Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Mommy's midlife crisis

In my dawn-patrol ritual on the back porch, the meditative moment, the contemplative pre-electronic communing with the planet in its optimistic turn toward our star, I often find myself flooded with yearning, with need, with want, with -- dare I say the word -- desire. So it was this morning as I surveyed my estate. I really, really, really wanted to cut back the crape myrtle.

[Regulars here, on seeing the word "yearning," instantly thought: he's going to make a joke about wanting a new lawn mower. But I'm not so predictable!!]

Being a man, particularly one past that conquer-the-world phase, is extraordinarily easy. We prune back our ambitions until they are mere goals, and then trim them some more until we have just a severe little topiary shrub shaped strikingly like the Lombardi Trophy. We learn to putter, and dither. We eyeball our stocks and gradually shift the money to bonds. We fall asleep in front of the TV. We're livin' the dream.

But women! Gosh, it seems so exhausting, just watching from a distance (not so far a distance in my heavily distaff household). So many women take on what are essentially two full-time jobs (professional and domestic), just for starters. They have standards of decency and cleanliness and comportment, which is a huge timesuck. They also have all those feelings, which looks to me as hard as running an orphanage.

Monica Hesse's funny piece this morning on sophisticated women succumbing to the "Twilight" books tells us, in effect, that women crave the kind of emotional intensity that goes along with being 17 years old.

It's a time capsule to the breathless period when the world could literally end depending on whether your lab partner touched your hand, when every conversation was so agonizing and so thrilling (and the border between the two emotions was so thin), and your heart was bigger and more delicate than it is now, and everything was just so much more.

"I noticed in that first week of reading that I was feeling things I hadn't been able to feel in a long time," says Lauren Ashlock, 27.

Poor Lauren, emotionally desiccated at 27! Life isn't cruel, but it is subtly corrosive of those things that fall loosely under the heading of romance. Who was it who said that love begins as a sonnet and turns into a grocery list?

Men are the ones famous for midlife crises, but women will inevitably challenge them in this field. It's the next hot trend. The role model may turn out to be Sandra Tsing Loh. I have always loved her radio commentaries -- her comic timing is exquisite -- and now she's well on her way to writing what will be a number one best-seller about her abandonment of her nuclear family. She wrote a piece for the Atlantic that questioned whether marriage is such a great idea, then wrote an even better one about being a bad mom. Her friends and associates are scolding her ferociously. She's in the center of a sanctimony maelstrom.

Because our gypsy children seem okay, because I'd been honest about my shortcomings as a wife and mother, because we are more than 40 years after Betty Friedan's Feminine Mystique, I'd thought mine was a sad but not atypical tale to cite in The Atlantic as a jumping-off point for a discussion about the state of modern American marriage, but...No!!! Oh, the shock, the outrage, the vitriol, the tying to the bumpers of and being dragged behind blogs large and small all across our fair nation! Oh, the plasterings with a scarlet A, the media stonings. I fielded so many horrified condolence calls after one particularly savage L.A. Times profile of me that I found myself plaintively asking a friend, "Don't you think the word crucifixion is overused nowadays? Do we have to keep using the word crucifixion?" But what particularly surprised me was the ire of some of my own sisters in the chattering class -- college-educated, affluent NPR listeners/New York Times readers. In the old days, for better or worse, members of this privileged demographic would have been on female liberation's front lines. Now they were among the most censorious. "YOU MUST GO BACK HOME!" one girlfriend of mine (56, married, Boomer professional, no kids) typed in block letters. "THINK OF THE CHILDREN!"

But she's given it all up for love. And living out of a Volvo. Bravo! What spunk and spirit. And how utterly exhausting.

--

Pure-genius boodling this morning by Engelmann:

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My arms can reach, to an ideal out of reach
With every fiber in my Being, and fiber is important
To a well-rounded nutritional breakfast,
I love thee freely, like Kelloggs' Just Right
I love thee purely, and without transfats,
Like a hearty oatmeal blend,
With sugar, but not too big of bag,
And don't forget the milk, skim please
And if we have time,
I shall but love thee better after one quick stop first.

By Joel Achenbach  |  November 19, 2009; 10:28 AM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Personal foul, 15 yards for Newsweek, Pinker [Updated]
Next: ClimateGate: Waiting for vegetarian overlord response

Comments

Aren't you fellows glad you don't have to live this way? Though I have never observed a lack of intense feeling in men. I've seen their eyes when they look at a riding-mower.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 12:24 PM | Report abuse

Riding mowers don't do it for some guys. But I can't throw out the BigBoxOfElectronics flier each Sunday without making a mental wish list.

Perhaps I need to write a series of novels about a teenage boy living near a family with an enormous arsenal of large but dangerous gadgets.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 12:31 PM | Report abuse

I prefer the self-propelled mowers that you walk behind. Because then it looks like you are doing more work than you really are.

Nowadays I live in an all-female household too, and should have some insights into this kit. But of course I don't.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 12:31 PM | Report abuse

Did you know that crocodiles are even older than dinosaurs?

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-091119paul-sereno-dino-crocs,0,2850583.story

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 12:33 PM | Report abuse

Start applying your double standards now. A woman who leaves her family for a purely physical fling and ends up living in her car is a shameless hussy. A guy that does the same is Living The Life.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 12:33 PM | Report abuse

From the Hesse article:

///For mothers of tweenage girls, there are added complications. Is it sweet or twisted to share the same crush as your 14-year-old? (Taylor Lautner as Jacob. Ahhhhhhh. Only 17. Ewwwww.) How do you reconcile cooing over an on-screen relationship that, if your daughter had it in real life, might be worth a restraining order? ///

As for me, my son and I spent many a fine weekend afternoon bonding while watching 'Bring It On' yet another time. It's a great movie because it's chaste enough to count as family viewing but risque enough to be entertaining.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 12:38 PM | Report abuse

But is Twilight allowed in the AchenHousehold? And would Joel have any say in the decision?

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 12:43 PM | Report abuse

How about taking fiction for fiction for once? Jeez. Part of the fun of it is that you get to live the life of people of different genders, ages, lifestyles, interests, eras, and moralities.

It builds empathy, it helps give you alternative ways to think about others' motives. It's a form of social play.

(However, drooling over a 17 year old actor is just grossp-- even if you're a teenage girl. Just my personal feeling there.)

Never read the twilight books, though.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 19, 2009 12:44 PM | Report abuse

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My arms can reach, to an ideal out of reach
With every fiber in my Being, and fiber is important
To a well-rounded nutritional breakfast,
I love thee freely, like Kelloggs’ Just Right
I love thee purely, and without transfats,
Like a hearty oatmeal blend,
With sugar, but not too big of bag,
And don’t forget the milk, skim please
And if we have time,
I shall but love thee better after one quick stop first.

Posted by: engelmann | November 19, 2009 12:45 PM | Report abuse

Last item before I get back to work:

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/clips/digital-short-firelight/1173548/

Which asks the question, why are vampires and werewolves sexy but Frankenstein monsters and mummies aren't?

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Well, there's that whole rotting flesh thing, for one.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 12:48 PM | Report abuse

My daughter and I both have crushes on John Krasinski. I mean, who doesn't? Especially if you've seen Away We Go.

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 12:51 PM | Report abuse

I can't really blame women, I guess, for using Twilight to get in touch with their inner teens. I mean, this sensation is what drives much of the male fascination with superhero movies.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 12:53 PM | Report abuse

Boats. Not riding mowers, but boats. Not even big ones. My heart has always belonged to a certain 21-foot Wilbur Morse-designed 1928 Friendship sloop. But otherwise, yes.

Joel, that was one of your best pieces of writing, by the way. Really. 3rd and 4th grafs especially, and the last 2 sentences of the 4th.

There are days when one can earn one's entire salary with but a single perfect sentence.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 12:54 PM | Report abuse

And here cometh Englemann!! Standing O!

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 12:57 PM | Report abuse

And the topic of age-appropriate crushes leads us back to Glee last night. I would much rather have my hypothetical daughter crushing on a twenty-something actor pretending to be a moody fake teenage vampire than on a real life older school teacher.

As Susie Pepper from Glee said so much better than I can paraphrase, girls develop crushes on unobtainable men (and boys) EXACTLY because the relationship is doomed to frustration and failure.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 1:01 PM | Report abuse

engelmann, I always feel such a fool sitting here, all alone in the house, tears in my eyes --laughing my head off! Excellent work!

Posted by: nellie4 | November 19, 2009 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Ode To Fiber is one for the ages. Perhaps the greatest BoodlePoem ever.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 1:03 PM | Report abuse

(Thanks Mudge, I did rejoice momentarily when the orphanage line unexpectedly appeared on the my laptop screen here at the public library.)

Of course my kids are going to New Moon -- I saw a pre-printed ticket to the theater for tomorrow. But they're not going at midnight tonight. So far as I know. Actually, I should check.

Posted by: joelache | November 19, 2009 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Mudge is correct an outstanding kit.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 19, 2009 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Big thunderstorm overhead here. Very unusual for November.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Oh, the Engelmann poem has to be up-kitted pronto.

Posted by: joelache | November 19, 2009 1:06 PM | Report abuse

About Sandra Tsing Loh, I keep thinking that if she were a clerk and in some legal conflict with her exing-spouse, she would (have) lose(t) custody yesterday.


Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 1:11 PM | Report abuse

ok - i'm just gonna come right out and admit it... i've read them all - seen and own twilight... will see new moon... but with this caveat - new moon WAS my least fav of the series... i mean she spends the whole time soooooooo depressed and soooooooo down and sooooooo destroyed and sooooooo - well, you get the pic - after a while i was like "jeez! would ya snap outta it! i know he's gorgoeous but enuff already" - then of course came Eclipse and i was hooked yet again... so i'm not expecting much from the movie...

why did i love the series so much? not quite sure but i was completely engrossed... pulp fiction? too be sure, but more than that... let me think on it and get back to ya!

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 1:20 PM | Report abuse

I assert, that to zeroth order, women and men tend to approach midlife differently, and that these approaches mirror their differing approaches to life. Men seem much more interested in external stimulation, while women seem much more interested in self image. Men tend to think "Am I getting as much out of life as I want" while women tend to think "Am I the person I want to be?"

Sometimes at midlife men will realize that they simply aren't going to have enough time left to experience all the good things that life has to offer, and panic.

Women, though, will realize that they are never going to become the idealized version of themselves that they desire, and panic as well.

Like I said, this is a hopeless oversimplification, but I think there is something to it.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 1:24 PM | Report abuse

My daughter is crushing on Artie from Glee.

Curt is my favorite character - he just makes me laugh.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 19, 2009 1:26 PM | Report abuse

Up-kit. A third cousin, twice removed of un-friend?

My mom marvels at the exotic groceries required by Mark Bittman's quick dishes. I point out that he's in exotic Manhattan (where she grew up), so they should have exotic groceries not among the 30,000 items carried by the local Publix, nor the supplemental stuff at Fresh Market or the little Asian groceries. But Manhattan seems so bereft of grocery stores that its inhabitants seem constrained to eat at delis or hot dog carts. Do Manhattanites make weekend food raids on raid New Jersey? Go to Ikea in Brooklyn for frozen meatballs?

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | November 19, 2009 1:27 PM | Report abuse

No, they go to Whole Foods in Columbus Circle or Dean and Delucca.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 1:33 PM | Report abuse

RD, your forebear had this to say:

"halfway along our life's path"

(Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita).

Insert your favorite soul-probing aria here. Me? Cue up Nessun Dorma

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Joel, I managed to track down the author of your mysterious "love...sonnet...laundry list quotation, but it was pretty difficult, because you screwed it up. According to this Web site, the original author was...you.

http://lawver.net/archive/2004/04/15/h16_love_is_a_grocery_list.php

This site also has it: http://www.successpsychics.com/1/Aries.html

This site lists a page from the esteemed Judith Viorst, who use the (proper) quote from something called "Homeward Bound" to open a chapter, thusly: http://books.google.com/books?id=uvfSOAqJQPcC&pg=PA95&lpg=PA95&dq=%22love+begins+as+a+sonnet%22&source=bl&ots=FkbBNk3Cqm&sig=4vUOqF1OHYXO4RwvsTcx34gWEMQ&hl=en&ei=h40FS8X5N9CWlAeonJWoDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CBEQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%22love%20begins%20as%20a%20sonnet%22&f=false

It's a grocery list, not a laundry list. Maybe that's why you forgot who wrote it. The mind goes when you get older, you know.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 1:34 PM | Report abuse

DotC,
There is a very nice Whole Foods just south of Union Square with about anything a Manhattanite would need. The checkout lines are governed by a color coded system with lights and LED signs that alternate calling people from one of the dozen or so check-out lines to any of the 30 or more open registers. The TSA could learn some crowd control lessons from this grocery store.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Good kit Joel... a lot of women I talk to seem to be in perpetual crisis. There is something inherently wrong with the way we live our lives. Endless spending is a starting point for our failure to find happiness. Men traveling none stop for work. Women planning their free time around 'shopping' for trinkets and trash. Children propped up with technology to keep them sedated. We willingly create our own empty horrible little lives and tear down our relationships with loved ones with reckless abandon for the pursuit of status. It's all about status today. That's the crux of it.

