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Many Earths Needed

In the boodle last night, foxn wrote:

"...the answer from the left seems to be mostly centered on Conservation. I've been a bike commuter for 20 years, my wife commutes a compressed schedule in a hybrid civic, we live in a medium sized house (~3K sq ft) in a very walkable neighborhood, have every light not on a dimmer using a compact florescent, shop at our local farmers market, have a summer vegetable garden, never turn the heat above 68, and don't have AC (full disclosure: we're in Seattle where temps above 80 constitute a heat wave, and we have no concept of humidity without precipitation so no one has AC). When I plugged all of our numbers into a carbon footprint calculator we still came back needing 2.5 Earths to sustain the entire population at our rate of consumption. Adjusting the numbers down about as far as I'd be willing to go with out being forced, I still couldn't get that much below 2 Earths. So unless we want to keep the rest of the world in poverty, we can't simply conserve our way out if this."

Dear foxn: I think I'm about a 75-Earth guy myself.

I'm trying to cut my energy consumption down to the level where, if everyone lived like me, we'd only need, say, two score planets. Or a score and a half. That's 30 by my count. Right now in the carbon-emission-reducing department I'm handicapped by the fact that I don't have any hobbies other than motoring. I'm a fanatical aficionado of compulsive and obsessive motoring. I can't relax until I'm doing about 75 on the highway, steering with one finger.

I will spare you details of my motoring history other than to say that I have owned two cars that have gotten gas mileage that seemed to be in the single digits. The '67 Mercury Monterey, purchased for $400 in San Diego for the sole purpose of having transportation during a Spring Break with some buddies -- it had a dysfunctional muffler, but we got an extension welded on in a garage in Mexicali for $3 -- may have put a scare in 10 miles a gallon but I wouldn't swear to it. This was the car that only went straight or to the right. Day-glo bug painted on the hood. Eventually I scrapped it for $75. Total carbon footprint of the Mercury may have been equal to that of Belize.

Then I had the '64 Cadillac Coupe de Ville convertible, which by itself kept several refineries in operation. I would have looked devastatingly suave behind the wheel of this great red beast had I been not so flamboyantly twerpy.

I am definitely going to start conserving energy, though, because I care about the environment, a lot. For example I'm going to start leg-trapping whatever wanders into the yard, to cut back on trips to the grocery store.

(By the way, I like the sound of the short commute on the "compressed schedule," whatever that is. Is that like leaving work early? Sign me up!!!)

--

This Clay Shirky essay on newspapers has caused a lot of buzz. I think he's wrong. I hope he's wrong!

--

Dr. Monce, who I mentioned in my item yesterday, has a reply, via Quark Soup. Excerpt:

"...if a climatologist had an opinion on a new finding in atomic physics, yes I would be skeptical. However, any scientist should always approach any new finding with some skepticism; that's our job. New findings must be verified independently by other researchers, and even then we may continue to try and find holes... that's what drives science. However, maybe that climatologist may have a different insight into the atomic physics finding that would be useful. Here's the real point as an example of how science really works: even today we are trying to find flaws in Einstein's work. Why? Because by finding the flaws we learn more about how nature runs. Wasn't it a physicist (Alvarez) who came up with the idea of the asteroid/comet impact extinction of the dinosaurs? Cross disciplinary discoveries do happen and are often met, appropriately, with great skepticism. However, such discoveries, when verified, lead to greater understanding of nature."

Just fyi, I would hardly be one to say that non-experts shouldn't weigh on scientific matters since I do that all the time and don't know diddly-squat about anything. But I do think we should not blandly assume that anyone who is a scientist is necessarily an expert on anything involving science. Yes, Luis Alvarez was a physicist -- but he was smart enough when doing his K/T boundary work to partner with his son, Walter, a geologist.

By Joel Achenbach  |  March 31, 2009; 6:15 PM ET
 
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Comments

I think "compressed schedules" might mean only working four 10-hour days, Joel.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 6:32 PM | Report abuse

Cofffee eases pain...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20090331/sc_livescience/coffeelessensthepainofexercise

Is this effect because the pain is psychosomatic as in thinking of exercise as like, work?

Because you know, exercise isn't normally supposed to hurt. What are those people doing, running Klingon pain-stick circuits?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 6:35 PM | Report abuse

I was feeling all virtuous about reducing my carbon footprint with the move and lack of commuting, etc. But its probably still way out of line. *Sigh*

Nonetheless I like this Kit very much, for its tone as much as anything.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 7:00 PM | Report abuse

I assure you, Wilbrod, that if you exercise as little as I do, it *always* hurts.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 7:04 PM | Report abuse

With my coffee consumption - I should be able to live pain free - or does it only work if you exercise.

Posted by: dmd2 | March 31, 2009 7:06 PM | Report abuse

I do jog better on a full tank, so...

Posted by: Scottynuke | March 31, 2009 7:20 PM | Report abuse

OhfertheluvvaPete...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/31/AR2009033103219.html

Maybe the White House should simply require nominees to post a bond into an "oops" account??? *rolling my eyes*

Posted by: Scottynuke | March 31, 2009 7:23 PM | Report abuse

You sure 'carbon footprint' doesn't have something to do with these?

http://captivate-indulge.blogspot.com/2008/09/diamond-and-sapphire-shoes-by-stuart.html

Posted by: LostInThought | March 31, 2009 7:33 PM | Report abuse

Love the 2008 40's retro shoes.

Posted by: dmd2 | March 31, 2009 7:39 PM | Report abuse

Oh, thanks, LiT. Now shoe envy will spoil the rest of my evening!

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 7:40 PM | Report abuse

I find it hurts more when I don't exercise, myself.

I'm just puzzled at what level of pain is the issue... discomfort, such as a blister or a hangnail ? Legs on fire? Crushing chest pain? I'd be convinced if the study quoted some pain measurements so we knew what kind of pain was decreased.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 8:20 PM | Report abuse

"flamboyantly twerpy" is available as a boodle handle, for cheap.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | March 31, 2009 8:20 PM | Report abuse

House just used an MRI machine on a corpse with bullet frags in his head. All I can think of is 'Mudges anchor tale. heh. hehheh.

Do goats bleat?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/01/dining/01goat.html?_r=1&hp

All I know about goats is that they do a wonderful job of dispensing with kudzu infestations.

Posted by: -jack- | March 31, 2009 8:24 PM | Report abuse

Paradigm shifts are normally initiated by people who are new to the subject. Either they are young and inexperienced or older and not initimately familiar with it. Either way, they are not bound to the old ways of thinking and therefore can see facts that are invisible to the "experts."

This is very upsetting to experts, but that never stops a paradigm from shifting. Experts are often losers in the process, because they cannot be flexible to acknowledge and adapt to the new paradigm.

This is not to say that climatologists are wrong. From what I can tell, they are flexible and trying to create a paradigm that fits the observed data, to make sense of it and enable us to adapt appropriately.

But let's not be stupid and fail to listen to what they are telling us. We must change, and do it rather quickly. I remember being astounded by a statement of the head of ExxonMobil, IIRC, who said that we will always need oil. Really? We still need buggy whips, too.

Posted by: slyness | March 31, 2009 8:41 PM | Report abuse

That is perhaps the best and most wittily-written treatise on goat-in-the-city I've ever read, jack. Many thanks.

