiwanlan | February 19, 2008 12:15 PM | Report abuse

Reposted from the last boodle, as it appeared just after the new kit announcement.

I don't get that "new" approach to math[s].

"Memorization will only carry you so far," Knight said. "With 'Investigations,' kids understand the real values of the numbers and are not doing shortcuts. When they multiply 23 times 5, they'll do five 20s to get 100, and then add five 3s to get 15, and they put that all together and get 115. What they've done is made actual use of the numbers."

I use the distributive law of multiplication all the time when doing math in my head. But at some point, you've got to know the value of a*b. Even "five 20s" has a particular value. I learned the times table first, then discovered how to apply the distributive law. I don't see how it can be done in reverse order.

But then, in my elementary school (run by UCLA education dept), we didn't start arithmetic until the 4th grade -- and by the end of 6th grade were ahead of the public school kids.

Brits say maths instead of math. How about Canucks?

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 19, 2008 12:16 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, daiwanian! I didn't want to be first.

My own recent experience brings the truth of this Kit home. The day of the Oklahoma Primary (Super Duper All Powerful Tuesday) several people I work with were in a quandary because they didn't feel they knew enough about the Democratic candidates to vote. They had the vaguest ideas about both Clinton and Obama. Some didn't even know Edwards had dropped out. In fact, all day I kept running into people who just didn't feel prepared to make an informed decision. This, although the campaign has been going on now for about a decade and there were several hundred candidate debates before the primary (I do have those numbers right, don't I? I'm going on feel). As a presidential politics junkie it is hard for me to remember that lots of folks, as Joel says, have time to pay attention out of the corner of one eye.

Posted by: Ivansmom | February 19, 2008 12:21 PM | Report abuse

John McCain called everyone in Virginia at least 10 times before our primary, which may explain why the Democratic turnout was twice that of the Republicans. People may not have known what Clinton and Obama stood for, but they knew who had interrupted dinner every night for two weeks.

Posted by: JR | February 19, 2008 12:25 PM | Report abuse

It does seem strange that people aren't following the campaign. For heavens sake, the British press is as avid as the American about it. But Ivansmom is right, a person has to have time to read and listen. Weingarten did a story about a blue-collar kinda guy who didn't vote in the last election, IIRC. He just wasn't tuned into it. To me, elections seem to be pretty important, but I'm old-fashioned that way. It was the way I was brought up.

Posted by: Slyness | February 19, 2008 12:28 PM | Report abuse

What interested me was that people wanted to vote, intended to vote. That in itself is not usual for primaries here, even in presidential races. That was different from previous elections. However, lots of people, even in pink or white-collar jobs, get their news from the local station half hour or scanning the local paper, if at all. Those sources tend to focus on local issues. If you tune out commercials and don't follow debates, you might not get a feel for the candidates.

Posted by: Ivansmom | February 19, 2008 12:31 PM | Report abuse

Joel-
Thanks for the reminder that there's a wide cross-section of voters participating in the election process (providing they get to the polls on the right day, of course). Oh, the humanity!

I love the irony in your interviewee's name.

Also - is there a picture of this gentleman anywhere, or at least a description of him (note: I resisted making any suggestions as to where find images, such as "reality" TV shows or USPS facilities)?
Or at least his hat?

Joel writes, "For some folks in Texas, the campaign is like a circus that only now is getting ready to come to town."

Indeed.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 19, 2008 12:33 PM | Report abuse

Of all the things to talk about in the Democratic race, the biggest headline has to do with the issue of plagiarism. I guess when the wind is taken out of the sails regarding issues associated with the economy, health care, the war, checks and balances, etc., negative campaigning comes to the fore. *sigh*

Posted by: jack | February 19, 2008 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, Mudge, one more Texas mention coming up, though hopefully jingoism-free.

I'm a grad student at UT-Austin. And I was excited when the Democratic debate was scheduled to be held on campus, even though it's highly unlikely that my name will be drawn for a ticket. But now it turns out that holding the debate at a university gym on Thursday evening requires closing the entire building for the entire week (Monday-Saturday). That includes the room where I go to yoga class. I used to like both Hillary and Barack, but now they're messing with my yoga!?! Who do they think they are?

Posted by: bia | February 19, 2008 12:50 PM | Report abuse

jack;

The wind's still full in the sails as far as the issues go, the campaigns are just tacking hard a-port into some very muddy shoals.

And I ain't talkin' no recording studio neither.

*SIGH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 19, 2008 12:58 PM | Report abuse

I read the comments posted on The Trail. They are not friendly. I don't feel like leave a comment there. But I am happy Joel had a cross platform for his thinking and brushes and photojournalisms here at the Boodle. Also noticed Princeton is planning to send 1/10 of the newly admitted freshman class to overseas for one year. Social service work. Does that mean college education can be bundled in THREE years?

Posted by: daiwanlan | February 19, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

good kit. and i loved these lines from the wsj article:

Real women don't care what Caroline Kennedy and Maria Shriver with their easy words and easy lives have to say about any of this. No one with a job takes advice from someone with a chef.


and i still have that code monkey song stuck in my head. i blame the boodle.

Posted by: L.A. lurker | February 19, 2008 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Daiwanian, I think that's how they do it in the UK.

Posted by: Slyness | February 19, 2008 1:07 PM | Report abuse

I'm finally checking in this morning, Cassandra. Had a busy morning, playing a lot of catch-up, plus we have a new employee starting today, and I spent a couple hours shepharding her around the building and getting her ID badge from the security people (always a daunting, bureacratic maddening task). Plus we blew a circuit breaker in my office and knocked out all seven computer stations for an hour or so. Oy.

Whaddaya mean, Bob, "like a Yankee"? I *am* a Yankee. Got the papers and birth certificate to prove it. If I'm not doin' something right, let me know. I thought I had it down pretty good.

Coming up momentarily, bc. Gotta clean out my Outlook folder, which is bulging at the seams. I got about 10 automated messages that my mailbox is over its size limit.

Oh, I'm not sure my Texas rant was fully understood (or I didn't make myself quite clear enough): it isn't references to Texas on the Boodle I've had more than my fill off; I meant references to Texas in the general media--TV, books, magazines, newspapers, Hollywood, whatever. The Boodle references to Texas haven't bothered me. (And one of my all-time favorite Boodlers, Nani, was from Texas, and I miss her.) It's the general Texas chauvinism I'm fed up with. Nothing specific to do with anyone or anything here. (However, I *do* love the movie as well as the TV series of "Friday Night Lights," in part because it paints such an accurate picture of Texas football culture, which is waaaaaay over the top, in my view. I also think the TV show, inparticular, paints a very good picture of the people without editorializing about them; one sees their humanity, and then one is free to say whether they'd enjoy being in that culture or not. But once again, it's just more Texas, Texas, Texas.)

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 1:10 PM | Report abuse

daiwantan, re your 1:00 pm. I got my BS in three years, and spent a year "before the mast", as it were, on various merchant ships that were plying the oceans.

My older daughter, on the other hand, took 7 years to get her degree. My younger daughter will take more years to get hers than I have fingers to count with.

Posted by: Don from I-270 | February 19, 2008 1:15 PM | Report abuse

Slyness said this a little earlier: "Weingarten did a story about a blue-collar kinda guy who didn't vote in the last election, IIRC. He just wasn't tuned into it."

Its not that blue collar rural people are not tuned in to it, they are just exhausted by it, in otherwise exhausting lives. Not that we all aren't. Exhausted sometimes, that is.

Posted by: dr | February 19, 2008 1:28 PM | Report abuse

Florida schools will teach "The Scientific Theory of Evolution". I suppose also "The Scientific Theory of Gravitational Attraction".

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | February 19, 2008 1:32 PM | Report abuse

Don, I didn't realize you were a fellow merchant mariner! Can you share any details? What ship(s), what ports, when did you get your Z-card?

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 1:33 PM | Report abuse

What that guy said has me baffled. He's a democrat who doesn't think the country is ready for a lady president. So he's voting for McCain. So blatant sexism is OK with this guy, but his racism is all subtext. Jerkoff.

And aren't the Dems having a caucus today in Hawaii?

Posted by: omni | February 19, 2008 1:39 PM | Report abuse

And, Mr, Yankee, your qualifications to judge the accuracy of a portrayal of small town Texas high school football culture would be exactly what?

Posted by: Anonymous | February 19, 2008 1:40 PM | Report abuse

hello, daiwanlan.

and good to hear from you, Mudge. You sound out of breath. You've been busy.

Time to meet the bus. A little chilly out and windy.

Grandsons gone back, and it is quiet. Quiet is so good. I can actually hear my ears ringing now.

Posted by: cassandra s | February 19, 2008 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Yes, shipmate. I graduated from USMMA, 71(Deck). As a midshipman, I sailed on: US Lines(SS American Condor), Lykes Bros. SS(SS Santa Mariana), and a Union Oil Co. tanker(SS Pure Oil). I sailed on sea-going hopper dredges on my mates license with Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co., and Williams-McWilliams Co. I did a stint in the US Navy and the US Coast Guard, as a marine inspector. Aarrgh, a dead-eye seaman, through and through, I be, matey!!

Posted by: Don from I-270 | February 19, 2008 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Dave of the Coonties, to be fair, we still *call* Einstein's Theories of Relativity just that, even though we have atomic weapons, nuclear powerplants, and the orbit of Mercury to prove them.

Having said that, those things are pretty conclusive evidence that those Theories are right.

And as an interesting side note, Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation and IIRC his First Law of Motion were proven to be slightly incorrect by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, which accounts for the slight precession of Mercury's orbit far better than Newton's Laws.

Dave, I agree with ya, but when Theories break Laws, Laws will only be Theories. Or is it if Outlaws have Theroretical guns, then Theories wil be Outlawed?
Guns, Laws, Theories and Outlaws.
Or something.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 19, 2008 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Anonymous at 1:40, if you'd seen the show or the movie, you'd know and wouldn't have had to ask such a dumb question.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Oh, OK. You think it's accurate because it feels accurate to you. You've never lived in a small town in Texas, attended a HS football game, etc. But you know best and I'm asking a dumb question. About what I'd expect from a Yankee.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 19, 2008 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Anon., how do you know I've never lived in a small town in Texas? You have no earthly clue what places I've lived in. (And as it happens, my oldest son, daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren live in Texas, near Forth Worth.) And I know one d@mn helluva lot about high school football and its culture.

To a much larger degree, your snotty comment implies that no one is capable of assessing another culture or locality without having lived in it. Thus, one would be unable to say "Such-and-such a TV show gives an accurate portrayal of the American West right after the Civil War", or "...gives a portrayal of working-class England after WWII," or "shows what it's like to live in Provence," or Maine, or Panama, or wherever. You've set up your own false criteria and proceeded to knock it down.