Posted by: MissToronto | November 19, 2009 1:35 PM | Report abuse

The Whole Foods in Columbus Circle in even bigger. You can buy enough food for and entire picnic and then take it across the street to Central Park.

And the Dean and Delucas are plentiful if rather pricey.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 1:37 PM | Report abuse

???? 'mudge?

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 1:37 PM | Report abuse

That explains why everyone at Wegmans is a couple. Looks like date night every night there.

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 1:44 PM | Report abuse

Yes?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 1:44 PM | Report abuse

The whole thing sounds to me like a way to ease girls into the role of shacking up with an abuser, the bad guy they're going to "help" who beats on them, takes them for granted, uses them and sucks their blood but it's forgivable because the guy has tragic "problems."

But I haven't read them so I don't know.

Posted by: Jumper1 | November 19, 2009 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Sailors don't mow lawns! :-)

Posted by: Braguine | November 19, 2009 1:47 PM | Report abuse

dave - that's one of the most wonderful things about nyc - there ARE grocery stores there... little tiny hidden away ones with eensy teensy aisles... you don't shop there unless you need staples...
you do to all the wonderful specialty shops that are incredibly abundant... cheese shops, pasta shops, anything and everything you can think of...
then there is china town for all your seafood and an abundance of farmer's markets where you get fresh produce from right outside the city... it's wonderful! you don't NEED a grocery store in nyc!

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Jumper,

http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/Vampire+tale+message+love+sucks/2235432/story.html

I think its a bunch of hooey, myself.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Ooops. My bad. Joel quoted himself correctly. But here's what's weird: if you Google love starts sonnet list, you get a ton of responses with laundry lists.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Joel was quoted by Judith Viorst? Wow, I am in awe. Judith Viorst is one of my heros.

Of course, Joel is another.

Posted by: nellie4 | November 19, 2009 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Sonnet to grocery list. Those Manhattan food options sound intriguing. I'd look for a Lebanese place with Egyptian rice, red lentils, and plenty of cheap saffron. Perhaps someone from Taiwan might have pumpkin snow.

I'm conflicted about Whole Foods. It's almost worth the drive for Italian grapefruit soda. The nice frozen veggies seem to be from China, of all places. Good hummus. Some well-cared-for produce. But much better Indian food is just up the street, next to the Lebanese. My best Asian food encounter in Florida was in Gainesville. The owner (if I remember the details correctly) is a Chinese ecologist who decided retailing was more fun than research. How can you not shop in a store with that kind of attitude?

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | November 19, 2009 2:06 PM | Report abuse

mo -

You need not feel shame for loving Twilight. Perhaps I am just too much of a Middle Aged Dad to really, you know, get it. Plus, I read them under duress, which sucks the joy out of pretty much everything.

And who am I to judge, really. I mean, come on, last night I compulsively watched a clip of Cartman singing a Lady Gaga song.


Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 2:11 PM | Report abuse

Hee Hee. RD said "sucks."

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 2:12 PM | Report abuse

I could write a lengthy book about my midlife crisis. Wonder what the statistics are. But I made it to the other side...a happy ending to that "slightly" (my opinion, of course) mixed-up chapter in my life. Whew. And my adult children are both happy and successful. And I am satisfyingly employed, well-matched and remarried. It can be done!!!

Hey, San Diego has Jimbo's. Similar to Whole Foods when no Whole Foods can be found. BTW, for those envious, the weather here has been frequently in the 40's near the ocean in the early morning. But no rain...almost never rain. I like rain. So there.

Posted by: Windy3 | November 19, 2009 2:26 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, Joel, for the quote from the Hesse piece. I'll stay away from the teen vampires. The very last thing I want is to replicate the chaotic and tremulous emotions associated with teen first love. As far as I'm concerned one advantage of getting older is that I don't ever have to do that again.

I also appreciate your revelation about the whole "standards of decency and cleanliness and comportment." It IS a timesuck! Unless, of course, you've trained your entire household to pick up, clean up and behave, in which case you are living in an alternate universe. I'll tell you my secret: I discovered time is malleable. Right up until it isn't.

Thanks also for sharing Engelmann's brilliant sonnet. That's one unusually talented pastry.

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 19, 2009 2:27 PM | Report abuse

RD, I carefully refrained from commenting on your first "Cartman sings Lady Gaga" remark because I was trying to banish it from my thoughts. I did so successfully and here you bring it up again. I'm sure the Boy will want to see it now. He & I agree that, whatever Lady Gaga's attraction as a pop personality, it is not based on her musicianship.

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 19, 2009 2:31 PM | Report abuse

Unfortunately my eldest has decided to eschew that timesuck of cleanliness for her room, I find it best if I just keep the door shut.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 19, 2009 2:33 PM | Report abuse

A few years ago my tweenage daughter was obsessed with the Twilight series, even to the point where she insisted on reading me the first book. Every time Bella mentioned Edward's eyes, I did the finger down the throat gesture just to be snarky. (Actually, I was expressing my opinion of sorts.) Anyway, we got about half-way through before the gag reflex got the best of me, and the urge to vomit wasn't coming from my finger down my throat.

Just recently, my daughter called the Bella character in the book a "do-nothing, sexless twit", so I asked her what was up with the change in her opinion about the series that she once loved so much. Her answer: "Dad, I've reached puberty."

Boy, am I'm glad we got through that stage, well almost through. Now, getting her to age 18 is the next parenting trick.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | November 19, 2009 2:40 PM | Report abuse

What a roller coaster kit. Joel first rubs salt in a fresh yearning-wound; my ride-on mower broke an axle last week when I was using it to pick up leaves (2cd front axle in 10 years, grrrr..) and I had to walk the gauntlet of shiny new ride-on mowers on end-of-season sale at the mower store to get to the parts counter. My heart nearly exploded from yearning. My late mid-life crisis toy may well be a shiny red zero-radius turn lawnmower. My early mid-life toy was a grey subi wagon, I’m such a wild man.

Then engelmann put some balm on that throbbing wound with his funny poem. That felt good.

A decent vampire/with/werewolves/pixie/elves series for adult is the Hollows books by Kim Harrison. I read a couple and got semi-bored but Mrs. D, Witch no.1 and her friend the Cute Overachieving Cousin are all hooked. The latest one gets out in pocketbook in a couple of weeks and I’ve been reminded a few times already that I, the forgetful one, must not forget (for once!) this important event.
But honestly I’d rather stick a fork in my eyeball than read Greek Island-style almost-sex scene aloud to my teenage daughter. It gets pretty hot between the main protagonists but Harrison has a series for younger persons. Hopefully she has tone it down a bit, but I haven’t read it so beware. http://www.kimharrison.net/The%20Books.htm

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 19, 2009 2:45 PM | Report abuse

I've been hating on Whole Foods ever since they bought Fresh Fields and Bread & Circuses. Aside from losing the wider variety that three different chains offered, the lack of competition means that WF gets away with charging really outrageous prices.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 2:49 PM | Report abuse

But it's just not Twilight. There is that True Blood series that the HBO show is based on. Then there are various other interlocking books about all sorts of semi-erotic supernatural creatures. I blame Piers Anthony.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 2:59 PM | Report abuse

I think we should retitle Loh's articles as "Narcissism: a Blog".

Posted by: chrisp339 | November 19, 2009 3:07 PM | Report abuse

Now if you want to get into medieval anthropomorphic woodland creatures, the Redwall books are so full of feasts and recipes it's practically food pr0n.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Funnily, I read Loh just today-- an article in a teacher's magazine, talking about how her father, now so sweet and kindly at 89, was one of the toughest teacher she ever had-- he wanted his kids to learn science, starting at age 6.

It was a cute article, including how she started out majoring in science but switched to liberal arts "which to a shanghai-born dad, is like pole-dancing." But she says, "I host a science show, so that helps."


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 19, 2009 3:15 PM | Report abuse

chrisp339,
Are familiar with the concept of blogs? They could all be called that.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 3:15 PM | Report abuse

Yellojkt, I can't read Redwall.

One, I keep wondering why the (*^(*% a weasel needs a knife when he has dozens in his own mouth. Then there's the clothes thing, too. Claws mix badly with buttons and zippers.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 19, 2009 3:17 PM | Report abuse

"Fuzzy Narcissism
To Make Your Lame Day Brighter:"
My new blog title.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 19, 2009 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Whole Foods also bought Wild Oats, then shut the store, 0:50 away. So the nearest is now 1:50 away in the tourist thicket of Orlando.

Fresh Market recently opened. I'm not sure that the 200 kinds of cheese are any better than the 50 or so at a cheese shop across the shopping center. Or better priced, or better cared-for. Their bakery seems good. Haven't tried deli.

Then there was the matter of Walmart selling Maytag cheese. Briefly. They seem to be letting their deli die of neglect. Can't believe it's not a profit center. Perhaps all the available personable, polite deli employees are working for Fresh Market and Publix.

I miss living within walking distance of Trader Joe's. They had the cheapest milk in town at a time when I was participating in a dietary study that required consuming it. French cheese at Kraft prices. Belgian chocolate at Hershey prices. Some good-for-cholesterol food, too.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | November 19, 2009 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Someone will eventually market a Narcissus named "Fuzzy Teacup".

The bulb merchants are dumping their leftover bulbs. Time to scoop up the loot. Except there's never sale prices on amaryllis bulbs, which can live long and proliferate in Florida.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | November 19, 2009 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Major thunder and lightning here now.

What's up with that? Sign of the Apocolypse?

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Warning: That not be the spelling...

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 3:38 PM | Report abuse

*faxin' englemann a Palm Door for Excellence in Boodle Poetry*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 19, 2009 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Oh Ivansmom, the Cartman version of "Poker Face" is way better than the Lady GaGa original. Of course, I am also quite fond of Cartman's version of "Come Sail Away."

Look, we all have our issues.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 3:52 PM | Report abuse

Could be a sign of the Pork Lips, rickoshea:

http://www.dolorescanning.com/canning/lips.html

I'm pretty sure Whole Foods doesn't carry this.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 3:53 PM | Report abuse

Hah!

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 4:04 PM | Report abuse

rashamon... my husband used to buy a "luncheon meat" whose first listed ingredient was "pork lips."

I used to wonder what it meant further down the list when it just said "pork."

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 4:04 PM | Report abuse

Now that I think of it, I'm also pretty sure that it's 100% fiber-free.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 4:09 PM | Report abuse

A friend of my wife's wanted some pig ears for her dog. She suggested an Asian grocery. Worked out fine.

We were at a Vietnamese restaurant in Wheaton last weekend and my wife got the Bún bò Huế which is the spicy variation on phở popular in the central highlands. It had all sorts of meats in it. She fished out a large dark red piece and grimaced. She was pretty sure it was heart and she doesn't like the organ meats so much. I broke of a small piece to give it a taste and wasn't impressed.

After lunch we went to the grocery store next door to pick up some staples. In the open refrigerator case was a gallon bucket with several big chunks of what had been in the soup just floating in juice. Pretty sure they were more hearts but there was no label or price.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

roshomon - love the tag:
ready to eat - great tasting - convenient

um....

um.......

um..........................

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

yello: I've always been curious about the items in some Chinese restaurants that are listed on the menu only in Chinese.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 4:20 PM | Report abuse

yello - i can only get the #12 at PHO75 - brisket and flank... i'm sorry but i aint eatin tripe, tendon or any other organs...
i'm an adventurous eater but i have my limits - i also don't eat menudo...

ah pho - pho can cure ALLL your woes and ailments...

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Dr G wants to take the family to a fake Vietnamese restaurant and order "faux pho for four."

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 4:26 PM | Report abuse

hey yello - what's the stuff on the side that the authentico's order at pho restaurants? i've always been afraid to ask...

ah dr. g - such the witty, witty gentleman!

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Totally off topic...

Did y'all know that Trip Advisor has 694 user-contributed reviews of [Dwight] Schrute's Beet Farm B&B?

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g52842-d730099-Reviews-Schrute_Farms-Honesdale_Pennsylvania.html

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 4:35 PM | Report abuse

In Del Rio (TX) I had friends & neighbors for whom it would have been a near-mortal insult had I refused to eat their menudo. I ate plenty, it was fine.

Posted by: bobsewell | November 19, 2009 4:35 PM | Report abuse

Oops... 624. Like it matters.

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 4:35 PM | Report abuse

I'm with you, mo. I stick to the flank steak or brisket. Which Pho75 do you go to? We seem to always end up at the one on University Blvd amongst all the Latin food restaurants.

I'm not a soup person, so if there are things on the menu other than pho, I will usually get that. Grilled lemongrass pork or chicken over vermicilli noodles is my favorite.