No mention of vindaloo, though.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 8:42 PM | Report abuse

Depends what kind of bullets. Standard-issue bullets are lead -- non-magnetic. That's why you can get an MRI on your head without ripping out your fillings. Which would hurt. More than all the coffee in the world could help you with.

On the other hand, steel-jacketed armor-piercing bullets would be a problem. But, then, a steel-jacketed armor-piercing bullet would not have fragmented in the guy's head.

Game, set, match go to the writers of House.

Posted by: ScienceTim | March 31, 2009 8:44 PM | Report abuse

They did say it was the pain of exercise, so I'm thinking 'legs on fire' rather than 'arm in wood chipper' pain.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Actually, I would agree with Mr. ExxonMobil. Petroleum is a source material for the chemicals industry, it's essential to modern fertilizer production, most plastics are petrochemical, and we use lots of petroleum-based lubricants in machinery. Lots of uses besides burning it. The $64-trillion question is, *how much* oil will we always need?

New guys shift paradigms, but they don't do it by authority -- they do it by hard work. Climate scientists have a rich literature that expresses the processes and reasoning that have brought them to the current broad consensus. It will take a powerful and incisive piece of scientific reasoning to cut that Gordian knot, more than a declaration (however eloquent) that "it's all hogwash." I agree with Dr. Monce that skeptics and doubters deserve a respectful hearing, but respect (and ears) get withdrawn if it turns out that the 'new ideas' are really just old ideas whose well-documented refutation the skeptics chose not to read. That is why evolutionary scientists refuse to debate the 'ideas' of creationists and intelligent-design 'theorists.' Dr. Huxley did all that heavy lifting a hundred years ago, more recently assisted by Dr. Gould: "Come back and state your arguments after you've spent some productive time in the library, guys."

Posted by: ScienceTim | March 31, 2009 9:02 PM | Report abuse

Similarly, when Larry Summers was Prexy of Hahvahd, he stuck his foot in his mouth with his radical new hypothesis that maybe men are recognized for excellence in various intellectual fields because men produce more persons of statistical-outlying excellence than women (as well as, he would also have to posit, more persons of astounding stupidity), whereas women are more middle-of-the road, neither exceptionally smart nor exceptionally stupid, just nice, safe, and comfortingly average. Radical.

Except, of course, that that had been the essential mold for women's prescribed role in society for a thousand years or more, since intellectual capability became a publicly-recognized attribute. That made "smart men tend to be smarter than smart women" the null hypothesis that any new theory would have to address. The null hypothesis, I think, was soundly rejected decades ago. The fact that Larry Summers had not chosen to acquaint himself with the available popular literature of one of the principal social revolutions of the latter twentieth century (the others being the overturning of officially-endorsed racism and religious prejudice) did not excuse him for lecturing professionals with the kind of idea that is more appropriate to a freshman seminar debate, where ignorance is excusable.

Posted by: ScienceTim | March 31, 2009 9:17 PM | Report abuse

Hey, if you subscribe to the Many-Worlds Interpretations of quantum mechanics, there could be a practically infnite number of Earths to sustain, well, everyone. Presumably, everyone could have their own Earth if they wanted to, to conserve or squander as they saw fit.

Maybe instead of trying to address change the weather and divert this Earth's thermal inertia, maybe we should be developing devices to Slide between all of those branching 'verses.

But instead of calling 'em 'EPR bridges' or whatever they did on that TV show, I'd suspect that we'd end up calling them "lifeboats."

Oh, and if you're Sliding between 'verses run into Mr. Spock with a goatee, my advice would be to move on to the next one. [Maybe hold out for the one where Dick Cheney wears a goatee...]

bc

Posted by: -bc- | March 31, 2009 9:17 PM | Report abuse

Of course, having just mouthed off for a while, I have to admit: my impression that rigorous work long ago refuted Larry Summers' "theory" is merely what I have picked up from the zeitgeist. I really should look up some of that available popular literature and verify for myself that the null hypothesis has been rejected by serious statistical analysis.

Posted by: ScienceTim | March 31, 2009 9:21 PM | Report abuse

John Mellencamp on Fresh Air.
Such stories...
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=102517146

Posted by: DNA_Girl | March 31, 2009 9:26 PM | Report abuse

Sliding between verses? Sort of like studying LIterature. Only, like, more cosmic.

The very thought makes me vertiginous. Please send smelling salts.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 9:59 PM | Report abuse

*Tim, I was going to write something about needing petroleum for many essential things besides fuel, and you pretty much covered it.

There will come a time, I think, when people look back on the 20th century with a certain nostalgia. A time when (to paraphrase and riff on Dennis Leary) steak-eating, cigar-smoking, handgun-toting, lawn-mower-riding atomic-bomb wielding, beer-swilling, Wall-Street-loving, golf-playing, excess-driven, Americans roamed the Earth in plaid shorts, behind the wheels of gas-guzzling, waste-spewing, 5000 lb. Belchfire Dreadnaught V-8s. [replaced every fall with a New Model.]

"Ah, the good old days," those nostalgic folks will say as they look at the Life Magazine Norman Rockwell paintings hanging over their bars, thinking to themselves that they missed the 20th century party.

Maybe they did. Or maybe - just maybe - a better, more mature one will be starting soon.

But first, there appears to be some cleanup to do to get ready for it.

And, um, *who* are these people passed out on the living room floor?

bc

Posted by: -bc- | March 31, 2009 10:03 PM | Report abuse

I'd add here that I approve of LiT's carbon footprint.

And I'm wondering if I can convince Weitzman to make gladiator sandals.

Sorry about the vertigo, Yoki.
Faxing smelling salts to ya, with a recommendation that you may want to refrain from looking too closely at Hubble Deep Field images, too.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hubble_ultra_deep_field_high_rez_edit1.jpg

[Warning: just about everything you see in this image - made of a tiny fraction of the sky - is an entire galaxy. Worlds without end, indeed.]

bc

Posted by: -bc- | March 31, 2009 10:14 PM | Report abuse

Power boodling here:

In college a Mexican restaurant, ironically called the US Bar and Grille, opened up near my apartment. It introduced me to two delicacies I still enjoy on the rare occasions I can find them: goat meat and Tecate beer. Not necessarily together, but fine separately as well.

In 'The Gods Themselves' Isaac Asimov imagined a world where differences in the laws of physics between universe can create infinite energy, in the short run. He also invents phase-shifting tri-sexual aliens.

The odd part of the Sibelus tax scandal is that they a) sold a house in 2006 for less than the mortgage, well before the current housing bust and b) continued to make payments and deduct interest they no longer owed. I need someone to explain that one to me.

And I really had to stay away from the mohel discussion. In all the debate over male circumcision, I find the argument over decreased sexual pleasure the least convincing. If there were more pleasure to be had, I would be functionally incapacitated. I'll let you connect the dots there.

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Hey wait a minute. This screen came up with the old preregistration for blogging stuff. Open screen and all, so I get to be me!

dr

Posted by: --dr-- | March 31, 2009 10:21 PM | Report abuse

Yello, I've read your last paragraph three times, and I'm still giggling helplessly.

Posted by: slyness | March 31, 2009 10:28 PM | Report abuse

Petroleum is too valuable to burn. We're going to find that out someday.

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 10:29 PM | Report abuse

Or maybe not. I don't know, I did not open my window, I did nothing but sip my beverage. Right... that might just be the problem.