You also clearly chose to ignore the reason I said I liked the show: that it shows the humanity of the people who live there-- the "humanity" of which requires no special local knowledge or expertise to form an opinion about. I don't have to be a paraplegic to admire Street and his plight and his story line, or Smash's various problems, or Matt Saracen's relationship with the Mexican girl (do you feel it is necessary that I have slept with a Mexican girl to have an opinion on this?), or Lyla Garrity's various problems (and especially her church attendence; it's one of the few shows on TV that even remotely mentions people going to church, especially an evangelical one), or Eric Taylor's dilemma regarding movie up to a college team, and his wife Tami's desire to keep their family together as a unit, plus having a baby relatively later in life. I like Riggins character, and feel badly for him when he screws up, which he does regularly. I know a woman a lot like Tyra; I like her character a lot. I like the whole plot line with Landry that just got resolved. All of these things I am personally *more* than comptetent to analyze and render an informed opinion about. (You see, Anon., the thing about universal themes and problems and situations is you down have to live in one specific s---kickin' small town in Texas to understand them. But you probably wouldn't know about that. You ought to get out more often.)

And your crack about my being a Yankee shows you are just a maroon (and a coward), whoever you are. Sign your handle next time.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 2:12 PM | Report abuse

I >>>HEART<<< Mudge.

Posted by: Moose | February 19, 2008 2:19 PM | Report abuse

Don: I think you mentioned a long time ago that you graduated from the USMMA. My Dad and his twin both graduated from there in either '47 or '48. Reardless, they both served during the Korean conflict.

Posted by: jack | February 19, 2008 2:20 PM | Report abuse

Look, I have had a really tough week last week. I expect to have that tough week will continue through the next couple.

Unidentified at 1:40 and 1:52, if you don't have the guts to identify yourself before spewing whatever the heck you are spewing, then maybe you should reconsider spewing it.

Everyone spews sometimes, but at least the owner of this very dignified porch knows who to pass the mop and pail to because we sign our name.

Now play nice, sign your name to whatever you choose to say. Your anonymity betrays you.

Posted by: dr | February 19, 2008 2:24 PM | Report abuse

I was just doing a Google search for something job-related and stumbled upon this fun site:

http://www.newsmeat.com/

You can search rich and/or famous people's names and find out how much money they have contributed to whose campaign since 1980. Danny DeVito has donated $115,000+ in that time, but Brad and Angelina? nothing recorded. Hm.

Rush Limbaugh: $2,000 to Republicans
Jerry Springer: $181,400 to Democrats
Howard Stern: $4,100 to Democrats

and so on...

Posted by: kbertocci | February 19, 2008 2:25 PM | Report abuse

LET'S RECAP
You said the show was accurate.
I asked how you knew.
You said that was a dumb question and did not answer it.
I inferred that you had no basis for judgement, and called you a Yankee, which you had already said was true.
You stated your basis, sort of, which was all I asked for in the first place.
You called me names.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 19, 2008 2:40 PM | Report abuse

1948

Posted by: jack | February 19, 2008 2:41 PM | Report abuse

Mudge has the right to call you names, anonymous, if you won't give us yours.

Posted by: Slyness | February 19, 2008 2:45 PM | Report abuse

It's time for a virtual mojito Curmudgeon. Or an actual mojito, depending on how stuck up is your agency. The ice crushing
sound may give you away, be careful.

Fishing with poison, how sad is that. *sigh*

Posted by: shrieking denizen | February 19, 2008 2:47 PM | Report abuse

This is the ship that my Dad served on.

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/AH/ah16.html

Posted by: jack | February 19, 2008 2:47 PM | Report abuse

Remaining anonymous allows for the "I'm rubber, and you're glue" defense. And maybe even "forcefield."

Posted by: Raysmom | February 19, 2008 2:48 PM | Report abuse

More political contributions:

Bill Gates - $267,358, of which 25% went to Democrats, and 30% to Republicans

Steve Forbes - $7,000,000+, of which 99.8% went to Republicans

Posted by: kbertocci | February 19, 2008 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Steve Jobs - $255,700; of that 99.6% to Democrats (one $1k donation to Republican Paul McCloskey's losing primary election in 1982).

Posted by: TBG | February 19, 2008 2:54 PM | Report abuse

And, sadly, injuries incurred by squirting lime juice in your eye making mojitos is not covered by the workplace safety insurance scheme unless you are a barman/maid.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | February 19, 2008 2:55 PM | Report abuse

Let me add a few quotes from the Wikipedia entry:

"Friday Night Lights is an Emmy Award-winning American serial drama television series .... [that] details events surrounding the Dillon Panthers, a high school football team based in fictional Dillon, Texas, with particular focus given to the team's coach, Eric Taylor (Kyle Chandler) and his family. The show uses this small-town backdrop to address many issues facing contemporary Middle America." [Note: as opposed to "just Texas"]

..."The show has, however, been a critical success and was featured on a number of critics' top ten lists following its first season as well being identified twice by the American Film Institute as culturally significant.[7][8] Lauded by critics for its realistic portrayal of Middle America and deep personal exploration of its central characters, the show has been awarded a Peabody Award, an Emmy Award, and a Television Critics Association Award."

Interesting. "Culturally significant," the critics said. A "realist portrayal of Middle America," they said. "[D]deep personal exploration of its central characters," they said. I wonder how any of the critics could have arrived at such a conclusion if they've never lived in a small Texas town?

"...awarded a Peabody Award, an Emmy Award, and a Television Critics Association Award." Well, I may not know what I'm talking about, bein' a Yankee and all, but at least I'm in pretty good company.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Looks like folks are a little edgy today, even after a three-day weekend. Guess I'll go back to doing some actual work.

Posted by: ebtnut | February 19, 2008 3:10 PM | Report abuse

Joel said, "The voters today in Wisconsin are not beholden in any way to the results from the Potomac Primary or Super Tuesday."

I gotta say that I disagree with you there. Since the results of previous primaries cause some candidates to drop out of the race, we here in the later states (like Wisconsin, or my home, Texas) have fewer choices from which to make our pick. So, in effect, my roster of candidates depends upon and is beholden entirely to the whims of voters in those other places.

The only way to make my vote not beholden to anyone else's would be to have a national primary day when every state holds its primary election, all the votes get counted at the same time, and the nominee is never known until s/he is announced at the convention. This would mean that a nominee could be named without that person having a majority of the delegates, but leaders are elected without a majority share all the time. It's how we ended up with Rick "Goodhair" Perry as governor.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 3:12 PM | Report abuse

bia,
It's a bit sad to see that the UT gym has to be closed for a week ahead of a debate.

I wonder, just a bit, whether the Florida approach would be to tent the building and fumigate it for termites. The grandest tenting I've seen was of the entire Flagler College main building in St. Augustine. It's a late-19th century hotel, one of the first in the US to be built of poured concrete. But its floors are wood. The primary designer, Bernard Maybeck, went on to an illustrious career in Berkeley and around the Bay area. The Palace of Fine Arts in SF is his (or at least the original was. The present structure is a 1960s re-creation).

Anyway, had the Flagler College building been wrapped in pink, it woulda been worthy of Christo.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | February 19, 2008 3:13 PM | Report abuse

kbert, this is fun:
Barbra Streisand: $589,675, 89% Democratic; remainder independent or special interest.
Michael Bloomberg: $340,400 Republican, $327,300 Democrat, $28,000 special interest
George Steinbrenner: $61,450 Republican, $125,650 Democrat, $49,500 special interest
Alec Baldwin: $0
Paula Abdul: $0


Posted by: Raysmom | February 19, 2008 3:13 PM | Report abuse

Jack, my dad was a hospital corpsman on the aircraft carrier "Bennington" which was in the same campains as your dad's ship. That is, they were two out of hundreds of thousands of sailors floating around the same ocean at the same time. Small world, isn't it?

Posted by: Don from I-270 | February 19, 2008 3:14 PM | Report abuse

About Texas and "Friday Night Lights"--

Even though I live and work in Pflugerville, Texas, where the football scenes for the show are filmed (Pflugerville High School's mascot is actually the Panthers), I've never seen the show. This has more to do with a dislike of football than anything else, and I can agree with Mudge's dislike of the bastardization of Texas that is presented as truth by the many forms of media. It's a little better nowadays, what with critically acclaimed shows giving a more accurate picture, but even Dillon, Texas is not a good approximation of Texas culture, if you wanna call it that. It IS better than the portrayal given by old Walker, Texas Ranger, though. Never have I seen soooo many cowboy hats as I did in that show. I mean, don't get me wrong, there are people who wear them, but the vast majority of people in Texas live in these big thingies called cities, surrounded by these other thingies called suburbs.

Oh wait, do y'all have cities too? And suburbs? And you say that there are people in the backwoods areas of your states that wear cowboy hats too?

Hmmmm....

Ours are still bigger than yours.

Had to stick a little chauvinist hubris in there just for you, Mudge.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

I forgot to say what I think is one of the better portrayals of Texas in the media today. Arlen, Texas. Another fictitious town, and you get ten points if you know what show I'm referencing. Now THAT place is about as real small-town Texas as it gets without actually being there.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Just a lowly data point here, Gomer, but I wear cowboy boots often. Here in DC, although technically, College Park is a suburb. Close-in suburb with charm and trees and urbanish demographics.

However, I like, ivansmom, have a license to wear such boots. Heck, I could even wear a cowboy hat, being from Montana (Ultima Thule complete with buttes and gullies) and and all.

Posted by: College Parkian | February 19, 2008 3:35 PM | Report abuse

Don and Jack already know this, but some footnotes on the Bennington:

Two photos of her flight deck at http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/022014.jpg http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/022015
.jpg when an F4U Corsair hit the tower.

Bennington's bow after she was damaged in a major typhoon http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/022025.jpg on June 5, 1945, off Okinawa.

Brief history: "Operating out of Ulithi she took part in the strikes against the Japanese home islands (1-17 and 25 February), Volcano Islands (18 February - 4 March), Okinawa (1 March), and the raids in support of the Okinawa campaign (18 March-11 June). On 7 April Bennington's planes participated in the attacks on the Japanese task force moving through the East China Sea toward Okinawa which resulted in the sinking of the Japanese battleshipYamato, light cruiser Yahagi, and four destroyers. On 5 June the carrier was damaged by a typhoon off Okinawa and retired to Leyte for repairs arriving 12 June. Her repairs completed, Bennington left Leyte 1 July and during 10 July-16 August took part in the final raids on the Japanese home islands."

"27 APRIL 1953 - 10:03 HOURS - BOILER EXPLOSION - USS BENNINGTON CVA-20
The NAVY released the names of the 11 killed and seven injured in an explosion aboard the aircraft carrier BENNINGTON off Cuba."

One of the worst disasters in U.S. naval history: "On 26 May 1954, while cruising off Narragansett Bay, the fluid in one of her catapults exploded setting off a series of secondary explosions which killed 103 crewmen and injured 201 others. ... On 22 April 1955 the Secretary of the Navy came aboard and presented medals and letters of commendation to 27 of her crew in recognition of their heroism on 26 May 1954."