This place in Wheaton (behind Hung Phat Asian Grocery) had some of the freshest basil and cilantro for the pho that we have seen outside of Saigon.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Life is back to normal here, as the boy's fever broke yesterday. Everyone returned to school. I could learn to like 3 day work weeks.

Posted by: -jack- | November 19, 2009 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Glad the boy is back to "normal," jack.

And yes... three-day work weeks are great. As are the four-day weekends they accompany.

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 4:42 PM | Report abuse

They had a custom of humming their own signature tune. And they charged the customers extra to hear it, at parties and whatnot. It was the fee, five, fo' faux pho hum.

Posted by: Jumper1 | November 19, 2009 4:45 PM | Report abuse

One of the weird downsides of the current recession, including a number of women who are entering the sex trade, as mentioned by Barbara Ehrenreich during her talk at Texas Lutheran University in Seguin last night: less typical dinner meats. More typical is people who skimp or eliminate their medications because they can't afford them, she went on to explain. Squirrel or raccoon for dinner anyone?

http://news.racinepost.com/2009/06/subsisting-on-stewed-squirrel-in-racine.html

Excerpt:
One of the examples she [Ehrenreich] cites is an unnamed Racinian: "In Racine, WI, a 51-year-old laid-off mechanic told me he’s supplementing his diet by 'shooting squirrels and rabbits and eating them stewed, baked and grilled.' In Detroit, where the wildlife population has mounted as the human population ebbs, a retired truck driver is doing a brisk business in raccoon carcasses, which he recommends marinating with vinegar and spices."

Not a pretty picture in a city whose priorities favor spending $55,000 on a piece of public art.
***

A good portion of Ehrenreich's talk last night is in this June 2009 New York Times op-ed:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/14/opinion/14ehrenreich.html?th=&adxnnl=1&emc=th&pagewanted=1&adxnnlx=1258666540-f9+BEsvuEJ8mdY1ORHsTzQ

Perhaps I'll save the best of Ehrenreich for the report she collaborated on, to be issued by the Institute for Social Policy [and Understanding] before Thanksgiving (she hoped..she was turning over her shoulder to tell me this as she was being escorted from the stage for her book signing). If anyone should have a heads-up on this, it should be NYT's Bob Herbert, or perhaps Ehrenreich will write a guest op-ed to be published in one of the major papers next week.

It was a 110-mile roundtrip drive to Seguin last night. Still feel very tuckered out from the trip.

Posted by: laloomis | November 19, 2009 4:50 PM | Report abuse

Bob S.> it would have been a near-mortal insult had I refused to eat their menudo.

I always wondered what happened to that band. Maybe the Jonas Bros. had better watch their backs in TX.

Thanks for the kind words. After Joel's saying it pretty much wrote itself.

Posted by: engelmann | November 19, 2009 4:50 PM | Report abuse

yello - remember i'm a va girl - and the ONLY pho i go to is PHO 75 in rosslyn - CRACK SOUP i tell ya! it has been voted best deal/pho for the last 23 years from washingtonian magazine so that must say sumtin right there...
i hate to say it but i've never understood non-soup ppl - i LOVE soup...

jack - shoulda taken him to pho - i'm telling you - it will cure any ailment! (or maybe just pho 75 in arlington - it's the crack!)

and bob s. - ok, i admit it - i've been too chicken to ever try menudo... but i've heard THAT cures all ailments as well...

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 4:51 PM | Report abuse

mo,
I kinda answered it above, but pho is a bit of a make-your-own dish. The bowl will come with the noodles, meat, carrot, scallions and jalapenos in it. You then add basil, cilantro, bean sprouts and chili-garlic sauce to suit. Ground peanut is also not uncommon (beware of food allergies). You are supposed to pick the basil leaf by leaf off the side plate.

Note that the type of basil and cilantro is just a little different from what you can get even in a Whole Foods. I was getting thai basil at H-Mart but I didn't see any at the one in Wheaton when we were there.

At Pho Hao, the best place for pho in Saigon and hence the world, they have giant heaping bowls of the green right on the table family style as well as in big nets hanging off the ends of the tables. Pho Hao is a high rise restaurant with rows and rows of long tables on each level. I call it Four Floors Of Pho.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 4:56 PM | Report abuse

I'll file that away for future reference, mo. It'll give me an excuse to go the the Queen City, and rendezvous with Jumper at the Penguin. I get my H1N1 vaccine tomorrow, and opted for the inhaled kind. I understand that it is the live virus iteration. How Salkian.

Posted by: -jack- | November 19, 2009 4:57 PM | Report abuse

yello - not THAT stuff - sheesh! i'm versed enuff in pho to know about the sprouts, greens, jalepenos, lime and sirachi (ah, sirachi) - i spent a cpl months eating so much pho there that the waiter didn't even bother to give me a menu or ask me what i wanted... it's the little bowl of stuff that some ppl order on the side. pho 75 only does pho so it's not the regular acoutremont that comes with pho...

Posted by: mortii | November 19, 2009 5:00 PM | Report abuse

Love the pho puns. I deliberately mispronounce it as foe, but the real Vietnamese way to say it is closer to fah as 'do, a dear,... fa, a long long way to run'. But since I have no ear for tonal languages, I'm probably insulting somebody's mother every time I order off the menu.

I am also very fond of banh mi. Once you get used to the idea of cilantro, jalapeno, and pickled carrots as garnishes, they are very delicious.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 5:04 PM | Report abuse

If we're talking about Asian food... Saturday night we had fabulous Bibimbap at the tiny, hidden Korea House Restaurant in Charlottesville.

The version we got was Dolsot Bibimbap, which means it was served in a HOT stone bowl, so that everything in the bowl kept cooking, caramelizing anything that touched the sides into a delicious, crunchy bite.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Korean_cuisine-Bibimbap-08.jpg/800px-Korean_cuisine-Bibimbap-08.jpg

Posted by: -TBG- | November 19, 2009 5:11 PM | Report abuse

I'll have to ask, mo. I'm really pretty ignorant about the cusine for how much of it I eat. I was trained early on as my wife's mother would prepare stuff in her kitchen to just not ask too many questions about what goes into the food. There either wasn't an English word for it or I didn't want to know. I do know that woodear mushrooms are the make or break critical ingredient in cha gio. I laughed when I found out that my M-I-L used lumpia wrappers for her cha gio. She claims it holds up a little better when frying.

She recently sent us four one-pound bags of mushroom seasoning since our son needed some for lemongrass chicken. Since you only need a tablespoon or two at a time, that is a lifetime supply.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 5:12 PM | Report abuse

Hey, TBG, how much is the fee for faux pho for four these days?

I understand there are some places where you can bring in your own pho and they'll fry it for you. But you have to be careful if someone wants to just give it away, because you never know where they got the free fry pho from.

I know nothing about that kind of food. If I tried to order it I know I'd make a pho pah.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 19, 2009 5:17 PM | Report abuse

yello: I stopped trying to order using anything other than English (or by number) after a couple of experiences in Thai restaurants. One was at the long-gone Thai Hut in Wheaton, where my efforts were rewarded by something far different than what I thought I was asking for. I was too embarrassed to send it back, but fortunately, it was rather tasty. Never did find out what it was. Another time I ordered take-out over the phone. Apparently, that time I got the pronunciation right, because the restaurant owner asked me how long I had lived in Thailand when I picked it up. The answer was "never," but, based on that assumption, I think they prepared the food in a much more traditional manner than was usual for Westerners. It was just about spicy enough to strip paint...

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 5:17 PM | Report abuse

Bibimbap looks delicious. At the Korean place in Ellicott City we usually go for the grill at your table stuff, so we have no idea what stuff is called.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 5:20 PM | Report abuse

Hey, it's Art after all.

Glee is a blog topic in the NYT's Arts Beat blog.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/11/19/glee-watch-paired-up/

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 5:27 PM | Report abuse

I understand that when Saturday Night Live gets takeout for the cast they sometimes order pho for Fey.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 5:37 PM | Report abuse

pssst...Jeff Bridges might be up for an Oscar. Look for Crazy Heart in a theatre near you:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/19/movies/19crazy.html

Posted by: -jack- | November 19, 2009 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Hey Boodle, the Pho jokes are good.

The bad haircut is now fixed, the necessary in-person banking done (it surprises me somewhat that *any* banking needs a trip to an actual branch. These odd pieces of paper known as "cheques."), and plans made for Friday evening. So that is a pretty good afternoon.

Now time to prepare a bog-standard supper. Nothing exciting tonight.

Is there anything good on TV tonight?

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 5:53 PM | Report abuse

Nobel Laureate John Mather tells the story of the universe in about one hour: pictures! text line on the bottom. Psst. WB, accomodates for you and your brethren and sistren.

WORTH the hour.

http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/mather/

Divided into 18 "chapters" so you can watch this in bits and starts.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 5:53 PM | Report abuse

Yoki -- bog standard dinner for us growing up was boiled dinner: tates, cabb, and some beef. Mebbe carrots!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 5:54 PM | Report abuse

Well,now -- after back-boodling a bit, I found that we were talking about food and that I have something to contribute. My Zambian friend brought me a cookbook from there, which gives recipes for all sorts of things.

Now, I'm a reasonably adventurous eater, but I am not (*NOT*) going anywhere near the fried caterpillars (which my friend loves as a snack). Nor am I going anywhere near the mouse. That being said, as someone who collects cookbooks from different cultures, it's a pretty fun read.

Time to nuke some leftovers for dinner. Oh, I miss my friend terribly! Hoping his brother will actually make it over around the beginning of the year. Such lovely people. . . . *sigh*

Posted by: -ftb- | November 19, 2009 5:56 PM | Report abuse

Mine too. I don't do that so much anymore, though it still tastes good to me. My Mam was adventurous; sometimes she put in onions :)

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 5:57 PM | Report abuse

Paging SD -- video lolcats-style confection in FRENCH!!! Circa 70s.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpDUc8pPxRk

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 5:57 PM | Report abuse

That is the downside of having beloved visitors, isn't it ftb? They eventually depart, leaving a sort of friend-shaped hole.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:01 PM | Report abuse

And putting it all together:

I was once in one of those fake Vietnamese restaurants in New York when four SNL cast members came in. When they were done, a certain well known political impersonator insisted on paying the tab.

So the waiter had to calculate the fee for Fey for faux pho for four.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 6:05 PM | Report abuse

Threadweaver award envelope, please.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:08 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Yoki with clafouti on top. Rasho, you hit the trifecta today. Good!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:10 PM | Report abuse

Hee hee, CqP, I just had a picture of you and me as award-show presenters, in amazing gowns, the slight quick red-head and the wide slow one, hamming it up mercilessly behind a podium and having a far better time than any of the winners. Works for me!

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:15 PM | Report abuse

The last time my kiddo was here, he told us pho was pronounced fa. I never knew - the first time I tried it was with a friend from Vietnam. I didn't want to eat tendon, so I just slurped the liquid. My picky-eater kid apparently has changed his ways, I'm happy to say.

And speaking of banks, he still hasn't cashed the check I sent for Christmas last year. Sigh. (I asked if he could deal with a check and he said yes.)

jack, glad your son is on the mend, and yay for the swine flu shot. I had no ill effects from mine - the dead virus variety. Hope it works. The stupidity of the American people continues to astound me.

Posted by: seasea1 | November 19, 2009 6:18 PM | Report abuse

You, in a silver-grey number shot through with burgundy flashes of light -- shot taffeta, seldom used these days but more's the pity tis not.

Me, in a emerald-green moire satin, with ruching touches.

We agreed, in advance, to wear huge ironical bows. Why? To give Robin Givhan a reason to write about our odd paean to the weirdness that is high fashion.

Rashoman -- are you swooning yet? You should!!!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:20 PM | Report abuse

Fantastic Kit Joel and Engelmann, your sonnet was perfect. I've been out all day and just starting to catch up, but we have dancing lessons tonight so any thoughts I'm having will wait til later.

Posted by: badsneakers | November 19, 2009 6:20 PM | Report abuse

Badsneaks, be sure to put on your sweet-sneaks for dancing. How darling! How fun! Would you like to go in a tango-red ruffle number? Or do you prefer a sleek black side slit frock? My treat.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:23 PM | Report abuse

And the old-hand Boodlers would see the compliment to them in the bows!

Perfect, perfect. Yes, shot-silk is too little seen laterally. Ever peeled a raw beet? Pure shot-silk.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:24 PM | Report abuse

Had to go stick my head in the freezer to cool off, CQP.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 6:25 PM | Report abuse

Rashoman, you now advance to level 16 of the boodle. Scotty will mail you the secret decoder ring AFTER you send in 42 Cream of Wheat boxtops.

Yoki -- I shall order the gown in beet-silver shot silk. PERFECT for you.