The boys have just left with the truckful of 'big' things, dressers, beds, guitars (How many guitars does a house have? Thousands and thousands, only second I am sure to the achen-bro). This moving stuff is fun when you don't have to do a thing.

The samll stuff will go tomorrow, and then I'll have a nice BIG bottle of sumthing specail, and I shall sorrow just the smallest bit before rejoicing that the house is once again, mine and mrdr's all by our selves.

Launched and changing the locks? Nah, the back door is always open anyway.

Posted by: --dr-- | March 31, 2009 10:33 PM | Report abuse

Way way too much information about something that did not need to be shared and nobody wants to know.

Some things are private, and should stay that way.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 10:36 PM | Report abuse

SCC I object to the spelling of my last,darn it, but just remember I am celebrating here.

Posted by: --dr-- | March 31, 2009 10:38 PM | Report abuse

I recollect that Luis Alvarez was at first unimpressed by stratigraphers, then gradually realized that they had certain competencies.

We normal mortals seem to expect brilliant physicists to do the Richard Feynman thing and see straight where mere specialists don't (as in the space shuttle's booster rockets).

Being an obsolete botanist, I can't critique climate scientists, but I do appreciate now that paleoecology is far more important than most supposed forty years ago. Our youthful Everglades have yielded up surprising information about how they developed and functioned; I certainly expect that peat bogs and ice cores from higher latitudes are yielding information crucial to understanding our near future.
____________

Personal greenness? My first two cars were Datsuns, followed by an Isuzu pickup (shoulda got a short-bed Chevy four wheel drive or, better yet, a Toyota). Kept a Geo Prizm twelve years. My Focus wagon is the most powerful car I've ever owned.

On the other hand, to live in Florida is to waste energy.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | March 31, 2009 10:48 PM | Report abuse

I'm proud of your spelling dr, you finally attained my standard. It may have taken a glass or two but it was worth it.

Yoki, you would make a very fine Mother Superior. Are you sure there ain't no woman with Catholic blood in their veins in your ancestors?

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | March 31, 2009 10:50 PM | Report abuse

slyness,
Thanks. At least somebody appreciates me.

Yoki,
Please remember that yellojkt is merely the one-line persona of a real person who may or may not act and behave the same way as the boodler of the same name. After all, nobody really believes bc regularly dresses up in gladiator skirts and coats himself with extra-virgin olive oil. Well, I have to believe he doesn't or otherwise at BPHs the unresolved sexual tension between us would make me functionally incapacitated.

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 10:52 PM | Report abuse

Not a one!

I think of my inner-self not so much as a Mother Superior (though I must tell you a story about the Mother House in Montreal one day) as a Librarian. There are rules, conventions, and I know 'em all.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 10:54 PM | Report abuse

DR, tears and a journey. To be sad and relieved and happy and triste at the same time; parenting requires this!

I laugh about the guitars. And, I bet that tomorrow, you find a sock that is not mrdr's.

Hard for me to talk about the climate stuff. Too tired and a bit sober about it all. To be aware of though is that the IPCC (Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change) represents about 15 years of work across many disciplines of at least 3700 rigorous thinkers.

What shall we do, vis a vis adaptation and mitigation? These question require our civil and sustained debate with an eye for action.

This quote from Teilhard may also apply to our long haul here:

“Someday after mastering winds, waves, tides and gravity, we shall harness the energies of love. And then, for the second time in the history of the world, man will discover fire.”

Toward the Future, London: Collins, 1975: 86-87.

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | March 31, 2009 10:55 PM | Report abuse

I enjoyed my days as an obsolete botanist. Don't sell yourself short, Dave. Someday, I want a 2 door Datsun 510. IIRC, that's the one that looked like a Grandma car, but had a Z engine. The 240 was great, too. when I drove my bro's Z, I pretended to be Paul Newman. Alas, just another geek.

Posted by: -jack- | March 31, 2009 10:55 PM | Report abuse

DotC,
When I lived in Florida I used to joke that my career was based on making the state habitable for Yankees. And that invariably involved the use of halogenated chlorofluorocarbons and all the environmental ramifications thereof.

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 10:56 PM | Report abuse

Likewise, I'm sure, yellojkt.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 10:57 PM | Report abuse

I've never owned a real gas guzzler but I have operated one. A huge v-8 powered dodgy product, it was outdated already in 1978 or so. It was a full time 4-wheel drive 4 doors thing with two ranges, low and high. I think it made around 6 mpg in low and 8 mpg in high but it could tow a house out of its foundation. We were under direct order not to go anywhere outside camp with that thing for fear to bankrupt the outfit with gas bills. It made an awesome manly rumble though.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | March 31, 2009 10:57 PM | Report abuse

Yoki,

If only. I know he only has eyes for another.

***sigh***

{long laboured and highly inaccurate Cyrano de Bergerac analogy deleted}

And to answer the unasked question, no, I have not been drinking tonight. Just feeling particularly silly.

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 11:08 PM | Report abuse

*Snort*

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 11:11 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I've already heard a "to clip the cigar or not to clip the cigar?" discussion once from a mom-to-be, and that was more than enough for a lifetime.

Yellojkt's comment is /mild/ in comparsion.

Speaking of intelligence being fluid, CqP might enjoy this article, even if it's over a year old.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=the-secret-to-raising-smart-kids



Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 11:12 PM | Report abuse

Good night, Boodle dear.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 11:13 PM | Report abuse

Sniffing April's approach--
Soon folly will spread on Earth
Not just in boodles...

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 11:16 PM | Report abuse

Oh, for pity's sake.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 11:17 PM | Report abuse

Good to know that by not breezing through grade school they are building their learning skills - but really a few gusts from time to time wouldn't hurt :-).

Posted by: dmd2 | March 31, 2009 11:25 PM | Report abuse

Precisely, Yoki. I knew you'd understand.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 11:25 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, WB; I appreciate that link. Martin Seligman is mentioned; he studies learned happiness and resilience.

The two-dimensional quality of text-based communication means that jokes can fall flat. I think, YJ, that you may be unaware that your 10:17 is not for all ears in a public setting. I believe you are more mannerly than that post would suggest. Just a thought and comment on the public nature of this text-world with a range of audiences.

Gnite, All, including Al (which I sometimes take as Artificial Intelligence).

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | March 31, 2009 11:26 PM | Report abuse

Actually I think the point is when the going gets tough, kids who are overpraised on their innate ability begin to doubt that, because they've never been told that yes, some things are hard even for the brightest people.

They also feel inhibited from asking for help or other measures to improve their learning because basically, they've been expected to learn without help just because they're so bright.

And I think that's a very good point to make. Often, what makes school easy for some kids is not innate talent, but good preparation.

The fewer skills they have to learn in a short space of time to accomplish an assignment effectively, the better they will fare, no matter their innate intelligence.

For instance, I can type fast and I know computers. I'm automatically ahead in typing papers in college relative to a student who has never used a computer before.

If students do not develop a sense of "I'll learn that when I come to it," they will find school much easier.

Because of the challenges I have figuring out technical subjects via interpreter, I often would do my reading in advance to be sure I could understand the vocabulary even through misspellings and confusions. I didn't have to know it all, but I had to know enough to understand and ask the right questions and get the information I needed somehow.