And this little nugget about that typhoon: "On 3 June 1945, the ships of Task Group (TG) 38.1, built around aircraft carriers USS Hornet (CV-12) and USS Bennington (CV-20), and the oilers in Task Group 30.8 were operating east of Okinawa, having just completed two weeks of air attacks against Japanese airfields on Okinawa and Kyushu. Although a tropical disturbance had been reported forming east of the Philippines, confused sighting reports and communications delays deprived Third Fleet of timely and accurate location information. Contradictory weather reports did not help the situation. On 5 June, the small and tight typhoon overtook TG 38.1, which passed through the eye of the storm at 0700 that morning. Hurricane force winds of 70 knots (80.5 miles per hour), with gusts up to 100 knots (115 miles per hour), damaged almost every ship in TG 38.1 and TG 30.8. In the former, heavy cruiser USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) lost her bow and two other cruisers suffered frame damage. All the fleet carriers suffered flight deck damage, while USS Belleau Wood (CV-24) also lost an elevator. The destroyers rode out the storm rather well, only USS Samuel N. Moore (DD-747) suffering major superstructure damage. In the refueling group, escort carriers USS Windham Bay (CVE-92) and USS Salamaua (CVE-96) lost part of their flight decks and tanker USS Millicoma (AO-73) suffered severe topside damage. One officer and five men were lost or killed, with another four seriously injured. Storm damage wrecked 43 planes and another 33 were washed overboard. After continued strong recommendations, the Pacific Fleet established uncoded plain language typhoon advisory dispatch procedures on 10 June and, two days later, began flying B-29 aircraft on storm reconnaissance missions."

Decommissioned 15 January 1970; stricken 20 September 1989 [from the Navy list of ships]; sold for scrap 12 January 1994
A great ship, Don. RIP.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 3:35 PM | Report abuse

Oh, FYI, jack and Don, my father may have been the quartermaster of one of the PCs escorting the bennington around. His ship operated out of Ulithi during that time period. Heck, my dad and your dads might have gotten thrown out of the same bar at the same time. Small world.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Arlen=King of the Hill, an animated community.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 19, 2008 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Arlen, Texas... home of Tom Landry Middle School.

Posted by: TBG | February 19, 2008 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Arlen, Texas, where the Laotians are fierce.

Posted by: Yoki | February 19, 2008 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, jack, Don.. you're making me think of my dad...

http://tbgboodler.blogspot.com/2006_09_01_archive.html

Posted by: TBG | February 19, 2008 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Arlen, Texas... home of the Mega Lo Mart.

Posted by: TBG | February 19, 2008 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Appreciate the data point, CP. I'll add it to my tabulation. And I will need to see your license to wear both the boots and the hat.

Maybe I didn't make my point well, but what I was trying to say was that Texas is usually protrayed in its small-town, cowboy motif. I, on the other hand, represent the huge section of the populace who does not own boots (except for hiking) or hats (except for baseball caps and beanies). I resent the image of Arbusto and Walker, Norris Ranger representin' in a cowboy hat, boots, and pearl-snap shirt and everybody thinkin that's all we've got down here. We got mooseeums an' art gall'ries an' fancy-pants res'rants too.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Mostly, CP, code talking here, but the fish are doilies. Repeat, the Fish are doilies.

Its crochet. I think I should be able to do a mock up on the pictures. (continuing the littering the world with doily related speak)

And just so you know, The venrable Soctties Tornament is on.

http://www.seasonofchampions.ca/2008toh/index.asp

Hurry Hard.

Posted by: dr | February 19, 2008 3:48 PM | Report abuse

Ten points each to Shiloh and Yoki, TBG gets 15 for the double reference.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Scc Scotties

Posted by: dr | February 19, 2008 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Gomer, if it makes you feel any better Friday Night Lights is great, even if you don't like football, and really not a lot of cowboy hats at all.

Posted by: dmd | February 19, 2008 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Everyone knows that Texas is not exclusively cowboy hats, boots, and pearl-snap shirt. That is Alberta.

Posted by: Yoki | February 19, 2008 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Yes, yes we are.

You know I have a cousin in Houston, IIRC. Maybe Forth Worth? I dunno. Somewhere big.

Posted by: dr | February 19, 2008 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Gomer, def. have the paperwork on the boots but I think my mom, my she RIP, has my paperwork on the hat.

Copy, DR, I thought that might be the case. This truth is pretty darn big; shout it from the housetops:

The fish ARE doilies.

Mudge, copy that? Doilies. Doilies. Everywhere. We love you, Mr. Shop Steward with the well-developed feminine side to permit us our yarn and stitchery stuff.

We miss you, RD.

Posted by: College Parkian | February 19, 2008 3:57 PM | Report abuse

Second what Yoki says. Alberta is northern MT; MT is southern Alberty.....yee haw.

Off to take CPBoy his drum sticks. Apparently, he broke a pair in class today.

Posted by: College Parkian | February 19, 2008 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Peter Carlson's columns are always entertaining and fun to read. Today, like many of us in the Boodle, he's wearing his tin foil hat. Here's his column...about Paranoia and those ever-wily shape-shifting alien reptile beings running America...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/18/AR2008021802230.html?hpid=features1&hpv=national

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 4:00 PM | Report abuse

*weeping quietly and wiping tears on chantilly lace doily*

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 4:14 PM | Report abuse

Gomer! That's right. I knew there was another boodler in the Austin area, but I got mixed up between you and Jumper.

Posted by: bia | February 19, 2008 4:28 PM | Report abuse

Shrimp the size of lobsters?! And they're disappearing due to pesticides and illegal poaching. Such a beautiful place, Jamaica. Stories like that make me want to move to...Timbuktu.

Posted by: Bean | February 19, 2008 4:29 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, Jack, TBG, et.al. thanks for the stroll down our parents memory lane. Isn't it funny how these "kids" who fought in "the big one" look just like our own kids in slightly anacronistic clothing?

They really were "The Greatest Generation".

Posted by: Don from I-270 | February 19, 2008 4:42 PM | Report abuse

I have a book by a fish and wildlife warden. Some apparently otherwise honest people will do the most shocking level of pilfering of wildlife resources if they don't get caught.

But this is a level of stupidity and greed that boggles the mind... mostly because such things were covered in Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle", implementing the FDA and other oversights on food safety.

I agree with Joel-- this is the tragedy of the commons/ unregulated free market where the customer has limited ability to inspect commodities for quality control.


Posted by: Wilbrod | February 19, 2008 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Oh yeah. In answer to the question I wouldn't say we have any different sayings up here to mean the other side of the world. For generic "remote location" either a rude made up name or a real place in Saskatchewan or Newfoundland always seems to be used.

Posted by: SonofCarl | February 19, 2008 4:53 PM | Report abuse

Kind of makes you want to rethink the seafood buffet at the all-inclusive resort. I'm an early riser, and I was shocked at the amount of pesticides that are spread over everything before most of the tourists awaken to their vacation in "paradise."


Posted by: Bean | February 19, 2008 4:53 PM | Report abuse

Just clicked on the Jamaica link now, I vacationed in that area once and may have had a ride down the river on a guided raft (can't recall the name of the river). But we stayed just outside Port Antonio, a very beautiful area, Port Antonio was just a small, very poor port town - much of the area then was still recovering from Hugo I believe.

Posted by: dmd | February 19, 2008 4:57 PM | Report abuse

My recollection of Friday Night Lights (the book) is that it's pretty specific to the Permian Basin area of Texas, rather than Middle America in general. But that's a foreign country to me, and maybe Texas is typical of Middle America. I haven't seen the movie or TV show, BTW.

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 19, 2008 4:59 PM | Report abuse

I haven't seen it either. But I remember the New Yorker TV critic was going on about how good it is.

Posted by: Bean | February 19, 2008 5:01 PM | Report abuse

bia- You said you're doing post-grad at UT? My wife just finished her Masters' there last summer in school counseling. Small world.

And for a "remote location" phrase, there is of course the boondocks, which can be shortened to "the boonies." And there is also "BFE", which stands for Bum-F(something that rhymes with duck) Egypt.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 5:11 PM | Report abuse

This tennis ball-obsessed pup sniffs out mercury in schools.

http://tinyurl.com/39vn3m

Sounds like a great job! All those kids, oh boy.

Posted by: Wilbrodog | February 19, 2008 5:13 PM | Report abuse

Cody, Wyoming had a tradition of dressing up for the tourists. In this vein, upon coming back to town after several days of unwashed field work, I think I generally visited the supermarket before washing up.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | February 19, 2008 5:13 PM | Report abuse

Just read the piece on the Jamaican river poisoners.

Chilling.

Posted by: Gomer | February 19, 2008 5:16 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, but what about those monster shrimp (contradiction in terms?)? I'm thinking I would need a whole bottle of horseradish and a whole bottle of ketchup just to make enough cocktail sauce.

Posted by: Bean | February 19, 2008 5:22 PM | Report abuse

It is a small world, Don and 'Mudge. It may have been that our Dads all were tossed from the same bar. Dad told a story of being docked somewhere in Egypt and seeing a hand coming through the porthole groping for something to take from a table or maybe a desk. Dad secured the fellows hand to the table/desk top with a letter opener until the MP's came to get him.

Posted by: jack | February 19, 2008 5:24 PM | Report abuse

LTL-CA, you're right. Math needs to be stored in procedural memory, and it means it needs to be practiced, or the ability to do math falls apart on multi-step calculations.

It'd be like trying to dance a ballet without getting the basic motions down solid but instead trying to do everything de novo by receiving instruction as the person dances.

Yes, math concepts are important, but you need the skills and knowledge in order to associate and grasp the connections in the higher concepts and execute them properly.

And comparing math to complex movements isn't just an analogy: gesture helps math processing.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071104191551.htm

Babies, birds and monkeys can count and even do mental math. Dyscalculia may be traced to the right parietal lobe; the left can hold abstract concepts, but the right needs more concrete input.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070117134436.htm

So, you can have all the concepts you want, but if you can't process math, you can't do math.

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 19, 2008 5:34 PM | Report abuse

The fish are doilies.

I have to think about this.

If the fish are doilies, then there is coffee on a fish.

Not a fish in the coffee.

Posted by: Ivansmom | February 19, 2008 5:41 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of math concepts, did Weingarten mention "New Math" in his homage to Tom Lehrer last week?

http://youtube.com/watch?v=a81YvrV7Vv8

lyrics here:
http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/SongUnid/EE27EF26A4F581BE48256A7D002575E1

Posted by: bia | February 19, 2008 5:46 PM | Report abuse

There are times when I think we sound a bit like a Dr. Suess book.

And thats a good thing.

Posted by: dr | February 19, 2008 6:12 PM | Report abuse

I'm not sure if anyone has mentioned that Joel has an article in the NattyGeo called "At the Heart of All Matter." Haven't read it yet. Maybe later tonight.

Posted by: Bad Sneakers | February 19, 2008 6:25 PM | Report abuse

The same pigment that brings the red to fruit fly eyes also makes butterfly wings red, or so I read here:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071025125134.htm

If it was not for keen eye color genes, then those butterfly wings would be dyed duller, and that's not a figment nor a lie.


Posted by: Wilbrod | February 19, 2008 6:27 PM | Report abuse

The WSJ took a deft look at Obama's guile and found heft behind his style. Worthwhile reading.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120336900169175159.html?mod=hpp_us_inside_today

And now to schlup through the snow with the pup in tow.