SeaSea -- took CPBoy to doc to get the shot and NONE LEFT!!!! NONE. Who is GETTING those shots? I am starting to believe that the Wall Street Cabal did corner the market.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:29 PM | Report abuse

CP, fire engine red please and either ruffles or fringe as the lesson are for Cha Cha - gotta move the hips, etc. ;-)

Posted by: badsneakers | November 19, 2009 6:33 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, why don't you see if you can get Faux Fox up there in Canuckistan? Get your Irish up.

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 6:34 PM | Report abuse

Oh no, CP. Out here pharmacies got some - I made an appointment. They've also had clinics where people waited for hours in line. Seems like there should be more available by now, especially when half the people don't want that guvmint shot.

Posted by: seasea1 | November 19, 2009 6:34 PM | Report abuse

Jack, you could put this on my gravestone:

Ironical bows

I think that pun works fine about the goofy oversized fashion ornaments beloved by the boodle and as a kind of exit move.

Can I lock in the price of $999.99?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:34 PM | Report abuse

And the green moire is on it's way to you, tenderly sheathed in rustling tissue paper, in one of those excitingly polished white boxes.

And yet, and yet, too many Edwardian novels of my childhood referred to "midnight-blue" silk. I wonder? I mean, for me? Perhaps for the People's Choice?

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:34 PM | Report abuse

If you don't want to watch Fox drivel, the NYT (same blog as above,) tells you what to watch:

What to Watch Thursday: Cameo Dads, Terror in Mumbai
By MIKE HALE

Ralph Waite, best known for playing Pa on “The Waltons,” moves up to Grandpa on “Bones” (Fox, 8 p.m.), where he guest stars as the grandfather of Booth (David Boreanaz). It’s also patriarch night on ABC: Frankie Faison appears as Bailey’s father on “Grey’s Anatomy” (9 p.m.) and Stephen Collins plays Addison’s dad on “Private Practice” (10 p.m.).

On “Fringe” (Fox, 9 p.m.), Michael Cerveris — taking time out from his preparations for Sarah Ruhl’s “In the Next Room, or the vibrator play” on Broadway — dons Zegna suit and eyebrow-obscuring makeup for an episode centering on his recurring character, the Observer.

The HBO documentary “Terror in Mumbai” (8 p.m.) uses chilling video surveillance footage, intercepted cellphone conversations and interviews with witnesses and law-enforcement officials to put together a time line of the massacre carried out last November in India’s largest city by 10 Pakistani terrorists.

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 6:39 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I would do one shade lighter than midnight blue for you: call this "between twilight and dusk" and I might, just might, stud the neckline with seed pearls. I would love that on you for dinner in soft lemony candlelight. But, for the stage we might need the overdone spangling of chandelier diamonds in a necklace and earrings. If you like, you may have a tiara for dress-up fun but you MAY NOT WEAR than on stage. Swear? Pinky-swear? Ok then.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:39 PM | Report abuse

Why does this sound strangely alluring, even though I don't really know what it means?

>>On “Fringe” (Fox, 9 p.m.), Michael Cerveris — taking time out from his preparations for Sarah Ruhl’s “In the Next Room, or the vibrator play” on Broadway — dons Zegna suit and eyebrow-obscuring makeup for an episode centering on his recurring character, the Observer.<<

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:41 PM | Report abuse

Hi Ricko.

Sneaks -- fire engine red in a restrained Carmen ruffle number. And, for competition, I insist you take the modified hair comb with a lace mantilla fall. Black but with red and white rhinestones.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:42 PM | Report abuse

Oh, heavens, no, CP. It would be fine to clown around in in the greenroom, maybe even take some photos, but I am not at *all* a tiara sort of girl. Not in public!

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:46 PM | Report abuse

Although I did wear a small circlet of Stephanotis in lieu of a veil for my (*thinks* first) wedding. Look, it was the early 80s, we were all about "flowers in her hair".

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:48 PM | Report abuse

I hated this Saturnin show with a passion. The zozotting duckling does nothing for me. Roast that baby and bring on the cassis jam. Yum.

That and Aglaë and Sidonie...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HtKJVXhV2Fg

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 19, 2009 6:49 PM | Report abuse

Rick -- I have in the costume wardrobe a lovely, lovely pinot noir dress with fringe that invokes but does not scream flapper. The neckline is ballerina and the hemline finished in a dear but subtle lettuce stitch. For you. Twas on Helen Mirren's short list for an event with the Queen. But now, yours.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:50 PM | Report abuse

SeaSea -- for you, we begin with lacey spiderweb mits that are mid forearm length. From there, we will build the gown. Something grey-lavender? Like the sky when rain is past and the sunset is just revealed?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:52 PM | Report abuse

CP, How very thoughtful of you, my dear. The choice of pinot noir is exactly right; I can spill my glass of wine down my modest bodice with no one being the wiser!

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 6:53 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I don't know what it means either, but I find it deliciously snarky.

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 19, 2009 6:54 PM | Report abuse

Oh, Shriek, I had entirely blanked that out. I am *falling about.*

Algae suffering from saturnine acidie (courtesy of Ivansmom's Universal Translating Machine) is not really that good a premise for a kid's show, you know?

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 6:55 PM | Report abuse

Oh SD -- sorry to send you to schlock. A friend sent it as a(n) (ironical) antidote to LolKats dreck. So sorry. In apology, I will wash VLP when he next encounters a skunk. Do you think a 200gallon stock tank of tomato juice will work?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:56 PM | Report abuse

Rick--the color came from a bottle of vino purchased by Mudge on one of his vineyard jaunts.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 6:58 PM | Report abuse

I'm loving the fashion show, CqP and Yoki! This tape will play in my head for days; I'll giggle at inappropriate times and people will look at me like I'm crazy. I hope Nelson is following along...

Mr. T and I came up the mountain this afternoon, hence my absence till now. A great day on the boodle, it makes up for the last couple.

Jack, I'm glad the boy is on the mend. Why do you always come to Charlotte when I'm not there?

I have two new places for you to try: Intermezzo, at 10th and Louise next to the Salvation Army, and Common House, on Central on the other side of the Salvation Army. I like the food at both. Intermezzo bills itself as a pizza joint but has good German-inspired entrees. Common House has great sandwiches and salads. Try the shrimp burger or the fried green tomato BLT.

Posted by: slyness | November 19, 2009 7:00 PM | Report abuse

Actually, rickoshea, CqP has it. A hit! A very palpable hit! You are as hot as Helen Mirren and as gracious as the Queen. And if you spill a little, we commoners will apologize profusely for it.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 7:00 PM | Report abuse

Slyness -- for the mountain, I won't put you in red/black buffalo plaid. Yet, how about a tiny houndstooth viyella shirt with black slacks to match. A pair of red flats to add a touch of Carmine wryness for Country-gal Slyness.

Viyella fabric -- first copyrighted textile ever -- is 30%wool/70%cotton; lovely, lovely hand and drape. Think highland clan plaids but so refined. Cozy, too.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 7:07 PM | Report abuse

That's OK CpQ, I recovered. The VLP hasn't met a skunk yet. *knocking on the VLP's head*

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 19, 2009 7:09 PM | Report abuse

SD -- I sent a brown/orange buffalo plaid Pendleton shirt to you. I also asked them to stitch up a matching Rocky the Squirrel hat for you. You need such fine wear for VPL walks. Mea culpa times three times three.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 7:13 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, a circle of Stephanotis, how lovely, had lots of them in my wedding bouquet, such a lovely scent.

I was veiless also, and as I am not the type to blush, no blusher either.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 19, 2009 7:15 PM | Report abuse

Oh my, I haven't thought of Viyella in, literally, donkey's years. When I was a little kid, we lived in one of those post-war salt-boxes that line the streets of south-side Edmonton. Seven people (plus occasional guests) in 800 sq/ft. We all had Viyella dressing gowns, because on winter mornings there would be frost around every electrical outlet, window-casing and doorway.

We learned, much later, long after we moved out, that when the fourth-to-us owners went to upgrade, the outer walls fell apart, rotted through and through. There was no insulation whatever. In Edmonton! Hee hee.

Did I tell you about walking to school without shoes in -40F blizzards? In our pyjamas? At 04:00?

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 7:19 PM | Report abuse

Pho-bulous, y'all.

Thanks also for the dresses. I have splendid mental images now. Sumptuous fabric, elegant design, lovely women. Very nice.

RD, the Boy and I thank you, in dubious fashion, for Cartman singing Lady Gaga's Poker Face. Very silly, funny. I don't even like South Park.

After a good day and a half recovered I seem to have relapsed. Grumpus. Grumpus. I loved this Kit and under other circumstances would have had something pithy to say about mommy's midlife crises.

Or perhaps I did, and posted it, and forgot. Let's pretend that.

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 19, 2009 7:24 PM | Report abuse

Oh, CqP, that is just perfect, thank you so much! And red flats! I was thinking earlier today that I need a pair!

For my (first) wedding, I made my veil with lovely faux apple blossoms (it was April!) and tulle just below my shoulders. No blushing veil for me, either. I was bareheaded and wore a light pink gown when Mr. T and I were married. The bridesmaids, my dottirs and Mr. T's neice, wore creamy white sundresses with pink bows on the back.

Posted by: slyness | November 19, 2009 7:29 PM | Report abuse

Oh my: Vampires meet lapins in James Howe's
Bunnicula series.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula

I bet that Ivansmom and RD already know these celery-juice seeking lapinopires.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 7:29 PM | Report abuse

I wonder if Lady Gaga knows that being gaga means to be senile in French...

The Rocky the Squirrell hat's fine. My reputation for wearing funny hats can't get worse.

I enjoyed the pho puns (pho pah gets the highest mark for a trilingual pun) and vietnamese food discussion. I always order something I know nothing about in Vietnames or Chinese restaurant. I got fried liver with creamed corn, half a duck chopped with the bones in, gooey doughnut dough in sweet/sour sauce, tripes in grey sauce, fried whole small fish, etc. but the stangest was an extremely sweet soup of seafood with a side of hot sauce served with something that looked like dried nan bread.
Tonight we had an Asian mash-up, Costco Spring roll with homemade Nuoc Cham (the dip with nam pla/fish sauce with pickled carrots) and cauliflower with Korma sauce. Asian fusion allright.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 19, 2009 7:38 PM | Report abuse

SCC crap, the whole thing. I didn't know what to do with the sweet soup, was it dessert or entrée?

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 19, 2009 7:40 PM | Report abuse

Jeez, you guys have sure had an intense two hours!

Yoki and CqP, am unfamiliar with the term/definition/derivation of "bog standard." I'd guess something Scots/Irish peat-bog related, but that doesn't help me much.

CqP, are you going to wear a real bow or a faux bow? You could show off said attire to a pretend boyfriend (yes, a faux beau, ma petit chou).

Yoki, I'm a big fan of "Bones," coming on at 8 (EST) on Fox; the writing is good, fast and clever, and lots of cool quirky characters. I also like "The Mentalist" on CBS at 10.

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | November 19, 2009 7:41 PM | Report abuse

Oh yes. Bunnicula was big when the younguns were very wee.

Regarding Pho. I used to have a boss who referred to dreary days as "Pho Days." But we always stuck with the very thin flank steak. Of course, we always ordered the super-sweet coffee. 'Specially since I always went a little crazy with the pepper sauce. I liked the fish sauce too, so long as I didn't think about it too much. And there were never enough sprouts and basil.

Loved the fashion talk, as always. I think when I got married I wore, um, a suit of some kind. I'm pretty sure it was black.

And Cartman does know to rock out fer sure.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009 7:45 PM | Report abuse

Pho Bow on top of the knotted hair bun, Mudge surely, and trimmed with miniature lacquer-ware chopsticks. I shall repeat the theme with double rows of pho bows down the spine of the dress.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 7:49 PM | Report abuse

Well, fair enough, no? When us lady-types take over for a while, and play.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 7:50 PM | Report abuse

CP, this is poetical:
"Like the sky when rain is past and the sunset is just revealed"

So, yes, with accents of amethyst perhaps, and maybe a scarf I'm finishing which is shades of pink and gold. Very fun.

Posted by: seasea1 | November 19, 2009 7:55 PM | Report abuse

I just realized I need to know how to write "pregnant egg" in kmer and vietnamese, so that I won't order it. It's a duck egg just about to hatch that is boiled in water. A hard boiled egg with a tiny crunchy boiled duckling inside. Even Saturnin doesn't deserve that.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 19, 2009 7:58 PM | Report abuse

Ewwww. I've drunk freshly-let snake blood mixed with wine in China, and eaten fish pie with salmon-vertebrae in England (and my former Sister-in-Law when she learned that I'd eaten horse and rabbit in my European incarnation asked me, "And do you eat road-kill as well?") but even I draw the line at mummified chicks.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:02 PM | Report abuse

Strange food should be an interesting topic. (Or would that be eigen-food, Yoki?)

Camel jerky would have to top the list for me.