When this was not available to me, I failed miserably in one class. It was a perfect storm of no book, an intolerant and poor teacher, and an inexperienced interpreter, and other things.

That class was made much harder for me than it had to be by all reasonable standards. I wasn't able to fully analyze the factors, not when the teacher made it feel like it was my fault by his attitude.

I think teaching students to analyze how they learn is a good way for them to help troubleshoot when they're put in an inhospitable environment for their learning style-- be it simply bad teaching, or other factors.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 11:38 PM | Report abuse

jack,
To be precise, my first two cars were Datsun 510 wagons that looked like mini-Volvos and evidently handled like the BMWs of the day. The second one did not take well to Wyoming winters. Apart from that, they were simple, likable cars, though I'm happy to no longer use a choke.

Full sized pickups were appropriate to the open country of Wyoming; when I worked out of Gainesville, a boxy little Ford Bronco impressed by its ability to maneuver around obstacles and mudholes. These days, I daydream of FJ Cruisers and Xterras. Honda Fit is what the budget permits.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | March 31, 2009 11:43 PM | Report abuse

Hmm.

Managed to avoid the Olive Mohel discussion earlier through sheer luck, and would be smart to avoid this here thread, but would simply point this out to yellojkt:

Believe what you want, but ya never *really* know until you ask.

Especially after a few limoncello.

Oh, and don't ask if you don't want me to tell.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | March 31, 2009 11:45 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod,
I had a horrible time learning typing in high school. It was humbling.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | March 31, 2009 11:45 PM | Report abuse

And I dream of a red Fit, whilst driving a used 2002 Civic, base model, 189,000 km. Turn-crank windows, no amenities at all. And I like it.

Posted by: Yoki | March 31, 2009 11:48 PM | Report abuse

CqP,
I am well aware that my sense of humor, no matter how circumspect and oblique I think I am being, pushes the envelope for many of the increasingly prudish and easily offended boodlecrew, which is why I do appreciate the occasional nudging when I start working too blue. That said, I would hope we are all adults here.

Nothing I say in the boodle is more risque than what appears in the family hour of most broadcast networks. And while I know that my comments give some the vapours (and that is why The Bunker has a very nicely upholstered swoon couch complete with beautifully crocheted antimacassars), I work on the assumption that I amuse as many as I shock. I have to, else my life and self-esteem become as shaky as a fiddler on a roof.

Or a mohel in a Royal Deluxe II.

http://www.hulu.com/watch/2323/saturday-night-live-royal-deluxe-ii

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 11:50 PM | Report abuse

yellojkt,
I had a non air conditioned apartment one summer in Gainesville, from which I usually walked to work. Not again. Non air conditioned dorm in Piedmont North Carolina was far more comfy in summer, thanks to relatively cool nights. The dorm was (back then) enveloped by forest. Cicada choruses could be deafening.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | March 31, 2009 11:50 PM | Report abuse

I'm going to restrict myself to the tame part of Yello's earlier comment - about Sebelius. I read the article about her tax problems and was left thinking: these are considered scandalous? First of all, of her 49 (not sure of the number, that's what I remember) charitable contributions, she couldn't find the confirming letter for 3, so they became disqualified. Whoop-de-do. And on the mortgage, in today's economic climate she practically qualifies for sainthood. Sold a house but didn't get enough to cover the outstanding mortgage, so she and hubby continued to make payments to the mortgage company on the (now reduced, but not eliminated) balance. They mistakenly thought they could deduct the interest part of those payments, but that's not allowed since it's not their principal residence's mortgage.

I just wish more short-sellers would continue to honor their commitment to pay the full loan. We should give her a medal.

Posted by: Wheezy11 | March 31, 2009 11:50 PM | Report abuse

I'll get into car stuff tomorrow, perhaps.

Aren't y'all sick of me talking about cars yet?

[Fortunately, I still manage to get paid to write about them.]

bc

Posted by: -bc- | March 31, 2009 11:54 PM | Report abuse

Well, the olive oil does help maintain our interest, bc.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | March 31, 2009 11:58 PM | Report abuse

Don't ask, don't tell is a motto that has served me well for over twenty-five years. My wife is ready for me to come out of whatever closet I'm in, but I continue to disappoint her by refusing her the easy way out.

And speaking of limoncello, we were in the liquor store pricing that and amaretto to make sure we don't get ripped off in the duty-free shop next week. I will never again match the bargain of four buck Amaretto Di Saronno®. But that is a tale for another day.

Posted by: yellojkt | March 31, 2009 11:59 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I have a car like that, too.

1997 Neon I bought brand new - 162,000 miles, manual trans, crank windows. Still gets mid-30s mileage city and highway combined.

My olde German sedan still gets over 30 MPG city and highway combined, and just turned over 200,000 miles (What izzat in metric - 300 billion klicks or lire or euros or something?).

Note: both cars have the original clutches.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | April 1, 2009 12:07 AM | Report abuse

Wheezy,
That's kinda what I figured happened, but it seems too far fetched in today's climate of walkaway vacancies to be true.

I can touch type but neither fast nor accurately. At least that is what I still blame my more egregious typos on. I took a semester of typing in eighth grade. We learned on those old fashioned Underwood style all-black manual typewriters with the very tall key rows and the manual returns.

The most memorable situation was when, immediately across from me during a timed test, Carolyn [last name redacted but I still remember it]'s blouse popped open revealing her white lacy brassiere. Since a serious grade was at stake, she waited until the end of the three minutes to embarrassedly rebutton it.

I hope I didn't make anyone blush.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 12:12 AM | Report abuse

I saw that Shirky piece on 3QD a while back. Sadly, JA, he makes a lot of sense. However, Mr. F is ensconced in the Residence Inn on Duke St. in Alexandria for a couple weeks and has been told there is little sense returning to St. Paul without a carry on full of the dead tree WaPo, and some stinky cheese from Whole Foods.

Toodles boodle and sweet dreams.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | April 1, 2009 12:13 AM | Report abuse

Yello, to beat this dead horse just to death, I imagine that Sebelius decided to sell her house when she became governor, but couldn't get what she had paid (the downturn in newer homes started early in 2006 in CA and the Midwest). Since she was governor, walking away wouldn't look too good. Also, the bank probably agreed to let them pay off the minimal amount without security because she was, like, governor, and so good for it. It was probably such a low interest rate it didn't make sense to pull principal out of investments to pay it off. Bet she wishes now she had, though, since the investments have probably plummeted in value.

G'night, all.

Posted by: Wheezy11 | April 1, 2009 12:21 AM | Report abuse

Wow!!!
I just saw the biggest badest black bear I have ever seen.He was near the entrance to our community,tearing apart someone's trash can.We he saw my lights he didn't budge,when I hit my horn he got angry and rammed into my car.He put his front paws(big suckers) on my hood and started shaking my car.I tried to run him off or over and he swiped at my side view mirror and knocked it off.There is a big claw mark down the side of my car.I was lucky to get out alive.I think he may of had rabies.The thought of that crazy bear running around the neighborhood scares the sh*t out of me. Time for a drink or two!!!

Posted by: greenwithenvy | April 1, 2009 12:32 AM | Report abuse

Wow, GWE. Did you call the police? They need to know about him. Glad you're OK. Your car is going to look a mess, but that's a small price to pay for the protection it gave you.

Posted by: Wheezy11 | April 1, 2009 12:42 AM | Report abuse

Oh by the way,since it is after Midnight of my most favorite day of the year.