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 19, 2008 6:40 PM | Report abuse

Hi, all. Is fishing with poison like trolling with anthrax?

My Texas days are long over, bia, at least for now. In fact, I packed up and left about two weeks after that business. I wrote a whole lot about those years. Lots of it, I won't let my mama read. But some I can.

Ivansmom, that sounds like the station, but I sure can't recall after so many years.

Having grown up in Florida, (in the wonderful pre-Disney time when Cape Canaveral provided us with the biggest dreams) in Texas I was always most at home in Corpus Christi, way down on the south end of the beach, away from the crowds.

Here's some geographic trivia: Texas extends further south than Florida, except for one little bitty thing known as Key West.

Posted by: Jumper | February 19, 2008 7:31 PM | Report abuse

Anybody know if there is a lunar eclipse tonight ?

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 19, 2008 8:33 PM | Report abuse

"And, Mr, Yankee, your qualifications to judge the accuracy of a portrayal of small town Texas high school football culture would be exactly what?

Posted by: | February 19, 2008 01:40 PM"

For the record thet wearnt me. My question is: what sort a misbegotten low-life does it take to call a Yankee "Mr."?

Posted by: Southern Comfort | February 19, 2008 8:36 PM | Report abuse

Looks like tomorrow night, gwe...

http://www.voanews.com/english/2008-02-19-voa58.cfm

I'm working your shift tonight. My once-a-month "late night," which last month lasted until 4:30 am. Let's hope I'm home by midnight this time.

Posted by: TBG | February 19, 2008 8:37 PM | Report abuse

Just got back in, and going to hug my bed real soon.

I hope your evening is good, and your sleep even better.

Night, boodle. Sweet dreams.

Posted by: cassandra s | February 19, 2008 8:40 PM | Report abuse

Al nopal solo lo van a ver cuando hay tunas.

Badly sunburned.

Buenos noches.

Posted by: Lobster Loomis | February 19, 2008 8:40 PM | Report abuse

SCC: Buenas noches.

Posted by: La Senora Loomis | February 19, 2008 8:42 PM | Report abuse

If you're not, TBG, write me. I'll be back up at 1:30.

Posted by: dbG | February 19, 2008 8:44 PM | Report abuse

Eclipse @ 7:01 p.m. PST, Wednesday, 2/20/08; later as you go east.

Posted by: Shiloh | February 19, 2008 8:46 PM | Report abuse

Thanks all, but they are calling for snow tomorrow and we may not be able to see anything.

Man I am ready for spring!!

Posted by: greeenwithenvy | February 19, 2008 8:52 PM | Report abuse

pretty bad when I can't even spell my handle correctly

Posted by: gwe | February 19, 2008 8:58 PM | Report abuse

gwe, i thought you were just signing off with emphasis.

Posted by: L.A. lurker | February 19, 2008 9:36 PM | Report abuse

Last lunar eclipse it was cloudy. Since we're in a subzero snap, I think it'll be clear tomorrow night. And if it snows, so be it.

Loomis, thanks for the Spanish original of that proverb you quoted a while ago "They go to the (Nopal) cactus only when there's (tuna) fruit.

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 19, 2008 9:38 PM | Report abuse

Laughing at your 8:26, SC. Nicely done.

GWE, the eclipse begins about 8 p.m. tomorrow night, with totality about 10 p.m. EST in our neck of the woods. We're supposed to have snow--an inch or two in your area, tomorrow afternoon, but it should clear out in time for the eclipse. Keep your fingers crossed.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 9:57 PM | Report abuse

We were really looking forward to the eclipse tomorrow night so we could use the new telescope, but it looks like snow showers here also. Darn!

Obama wins Wisconsin. He's speaking now and I have to say that the more I hear him, the more I like him. Nice to feel inspired instead of enraged.

Posted by: Bad Sneakers | February 19, 2008 10:06 PM | Report abuse

Oh, BTW, we have our Canuckistani friends to thank for the approaching Alberta Clipper, currently moving over Illinois and headed this way. About an inch of snow tomorrow afternoon/evening in the DC area, so the weatherpersons say. Thank you, Yoki. Much appreciated. We were getting sooooooooo fed up with the 70-degree weather we had this past weekend.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 10:08 PM | Report abuse

I don't know if this is true or not, but it's certainly one weird angle:

"Lights at Night Are Linked to Breast Cancer
"Study Bolsters Theory About Interference With Production of Key Hormone

By Rick Weiss
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, February 20, 2008; Page A04

Women who live in neighborhoods with large amounts of nighttime illumination are more likely to get breast cancer than those who live in areas where nocturnal darkness prevails, according to an unusual study that overlaid satellite images of Earth onto cancer registries.

The finding adds credence to the hypothesis that exposure to too much light at night can raise the risk of breast cancer by interfering with the brain's production of a tumor-suppressing hormone.

"By no means are we saying that light at night is the only or the major risk factor for breast cancer," said Itai Kloog, of the University of Haifa in Israel, who led the new work. "But we found a clear and strong correlation that should be taken into consideration."

Scientists have known for years that rats raised in cages where lights are left on for much of the night have higher cancer rates than those allowed to sleep in darkness. And epidemiological studies of nurses, flight attendants and others who work at night have found breast cancer rates 60 percent above normal, even when other factors such as differences in diet are accounted for.

On the basis of such studies, an arm of the World Health Organization announced in December its decision to classify shift work as a "probable carcinogen."

Jeez. And it gets scarier still:

"Abraham Haim, a University of Haifa chronobiologist involved in the study, said the findings raise questions about the recent push to switch to energy-efficient fluorescent bulbs, which suppress melatonin production more than conventional incandescent bulbs. "This may be a disaster in another 20 years," Haim said, "and you won't be able to reverse what we did by mistake." He called for more research before policies favoring fluorescent lights are implemented, and for more emphasis on using less light at night.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/19/AR2008021902398.html?hpid=moreheadlines

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 19, 2008 10:15 PM | Report abuse

Darn, early to bed for me. I can never sleep with lights in the bedroom anyway.

Nighttime illumination and disruption of the sleep cycle has also been linked with childhood leukemia.

But until we all have "sonar canes" or something, I think we're stuck with lights on at night for a while. Wilbrodog can only do so much guide dog work at bedtime.

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 19, 2008 10:21 PM | Report abuse

Sheesh. I thought that I was doing the right thing when I replaced the incandescent lamps in our light fixtures with fluorescent lamps. Joe Jackson said it: Everything gives you cancer.

If I had a political pundit's hat to wear, I'd think that it'd be fair to say that the Obama campaign has legs.

Posted by: jack | February 19, 2008 11:27 PM | Report abuse

I was long bothered that churches, which are mostly used on Sunday mornings, almost always need artificial lighting. Today, of course, natural light has become a nuisance.

I like light switches that light up when off--if they're not visible from bed!

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | February 20, 2008 12:29 AM | Report abuse

This is kind of freaky:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/19/AR2008021902617.html?hpid=topnews
(and amazingly on topic about light, or the absence thereof)

Posted by: mostlylurking | February 20, 2008 12:51 AM | Report abuse

Saw that duller color story, Mostly. I agree it's on topic, as far as being off-topic goes.

Dave, any kind of softly glowing light source drives me crazy in bed at night if I can see it.

One huge complaint I have about Windows is that the sign off screen is screamingly blue, which is much more irritating to the eyes than, say, red light, and can act as a caffeine-like boost at night.

Check this story out:

http://www.livescience.com/health/060201_blue_light.html

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 20, 2008 1:34 AM | Report abuse

IMHO an excellent BBC TV documentary....

http://www.archive.org/details/ThePowerOfNightmares

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 20, 2008 1:35 AM | Report abuse

Hey, Wilbrod, once you have signed off, how about getting up and walking away, or turning off the monitor? ;-)

I have a some issues with MS, but it never occurred to me to include the color of the Windows sign-off screen. ;-)

Posted by: LTL-CA | February 20, 2008 1:38 AM | Report abuse

Wow, Obama has his 9th and 10th primaries in a row -- and in the 10th in Hawaii he beat Hillary by more than 50 points! Jeez, that's a slaughter. And I get a kick from pundits (such as Robert Samuelson's column today) that describe all the things Obama is doing wrong in his speeches (and that Hillary is doing right). Uh-huh.

Still and all, it ain't over until it's over, as I keep saying.

'Morning, Boodle. Scotty, Cassandra, up and at 'em. The good news is today is "hump day" already, and we have to get through a snow shower here this afternoon and a lunar eclipse tonight.

Interesting story/book review on making chowders of various kinds, although I think it's a bit wrong-headed in asserting that it's possible to make a chowder without the milk or cream component. Yes, what emerges might be a perfectly good soup--but it ain't a chowder, never mind the historical antecededant from before 1750. For the last 250 years a chowder has had a milk or cream base to it, and that's how most people think of it. The photo that accompanies the story shows an alleged chowder that (in my view) ain't a chowder. But so be it. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/19/AR2008021900627.html?hpid=features1&hpv=national

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2008 5:51 AM | Report abuse

Morning, morning, friends. I've been up awhile, Mudge, just reading and not at the computer. Fingers are swollen as usual, and hard to type.

I see Obama is still winning. This must give the Clintons all kinds of distress.

Today is busy Wednesday. The radio program, Bible studies, and the Center. Hopefully I can get back in and throw a word or two.

I sort of looked at the piece you were talking about Mudge, the breast cancer thing and light. Not good for me because I sleep with a lamp on all the time. People will bad ears have a tendency to kind of float in the dark, so need to stay grounded with sight, and that requires light. You just cannot win this fight, can you?

Have a good day, folks. You can do that in spite of the circumstances, with help from my friend, the Lord Jesus.

Scotty, Slyness, Martooni, wake up folks, and good morning to all.*waving*

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Posted by: cassandra s | February 20, 2008 6:04 AM | Report abuse

I'm up, Cassandra! Good busy morning to you!

Oh jeez, on the lighting issue. I just bought a pack of the fluorescent bulbs. I have some but don't like the light; it isn't bright enough and it bothers my eyes. Mr. T can't sleep with light, so having it on isn't an issue for me.

Dave, I gotta agree about artificial light in church. I think I said something about going to a funeral at a church whose sanctuary had no windows. That room gave me the willies. I like to see light from the sun.

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2008 7:07 AM | Report abuse

*wild applause for 'Mudge's chowder choice*

*quickly-passing-through-on-yet-another-jam-packed-day-of-pre-vacation-insanity Grover waves*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2008 7:51 AM | Report abuse

Greetings to all my imaginary friends. I returned yesterday from my trip out west. Thanks to those individuals who made sure that neither I nor my family went hungry. It was greatly appreciated.

The ceremonial highlight of this trip was last Friday at a church in Washington State.

Now, in any Catholic Mass the moments of transubstantiation are of special significance. The faithful believe that the substance, though not the form, of bread and wine are transformed into something divine. More to the point, this is also when the altar boys are supposed to ring the bells.