Posted by: rashomon | November 19, 2009 8:10 PM | Report abuse

Wow. Vyella. I had some hand me down shirts from my Dad made of that material, plus some Pendletons. I was in HS, ca. '73. Great skiing shirts/casual winter wear, always with properly weathered Levis.

Posted by: -jack- | November 19, 2009 8:10 PM | Report abuse

Depends where you live, jack. Where EYE "winter" we require quite a bit more outerwear.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:12 PM | Report abuse

Feh. Fried lamb's eyes, rashomon (oddly, delicious, and not a bit jelly-like).

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:15 PM | Report abuse

Eigenpho. And the artificial stuff would be Igonfaux.

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | November 19, 2009 8:15 PM | Report abuse

Sad, Viyella fabric and clothing no longer made. Would have liked to sew up a cozy something for 2010. For outerwear in Jack's climes but underwear in Yoki's. :)

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 8:16 PM | Report abuse

No Viyella
quipped Barbarella?

Then, unroll the chiffon
Tis like nothing on.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 8:18 PM | Report abuse

hahaha, you totally owned that one, CP. Love you.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:18 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, it just now occurred to me that Barbarella is Barbara Allen. Wow. Can you believe it?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 8:25 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I know. And the Silkie. It takes a certain kind of anthrogust, to do this. Yes! They are, sort of, mythical beasts that teach us something important. Perfect Forms. Barbara Ellen, is, somehow, the Woman in the Green Kirtle.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Yoki -- see this artist's take on Barbara Ellen
http://www.dandutton.com/full_index/barbara_ellen_oc.html
Can be clicked into a large and astonishing image.

Had a collateral ancestor named Susan Ellen -- called Susella or Shushella.

One Irisher elder, Paddy Josie (Patricia Josephine) would always say when the style just perfect: "Silky, dear, so silky." I now know that she was invoking "Selkie" for sleek beauty.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 8:37 PM | Report abuse

And then there was the time the Vikings quarterback got in trouble with PETA over his winter coat despite the fact that it was fake. So in a goodwill gesture he auctioned it to benefit a soup kitchen and named the charity Favre Faux Fur For Pho.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 8:41 PM | Report abuse

Serious boodle fashion question. Have purchased a pair of expensive (for me)black velvety kitten heeled pointy toed pumps for New Years and other holiday grown up events. Are pants ok, or must I break down and buy a dress (of the little black, not gown variety)?

With no kids at home we are blissfully Twilight free Chez Frostbitten. My inappropriate crush is on Puck from Glee, which goes to show I've learned nothing since high school and very little while still there.

I must say you all look fabulous, got my first pair of real prescription spectacles today-no line trifocals. Drive, read, work on the computer all with the same lenses (though preferably not at the same time).

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 19, 2009 8:49 PM | Report abuse

mo,
My wife says the side dish is thinly sliced onions soaked in vinegar. Our local pho place has been bought by Koreans who like the onions and also really spice it up with as much chili sauce as they can. Korean food violates my rule that the spiciness of a cuisine is inversely proportional to the distance from the equator.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 8:50 PM | Report abuse

Yes. The Black-Irishman is also like a seal, in his darkness.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Kitten heels! Wear how you most wish, frosti. Slacks, a black pencil skirt and leather jacket, skinny jeans and a sweater, or even (very daring) leggings ($25 at Jacob) and a short trench. Kitten heals *so* work with everything.

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 8:54 PM | Report abuse

Frosti -- either work with the shoes, including the kitten heels. These used to be called court heels, as in Louise of frenchi-Parisian-Versailles fame. If you can bear this, some sort of frosted bauble would set off the black so nicely AND punny off your name oh Gertrude Jekyll of the Northern Lakelands.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 8:56 PM | Report abuse

Oh boodle, here is my holiday fantasy for the uncoming days of darkness lightened by family and food: I shall costume you all as in a Pieter Bruegel painting. Imagine that!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 19, 2009 9:04 PM | Report abuse

That will be fabulous fun, CqP! I can hardly wait for the mental pictures of all of us!

Something shiny and drapey and comfortable for me, please.

Posted by: slyness | November 19, 2009 9:06 PM | Report abuse

Yoki-I have dropped some weight of late, but not so much that Stacy and Clinton wouldn't come sweep me off the street should I wear either skinny jeans or leggings.

CqP-I must say the shoes make me dream of walking through a mirror into Versailles. What suddenly seized me and drew me to them I don't know, but at the moment I tried them on I wished you were there to say yea or nay.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 19, 2009 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Might I be so bold as to request no lace or itchy fabrics, has bothered my skin since I was a little one.

Loving your fashion comments tonight CP.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 19, 2009 9:18 PM | Report abuse

I layered the Vyella/Pendleton over long underwear tops completed the ensemble with a ski sweater. The alternative wardrobe was for school, thus a tshirt with some sort of graphic, and an open shirt, again with jeans, and untied high top 'Verses, or untied hiking boots. Our iteration of counter culture dress. Then I let my hair grow for a few years.

Posted by: -jack- | November 19, 2009 9:18 PM | Report abuse

Splendid again, y'all.

CP, in the Boodle Brueghel may I wear a hat? A big one?

Yoki, I almost forgot to congratulate you for the fine Universal Translation.

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 19, 2009 9:41 PM | Report abuse

Dratted CO alarm keeps going off. We opened the doors to let fresh (cold) air in. This place is too tight. The alarm gets antsy when Mr. T turns on the gas logs to warm the house up...

TBG, is Dr. G watching the Heels? (I know, stupid question.)

Posted by: slyness | November 19, 2009 9:54 PM | Report abuse

Not sure I understand what viyella is CP, but would this suffice?

http://store.hbc.com/women-s-team-canada/women-s-canadian-olympic-team-lumberjack-henley/prodRVWTF906.html

Posted by: dmd3 | November 19, 2009 10:01 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

I'm so sorry I missed today's festive Boodling (BTW, great Kit, Joel). Been working harder than usual this week, and will probably do so until the Thanksgiving holiday, when I'll collapse in a shambling smoking heap of twisted metal.

Decided to reward myself by watching the Miami Dolphins at the Carolina Panthers on Thursday Night NFL football. Looked like it was going to be puntfest early on, but the Dolphins seem to have relocated their offense despite the absences of QB Chad Pennington and RB Ronnie Brown [Naturally, I picked Carolina tonight.]

Frosti, good call on those shoes and I think you'll be fine with whatever you choose - the slacks or the LBD.

Personally, I ready for some good full-dress Holiday Partying myself, no bows for me except for the tie on my tux.

And lord knows those of us suffering with lycanthropy can sympathise with the difficulties of removing clothing fasteners with nails or teeth. However, perseverence has it's rewards.

And finally, I know for a fact that I am in no position to critique or comment on anyone's exhibitions or definitions of romantic love (fictional or otherwise). I think we all know for ourselves when we're in it, when we're out of it, and what we're willing to do for it.

Maybe even break open a box of high-fiber breakast cereal.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 19, 2009 10:21 PM | Report abuse

But I won't do THAT!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTPko-aXvJM

Posted by: yellojkt | November 19, 2009 10:33 PM | Report abuse

When my daughters became teenagers I was only in my early and mid thirties so I think I had an early mid-life identity crisis trying to deal with their become young women at a time when I still thought of myself as a ‘young woman.’ My way of dealing with this was not to dress like a teenager, get crushes on their teen idols or seduce one of their boyfriends, thank goodness.

However, I did read every single Ann Rice vampire book around that time and I had a crush on Frank Langella after I saw him on stage as Dracula, so I guess there is ‘something’ about vampires that appeals to girls and women. Intimacy without s3x? The romance of something dark, mysterious and forbidden? I have no idea because I’m well past that phase of my life and have no interest in vampires anymore, unless in biting me, they infuse my blood with ‘geritol’ ;-)

I am tired after two afternoons with granddaughters but we had fun. The beach and a cemetery yesterday and the Sandwich Glass Museum and another cemetery today. I was explaining to the 10 year old yesterday that I couldn’t sleep over last night because I had yoga class and she said that it was okay because yoga helped me keep the kinks out.

Posted by: badsneakers | November 19, 2009 11:11 PM | Report abuse

I've never gotten the vampire fetish myself, although a friend was seriously into vampires.

However I did like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and to a lesser degree, "Angel," but that was because of the story, dialogue, and humor about being the outsider.

Also, Buffy's boots are boots you can really do a lot in. I had a pair like those, and they were amazingly comfortable. I didn't kill any vampires, but I could walk a few miles in those ankle-highs.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 19, 2009 11:28 PM | Report abuse

After reading those Atlantic articles, I'm wondering if she'll write something further about life and love in her Volvo.

Call it

"Tsing Loh's Sweet Chariot"

And about that song, yello -- you'd be surprised.

Or maybe you wouldn't.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 19, 2009 11:34 PM | Report abuse

Too clever by half

Posted by: Yoki | November 19, 2009 11:44 PM | Report abuse

Ah, very good bc!


About fabric: while looking up the definition of Viyella (which was the first blend of cotton and wool, for those of you who didn't look it up) I found the fabric "challis." And I remember that! Had a lovely dress, very soft wool challis, in red. My "good" dress back in the mid 50's.

Posted by: nellie4 | November 19, 2009 11:49 PM | Report abuse

I don't know Viyella either, but I remember when voile was in fashion for dresses.

Posted by: seasea1 | November 19, 2009 11:56 PM | Report abuse

Something else I like about this nifty Kit -- JA deftly juxtaposes the Victorian-classic teen-oriented "Twilight" fantasy/romance novels and films with the gritty, confessional autobiographical blogesque works of 40-something Sandra Tsing Loh.

The dreams of sweet (dare I say, chaste?), almost confectionary youthful first love versus the clanky steampunk reality of 21st century love/sex/life.

And the effects on the human spirit, heart, and mind as we intellectually consider one extreme and the other and how both are, perhaps, necessary.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 20, 2009 12:08 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

Sorry to have kilt the Boodle last night.

A question:

Will Oprah announce that Sarah Palin will be taking over her show in 2011?

[As tempting as it might be to Tina Fey, I hope she doesn't go there either, though Palin's a goldmine of material these days.]

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 20, 2009 6:14 AM | Report abuse

bc,
You should know. Why do the vampires always get the girl? A werewolf is a nice ordinary hard-working guy that just has to blow off a little steam once a month. But go on one little rampage and leave a pasture of dead cattle in your wake and everybody's reaching for the box of silver Federal Premiums.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 20, 2009 6:44 AM | Report abuse

BEC biscuits in the ready room, along with proper coffee. Up 'n at 'em.

why are they called bobby pins, and not something like gomer pins?

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 7:11 AM | Report abuse

Nothing surprises me. A great many things amuse me. A few rare things impress me.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 20, 2009 7:19 AM | Report abuse

Senators draw their home state. And Al Franken is up first.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/12/departments/senator-maps

Posted by: yellojkt | November 20, 2009 7:28 AM | Report abuse

Gutten Morgen, Boodlerei!

Chomp, chomp on bisquits. Zooming into dismal overcast sky. Spring been cancelled here. No warm weather in sight.

Spy scandal spoiling relations between Chile and Peru.

In Singapore presidenta Bachelet told Alan Garcia, "We don't spy on anyone."

This morning, Peru delivered a 300 page report on Chilean spies in Peru.

Sensational headlines toned down today as things were getting out of hand.

Brag

Posted by: Braguine | November 20, 2009 7:29 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, you all. Jack, I've often wondered what constitutes "proper coffee"? It tastes wonderful, btw.

RE: bobby pin vs hair pin. Which is the wide spread one and which is the tight one? (maybe too graphic) I always thought bobby pins were named after the era when women had their hair bobbed, which is now in fashion again.

Wonderful kit, Joel. I know you support all of your womenfolks interests, appreciate their endeavors, forgive any teeny, tiny failings they might have, like disinterested in pruning the crepe mytle on their own.

Some times I think midlife crisis in the female is just a late teenage rebellion, but I also think most men are just little boys grown tall....works for me.


Posted by: VintageLady | November 20, 2009 7:35 AM | Report abuse

bc, please tell me it's 2011 already...

No? I'll settle for it being Friday, then.

I'm easy to please, y'see.

Except with my football picks... *SIGH*

*contemplating-a-completely-contrarian-approach-to-picking-the-weekend's-winners Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 8:06 AM | Report abuse

bc, to apply a line from one of the funniest women ever: "Oh, Todd!"

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 8:21 AM | Report abuse

'Morning, Boodle.

Gotta go sit in a mandatory saftey training class for the next 3 1/2 hours. What they can talk about for that long I have no earthly clue; all I know is I just don't ever want to be 3 1/2 hours worth of safe. Life's too short at is it. So try not to have an interesting discussions until noon, 'kay? (Which means you can talk about vampires and New moon until the cows come home.)