April Fools!!!!!!!

Actually all I really saw on the way home was a fluffy bunny......and it was cute

Be sure and prank someone you love today,or someone you don't love.It will be a great day!!!

Posted by: greenwithenvy | April 1, 2009 12:46 AM | Report abuse

I always *always* fall for April Fools jokes. It's my curse.

Now I'm really going to bed. G'night, GWE.

Posted by: Wheezy11 | April 1, 2009 12:48 AM | Report abuse

So sorry wheezy, But pleasant dreams my friend!!!

Posted by: greenwithenvy | April 1, 2009 12:51 AM | Report abuse

I was amused, yj.

Reminder to self: do not honk at bunnies when visiting gwe on Saturday.

Earliest part of pre-dawn patrol here, about to head into the kitchen for some kefir and a Canadian bacon/egg white omelette on multi-grain English Muffin sandwich. Fixings are in the fridge for later, guys!

Posted by: -dbG- | April 1, 2009 1:43 AM | Report abuse

I am looking forward to your visit dbG.

we are getting rain and wind now in west by god,April showers and May flowers for sure.Off to bed

Goodnight boodle

Posted by: greenwithenvy | April 1, 2009 2:08 AM | Report abuse

For openers, 3K is too much space. For another, we will not need that much energy in the future where homes will "sip" energy and move it around from refrigerator to heating to water and conserve very well. Solar cells will supply homes and nuclear will provide a few energy intensive industries. Hydro and geo energy will do its part. We do not have to keep the world in poverty - certainly not a poverty of thought and solutions.

Posted by: GaryEMasters | April 1, 2009 5:38 AM | Report abuse

Morning all!

Odd day ahead... Working from home this morning as I prepare for an "energy audit" this afternoon. I think I'll be able to use the list of results as effective insulation! Then again, the auditor might just throw his hands up and suggest starting from scratch.

DNA_Girl, I had a scare yesterday... Tried to visit Sinfest at work and kept getting a blank screen!!! *"Home Alone"-like pose* It's working now, thankfully.

At least Ford and GM are providing proper attribution for their latest sales ploy:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/31/AR2009033103640.html

And our buddy Kim is REALLY smoking something where this saber-rattling is concerned, considering where U.S. monitoring aircraft will be flying...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/31/AR2009033100153.html

*watching-the-Dawn-Patrol-in-my-slippers-and-nightshirt-but-fully-caffeinated Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | April 1, 2009 6:15 AM | Report abuse

Wow Gary,
That is about the least troll-like thing you have ever said. We'll make a boodler out of you yet.

I don't begrudge anyone 3000 square feet of living space if they can afford it. Heck where I live it's not even a McMansion until 5k. I'm pretty envious of those three car garages, but very few townhomes come with them so I'm out of luck. You can live a comfortable life and still be environmentally responsible.

While I think the distributed grid will become a reality and zero net energy houses are a possibility in my lifetime, hydro and geo are pretty much tapped out and it's at least fifty years until nuclear is clean, safe, and necessary enough to start ripping down smokestacks. Until then I would focus on the dirty part of the exhaust as well as the carbon. A decent CO2 level would be nice, but not if the pH level of the ocean is around 5 or so.

And the biggest bang for the buck comes from tackling the biggest and dirtiest sources. For now that means using whatever economic leverage we still have with China and other developing nations to not build their economies on the high sulfur low grade coal they are pumping into the smog clouds. Long term, we are paying too high an environmental price for those cheap imports.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 6:20 AM | Report abuse

S'nuke,
I'd have to read the fine print of those no-job, no-payment deals before I bit. They seem mighty generous. Since I (technically my wife) already own two Hyundais we were ahead of the curve there. Don't know if they'd honor the deal retroactively, but I have to hope we are no longer underwater on at least one of them. Having two car payments and a kid in college was not my idea.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 6:25 AM | Report abuse

'Morning,Boodle. Reporting for Dawn Patrol, even Scotty in his bathrobe and fuzzy slippers instead of his usual flight suit.

yello, I think you ought to re-examine that assumption. I think it is seriously flawed.

CP, your quoting "Shakespeare in Love" made my morning.

Not much in the Op-Ed columns, despite an editorial labeled "In Defense of Genocide" (no, the WaPo editorial board really isn't in favor of it. But the headline snapped me to attention and forced me to read the damn thing, almost against my will. It's about the Arabs' hypocrisy and Darfur.)

Excellent episode of "NOVA" on last night about the theory that a comet was responsible for wiping out the large mammals of North America 12,900 years ago, rather than the extinction being caused by the Clovis People. Quite convincing evidence in the finding of "nano-diamonds" under the black mat layer and in Greenland ice.

Onward and upward.

Posted by: Curmudgeon- | April 1, 2009 6:26 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Morning, friends. GWE, you're a funny guy. Wheezy, glad your daughter is back safe and sound. What a horrible experience.

I once owned a car that looked like one of those army tanks, and it was green. A guy hit me from the back, and his car got totaled, the tank only got a small dent. I went through a license inspection check one time and had a bad sticker on the tank, and there was so much smoke coming from the car, the policeman couldn't see the sticker. He flagged me through. I was surprised he didn't make me park it.

Concerning the kit, I don't know if the consequence of keeping the world in poverty is enough of an inducement for us to curtail our overuse of energy. It should be, but hey, a lot of things should be, that aren't necessarily so.

Wednesday, the busy day. I love it. Yoki, Mudge, Slyness, Scotty, Martooni, and all here, have a blessed day. *waving*

Posted by: cmyth4u | April 1, 2009 6:34 AM | Report abuse

And good morning Al!!!!!!!

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/01/us/01franken.html

Posted by: Scottynuke | April 1, 2009 6:41 AM | Report abuse

mudge,
I live by the foma that make me brave and kind and healthy and happy.

In the spirit of foma-fied kindness, I wish you a fine morning and I heartily look forward to your next flatulence filled shaggy dog story or anachronistic tale of debauching serving wenches or your recounting of your latest amazingly amusing if slightly squeamishy exaggerated medical mishap.

I have never failed to be amused by your contributions here no matter how much you have tried to personify your moniker. More than anyone else you make and define the spirit of the boodle and your good opinion means more to me than perhaps anyone else on this forum. I will take your opinion under serious advisement.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 6:52 AM | Report abuse

He's good enough, he's smart enough, and doggone it, people like him!

For me, the Al Franken Decade never ended:

http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2007/12/al-franken-decade.html

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 6:58 AM | Report abuse

Morning, all, and Al.

Whew, lots going on here overnight. I love this place!

Hmm, the cars in my life. The Pinto, the Escort (now that was a seriously bad car), the Caravan (manual transmission), the Voyager (Elderdottir is still driving it), and the current RAV4. I'm going for efficiency and low repair costs these days.

It's supposed to rain but is only overcast right now. Walk or ride the exercycle? Hard decision, so early in the morning.

Posted by: slyness | April 1, 2009 7:18 AM | Report abuse

The republicans will keep Al out for years, if possible. Their fear? They are terrified of the thought of being mocked by the country's most hysterical Senatorial delegation ... the Amy and Al show.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 7:26 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. I'm a collector of American Car Mediocrity. A AMC Hornet (bottle green & rust), an Aspen with the slant-6 and minivans by 2 different car makers that turn out to be lemons both. One had an electrical system that was worthy of Lucas Electric and the other one started to fall apart when the warranty expired. This fine gm product was totally finished at the ripe age of 6 years old with less than 100k km on the clock.
I got much better luck with an older malibu and the subie. The jury is still out of the third minivan.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | April 1, 2009 7:36 AM | Report abuse

I drive a 2003 Saturn Ion with only 60K.