I, my two brothers, and thanks to the influence of a radical archbishop, my sister have all been altar boys (or "servers" in the new terminology.) Therefore we all shared a moment of relief when they got the bells just right. For we understand that if the bells are rung with either tentative timidity or immoderate zeal the respectful ambiance of the proceedings can become compromised.

This has been known to displease the celebrant.

Our obsession with the bell ringing is clearly ironic given that this was the first time in many years that any of us had actually attended a Mass. Yes, we are fall-away Catholics, but gosh darn it, we know good bell ringing when we hear it! My Dad would have joined in our approval, except, of course, that this was his funeral.

By giving my father a full Mass we were honoring a cross-generational pact. Such pacts with the dead are important. By honoring them we help to reassure ourselves that when we die our wishes will also be taken seriously. Implicit in such pacts is the understanding that the dead will be honored in thought as well as in deed. And as I stood with my siblings I found it easier to do this than I once believed.

For bells are not the only sounds I remember from my youth. As I recall, there was also quite a bit of shouting involved.

Yet, in the days leading up to this funeral I felt such memories fade. In their place emerged recollections of happier things. My father carving home-grown pumpkins with us on Halloween. The patience and joy in his voice as he shared the many secrets to good tomatoes. His unwavering confidence in our abilities and his pride in our accomplishments. I guess you could call it a form of cognitive transubstantiation. Ordinary memories became something akin to divine.

After the service, and part way through the first of several quite respectable bottles of Chianti, we agreed that Dad would be pleased that we took great pains to ensure that all the appropriate rites and rituals had been observed. Including, of course, the bells. And we all expressed the hope that our own post-mortem requests would be so scrupulously obeyed.

But I don't know. The last time I mentioned it, my son seemed oddly resistant to that whole "eternal flame" idea.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2008 8:20 AM | Report abuse

RD - It seems that some of the rituals brought you some comfort and I'm glad. Welcome back.
Mostlylurking - did he take the sun back east with him?

Posted by: Kim | February 20, 2008 8:28 AM | Report abuse

Welcome back, RD.

My condolences on your loss. Your absence was keenly felt.

Posted by: Don from I-270 | February 20, 2008 8:37 AM | Report abuse

Well-said and well-returned, RDP. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2008 8:37 AM | Report abuse

RD, wonderful description of your experiences. Welcome back.

Posted by: Raysmom | February 20, 2008 8:47 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

So much about light today, those effervescent photons that can't decide if they're particles or waves...

I hope to be able to see the lunar eclipse tonight, but with the snow showers moving in, I think it's unlikely I'll see much.

That article mostlylurking links to is quite interesting, and pulls together some research paths I'd been paying attention to from time to time.

I wonder how much investment the Arbusto Administration has directed to Rensselaer Poly for that Deep Black material? Seems like a good media for White House memos (after all, if you can make email files disappear...)

Also, if there were visibilty cloaking technology already availble, who do we think would already have it (someone who could afford it, I expect)? The Government? Bill Gates? [Note that I did *not* mention Steve Fossett]

Also, as much momentum as Obama has at the moment, the conventions are still a long way off. I think Hillary still has a good chance, particularly if she can convince people that she's ready to step in and resolve some of the current problems facing the Bush White House.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2008 8:50 AM | Report abuse

Welcome back, RD. I'd say you and your siblings did the right thing, and I'm glad it brought you comfort. I too felt the fading of less-than-happy memories when my mother died. Perhaps that is an outcome of proper grieving, as well as the knowledge that you have honored him as he would have wished, as you said.

Maybe Shakespeare had it wrong, and it's the evil that we forget, not the good.

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2008 8:52 AM | Report abuse

I am also proud to report that I am now a seasoned mariner. Sort of. For my older brother owns a Macgregor 26.

http://www.gisails.com/images/boatpics2/boat_27_1.jpg

We spent a delightful and thoroughly therapeutic afternoon on the peaceful waters of Southern Puget Sound. With the exception of a few rowboats and the Washington State Ferry system, this was actually the first time I have ever done time in a watercraft. I must admit I see the appeal. Especially when my brother, showing a rare moment of questionable judgment, actually let me take the helm. It was intoxicating. I suddenly felt the desire to splash on some Old Spice and say "arr."

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2008 8:59 AM | Report abuse

RD, thanks for that piece on the Mass for your father.

Your mention of the ringing of the bells took me back to my own days on the altar, and getting that bell ringing just right.

I'm sure your Dad would have been pleased by the Mass. Heck, your *description* of it gave me that warm fuzzy feeling of recognition and belonging.

Something that we Altar Boys (remember, this *was* back in the day) didn't get to handle frequently was the incense. Please remind me to tell you some stories about handling that stuff during funerals and Novenas the next time I see you, RD.

And remember, when I go I want the Classic Viking Funeral; shove me out in the water and set me on pyre. Flaming arrows for everyone.

And don't forget to have a really good party. Even though I won't be there, believe me, I'll be there.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2008 9:02 AM | Report abuse

Welcome back RD, lovely description of the services. My sister and I were known to giggle at an over enthusiatic bell ring when we were young as well.

Hold on to those memories and pass them down the line, for they truly matter.

Posted by: dmd | February 20, 2008 9:07 AM | Report abuse

We used to love to serve at funerals because of the incense. My friend Jim, who was quite the rebel, used to dump an extra spoonful of the stuff into the censer after we had returned the the Sacristy. I still recall the difficulty of hanging up our cassocks amidst billowing clouds of blue smoke.

This used to also annoy our Irish priest no end because sacramental incense is pretty costly. He muttered a few phrases when he came in not found in the Catechism.

But man, it was some primo good .. um.. sacramental incense.

My mother always wondered why I came back with bloodshot eyes.

Posted by: RD Padouk | February 20, 2008 9:23 AM | Report abuse

RD,
Great exegesis on traditional Masses. As a former altar boy, I can vouch that the bell ringing was the most nerve racking part of the job because you had to actually pay attention to what the priest was saying. At out small base chapel, the bell ringing was actually striking a small bowl shaped gong.

Most churches I attend have eliminated most of the "smells and bells" altogether except for the most solemn occasions, which I assume your dad's funeral was. So it goes.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 20, 2008 9:27 AM | Report abuse

RD, welcome back.

I'm meditating on the "eternal flame" / "viking funeral" and imagining that anybody's best bet on either of those would be if the boodle somehow survives through the intervening decades. I can actually visualize both scenarios being facilitated by this group -- with tinfoil hats thrown in for good measure.

For my part, I'll put in my wishes that whatever form the ceremony might take, at some point after or during, let hilarity ensue. I bet the boodle could handle that, too.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 20, 2008 9:35 AM | Report abuse

My daughter was an altar server and I can tell you as the moment grew closer I would be soooo nervous until she pulled it off. After a few Masses I relaxed and I don't know why I was so nervous in the first place. The Benedictine brother who shepherds the altar servers (and there is no better word for what he does-they are like little goats)is a delightful man and there was no worry that he or the priest would get upset. Just Mommy nerves, I guess. (Or a flashback to some nervewracking moments growing up in the Church, perhaps!)

Posted by: Kim | February 20, 2008 9:38 AM | Report abuse

RD, I'm reminded that my grad school roommate (Classics, lots of reading) had an elaborate Latin wedding with something like six priests. But of course no fancy reception. He's had a rewarding academic career--I'm happy to see that there's still life among the Romans and Greeks.

Posted by: Dave of the Coonties | February 20, 2008 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Lest I miss my cue, I must add this comment to Joel's statement, "We make a mistake when we imagine the electorate as a single sentient organism."

We are probably making a mistake if we imagine an individual human being as "a single sentient organism." We need to keep working on this puzzle, even though we have reached a consensus that it is unsolvable. Possibly the electorate-as-organism metaphor can be helpful.

I'll keep thinking about it, but right now I have much more mundane things clamoring for my attention. Later, y'all...

Posted by: kbertocci | February 20, 2008 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Welcome home, Padouk; I'm glad the bells were tolled properly, and that Neptune welcomed you onto the foamy brine without mishap (as he is sometimes wont to do).

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2008 9:58 AM | Report abuse

Welcome back, RD. Your post reminded me of growing up in the Episcopal church and being an acolyte. I'd have to agree with Slyness that such affairs preserve the good memories. Bell ringing kind of chokes me up, though.

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2008 9:58 AM | Report abuse

I have attempted to find the source that I mentioned during this past weekend that contains the page with the passage about the appropriateness of attribution. I feel strongly that it is from a book by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin. I bought Telushkin's 1991 book "Jewish Literacy" when we lived in Louisville.

I searched on Sunday and Monday my one bookcase that has books grouped there, among them the themes of both Jewish topics and general spirituality, to find the book that I thought I had purchased, also by Telushkin. I thought that I had bought this second volume by Telushkin about the same time we were in Louisville when I bought Telushkin's 1991 book, about values or ethics--a day-to-day guide. Could it be the book that I seek is in one of the few remaining boxes in the garage that is unpacked--separated from the other books and tucked in a small space at the last minute? Or, as appears in all likelihood now, was it a book that I perused on several occasions but didn't buy?

So I turned to amazon.com, to learn that Rabbi Telushkin had written a book about ethics in March 2006. No, that wouldn't have fit our Louisville timeframe of 1999-2001. I strongly believe the book that has the passage that I am looking for is Telushkin's February 2000 book, "The Book of Jewish Values: A Day-by-Day Guide to Ethical Living."

Who knew that Obama would plagiarize so often and from so many different sources? Dana Milbank has done a good job capturing them all, and Dowd jumps on the rebuttal bandwagon this morning, attempting to find instances when Hillary has borrowed a few words herself.

Milbank unfortunately glossed over Obama's Vi@gr@ joke from the rally here yesterday--made at the end of Obama's remarks about pharmaceuticals that Obama lifted from John Edwards. You don't see Milbank's article in today's San Antonio Express-News, by the way--it's all Obama rah-rah, which tone it has been for some time now. Perhaps I should talk about Bess, (Milbank refers to her as "the woman") who lead the chant "Yes, we can," shortly before Obama came out to the small arena set up for him to speak--she part of the snafu mentioned in the next graf.

I am extremely tired this morning. I left for the rally at 9:10 a.m., but because of a big snafu after the rally concluded that involved a small group of us at the rally--those of us who had brought books written by Obama, I didn't leave Guadalupe Plaza until 5 p.m.--even though Obama finished speaking at about 3:30 p.m. When the mob moved to cluster around Obama, I moved to rear, to the press area under the trees, and spoke briefly with Gary Tuchman of ABC News, the only national figure in the press pack whom I immediately recognized.

There was a town meeting portion of the rally. Obama pointed to the area where I was seated, since I had had my hand up for some time, and called on the other "young lady," a woman of my age (we both popped out of our folding chairs at the same time), who was dressed as though she were in the audience for Monte Hall's "Let's Make a Deal." Obama got an emotional question from her, since her children had served in Iraq, but I would have asked a far more difficult question about foreign policy in the greater Middle East--specifically, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Today, my question is a moot point.