OK, a quick trip past the head, a fresh cup of coffee, a legal pad and pen, and I'm off. See ya at lunch. Maybe if I sit in the back I can play Texas Hold'em on my Blackberry.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 8:25 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all. Hey Cassandra! Early this morning I dreamed about coming to see you. It was a nice dream. We slept in, both of us needed the extra horizontal time.

Thanks for handling breakfast, Jack, the biscuits are delicious!

Today's task is to find and cut a suitable Christmas tree. There are, oh, 25 million trees in the high country, but Mr. T has to go out before Thanksgiving so that the right one doesn't get away.

Posted by: slyness | November 20, 2009 8:27 AM | Report abuse

Gonna pass on the coffee. I prefer mine a little tawdry.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 20, 2009 8:31 AM | Report abuse

That Mr. T is a good man Slyness!

Posted by: dmd3 | November 20, 2009 8:57 AM | Report abuse

I am so sorry I missed yesterday, not that I could have kept up or added anything.

You guys are pure genius.

Posted by: --dr-- | November 20, 2009 9:16 AM | Report abuse

Hmmmmm... Two discussion of interest to the Boodle:

Sietsema: Martha Stewart vs. Rachael Ray

The League: Nothing but Cowboy hatred?

I know how 'Mudge would reply to the second item. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 9:28 AM | Report abuse

Proper coffee, IMO, is the strongest brew made that isn't espresso. If you can see the bottom of a full cup, it isn't strong enough.

Stewart:Ray::_____________

a) preppy:perky
b) gourmet:pedestrian
c) budget breaker:frugal
d) hair spray:scrunchie

Personally, I'd like to see a cage match.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 9:53 AM | Report abuse

coffee maker died.

Not good.

Left with only option ... since Krups maker lacks a carafe, I am down to a french press and don't have a coarse grind, so I am stuck with a turkish brew that I need to decant.

Though it is tasty, it isn't good to the last drop.

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 9:54 AM | Report abuse

I need to try this.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/17/AR2009111703727.html

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 10:00 AM | Report abuse

Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/20/AR2009112001317.html

Oooooooookayyyyyy... *shaking my head*

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 10:32 AM | Report abuse

Scotty: I have a great deal on this piece of land...a bit swampy, with a castle...

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 10:46 AM | Report abuse

Analysis of the Chevy volt, after the battery runs out:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/22/automobiles/autoreviews/22-chevy-volt.html?hp

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 10:50 AM | Report abuse

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jO1EOhGkY0

Let's not bicker and argue.

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 10:59 AM | Report abuse

News Flash! Vatican validates Shroud of Turin
News Flash! Church of LDS validates golden plates of Moroni
News Flash! Orly Taitz proves Obama born in Kenya

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

Posted by: kguy1 | November 20, 2009 11:01 AM | Report abuse

From the Hope Springs Eternal Desk-

http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/11/18/101-year-old-man-buys-a-426-hp-camaro/?hpw

My favorite line: “He told me, ‘If I keep that 10 or 12 years, it will be worth about $100,000,’” Mr. Lamb said. “He’s very optimistic.”

Posted by: kguy1 | November 20, 2009 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Way to go Virgil! It's never too late to get what you want. I was just talking to the granddaughters yesterday about buying another Miata at some point in the future. They remember the one I had and asked why I sold it. Really miss that car.

Posted by: badsneakers | November 20, 2009 11:41 AM | Report abuse

At that age, you need a flashy car to pick up all those young nonagenarians.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 20, 2009 11:47 AM | Report abuse

I sure hope they don't check the shroud for editing marks...

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 12:05 PM | Report abuse

I sure hope they don't check my bedsheets that closely 500 years from now.
The embarrassment.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Ah, this is the Day of Dead Appliances. The built-in microwave passed away this morning, mid-job.

I looked online in one of those big electronic places, out of 150 shown, not one is also a convection. Descriptions extol sensors, automatic this, control that, but not one said "easy to clean and will last 10 years." That and different power cycles are about all I need--I prefer to cook, so the microwave is a convenient convenience for some parts of cooking.

I'm wondering if I can remove it and install a new one myself.

Not that one could call it authentic hummus (I think), but Bobbi's Tex-Mex Hummus (for garlic lovers only), black beans, jalapenos, fresh-cut garlic, oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, is pretty good! First there's a chill, then the jalapenos kick in and there's a comfortable afterburn in your mouth. I'll bring some to lunch today so you can try it.

TBG, looking forward to tomorrow!

Posted by: -dbG- | November 20, 2009 12:22 PM | Report abuse

rme, I'll go pick up more.

The current batch has been rendered unsanitary.

On the other hand, labs like it too!

Posted by: -dbG- | November 20, 2009 12:25 PM | Report abuse

I adore black beans, dbG. That sounds a little like a black bean soup I made once, only hotter and less wet.

Sorry about the microwave.

Microwave slash convection ovens are nice, but I never got the hang of the convection part.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 20, 2009 12:25 PM | Report abuse

How's this for a Sign of the Apocaplypse:

The Weather Channel is now showing...

movies.

And not even a "weather" movie such as "Twister," but a schlocky sci-fi shark flick, "Deep Blue Sea."

*SIGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 12:44 PM | Report abuse

The Perfect Storm
Les Parapluies de Cherbourg/Umbrellas of Cherbourg
The Day after Tomorrow

Then what?

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Agreed on Deep Blue Sea, Snuke, but you've got to admit that it does contain one good scene-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMwmqp3GLMc

Posted by: kguy1 | November 20, 2009 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Pretty sharp shark, but no frikkin' lasers.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 1:00 PM | Report abuse

Another part of the cunning invasion plan...

(Audio, perfectly safe for work but nobody will believe it is work-related.)

http://www.newyorker.com/online/2009/11/23/091123on_audio_trillin

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 1:00 PM | Report abuse

s_d - then what?

2012, when it sprints out of the theaters, I suppose.

Perhaps a double feature of The 10 Commandments and Evan Almighty, too.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 20, 2009 1:07 PM | Report abuse

"Volcano" or "Dante's Peak," perhaps?

"Earthquake" would work, although "10.5" is already sliced up for TV, so...

*shrug*

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Shriek, in the Calvin Trillin audio Yoki linked to, Trillin says the "correct" pronounciation of poutine is close to POO-tin (almost like the Russian fellow(, although he admits "everybody pronounces it" poo-TEEN.

(I don't quite understand how one can be "correct" but the other is how everybody says it.)

Be that as it may, how do you and our other Canucks view the proper pronounciation? Yoki? DMD? DR?

re: the weather movie debate: "Key Largo"? "A High Wind in Jamaica"? "None But the Brave"? "Singing in the Rain"?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 1:33 PM | Report abuse

When it's raining lava I admit it's pretty radical weather.

"Airport" maybe, with George Kennedy dealing with ye old 707 stuck in the snow.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Well, Mr. T has his Christmas tree. It was bright and windy and chilly on the side of the mountain, but we found one we liked. This particular tree lot is a grandma and grandpops operation, but the trees are okay. The 12-footers were beautiful, the shorter ones not as nice but it *does* pay to be first!

Posted by: slyness | November 20, 2009 1:35 PM | Report abuse

I'm firmly in the Pou-tin camp, dmd. But with that silent-but emphasized e on the end that is so characteristic of French.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Sorry! That was for 'mudge, of course.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 1:43 PM | Report abuse

If you need an excuse-

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8367141.stm

Posted by: kguy1 | November 20, 2009 1:45 PM | Report abuse

Kind of like they pronounce "boudin" in Louisiana, I reckon.


Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 1:52 PM | Report abuse

I would also say that I don't think Trillin is correct about poutine being close to a national dish. It is still very much identified with Quebec, primarily Montreal. You don't find is as part of the regular menu in very many fast-food or casual joints outside the province. Sure there are *some* restaurants in each city that do, but he exaggerates it's universality.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Anybody (local) been outside recently? What a fab day out there. I think it may require the following tune cootie, which I may have posted before. This is the "long" version, 5:35. I just love how just when it "ought" to end, at about 3:55, it jumps up a notch, and then at 4:40 the marimbas and bongos come in for the great finish.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4X5VZAfxEY

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 2:06 PM | Report abuse

Geez. Poutine is almost routine but now I have to figure out "disco fries?"

I did make paneer the other day. From
http://thepauperedchef.com/2009/11/how-to-make-paneer.html

I'm not averse to some rattlesnake burgers today. That's not the sort of thing one stumbles across. Well, actually, that really is the ONLY way to find rattlesnake burgers...

Posted by: Jumper1 | November 20, 2009 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Here's William Safire on Putin/Poutine/Путин

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/03/magazine/03ONLANGUAGE.html

Both the Fearless leader and the mushy concoction are written "Poutine" and pronounced: Poo-tin.

It amused the Russian journos to no end at the G20 summit in Quebec City a few years back that the Fearless Leader had his name in front of every chipwagon and chip shop of the city.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 2:13 PM | Report abuse

You can find poutine everywhere in Québec Yoki. The infection started in Valleyfied or Drummondville, depending on the story, in the seventies and the whole province was covered in brown gravy and curds by the late eighties. Ontario and New Brunswick are pretty much gone now and the infection is still spreading/oozing in every direction.

Man, it's dark and rainy and I'm supposed to BBQ some steaks tonight. *sigh*

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 2:20 PM | Report abuse

"The Snows of Kilimanjaro," "Hurricane," "The Rains Came," "Thunder on the Plains"

Favorite cheesy volcano movie: "Krakatoa, East of Java." I always loved the title since Krakatoa is *west* of Java.

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 2:38 PM | Report abuse

From Caroline Hax's chat today:

1) plaid and paisley can work (many viyella pieces are plaid; many challis pieces are paisley); and 2) this direct quote about mom jeans (remember when Obama wore "dad" jeans to some sporting event):

Carolyn Hax: Okay, but can we lay off the mom jeans? They are the 00's version of tut-tutting when women "let themselves go"--and I think it's in everyone's interest to mount a lusty defense of letting oneself choose one's own shape and one's own packaging. I mean--some of my favorite moms (and a few favorite dads) are pears in elasticized denim.


Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 2:40 PM | Report abuse

*Faxing S_D some splendid fall weather from NC*

Current temp 49 on our porch, clear skies...

Posted by: slyness | November 20, 2009 2:44 PM | Report abuse

"Twister".

Geez.

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 20, 2009 2:56 PM | Report abuse

Bad weather in OK? Or Ivansmom, do you propose we play the game?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:03 PM | Report abuse

cQp, some of us can do more than others about our shape. At the end of the day, it comes down to what we look like between the ears.

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 3:07 PM | Report abuse

RT -- that is what CH is saying. So, we all agree: oh my, the combined rhetorical heft of
CqP
CH
RT

Next, we can tackle world peace.


Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:13 PM | Report abuse

Can't we all just get along? There, that's another one solved.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Here is a link to today's Twilight discussion moderated by Jen Cheney.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2009/11/13/DI2009111303218.html?nav=hcmoduletmv

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:16 PM | Report abuse

Is it too late to add "Out of the Fog" to the weather movie play list? And "A Foggy Day in London Town" to the music list?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 3:21 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, that Gershwin tune/lyrics is a fave of mine:

I was a stranger in the city
Out of town were the people I knew
I had that feeling of self-pity
What to do? What to do? What to do?
The outlook was decidedly blue
But as I walked through the foggy streets alone
It turned out to be the luckiest day I've known

A foggy day in London Town
Had me low and had me down
I viewed the morning with alarm
The British Museum had lost its charm
How long, I wondered, could this thing last?
But the age of miracles hadn't passed,
For, suddenly, I saw you there
And through foggy London Town
The sun was shining everywhere.

---
Love Ella F.'s and Sarah V.'s version, but cannot say there is a bad one around.


Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Repost

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jO1EOhGkY0

Let's not bicker and argue.

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 3:25 PM | Report abuse

I believe Ivansmom was adding "Twister" to the movie list, CqP.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 3:28 PM | Report abuse

I must escape more dramatically!

(and so shall I!!!)

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, Yoki, for a moment I thought she was signaling a hunker down time in the OK state.
Thanks for the Python, RT. Would have been a week with MP, which is not good.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:32 PM | Report abuse

Well, there's always "The Fog" and "The Mist," too...

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 3:33 PM | Report abuse

A big fav of mine, too, CqP. Petula Clark had a version on one of her records in the 60s that was very good, but it isn't in YouTube. Maybe when a song is this good nobody can ruin it, I dunno. But even this Pia Zadora version is quite good. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLsmcr8MBJM&feature=related

And you know I gotta link this one for ftb: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObeRSO_ehSY&feature=related

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 3:38 PM | Report abuse

Just in and noticed an answer is required for a very important question, here in the heart of English Canada (hehehe couldn't resist),

Posted by: dmd3 | November 20, 2009 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Yep, Yoki got it. "Twister" the movie. Best line: "Cow!"