Try not to be blinded by envy.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | April 1, 2009 7:46 AM | Report abuse

This is so choice:

John Amato reported on the special election for NY-20 yesterday, "With 100 percent precincts reporting, Murphy leads Tedisco by only 59 votes, 77,344 to 77,285.

"With nearly 6,000 absentee ballots that will essentially decide the race as of Monday, the election will not be decided at least until April 13."

Murphy is a D and Tedisco is a R ... and Steele ... I wonder if he wants his kitchen sink back?

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 7:49 AM | Report abuse

RD, how do you get the whole family on an ION? I guess parking isn't a problem down town, but the airbags must be REALLY small.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 7:51 AM | Report abuse

Man, how could I forget the K-car in my Pantheon of Mediocrity?
That car was good to me though. Very reliable and yet cheap to fix. It seemed at the time (90-94) that half the cars on the road were k-cars so used parts were incredibly cheap.
But it had to go when we had to find room for a third children car seat in the back. The two older kids were capable and willing to talk by that point...

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | April 1, 2009 8:29 AM | Report abuse

Today's Op-Ed Page is a mixed bag.

I'd love the schadenfreude of watching Republicans become born-again deficit hawks because the hypocrisy level is so high. If only it weren't so pathetically obvious.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/31/AR2009033103199.html

I've been following the sexting paranoia for a while and we've reached the missing-kids-on-milk-cartons level of statistical hysteria. Ruth Marcus's take is very funny and only a little breathless.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/31/AR2009033103256.html

While the fear of teenagers e-mailing smutty pictures of each other is a troubling trend I gotta think this is even less widespread and more innocuous than the much hyped middle-school sex parties of a few years back. Once again we are defining deviancy upwards in a troubling way. Equating some undersupervised teenager sending her boyfriend some fuzzy bra and panties cellphone shots with genuine child pornography is revoltingly callous to the genuinely exploited children that are used to make the real thing.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 8:51 AM | Report abuse

By the way, I am still chewing on the image of Joel in a caddie convertible. But, what if he had Rox Diamond cranking on the 8 track?

OK, I see it.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 8:52 AM | Report abuse

This is wildly off topic but this story upset me last night when I saw it and even more after reading this, re: Afganistan.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20090401.wafghan01/BNStory/Afghanistan/home

Posted by: dmd2 | April 1, 2009 8:59 AM | Report abuse

SD,
While it's fun to ridicule Detroit's faux pas, there were some genuinely awful cars in the 70s that never rose to the level of AMC's trademarked 'so ugly they're cute'. The last American branded car my dad owned was a 1976 Gran Torino Brougham. Clint Eastwood's nostalgic revisionism to the contrary, this was a lemon of the highest order. My dad was a leather jacketed Kenickie grease monkey in his day and even he got tired of the weekly tune-ups needed just to keep the mileage in the high single digits.

When we returned from overseas, he bought our family of five (including two teenage boys) a 1980 Toyota Corolla and never bought a domestic car from the showroom again. Nobody is bigger patriot (and budding xenophobe) than my father but loyalty lost is tough to regain. It takes a generation to turn around brand reputation like that and GM and their ilk never quite played catch up.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 9:01 AM | Report abuse

jkt,

I really like watching those hypocrite Republicans flinging around the budget numbers that NOW include the "war on being scared" as if that's a new thing.

It's worth noting that not all republicans are being hypocritical.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 9:02 AM | Report abuse

Exciting news about a little-known creature on the land of our Canadian friends, the "wooly snake": http://web.me.com/dooleyclan/Site_2/Blog/Entries/2009/4/1_Wooly_snakes.html

Posted by: ScienceTim | April 1, 2009 9:05 AM | Report abuse

New kit.

Posted by: Boko999 | April 1, 2009 9:07 AM | Report abuse

ha ha, boko. nice one.

Posted by: LALurker | April 1, 2009 9:12 AM | Report abuse

Ya made me look, Boko... *L*

Posted by: Scottynuke | April 1, 2009 9:14 AM | Report abuse

Love those wooly snakes, needed the smile after reading the article on Afganistan.

Posted by: dmd2 | April 1, 2009 9:17 AM | Report abuse

yello, someone needs to make you aware of this, and I guess it is going to have to be me. You accused Yoki of being prudish, which she manifestly is not. You have injured and angered her thereby.

This isn't about you and me. This is about you sailing too close to the line, and crossing it from time to time, and not being aware of it -- and then trying to rationalize and excuse and deflect it. I take risks myself sometimes, and have strayed farther than I should have on occasion, so yes, maybe it is the pot calling the kettle black. But the point is, last night you crossed a line and hurt someone, and need to be made aware of it.

The Boodle tends to be extremely polite, values civility above all else, and tends to be very forgiving. Sometimes it overlooks more than it should, and in its forgiveness perhaps sometimes goes too far itself. But sometimes the referee has to throw the flag.

Posted by: curmudgeon-1 | April 1, 2009 9:20 AM | Report abuse

While the pranks so far today have been of a very high caliber, can we reach a gentleman's agreement on No Goatse or Rick-Rolling? Thanks.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 9:21 AM | Report abuse

I'm pretty much a prude myself. You can turn on me, Yello. I'm here for your sharp comments. Give thems werds some re-direction.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 9:29 AM | Report abuse

Clearly I need this new service from Google:

http://mail.google.com/mail/help/autopilot/index.html

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 9:32 AM | Report abuse

Hiya -- *cough* *cough* -- didn't sleep too well last night, but better than I expected. Not sure if I'm feeling better right now, or on my way to feeling worse. Can't tell yet.

Just got off the phone with a friend who has a 20-month old son who is speaking in complete sentences and knows how to spell a few words. A real precocious cutie pie. Nevertheless, as 20-month olds are wont to do, he doesn't have the ability to conquer or control his emotions yet, so if he asks for something and is told "no" he apparently then says "please" and when that doesn't work, he then says "manners" and when even that doesn't work, he then has his meltdown. Ya gotta laugh (especially since we're all not in the room with him and his meltdown).

Time for more tea (and sympathy, perhaps?).

Posted by: firsttimeblogger | April 1, 2009 9:34 AM | Report abuse

i'm definitely in the prudish crowd and yj's posts sometimes annoy me. however, the initial post in question actually didn't bother me. like others, i found it somewhat amusing, even if tmi for regular face-to-face social interaction.

i agree that yoki is no prude. mudge, are you speaking on yoki's behalf at her request?

Posted by: LALurker | April 1, 2009 9:38 AM | Report abuse

There was a mohel discussion? And I missed it? That cuts deep man, cuts me to the quick.

We had some graffiti on our suburban synagogue involving a term directly relevant to the mohel's trade. In the email letting us all know, our rabbi suggested it could be related to the "Intactivist" march down at the White House. Two things come to mind:
(1) Intactivist is an excellent term, inventive and fun to say.
(2) There was a march at the White House on this subject? What did they chant -- "Save the Willies!"?