Perhaps later today, when I'm a bit more rested, I'll circle back to the earlier remarks I made about Mo MoDo's recent weak effort to analyze Maureen Dowd's bleak editorializing on Sunday.

Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2008 9:59 AM | Report abuse

RD, that's a sweet little sloop you were on there, matey. You sound like you could catch the sailing bug with just one or two more bites like this one. I can only drool over such a hole in the water, as I don't have *any* money to pour into one like that.

The best I can do is offer to crew for those who are more well-heeled than I.

Posted by: Don from I-270 | February 20, 2008 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Got really busy this AM and am just now getting back into this boodle and notice some Geographic trivia in error.

Jumper at 7:31 stated "Here's some geographic trivia: Texas extends further south than Florida, except for one little bitty thing known as Key West."

The furthest southern city in Texas is Brownsville which is about 4 miles NW of the southernmost point.

On the other hand let's take a close look at Miami, Florida.

Oops Jumper...

Brownsville, Texas: 25°55'49?N 97°29'4?W

Miami, Florida: 25°47'16?N 80°13'27?W

Not counting the Keys, Flamingo is the southernmost city in Florida. Flamingo is about 50 miles SW of Miami.

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2008 10:27 AM | Report abuse

I stood in line next to a man of Lithuanian descent who had taken the day off to attend the Obama rally from his job in Austin at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (also the mulch fire buffoons). The man worked in nuclear issues, and had been involved in Andrews County for some time. He shared that because of the opposition of the "greens" to the project, he had very recently been switched to supervising uranium in situ mining.

He also joked (?) about the strain on his marriage lately because he is such a rabid Obama supporter, while his wife, involved in education in Austin, feels equally as strong about Mike Huckabee:

Here's a 2003 overview of the situation in Andrews County (approximately that area where the southeast corner of New Mexico juts into Texas):

http://www10.antenna.nl/wise/index.html?http://www10.antenna.nl/wise/589/5525.html

U.S.: Texas gives go-ahead for two waste dumps

The Texas State Legislature has just given the go-ahead for the first new so-called "low-level" radioactive waste disposal sites to be realized in the United States in decades. The two disposal sites will hold wastes from nuclear weapons production and commercial producers (mainly nuclear energy). The proposed dump sites in Andrews County are located on top of the Ogallala aquifer, the largest in the U.S.

(589.5525) Texas Radiation Online - Projected to open in 2008, the site would have two dumps: one for federal nuclear weapons waste with an initial capacity of 162 million cubic feet (4.6 million cubic meters) and one for commercial radioactive waste (primarily from nuclear energy) from the Texas Compact (1). A "Compact" consists of a number of states which store radioactive waste from their territories in a disposal site in one of the states, in this case Texas.

The Compact currently includes Texas, Maine and Vermont, but Maine will be leaving in 2004. Not only could other states replace Maine, but both dumps could end up accepting additional radioactive waste from the entire nation due to legal loopholes.

Equivalent to a football field over 280 stories tall (2), the original capacity of the federal weapons dump would be 60 times that projected for the commercial dump over its 35-year term (3).


Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2008 10:42 AM | Report abuse

Ya gotta keep up, LindaLoo. I'm already on today's column about the plagiarism charges. Dowd thinks it's pretty small beer and that the Clinton's have a lot of nerve accusing others of creative borrowing. Plus today's blogpost has my entry in the Hillary/Obama photshop contest:

http://dowdreport.blogspot.com/2008/02/liar-liar.html

Hillary as Grace Kelly is a stretch but I can totally see Obama as Cary Grant.

And since you and I are are the only ones bothering to discuss columnists from That Other Paper, people are going to start accusing me of just being your sock puppet. That's how rumors start.

Posted by: Mo MoDo | February 20, 2008 10:47 AM | Report abuse

Its good to have you home, RD.

One of my boys served, and had the misfortune to trip on the hem of his garment (vestement)causing the bell to ring in an inappropriate place. The look the priest gave him is burned into my soul.

He redemmed himself though abosolutely proper bell form for the rest of his serving career. But it isn't something I've ever forgotten.

Posted by: dr | February 20, 2008 10:50 AM | Report abuse

But of course, Hawaii is the southernmost state of all.

And Alaska is the most northern, western AND eastern state.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2008 10:55 AM | Report abuse

Loomis, I think you failed to take adequate note of the very last sentence in Milbank's column: "Whoever first uttered the words that followed, it didn't much matter: On the arena floor, they were drowned out by deafening cheers."

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2008 10:55 AM | Report abuse

Ding-ding-ding-ding...Scottynuke wins the Geographic Trivia Prize.

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2008 11:02 AM | Report abuse

Bell-ringing. I rang handbells throughout my youth and have done some ringing as an adult. Talk about being nervous: Nothing like counting and then getting it wrong. Ooops! and Ouch! But when it's right, the music is heavenly. Carol of the Bells rung by bells - now that's Real Music.

Our original set of bells were cast by the Whitechapel Foundry in east London, a concern that first did business in the reign of Elizabeth I (1533-1603, reigned 1558-1603). They were tuned to each other, which meant that they weren't good to take to festivals, where groups of bell choirs rang together and the different sets of bells might be off-key to each other. So we sold them and bought a set that were tuned to a standard. Of course, we haven't had a bell choir to go to festivals in several years; go figure.

I was a junior in high school when we were asked to ring at the Singing Christmas Tree. A local choral group did their Christmas concert standing on a Christmas-tree riser and it was a popular event. On our first number, we were tolling the G bell while the chorale was singing, for the visual effect, as the audience couldn't hear the bells over the singing. At the first performance, we all jumped out of our skins, because the chorale was flat and singing F#. The review was glowing, especially about that song. That's when I figured out that reviewers aren't infallible.

Posted by: Slyness | February 20, 2008 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Omni, you just can't say "Southernmost City" and then say something other than Key West. You're not allowed to "not count" the Keys. Not unless you are ready to recognize the legitimacy of the Conch Republic, in which case, they will be looking to collect some foreign aid, calculated retroactive to 1982...

Key West IS the Southernmost city. They have the Southernmost Point, the Southernmost House, the Southernmost Motel, the Southernmost Pharmacy (a long-time local business, recently closed), the Southernmost Hockey Club, the Southernmost Notary, the Southernmost Swordfish Tournament, the Southernmost Scavenger Hunt ... well, maybe you're starting to see the pattern.

[I was amused by a similar phenomenon in Gainesville: Gator Dry Cleaning, Gator Accounting, Gator Pizza, Gator Moving & Storage, Gator Dental Associates, etc. ad nauseum.]

P.S. The last time I was there, Flamingo wasn't anything like a "city" -- more like a ranger station in Everglades National Park. Wikipedia says it's not incorporated, although a co-worker assures me he remembers seeing houses and a hotel there. I have no such memory, all I remember for sure is the mosquitoes.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 20, 2008 11:13 AM | Report abuse

I didn't fail to take adequate note of Milbank's words, Curmudgeon.

HOWEVER...

But since I did have feet on the ground at both Clinton's San Antonio rally and Obama's San Antonio rally--AND MILBANK DIDN'T--I didn't notice any level of difference in the level of noise or sound at Clinton's San Antonio rally versus Obama's San Antonio rally.

And I betch you your bottom dollar, Cur, that I noticed many things that Milbank failed to report, given the fact that Milbank probably doesn't know his gee from his haw about San Antonio.

I did notice at yesterday's rally, when Obama mentioned Exxon Mobile's record profits recently, and when I shouted out "Exelon," Obama did go into his riff about women and the vote and abolitionists and his U.S. History 101--you know the same 'ol, same 'ol stuff that's in the YouTube video that I linked to recently. Obama's stump speech was truly in evidence for most of his "performance" yesterday.

Loomispouse was watching, for a few moments on CNN, Obama's speech from Houston--at thich point I commented that it was the very same thing he'd said in San Antonio just hours earlier.

I am planning on attending Bill Clinton's rally at Sunset Station (the old Sante Fe and Antrak depot area) on Thursday night, even though I just had to move a medical appointment scheduled for Friday and will miss the CNN Austin debate (which I feel will be reaired). I don't have the warm and fuzzy feeling that I should attend the Ted Kennedy rally at Trinity set for the noonish hour on Thursday, though. I understand McCain may hold a rally at the nearby UTSA campus on Sunday. Nothing firmed up, but may go Sunday if McCain does show.

By the way, our paper this morning reports that Archbishop Gomez is all hunky-dory with Huckabee holding a rally Thursday night at St. Mary's.

Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2008 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Mo MoDo, I find your writing, via last week's link, about Dowd superficial and shallow, if the only thing that you can do is call out pop culture references. No interest in going there today to get more of the same.

Sorry if I'm having a hard time keeping up with all of your noms de plume or split personalities.

Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2008 11:28 AM | Report abuse

On a completely unrelated topic, I see that Project Beer Can OnnaFence proceeds apace:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/20/AR2008022000240.html

And Mudge, buddy, they're *saying* that they expect half of the satellite's 5,000 lb. to make it to sea level (granted, spread out over a lotta miles), and that they're looking for a direct hit on the hydrazine fuel tank. We'll see, eh?

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2008 11:35 AM | Report abuse

*taking a trivial bow for being exceptionally trivial*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2008 11:35 AM | Report abuse

This was the best piece of writing from Sunday's NYT, not Dowd, and I'm pasting it in here--almost in full:

Here is our list of [foreign policy]questions. It is by no means comprehensive.

INTERNATIONAL LEADERSHIP Too many people who long admired this country as a beacon of democratic values now suspect and fear it. What steps would the candidates take to revive America's reputation and its ability to lead? Would they immediately shut the Guantánamo Bay prison, commit to a global treaty to address climate change and press the Senate to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty?

CHINA How would the candidates handle relations with a rising China? How would they manage a potential military competition while also encouraging democratic reforms there? How would the candidates persuade Beijing to help dismantle North Korea's nuclear program and contain Iran's nuclear ambitions, or to play a constructive role in Sudan and Burma? How would they conduct relations with Taiwan?

NONPROLIFERATION Mr. Bush tore up arms control treaties, offered to sell civilian nuclear technology to India, then wondered why so many countries weren't more outraged by Iran's nuclear misbehavior. Do the candidates have practical plans to halt the spread of nuclear weapons? Would they commit to deep cuts in America's nuclear arsenal, forswear the development of new nuclear weapons, and persuade the Russians to do the same? If the candidates see nuclear energy as a way to control global warming, how would they ensure that its spread does not lead to the spread of nuclear weapons?

RUSSIA President Vladimir Putin has crushed rivals, closed most independent news organizations and all but extinguished hopes for democracy. Washington needs Moscow's cooperation on a host of dangerous issues. How would the candidates manage relations with an increasingly autocratic and increasingly powerful Russia?

DEFENSE SPENDING The United States' annual military budget is now about $500 billion, with nearly $200 billion more for Iraq and Afghanistan. That is a 62 percent increase in overall defense spending during Mr. Bush's tenure. And there is no relief in sight. The American military -- in terms of both its people and equipment -- is badly strained. Even a new president committed to a swift withdrawal from Iraq will have to keep asking for large budgets to repair the damage and ensure that the country is ready to face new dangers.