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 20, 2009 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Why waste time on the Weather Channel, when you can have... the Puppy Channel!

http://puppychannel.endavomedia.com/mediamanager/?ee_channel=346

Posted by: ScienceTim | November 20, 2009 3:40 PM | Report abuse

And "Twister" leads inexorably to "Wizard of Oz".

I'm sure someone already said "The Ice Storm".

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 20, 2009 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Heart of English Canada? Not Centre of the Universe?

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 3:42 PM | Report abuse

Film versions of Wm.S.'s The Tempest?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:42 PM | Report abuse

I dunno: "Wind in the Willows"?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 3:43 PM | Report abuse

"Twister" is one of my all time favorite unintentionally hilarious films. I mean, evil meteorologists who accepted corporate sponsorship and driver around in black SUVs? The horror. The horror.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 20, 2009 3:45 PM | Report abuse

I must add that several fast food outlets now have Poutine on the menu here, it has invaded out area. I cannot guarantee that the quality of the poutine is up to Quebec standards though.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 20, 2009 3:46 PM | Report abuse

"Singing in the Rain"

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 20, 2009 3:47 PM | Report abuse

Full fathom five
My father lies

I vote we include The Tempest.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 3:48 PM | Report abuse

"Deluge" "Rain" "The Day the Earth Caught Fire" "Ice Age"

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Part of my first post got erased, I use the Poo-teen pronunciation.

I was feeling modest and chose not to use the centre of the universe today, of course we all know that is where I live :-).

Posted by: dmd3 | November 20, 2009 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Cape Fear is a weather-as-plot item movie.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:56 PM | Report abuse

"Hail the Conquering Hero"?

"SO Proudly We Hail"?

"Chuck Berry Hail, Hail, Rock and Roll""

"Race for the Yankee Zephyr"?

"McCloud: Who Killed Miss U.S.A.?"

"Sirocco"

"The White Squall"

"Chubasco"

"The Sundowners"


Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 3:57 PM | Report abuse

"Rain Man" "Black Rain" "Purple Rain"

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 3:58 PM | Report abuse

We are doing songs too?

You are like a Hurricane by Neil Young.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Extra points for "Sirocco," mudge.

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 4:01 PM | Report abuse

ugh - just had our office txgvg party - mucho food!!! probably the BEST collard greens i've ever had! (my mom's previously were the best - these won by a landslide - should i tell mom?) and some wonderful dirty rice... you'd think we were dining in the south instead of in DC - i think it's just that southerners like to show off their culinary prowess... i won the office party award - a basket of cedarwood and rosemary smelling stuffssss... and now I"M STUFFED!! UGH

anywho - cpq - can i get a renaiss gown with a corseted top and flared sleeves? maybe a train and a lovely neckline (something that shows off a little decoletage - tastefully mind you) in maybe a nice velvet - you know the color - black of course, with maybe some blood red accents???? what say you?

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 20, 2009 4:02 PM | Report abuse

"Chain Lightning"

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 4:06 PM | Report abuse

I wish it would Rain by Nanci Griffith

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Yes, MO. What do you want to spend? I am calling a costume buddy about a black dress...what is your time frame?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 4:08 PM | Report abuse

How about Condominium? I believe it was a made-for-TV movie adapted from John D. MacDonald. Florida-hurricane in a flimsy high-rise condo building. A truly awesome book. (He also wrote Cape Fear.)

Posted by: rickoshea1 | November 20, 2009 4:10 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, rashomon. One of my favorites. (Well, any Bogie is one of my favorites.) One of the stars was one of my early favs, Gerald Mohr, whio I always thought was a dead ringer for Albert Camus. Mohr may be the only actor in the world who wore a trench coat even better than Bogie did (and nearly as well as Camus).

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 4:11 PM | Report abuse

Ah, my. Had some boneless and skinless chicken thighs and had to cook them, so braised them in some olive oil, vinegar, white wine, tomato sauce, and spices... including cayenne and garlic.

Cooked them covered for 40 minutes and then uncovered for 20 minutes each side.

Reduced the sauce and added a roux to thicken into a curry-like gravy.
Put it into the fridge, but grabbed a taste. MMMMmmmmmm. Can't wait! Thinking about grilling one of the thighs and then slicing it for a sandwich. I could make a spread of 1/3 mayo, 1/3 sour cream and 1/3 of the sauce... maybe add a bit of punch, too.

I might toss in a sliced pickle along with some tomato and lettuce.

I'm not thinking about Sarah Palin right now.

Posted by: russianthistle | November 20, 2009 4:14 PM | Report abuse

For space-weather enthusiasts: the movie of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, in which the Van Allen belts catch fire and need to be extinguished.

Posted by: ScienceTim | November 20, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

and the fascination with vampires (sorry mudge - i was away whilst you were away and you know this is one of my fav subjects)
i have loved vampires for as long as i can remember - i remember being 5 and seeing dracula (must have been the bela lugosi one) and have been in love with vampires since then... they are the mysterious, charming, foreign, dark count who can charm you with their eyes and grant you eternal life with a kiss of bliss. tall, dark and handsome to be sure! then they can disappear or turn into a bat, or a mist... like someone said, the ultimate in romance and seduction w/o the s3x... they are allll powerful, yet ultimately all vunerable when exposed to sunlight, garlic or holy water. they are the tortured lover, a monster who must live forever alone, for once they find someone, they don't know what will happen when that person is transformed into one of the undead... therefore, while they have the power to create one of their own, once they use that power, they no longer have the power over that individual. it's the juxtaposition:
the dark vs the light - they embody the darkness and are vunerable to the light
the romantic vs the unrequited lover - they possess the ultimate powers of passion yet can never experience the passion themselves (except in the bloodletting)
the powerful vs the powerless - they have the power to take a human life yet once they slumber they are absolutely vunerable to distruction

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 20, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

Mo, consider a two-piece approach -- more accurate.


http://stores.renstore.com/-strse-113/Aowyn-Surcoat/Detail.bok

worn over this:

http://stores.renstore.com/-strse-110/Aowyn-Chemise/Detail.bok

That would be the least expensive options. See the variations.

Bodices -- the corset thingie -- are very labor intensive. Here is one:

http://stores.renstore.com/-strse-108/Hourglass-Boned-Corset/Detail.bok

You may recall that my celeb moment is to have worked on the bodice worn by Kelly McGillis in Marlowe's

The Dutchess of Malfi.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Chain Lightning is very good.

I think we need to assert that the weather term must appear in the title, not just be part of the theme or plot. Thus I fear we must disqualify Condominium, Cape Fear, etc. Conquer, rashomon?

I think the rules committee needs to discuss whether a volcano makes the cut as a weather phenomenon as opposed to a Mother Nature event.

Hence:

Tropic Thunder
Days of Thunder
Blue Thunder
A Sound of Thunder
Rolling Thunder
A Thunder of Drums
and etc.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 4:17 PM | Report abuse

"Call Me the Breeze"

Skynyrd, not the original, TYVM.

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 4:18 PM | Report abuse

cpq - i was thinking of the virtual fashion show we were having last nite but if you could really get me one IRL that would be wonderful! we can talk off line!

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 20, 2009 4:19 PM | Report abuse

May need a ruling on "Northern Lights."

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Duchess!

This is the production I worked on.
http://members.fortunecity.com/fabianvillegas2/misce/perfo.htm

The front image of her dress had a bodice underneath....so, imagine the utter custom fit to make that work. I still tremble at the tast that was.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Cape Fear is an excellent choice
It's pretty windy at the end of The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | November 20, 2009 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Hail to the Redskins? (skulks silently away)

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Hadn't thought about space weather, SciTim. I guess that might include meteor showers, no? Solar wind? Sun storms and those storms on Jupiter? The Clouds of Magellan?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 4:27 PM | Report abuse

Ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww, rashomon...

*throwing the flag*

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 4:27 PM | Report abuse

cpq - of COURSE i remember! i was frenvious! THANKS for those sites!!! the corset they show is actually a fantastic price and i love the aowyn surcoat!!!! really pretty and looks like it can be worn in an normal setting (not like the stuff you can only get away with at a renfair type of place...)

weather channel movies - did anyone say earthquake?

mo

Posted by: mortii | November 20, 2009 4:28 PM | Report abuse

Tee hee. CqP said "utter."

Oh, wait...

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | November 20, 2009 4:29 PM | Report abuse

CqP, that costume is gorgeous but it doesn't look 17th century to me...no ruff. Am I right about that?

Posted by: slyness | November 20, 2009 4:39 PM | Report abuse

"Thunder Road"

The Robert Mitchum/Gene Barry one, of course.

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 4:47 PM | Report abuse

This isn't on topic (surprise!), but it did make me laugh.

To bow or not to bow.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/to-bow-or-not-to-bow-that-shouldnt-be-the-question/article1371729/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheGlobeAndMail-Front+%28The+Globe+and+Mail+-+Latest+News%29&utm_content=Google+International

Posted by: dmd3 | November 20, 2009 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Slyness, the dresses straddle several time frames. The clothing of the little people -- read the ordinary unwashed -- changed very little for about 600 years.

Off to meet Friday buddies for an hour of local conviviality

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 20, 2009 4:58 PM | Report abuse

For ftb and other fans, this morning's Indexed:

http://thisisindexed.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/card2302.jpg

Posted by: slyness | November 20, 2009 5:05 PM | Report abuse

Dead?

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | November 20, 2009 6:42 PM | Report abuse

Life support.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 20, 2009 6:53 PM | Report abuse

Anybody mention "Stormy Weather?"

I love that song:

I know why
There's no sun up in the sky
Nuclear winter

Or maybe I'm thinking of a different movie...

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 6:53 PM | Report abuse

Ivansdad offers, "John Travolta's first movie. 'Devil's Rain'. It's awful."

Posted by: Ivansmom | November 20, 2009 6:55 PM | Report abuse

Ain't No Sunshine
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIdIqbv7SPo
Must be added to the weather play list.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 20, 2009 7:04 PM | Report abuse

I remember Devil's Rain (vaguely), mostly because it had a pretty good cast, all of whom must have been desperately in need of a paycheck. I think it was one of Ida Lupino's last movies.

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 7:16 PM | Report abuse

from the front page:

"Must a state dinner be so stately?
As White House prepares for first state dinner, is frothy couture really appropriate attire?"

Only if it is made if Viyella and Challis.

Posted by: nellie4 | November 20, 2009 7:31 PM | Report abuse

SCC: of, not if

the second if

Posted by: nellie4 | November 20, 2009 7:32 PM | Report abuse

Methinks DNAGirl's talents are called for in this case:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/20/AR2009112002781.html

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 7:57 PM | Report abuse

just because CqP mentioned it...I'd guess that this was shot between '75 & '77.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Obfci1CIqq8

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 8:03 PM | Report abuse

...and *this* is perhaps my favourite song from AS&B.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IDtUeFExUQ

"Lyndon Johnson bared his scars...American stars and bars."

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 8:10 PM | Report abuse

Whooooooaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Nellie...

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/21/science/earth/21climate.html

I smell a majot Kit in the offing. :-O

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 20, 2009 8:13 PM | Report abuse

Smilla's Sense of Snow with Julia Ormond, from the original Danish film, Frøken Smillas fornemmelse for sne

The Wizard of Oz

About 10 inches of rain fell in Rockport, on the coast near Corpus Christi, today. Lots of localized street flooding here and, of course, one high water rescue in town on Salado Creek. Despite numerous warnings during eash storm, posted signs and barricades across flooded roadways, people with low IQs still manage to drive through flood waters and get stuck. Search and rescue gets called out; TV hekicopters hover overhead. I tire of the stupidity of some drivers and the same story recycled one more time..

Posted by: laloomis | November 20, 2009 8:16 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, can’t contribute. I’m as ignorant about movies as I am about songs.

Just want to say….Egypt is about to go to war with Algeria. Ireland will never speak to France ever again. All because of World Cup.

I think Thierry Henry’s handball was an instinct reaction. Ok, I’m bias because I’m a Henry fan since his Arsenal (English Premier League) days. I think Fifa should just have them replay before somebody gets killed.....soccer fans?......sd? What do you think?

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/football/article6925303.ece

Posted by: rainforest1 | November 20, 2009 8:23 PM | Report abuse

s'happenin, S'nuke?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb_F7CI75KI

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 8:24 PM | Report abuse

Actually, Scottynuke I smell another lame George Will column in the offing. Let the cherry-picking begin.

Posted by: rashomon | November 20, 2009 8:29 PM | Report abuse

I read a blog entry about that match, rf. The interesting thing was that if there were a couple of extra linesmen to call the match, Thierry's foul would have been called. Regardless, another point was made that the defence was absent, particularly the keeper, as the ball was left bouncing about in the small box. In that context, the side that gets to such a 50/50 reaps the spoils. tut tut.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 8:34 PM | Report abuse

Jack, it’s true that the defence was just not there, but the Irish would argue that that’s beside the point. A rule has been broken. They have a point there.