Was this march the source of the mohel discussion?

Of all the causes for which one might march before the White House, I am hard-pressed to think of one with less significance. I can only assume that its "importance" as a political issue is related to some misguided and insulting equation between circumcision of the male, and female "circumcision". They could be equivalent only if the end of the male member were, literally, cut off with a rusty grapefruit spoon. By your own mother. At age 13.

Posted by: ScienceTim | April 1, 2009 9:41 AM | Report abuse

Tim, like most Americans, I draw the line at rusty.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 9:44 AM | Report abuse

This is really not the time of year to use the "TMI" acronym around me... *L*

Posted by: Scottynuke | April 1, 2009 9:44 AM | Report abuse

I'm still stuck with the old 2005 Pininfarina "Birdcage 75th" with bald tires and a hole in the muffler.

Good Sci-Am article yesterday's link from Wilbrod. My latest speculations involve the old left-brain / right-brain thing. That everyone literally has two people living in their skull, siamese twin intellects that have been hypnotized by our culture into thinking they are just one individual.

Posted by: Jumper1 | April 1, 2009 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Tax My Income?

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 9:46 AM | Report abuse

Hmmm. Hope I'm not reigniting a problem.

Squirm-inducing or not, mohels and circumcision are part of public knowledge, or should be, since they are part of common medical practice even for newborn males who do not belong to a religion that practices circumcision. Or has that practice ended? Can't debate it if we don't acknowledge its existence. TMI or not, every single male person finds himself placed in one camp or the other regarding circumcision, usually put there prior to having any conscious knowledge of the subject.

Anyway, having dropped my grenades, I have to run -- critical work to do today, with deadlines enforced by humongous potential public embarrassment.

Posted by: ScienceTim | April 1, 2009 9:52 AM | Report abuse

LAL, yes, I was speaking on Yoki's behalf, although NOT at her request, or even with her knowledge. She may not even be reading the Boodle today, as it happens, I don't know.

But I do know for a fact that she was angry and hurt at being labeled a prude. I myself thought the "Mother Superior" line was over the line, although Yoki didn't mention it. But I thought it was mean, and wrong-headed.

Look, as I said, I'm sometimes guilty myself. But it has been called to my attention by more than one Boodler that some of our discussions are offensive to some. In particular, our discussions and jokes about "Brazilians" and such are offensive to some. It matters not a whit whether I agree or disagree; the fact is some don't like it. So I strongly we suggest we add it to the list of unmentionable topics, such as fighter aircraft, etc. It doesn't matter a damn what Weingarten and his chat do or get away with; we are not the Weingarten chat.

Posted by: curmudgeon-1 | April 1, 2009 9:54 AM | Report abuse

Tim, it wasn't the mohel/circumscision discussion that was problematic, only one single line. No one (to my knowledge) had a problem with that whole thread, except for the one line.

Posted by: curmudgeon-1 | April 1, 2009 9:58 AM | Report abuse

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm... Interesting if not unexpected:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/01/AR2009040100763.html

Posted by: Scottynuke | April 1, 2009 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Mr. Mudge, question for you...

As a follow on to the CO2 discussion. There has been that great concern that ice dumping into the area near Greenland would cause a change in the world ocean currents (if I have that right).

Have there been any reports or data showing variations on ocean flow in recent years?

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 10:02 AM | Report abuse

I thought somebody said new kit? Oh, okay, I get it now. I'm such a good target.

Weed, TMI=too much information. A good acronym.

Posted by: slyness | April 1, 2009 10:03 AM | Report abuse

Glad we are civil about this discussion. Few remarks:

I don't care for some of our chat tangents; I am not a prude either but appreciate decorum and a sense of both audience and occasion.

YJ is nicer and more nuanced than his posts suggest; he seems aware of this persona-creation.

People: this is not a bar nor a locker-room nor a private porch. We are on JA'a work porch, actually, on the house of the WaPo website. Tis pubic; tis NOT ours.

And, unlike Vegas, the stuff is broadcast widely into the perma-ether of digital space.

And, jokes often are risky and private and fleeting, mostly. Here, the text stays. Consider this.

Thanks, Mudge for speaking about this. Yoki! Hi there. Back to salt mines...

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | April 1, 2009 10:11 AM | Report abuse

Oh, there's another TMI that had a certain prominence last weekend, slyness... :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | April 1, 2009 10:11 AM | Report abuse

"Doth he love us?" said Pearl, looking up, with acute intelligence, into her mother's face. "Will he go back with us, hand in hand, we three together, into the town?" "NOt now, dear child," answered Hester. "But in days to come he will walk hand in hand with us. We shalt sit upon his knee; and he will teach thee many things, and love thee dearly. Thou wilt love him; wilt thou not? "And will he always keep his hand over his heart?" inquired Pearl.
"Foolish child, what a question is that!"exclaimed her mother. "Come and ask his blessing!"
But, whether influenced by the jealousy that seems instinctive with every petted child towards a dangerous rival, or from whatever caprice of her freakish nature, Pearl would show no favor to the clergyman. It was only by an exertion of force that her mother brought her up to him, hanging back, and manifesting her reluctance by odd grimaces; of which, ever since her babyhood, she had possessed a singular variety,and could transform her mobile physiognomy into a series of different aspects, with a new mischief in them, each and all. The minister--painfully embarressed, but hoping that a kiss might prove a talisman to admit him into the child's kindlier regards--bent forward, and impressed one on her brow. Hereupon, Pearl broke away from her mother, and running to the brook, stooped over it, and bathed her forehead, until the unwelcome kiss was quite washed off, and diffused through a long lapse of the gliding water. She then remained apart,silently watching Hester and the clergyman; while they talked together, and made such arrangements as were suggested by their new position, and the purposes soon to be filled.
And now this fateful interview had come to a close. The dell was to be left a solitude among its dark, old tress, which, with their multitudinous tongues, would whisper long of what had passed there, and no mortal be the wiser. And the melancholy brook would add this other tale to the mystery with which its little heart was already overburdened,and whereof it still kept up a murmuring babble, with not a whit more cheerfulness of tone than for ages heretofore.

Posted by: cookkenusa | April 1, 2009 10:13 AM | Report abuse

"Doth he love us?" said Pearl, looking up, with acute intelligence, into her mother's face. "Will he go back with us, hand in hand, we three together, into the town?" "NOt now, dear child," answered Hester. "But in days to come he will walk hand in hand with us. We shalt sit upon his knee; and he will teach thee many things, and love thee dearly. Thou wilt love him; wilt thou not? "And will he always keep his hand over his heart?" inquired Pearl.
"Foolish child, what a question is that!"exclaimed her mother. "Come and ask his blessing!"
But, whether influenced by the jealousy that seems instinctive with every petted child towards a dangerous rival, or from whatever caprice of her freakish nature, Pearl would show no favor to the clergyman. It was only by an exertion of force that her mother brought her up to him, hanging back, and manifesting her reluctance by odd grimaces; of which, ever since her babyhood, she had possessed a singular variety,and could transform her mobile physiognomy into a series of different aspects, with a new mischief in them, each and all. The minister--painfully embarressed, but hoping that a kiss might prove a talisman to admit him into the child's kindlier regards--bent forward, and impressed one on her brow. Hereupon, Pearl broke away from her mother, and running to the brook, stooped over it, and bathed her forehead, until the unwelcome kiss was quite washed off, and diffused through a long lapse of the gliding water. She then remained apart,silently watching Hester and the clergyman; while they talked together, and made such arrangements as were suggested by their new position, and the purposes soon to be filled.
And now this fateful interview had come to a close. The dell was to be left a solitude among its dark, old tress, which, with their multitudinous tongues, would whisper long of what had passed there, and no mortal be the wiser. And the melancholy brook would add this other tale to the mystery with which its little heart was already overburdened,and whereof it still kept up a murmuring babble, with not a whit more cheerfulness of tone than for ages heretofore.