There will have to be tradeoffs. What weapons systems would the candidates cancel? What new acquisitions would they seek? Should the Pentagon make nation-building a prime mission? Should the State Department play a larger role in postconflict reconstruction?

USE OF FORCE All presidents rightly reserve the right to take military action to protect the national interest. What has Iraq taught the candidates about the use of force? Do they believe in pre-emption or the use of preventive force? What about humanitarian interventions?

TERRORISM Is the war on terrorism a military fight? Should it even be called a war? How would the candidates improve America's intelligence capabilities and elicit more cooperation around the world? What would they do to oust Al Qaeda from Pakistan? How would they ensure Pakistan's cooperation while also pressing for democratic reforms that are essential for its long-term stability? What is their strategy to stop the Taliban and Al Qaeda from regaining control in Afghanistan?

MIDDLE EAST It is far too little and very late, but President Bush finally launched an Israeli-Palestinian peace initiative. What should the United States, Israel, the Palestinians and Arab states be doing to increase the chances of success? Given that Hamas controls Gaza, is a two-state solution with Israel and Palestine really viable? How can the United States both protect Israel and encourage it to negotiate a peace settlement?

IRAN Iran continues to defy the United Nations Security Council by enriching uranium -- the hardest part of building a bomb. How clear and present is the danger? What are the candidates willing to offer Iran in exchange for giving up its nuclear efforts? If Iran shows no interest, are there realistic military options? Must Iran also cut all support for Hezbollah and Hamas? Can Iran be contained without a military confrontation?

NORTH KOREA Since Mr. Bush took office, Pyongyang has tested a nuclear device and produced enough fuel for 10 or more nuclear weapons. Now a deal to dismantle its nuclear program appears to have stalled. Would the candidates continue those negotiations, offer additional incentives to speed up denuclearization or look for new ways to pressure Pyongyang?

On Iraq, there are still many unanswered questions. Most of the discussion during the campaign has been stuck on the past (who supported the war or not). Voters need to know more about what the candidates would do from their first day in office. Whether they plan to stay or leave, how would they accelerate political reconciliation there? What would they do to ensure that Iraq's chaos does not spill beyond its borders? Americans deserve to hear the candidates' answers, long before they go to the polls.

Posted by: Loomis | February 20, 2008 11:37 AM | Report abuse

The whole point of my blog is to explicate Maureen Dowd's trivial pop cultural references. Thanks for noticing.

Posted by: Mo MoDo | February 20, 2008 11:47 AM | Report abuse

I think I can still, technically, say "good morning." Got home at 2:30 am from my monthly late "night." Ugh. This is a second monthly cycle I'm not too fond of.

RD... welcome home. I'm glad you found peace and comfort in the rituals of both the church and the bottle of chianti. Funerals really are for the living, aren't they?

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2008 11:51 AM | Report abuse

SCC: This is a monthly late-night work deadline. Work.

That is all.

Posted by: TBG | February 20, 2008 11:52 AM | Report abuse

Here's a 'Holy Smoke' memory. The altar boy was lighting the extremely tall candles at the very top of the altar. One was especially hard to light. He kept trying, but after he thought he was successful and turned away to light the others, it would go out, so he kept returning to it. He was, I could tell, feeling uncomfortably aware that all eyes were on him. So, giving it his all, he succeeded in lighting it. He did it so well, however, that the wall behind the candle was lighted as well and began to burn. He turned as we all gasped in unison to see it start to climb a bit up the wall.

To our surprise, there was a watering can under the skirt of the altar; he pulled it out, poured the water on the wall, smothered it with something and put the fire out. The priest came out and the Mass commenced.

Later that year, the priest, a first cousin of JFK, ran away with a senior girl at our parish high school.

We never found out any further details.

Posted by: Maggie O'D | February 20, 2008 11:59 AM | Report abuse

bc, here's the first two graphs of the satellite story you just linked to:

"WASHINGTON -- High seas in the north Pacific may force the Navy to wait another day before launching a heat-seeking missile on a mission to shoot down a wayward U.S. spy satellite, the Pentagon said Wednesday.

"Weather conditions are one of many factors that U.S. military officers are taking into account as they decide whether to proceed with the mission Wednesday or to put it off, according to a senior military officer who briefed reporters at the Pentagon on condition that he not be identified."

Um, now here's the part that worries me: we can only shoot down incoming bad stuff if the weather's nice? Suppose it was an ICBM? We gonna put WWIII on hold until the sun comes out? We d@mn sure better have near-all-weather capability. No, I don't expect to be able to launch in the middle of a typhoon (pace the flick "Marooned," when Gregory Peck launches a rescue mission through the eye of a hurricane).

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2008 11:59 AM | Report abuse

Don't worry, we completely understood the first time, TBG, bless your heart.

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 20, 2008 12:04 PM | Report abuse

Welcome back Mr. Padouk.
I had a short career as an altar boy too. Never had an embarrassing with the bells but I had a fit of sneezing while I was on censer duty. I was big enough and strong enough to swing the thing one-handed but just barely as I retrieved a kleenex. One female colleague (altar girl?) wasn't so lucky, she took a dive with the cruets while taking up the steps to the altar. Major mass disruption ensued. The vicar, a very known jer@, wasn't helping at all.

Posted by: shrieking denizen | February 20, 2008 12:05 PM | Report abuse

kbertocci, Jumper started it, not me.

Posted by: omni | February 20, 2008 12:13 PM | Report abuse

Re. incoming:

Mudge, you still know how to "duck and cover," don't you?

And I *know* you know that our ability to knock out inbound ICBMs is, er, *marginal* at best. Particularly if there are multiple launches of ICBMs with MIRVs that have defensive/evasive capabilites (I guess they's be "not-so-BMs" then, wouldn't they?).

Duck and cover, baby.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 20, 2008 12:16 PM | Report abuse

Glad the mass was fillfuling, RD, and lovely description. I've rarely if ever been aware of the bells at a mass.

Sometimes it is quite comforting to be reminded of sacred space.


Posted by: WIlbrod | February 20, 2008 12:20 PM | Report abuse

Welcome home, Padouk. I'm sorry for your trouble, but your description of the beautiful mass and the wine-drinking-with-sibs was lovely. Also, your insights in the reconciliation of the past are so welcome.

Posted by: Yoki | February 20, 2008 12:23 PM | Report abuse

Snuke, are you a geography bee before?

Posted by: daiwanlan | February 20, 2008 12:27 PM | Report abuse

RD, so glad you're back, and your description of the service is beautiful. I've never been to a Catholic service before. I'm happy you found some comfort in the service, and your memories.

As you can see, things are pretty much the same here. *sigh*

Posted by: cassandra s | February 20, 2008 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Welcome back, RD, and sorry to hear about your loss.

About the missile and our satellite--

I find it ironic that we were so teed off at China for using a ballistic missile to shoot down their satellite just a few short months ago. The US gummint cited concerns such as orbital debris that could affect our satellites and space station as well as the worry that China could go on the offensive and shoot down others' satellites. But all of that stuff is no concern if we want to do it. And we are left saying, "What's your problem, world?"

Posted by: Gomer | February 20, 2008 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Buzz buzz, daiwanlan... :-)

Actually, I just remember that little factoid from a back-of-the-magazine quiz decades ago, in OMNI. No kidding, omni!

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2008 12:36 PM | Report abuse

> I am extremely tired this morning. I left for the rally at 9:10 a.m., but (cut) I didn't leave (cut) until 5 p.m.

Let's see. If you added an hour for lunch and more for commute time, you'd almost be working.

Posted by: CC | February 20, 2008 12:37 PM | Report abuse

New kit!

Posted by: jack | February 20, 2008 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Shuttle's home safe, too...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/20/AR2008022000386.html?hpid=moreheadlines

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 20, 2008 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Has this made news back East? The sky fell yesterday in Oregon.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/120347791474910.xml&coll=7&thispage=1

Posted by: bh | February 20, 2008 12:51 PM | Report abuse

Omni, it's okay, so long as I have the last word on all things "southernmost."

"Southernmost Boodler," that handle's still available...hmmmm....but since the A-blog is global, that wouldn't work, I guess. As soon as I started using it, someone would chime in from Patagonia, or Antarctica. Never mind.

Posted by: kbertocci | February 20, 2008 1:09 PM | Report abuse

LL, those are all good foreign policy questions in your 11:37 post. The only problem with them is that I (and I submit most voters of either party) don't need to know the answers to any of them, nor, indeed to any policy and issues questions whatsoever. There's just no way I'm gonna vote for John McCain, a conservative Republican, over Barack Obama OR Hillary, two moderate and/or liberal Dems. I suspect a healthy plurality of voters (if not a slim majority) pretty much make up their minds based on factors NOT relating to answers to specific policy questions.

If one understands that Candidate X is, say, a liberal or a moderate or a conservative, or a neocon, or a pragmatist, or whatever generalized criteria you want to apply, then one can make a relatively informed decision which one you agreee with on broad questions and general philosophy. I really don't need to know what Obama has learned about the use of force in Iraq. If I don't like his answer very much, what am I gonna do? Vote for Ralph Freaking Nader?

No. I submit that it is reasonable to make generalized assumptions about candidates without having to delve into the minutiae of their position papers, as you seem to enjoy doing.

Sure, some independents in the vague, undifferentiated middle might be wavering back and forth, but I'm not one of them, and neither are you, so I don't understand what all this sturm and drang is about.

I don't need to read a single thing about McCain except the headline to know that he claims he's not gonna raise taxes. I could have predicted that well before he made the announcement, and so could you, and so could any of us here on the boodle. That ain't exactly a shocker, now, is it? I don't need to read one solitary word of his position on Iraq beyond the bumper-sticker sound bite to know I'm not in agreement with him. It's not rocket science, LL.

And Obama might very well hold some position somewhere in his repertoire that I might not agree with. So what? Do I need to ferret it out and pick at it like an old sore? No. Same thing with Hillary. I know her general, overall position on things; I don't need to read her position paper on prescription drugs, or reforming medicare, or funding for education, to decide if I'm gonna vote for her.

You can raise all the excellent questions you want to, as that NYT piece has done. But they are pretty much irrelevant.

Posted by: Curmudgeon | February 20, 2008 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, just as well you didn't read her position papers-- I did, as part of my disability issue research. (Didn't change my mind on who I'd vote for, really).

In short, too much Hillaryism is bad for the editorial/writing soul. Seriously.

Posted by: Wilbrod | February 20, 2008 1:39 PM | Report abuse

Did Mudge kill the blogsphericer?

Posted by: bh | February 20, 2008 10:55 PM | Report abuse

What a cute site you have here.
I can tell that you have put a lot of time and work into it.
Great job!
fioricet online
http://fioricetbuyfior.blog.ijijiji.com

Posted by: fioricet | February 21, 2008 2:28 PM | Report abuse

What a cute site you have here.
I can tell that you have put a lot of time and work into it.
Great job!
fioricet online
http://fioricetbuyfior.blog.ijijiji.com

Posted by: fioricet | February 21, 2008 2:29 PM | Report abuse

What a cute site you have here.
I can tell that you have put a lot of time and work into it.
Great job!
fioricet online
http://fioricetbuyfior.blog.ijijiji.com

Posted by: fioricet | February 21, 2008 2:31 PM | Report abuse

violoerzelt

Posted by: paslazel | February 21, 2008 4:52 PM | Report abuse

as3nexyxj1myhli tmr8skbyl3 [URL=http://www.293033.com/1047791.html] vu99tewrkr [/URL] s1v4mqis1pc4d5f

Posted by: x0acuq6os9 | February 25, 2008 10:10 AM | Report abuse

1iyy1pu9 http://www.981814.com/913958.html 9r0c4eo2ogn1g6

Posted by: fk2xa3gadk | February 27, 2008 8:27 AM | Report abuse

4u26ff66l6 [URL=http://www.412755.com/1037790.html] 7fa1ttwyx510x83 [/URL] mctxvitjuk4gg

Posted by: h0pag6f8m1 | February 27, 2008 8:44 AM | Report abuse

hn39x1vi1u [URL=http://www.1064512.com/709718.html] 5qcwtl2jj [/URL] lng5zf2ceb0

Posted by: 1h7iebn598 | February 27, 2008 10:03 AM | Report abuse

gmow5nvx http://www.529340.com/717620.html n7f05smcwlq7oijy

Posted by: tmb257jr4n | February 27, 2008 10:11 AM | Report abuse

afty64w cool site!!! [url=http://seroitu1.com]cool site!!![/url] http://seroitu2.com rtj5653

Posted by: seroitu | February 28, 2008 9:39 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | February 29, 2008 6:38 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | February 29, 2008 6:38 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | February 29, 2008 6:38 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | February 29, 2008 6:39 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 1, 2008 5:40 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 1, 2008 5:41 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 1, 2008 5:41 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 1, 2008 5:41 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 3, 2008 9:39 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 3, 2008 9:39 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 3, 2008 9:40 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 3, 2008 9:40 PM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/top-100-us-sites/web/yahoo-com

Posted by: yahoo | March 5, 2008 2:59 AM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/top-100-us-sites/web/yahoo-com

Posted by: yahoo | March 5, 2008 3:36 AM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/top-100-us-sites/web/yahoo-com

Posted by: yahoo | March 5, 2008 3:50 AM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/top-100-us-sites/web/yahoo-com

Posted by: yahoo | March 5, 2008 4:00 AM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/Our-aqtsn-group-1/web/malaysia-airlines - malaysia airlines

Posted by: airlines | March 5, 2008 2:17 PM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/Our-aqtsn-group-1/web/southwestern-airlines - southwestern airlines

Posted by: airlines | March 5, 2008 2:56 PM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/Our-aqtsn-group-1/web/hawaii-airlines - hawaii airlines

Posted by: airlines | March 5, 2008 3:09 PM | Report abuse

http://groups.google.com/group/Our-aqtsn-group-1/web/turkish-airlines - turkish airlines

Posted by: airlines | March 5, 2008 3:18 PM | Report abuse

7dmv6e58elwzl a0rdz7p6gtizwb 0si0394b3dj56c

Posted by: mmnyviybwz | March 6, 2008 7:34 AM | Report abuse

r9lxf4g2 4ed7u8uaui2eh [URL=http://www.903170.com/712543.html] k6zsq6wm [/URL] 72ruw313zd2

Posted by: 1aolcmr1pd | March 6, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:46 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:46 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:46 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:46 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:46 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:47 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:47 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:47 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:47 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:50 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:54 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:54 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:54 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 7, 2008 5:54 AM | Report abuse

warqnhreexbmpfp tv3cweu4dkjs [URL=http://www.1028726.com/539399.html] kyvf1yjvu [/URL] 1qdfkb50jnq

Posted by: htnybd9y9g | March 13, 2008 7:24 AM | Report abuse

npzyyuhbz8fz9 s3rrtwsg [URL=http://www.730571.com/566882.html] pz5jf0s3vmfd [/URL] lchu8gen4

Posted by: zhzrfet6os | March 13, 2008 7:26 AM | Report abuse

u87prl8wjn7e8f 08b83rnsyka [URL=http://www.596729.com/278341.html] azhl9tke43saxmonb [/URL] kmw076vp3a6kxt0z

Posted by: r79me1gllz | March 13, 2008 7:31 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:40 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:41 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:41 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:41 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:41 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:42 PM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 13, 2008 10:42 PM | Report abuse

elshdbfy4fp n0oz8syb7c [URL=http://www.815190.com/1089282.html] epp2g1yo4vzzczax4 [/URL] 15mr50dv2b3q7h

Posted by: d1ekk4mx83 | March 14, 2008 4:50 AM | Report abuse

elshdbfy4fp http://www.389705.com/377076.html 15mr50dv2b3q7h

Posted by: d1ekk4mx83 | March 14, 2008 4:51 AM | Report abuse

c8xfxje4wrdspvs 8usv4beob [URL=http://www.171754.com/1097350.html] 2yl3wxcy [/URL] f6hhzibl6sk99

Posted by: xpn4h0fmwk | March 14, 2008 5:42 AM | Report abuse

c8xfxje4wrdspvs urieoveoudd20s5 f6hhzibl6sk99

Posted by: xpn4h0fmwk | March 14, 2008 5:43 AM | Report abuse

r3qspb43ecvpo02n [URL=http://www.858295.com/790513.html] v30z3ks8g4u [/URL] mk8tga2x6t

Posted by: 7c9e8z0iv2 | March 14, 2008 6:00 AM | Report abuse

r3qspb43ecvpo02n a275dx8g6 mk8tga2x6t

Posted by: 7c9e8z0iv2 | March 14, 2008 6:01 AM | Report abuse

fjlgqax23dg9v [URL=http://www.873733.com/709099.html] isive7017h967 [/URL] uz5d3rvt8

Posted by: 0dtn831cfc | March 17, 2008 3:03 AM | Report abuse

fjlgqax23dg9v qwn9hg6fm9ier5 uz5d3rvt8

Posted by: 0dtn831cfc | March 17, 2008 3:05 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 18, 2008 2:01 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 18, 2008 2:02 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 18, 2008 2:02 AM | Report abuse

molbmetu0uer 08adx8ll [URL=http://www.565522.com/250041.html] gxfoqoshv [/URL] 69pjkkikxr

Posted by: lqrw4nu1dq | March 18, 2008 3:36 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:49 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:50 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:50 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:50 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:50 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:51 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:51 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:51 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:51 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:51 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:51 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:55 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:55 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:55 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:55 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:55 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:59 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:59 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 1:59 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 21, 2008 2:00 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 23, 2008 6:08 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 23, 2008 6:08 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 23, 2008 6:09 AM | Report abuse

MESSAGE

Posted by: ISHMAel back | March 23, 2008 6:09 AM | Report abuse

mvdx nuqtxkb odkbysu fbapc tnlmrs mqdak tvyc

Posted by: qniujcwk muxpojsd | April 6, 2008 1:51 PM | Report abuse

fqblki bmyhe wlaqprkyi nbua htjbai kpmyv tescw http://www.vzqxmw.pklj.com

Posted by: ietjndwl njdgm | April 6, 2008 1:51 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!!
http://young-porn.greatapproved.in young porn

Posted by: young porn | April 8, 2008 7:11 AM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks!!!
http://porn-midget.brige.us porn midget

Posted by: porn midget | April 8, 2008 10:20 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!
http://filme-porn.brige.us filme porn

Posted by: filme porn | April 9, 2008 12:28 AM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!
http://filme-porn.brige.us filme porn

Posted by: filme porn | April 9, 2008 12:29 AM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks!!!
http://filme-cu-sex.brige.us filme cu sex

Posted by: filme cu sex | April 9, 2008 2:26 AM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks!!!
http://filme-cu-sex.brige.us filme cu sex

Posted by: filme cu sex | April 9, 2008 2:27 AM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!
http://hentai-top-100.brige.us hentai top 100

Posted by: hentai top 100 | April 9, 2008 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!
http://hentai-top-100.brige.us hentai top 100

Posted by: hentai top 100 | April 9, 2008 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks.
http://mysekstv.brige.us mysekstv

Posted by: mysekstv | April 9, 2008 6:10 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks.
http://mysekstv.brige.us mysekstv

Posted by: mysekstv | April 9, 2008 6:11 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks.
http://mallu-adult.brige.us mallu adult

Posted by: mallu adult | April 9, 2008 6:57 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!!
http://arabsex.brige.us arabsex

Posted by: arabsex | April 9, 2008 7:17 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!!
http://arabsex.brige.us arabsex

Posted by: arabsex | April 9, 2008 7:17 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!
http://vulva-photo.brige.us vulva photo

Posted by: vulva photo | April 9, 2008 7:41 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thank you!!
http://vulva-photo.brige.us vulva photo

Posted by: vulva photo | April 9, 2008 7:42 PM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks!!!
http://keralaerotic.rapigo.net keralaerotic

Posted by: keralaerotic | April 10, 2008 11:32 AM | Report abuse

Useful site. Thanks!!!
http://keralaerotic.rapigo.net keralaerotic

Posted by: keralaerotic | April 10, 2008 11:33 AM | Report abuse

http://geo.ya.com/kotimare/ preved

Posted by: scuko | April 12, 2008 5:51 AM | Report abuse

http://geo.ya.com/kotimare/ preved

Posted by: scuko | April 12, 2008 5:52 AM | Report abuse

http://geo.ya.com/kotimare/ preved

Posted by: scuko | April 12, 2008 5:53 AM | Report abuse

http://geo.ya.com/kotimare/ bleper

Posted by: duchos | April 21, 2008 7:46 AM | Report abuse

[/url] [URL=http://[/URL] [url=[/url] http://
[url=http://[/url] http://
[/url] [URL=http://[/URL] [url=[/url] http://
[url=http://[/url] http://

Posted by: Lorgeaxofedor | May 8, 2008 3:44 AM | Report abuse

hwty lcnmva wadkc
http://cerita.ridzel.biz cerita
http://porn-youtube.ridzel.biz porn youtube

Posted by: porn youtube | May 10, 2008 8:31 PM | Report abuse

upvsz epzcbt euag
http://kambikatha.ridzel.biz kambikatha

Posted by: kambikatha | May 12, 2008 3:38 AM | Report abuse

upvsz epzcbt euag
http://kambikatha.ridzel.biz kambikatha

Posted by: kambikatha | May 12, 2008 3:38 AM | Report abuse

michael jackson music video michael jackson music video [link=http://limorgalili.com/admin/backup/dump/text-1588.html]michael jackson music video[/link]

Posted by: michael jackson music video | August 16, 2008 7:36 PM | Report abuse

playboy cheerleaders playboy cheerleaders [link=http://limorgalili.com/admin/backup/dump/text-1175.html]playboy cheerleaders[/link]

Posted by: playboy cheerleaders | August 16, 2008 7:37 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company