Posted by: cookkenusa | April 1, 2009 10:13 AM | Report abuse

Huh? You're asking me, weed? I know nuthin' from nuthin' about this whole topic. Note my complete absence of commentary on anything remotely having to do with global warming, CO2, etc. I only watched the NOVA episode last night.

Now, as a sailor, going around the globe with Anson, Cook, and some o' them other fellers, we pretty much knew nothing about ocean currents, except that they existed, and seemed to go this way and that, and some seemed warmer than others. But as a general rule, I tended to stay away from Greenland, Iceland, and any place that cold, despite my direct ancestry to Vikings such as Leif Erricson, Eric the Red, etc. Every time they set out on a voyage, they asked me to come along, and I always refused to go unless they swore they were heading to, say, Cancun, or St. Maarten or someplace reasonable like that. But no. They always wanted to go someplace where you'd freeze your [helmet] horns off.

Posted by: curmudgeon-1 | April 1, 2009 10:15 AM | Report abuse

I thought SD used the Mother Superior line.

Also, I think CqP covered that pretty well in her post last night, and it looked like it was settled. Some thought it mild, some thought it funny, and some thought it over-the-line. Like using the term FMPs...some find it racy, while others consider it to be an industry term.

And yes, there are more than a few of us here who know our etiquette rules like we know the back of our hand (hey...where'd that scratch come from?) Our mothers are proud of this. For some of us eyetalians, those mothers are, in fact, Mother Superior. And speaking for myself only, Mother Superiors have been some of the nicest, most understanding, most wonderful women on the face of the planet who know way more about the human condition than some would suspect. In my experience, Mother Superior as the prudish uptight kind of woman is only in the movies.

Deflecting, rationalizing, and plain old 'I don't know what I did wrong and I'm not going to bother finding out' does seem to be the pot calling the kettle black. But as Sis1 points out, that's generally done because the pot loves the kettle. Which puts a whole new spin on everything.

Posted by: LostInThought | April 1, 2009 10:16 AM | Report abuse

LiT -- some of my favorite people are Mother S or similarly coiffed women. An under-rated and under appreciated bunch...many of them the first feminists I ever knew! And, surprise, surprise, that is one of my nicknames at work. That and biker-grrrl. And Mrs. Aristotle.

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | April 1, 2009 10:20 AM | Report abuse

And, who posted the clip from The Scarlett Letter?

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | April 1, 2009 10:23 AM | Report abuse

Hey, bc, grab a load of this. Now here's what *I'm* talkin' about as the car of the future! http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7968860.stm

Posted by: curmudgeon-1 | April 1, 2009 10:23 AM | Report abuse

RT - We also have a Toyota minivan. But I didn't want to mention it for fear that owning a minivan might damage the Bad Boy image I get from the Ion.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | April 1, 2009 10:23 AM | Report abuse

A lot of peole are prudes about one thing or another. I'm no exception. If someone wants to get to me by calling me a prude, though, lots of luck. My horselaugh slays giants.

Posted by: Jumper1 | April 1, 2009 10:27 AM | Report abuse

Currents... I guess, Mudge, only really count if you don't have a sail. Or you are anywhere near the Capes.

I was just wondering since most of the controversy is about land temps. I was thinking that maybe the real interesting "stuff" is in the oceans and we simple people just don't know.

Me, I love to sail ... if it is around the BVI. Being in irons in the Bay just doesn't meet up to my standards.

BTW, I will know that I am back when I get to go down there again. That would be dream level 3.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 10:29 AM | Report abuse

No GWE don't say it!

Posted by: Jumper1 | April 1, 2009 10:31 AM | Report abuse

while ja likes us to keep a civil tone with each other, i doubt he thinks we have to tip toe around certain topics to such an extent.

Posted by: LALurker | April 1, 2009 10:34 AM | Report abuse

rd, forgive my very lame joke. I am just "charged up" over your ion.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 10:38 AM | Report abuse

Mrs. Aristotle? You'd have to prove it!

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 10:41 AM | Report abuse

I'm the poster that plagerized a few lines from Nathaniel Hawthornes, "The Scarlett Letter." Another novel from the pantheon of great American Literature by another great American author worth your time would be Herman Melvilles, "The Confidence Man," by the by..greeting to all in our Nations Capitol. Aloha!!

Posted by: cookkenusa | April 1, 2009 10:41 AM | Report abuse

That's not to say we try to be too "fancy" around here. The Boodle is a feast of diverse opinions and viewpoints and some lattitude should always be given to genuine attempts at humor even if they fall flat someimes.

Posted by: Jumper1 | April 1, 2009 10:44 AM | Report abuse

You had me going, Aloha. I figured it was yellojkt.

Posted by: Jumper1 | April 1, 2009 10:53 AM | Report abuse

RT - yes, that I have an Ion has electrified many.

hahahaha.

Sheesh.

New kit BTW.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | April 1, 2009 10:56 AM | Report abuse

jumper, good point. I basically missed the controversy for the same reason that I miss many others... I just skim anything that doesn't call out my name.

Of course, that means I miss some good things, as well. When possible, we all should avoid taking things too personally. At the same time, I think that Mudge is really being helpful by reminding us all to think of others.

The internet is a curious place where people can post thoughts that they wouldn't otherwise say in a personal discussion with those same folk with whom might be sharing an internet board, blog or online discussion group.

Thanks to the SAO-15, we now do indeed know each other, or many of the usual suspects. The Boodle is an unusual Internet entity. Achenblog has several layers of participants.

Posted by: russianthistle | April 1, 2009 10:58 AM | Report abuse

Speaking of unkind cuts, I did not call anyone a prude or 'Mother Superior' or assign any other religious order to anyone.

Meeting Yoki was one of the highlights of my year to date and I wouldn't describe her as a bluenose by any stretch of the imagination. In the Church of Boodle Sanctimoniousness she would barely qualify as a Novice Initiate and a rather wayward one at that. I picture her in a tie dye wimple with a guitar leading folk songs.

IIRC, Yoki and I had a few other direct or indirect exchanges after her TMI warning (the other type, Scotty) where I didn't detect any umbrage whatsoever. But then I am notoriously tone deaf to subtlety. Just ask my wife.

Anyone with a genuine complaint against my demeanor and subject matter(which was quasi-on-topic leading back to the rather silly anti-penile peeling protesters and their misguided moral equivalences), now or ever, is welcome to discuss this with me off-line. My name is yellojkt. I have a gmail account. Piece it together.

I may tell you to pound sand, but I can do so politely and privately.

Posted by: yellojkt | April 1, 2009 11:40 AM | Report abuse

May I please be leading a raucous symphonic metal band wearing a leather wimple? Folk just isn't me.

Posted by: Yoki | April 1, 2009 1:36 PM | Report abuse

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