Posted by: rainforest1 | November 20, 2009 9:00 PM | Report abuse

Brian Williams just told us that the supercollider started all by itself a day before it was supposed to.

Cue eerie music.

Posted by: nellie4 | November 20, 2009 9:22 PM | Report abuse

I'll concede that point to you, rf. Unfortunately, for the players from the land of my Grandfather, da rules is da rules. FIFA state, in so many words, the once the officials have made the call, an appeal is right out. Game, set, match. The rotund one bellows, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 9:23 PM | Report abuse

SCC: ...FIFA states...I'm such a geek.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 9:25 PM | Report abuse

I watched that play over and over again, and I'm with rainforest. The options may have been limited, but the rule Rules.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 9:56 PM | Report abuse

Ah, but only if the other two linesmen were present. Been there, done that at the helm of many a soccer match. Sometimes the officials just don't see it, and there's little one can do to change things once the call is made. It's like making a snap parental decision, and regretting it the moment the words leave your lips. Once the ruling is made, you can't take it back.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 10:06 PM | Report abuse

Oh jeez, jack. Now I really get what you're saying. I've had one or two of those moments as a parent.

I feel bad.

Never mind.

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 10:09 PM | Report abuse

like Scar said: "Life's not fair...", as he twiddled a mouse between the phalanges of his paw.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 10:30 PM | Report abuse

And as Ursula said, "It's what I *do.* It is what I *live* for." And as Kenneth Graham had it, "fat of body and of very evil mind."

Posted by: Yoki | November 20, 2009 10:36 PM | Report abuse

Dude. Ursula.

Must be getting cold. One of our smoke alarms is chirping, alerting me that the battery has nearly exhausted its ion exchange mechanism. *running for the ladder and a 9V*

BTW, smoke detectors have an installation life of approximately a decade, long enough for whatever radioactive material in it to decay to a point where it loses its ability to act as an ion chamber. curses. We have 15 to replace.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 11:08 PM | Report abuse

*Tim, I'm glad you mentioned the film "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea." I'd been thinking about that all day, and finally sat down to put it into the Boodle. Lo, you've beaten me to it.

About the non-call in the Ireland/France match -- I think they're right in letting it stand, even though the foul should have been called. The rules *are* the rules, and if FIFA wants to change them or to implement some sort of instant replay/challenge rules for WC qualifying matches, I think the time to do so would be after the next World Cup and before the next round of WC qualifiers starts. As far as I understand it, the rules don't specify that the refs have to be any more perfect than the players. Otherise why would there be rules and penalties at all?

It's the only way to be fair, IMO.

I'm not sure if the LHC fired up on its own, or if someone on this side of the pond made a mistake about the date. Unless the LHC created tachyons somewhere down the line and caused a localized disruption of spacetime centered on/anchored to the LHC itself...

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 20, 2009 11:17 PM | Report abuse

Just back in from an evening out with friends at a charity function. A fun night out, but one of the women at the event was a dead ringer for Sarah Palin, right down to the glasses, very unnerving, you betcha. I kept my distance :-)

Posted by: dmd3 | November 20, 2009 11:19 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, bc. While FIFA is at it, they would do well to jettison the penalty kick tie breaker to decide the championship in the final match for the Cup. I'd like it to go as the Stanley Cup: sudden death OT until someone puts the game winner into the back of the net.

Posted by: -jack- | November 20, 2009 11:23 PM | Report abuse

OK!

Posted by: Yoki | November 21, 2009 12:13 AM | Report abuse

bc, you have a good point about the refs not being perfect and neither are the players.

Posted by: rainforest1 | November 21, 2009 12:18 AM | Report abuse

for a minute, I thought it was dead.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUHKNsvM98Y&feature=related

Posted by: -jack- | November 21, 2009 12:37 AM | Report abuse

deal

Posted by: Yoki | November 21, 2009 12:51 AM | Report abuse

Oh, Jack, I forgot to mention....I'm with you on that penalty kick thing. I think it's an unfair way to decide who the winner is.

Posted by: rainforest1 | November 21, 2009 1:15 AM | Report abuse

dmd, that's funny. Maybe that was Tina Fey!

Posted by: seasea1 | November 21, 2009 1:17 AM | Report abuse

I scored a ticket to the Springsteen show in Baltimore. I have now heard "Hungry Heart" in concert and can die happy.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 21, 2009 1:31 AM | Report abuse

Dare I think there'll be photos forthcoming, yello? :-)

And I still think we've got a climate change debate Kit on final approach, especially given all the related chatter on the Opinions page:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/opinions/outlook/index.html

The lawnmower's been charging all night, so I believe I'm ready for a mega-mulching session out in the yard today.

And in the "I BEG your pardon????" dept. on the home page:

The church of Oprah
Under God -- We're losing Oprah Winfrey as TV talk show host, but what about her spiritual leadership?

Um, didn't really ever think there was such a thing, truth be told. *shrug*

And in the "Having It Both Ways" Dept., the NYT home page has a) an article where economists are saying the stimulus is a good thing, and b) a blog item saying polls show people are blaming Democrats for the economy.

*enough-of-this-I'm-going-back-to-bed Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 21, 2009 7:02 AM | Report abuse

Morning all, happy Saturday. Hey Cassandra!

Fifteen smoke detectors, Jack? One in each room and two in the kitchen? Is that required by code? Good thing they are only $5 each; I bet you could get a quantity discount at Lowe's.

As usual, Nate Silver has the backstory on the global warning kerfuffle:

http://www.fivethirtyeight.com/2009/11/i-read-through-160000000-bytes-of.html

Posted by: slyness | November 21, 2009 7:58 AM | Report abuse

What with Thanksgiving coming up, we are busy preparing. And we aren't waiting until you are in a turkey induced stupor.

http://failblog.org/2009/11/20/suspicious-fail/

Posted by: --dr-- | November 21, 2009 8:04 AM | Report abuse

That is funny dr, I saw it last night, my daughter had posted it on her facebook page.

Posted by: dmd3 | November 21, 2009 8:10 AM | Report abuse

Spot on, slyness. I think I'll inquire at the FD first, and try to keep money in the local economy.

I read the story you linked to last night , Scotty. The boss would call that story a talker.

Posted by: -jack- | November 21, 2009 8:30 AM | Report abuse

Good morning boodle! The anticipation of an afternoon in the mid 50s has me practically giddy this morning.

Haven't watched Oprah in years but couldn't avoid the "news" coverage last night. Is it my imagination or has she succumbed to plastic surgery's siren call? We apatheticists are pretty skeptical about Oprah's spirituality. We may not care about whether or not there is a divinity, but for crying in the night-don't make it up as you go along. That way leads vaccination avoidance and other nuttiness masked as "what the gov't (scientists, doctors) don't want you to know."

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 21, 2009 8:49 AM | Report abuse

New time suck-NPR's Tiny Desk Concerts on Youtube.
Love this one-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXXc25vtuxk
but they also have Tom Jones!

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 21, 2009 9:03 AM | Report abuse

Well, since you mentioned it Scotty:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/sets/72157622845747564/

I was so lucky to find somebody on the internet willing to sell me a ticket for face value. Bruce fans are a tight-knit generous bunch. I bought him a beer, but that wasn't nearly payment enough.

Posted by: yellojkt | November 21, 2009 9:24 AM | Report abuse

Thanks, Frostie,
I like this Lambchop Kurt Wagner's contribution
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IG_uM5th6Fo

Nice to see radio, here.

Saw kitten-heels shoes last night and almost exclaimed, "Frosti has some like that!"

LiT -- channeling this shoe moment to you.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 21, 2009 9:24 AM | Report abuse

Frosti, that's an interesting point about 'making it up as you go along' where spiritualiy is concerned.

My own spirituality - such as it is - has been constantly under review and subject to change through my experiences, what I learn over time and my growth as a thinking human being. And it's changed over time, and, I expect, will probably continue to change as I incorporate my perceptions and considerations of the world into my belief/ethical systems and my actions based upon them (hopefully). 'tis a fine line between consistency and flexibility, but it's a line I try to walk with my head and heart up, looking forward while appreciating the past, learning all the way (ha ha ha!).

I was rasied Roman Catholic and in my heart that's what I still am, even if other parts of me have significant issues with that assessment. And even the Church has changed a lot over time, though they take a very long view and have all the time in the world to consider change and ideas, as I suppose a catholic (in the meaning of that word) church should. Personally, I've got less than a century here, so I think have to be a little quicker about things. Fortunately, my scope of change is a bit smaller, though hopefully my ideas aren't.

I am totally making it up as I go along, reeling from second to second in something I hope is a little more congruent to my heart, spirit, and mind than simple Brownian motion.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | November 21, 2009 9:35 AM | Report abuse

BC -- me too. Thanks. Related to this is how many people react to the authority and volume of knowledge in science and technology.

In teaching composition to students -- really a course in thinking -- I find this stance so interesting in my students:

a kind of false confidence about dismissing much of knowledge as a rhetorical conspiracy between science, government, and industry.

Take the emerging new guidelines about mammograms. Some students see this as evidence that science is flawed and subject to HUGE interfering forces like big Pharma and say MRI companies. I tell them that science revises itself as we gather more information and evidence. This is good!

But, many of them see conspiracy here. I find this so odd, knowing and loving science....and some fine scientist-practitioners too.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 21, 2009 9:43 AM | Report abuse

bc, your 9:35 is a great post,

Posted by: dmd3 | November 21, 2009 9:46 AM | Report abuse

And, meant to say, that when I see Oprah or hear some of her take on "the issues" I see this same attitude toward science and knowledge....it is a kind of closing off of full and deep thought.

Don't mistake me for dissing sceptically. Just, that we elevate authorities know from popular cultur. Odd, their cred to pronounce for us to, say, vaccinate or not based on
A Course in Miracles or that stooooopid law of attraction abominiation....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 21, 2009 9:50 AM | Report abuse

bc-there is thoughtful making it up as you go along, which you obviously do, and I hope I do-and there is making it up as you go along just one heartbeat away from foil hats. I know Oprah far less well than I know you, but I'm willing to bet she is more a foil hatter than really thoughtful. Sigh, I am betraying my Apatheticist ideals by caring enough to speculate about Oprah.

CqP-the shoes are my new "frostiboots." I don't walk in them so much as they take me out for a walk. Haven't gone anywhere in them yet-looking for the right get up. Taffeta, I want a boodle outfit of taffeta in a deep, deep, green that looks black until the light hits it just right.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | November 21, 2009 9:53 AM | Report abuse

Frosti, I share your feelings about Oprah, altho' I wonder if her face undergoes more changes from her weight fluctuation than from any outside source.

I've skimmed her magazine at the hair salon and come away wondering why she needs to push her 'spirituality' onto her readers. Of course, I am automatically resistant to that sort of thing, skepticism is in my genes. I admire her in many ways, but like a majority of those who have made it big, she couldn't have done it without a large ego. Unfortunately, a large ego often blinds one to some basic truths regarding life and one's place in it.

Posted by: badsneakers | November 21, 2009 9:53 AM | Report abuse

Oh Frosti, am faxing you that exact worf and weave of shot taffeta....lovely, lovely, lovely. You find that same effect with grackles and some starlings during mating season.

I am also sending a small bolt of black illusion. This makes nice sleeves or wraps or a stole-jacket. Many of Grace Kelly's outfits featured some illusion....am coveting some kitten-heels...will think about this in January.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | November 21, 2009 9:56 AM | Report abuse

Pardon my cynicism, but much of what's pushed by Oprah and her ilk is $pirituality... *SIGH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | November 21, 2009 10:18 AM | Report abuse

FYI-- new kit on mean physicists.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | November 21, 2009 10:44 AM | Report abuse

I've never watched Oprah and probably never will, not that that makes me a saint or anything. Personally, I find spirituality not a making-it-up-as-you-go-along thing nearly as much as a discovering-new-insights-and-depths-as-you-go-along thing. YMMV.

There are great truths in life that we humans can perceive only dimly, if we spend a lifetime thinking and doubting and testing to find. CqP is right about questioning authority. Each of us has to find our way. I don't find the tearing down of all authorities and standards helpful, but then I think others have something to tell us.

Posted by: slyness | November 21, 2009 10:57 AM | Report abuse

Enough. Sandra Tsing Loh is not living out of a Volvo--she lives in a 2 story Victorian in Pasadena---and she walked out on her children after having lied about her affair for months. She tore apart two families, and there's another child- the child of her affair mate---who has been severely hurt. It's all about justifying her crappy behavior. She distorts the truth (lies?)for sympathy and self pity. Not someone to admire, at the very least.

Posted by: klear7 | November 23, 2009 12:58 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: RD_Padouk | November 19, 2009

I assert, that to zeroth order, women and men tend to approach midlife differently, and that these approaches mirror their differing approaches to life. Men seem much more interested in external stimulation, while women seem much more interested in self image. Men tend to think "Am I getting as much out of life as I want" while women tend to think "Am I the person I want to be?"

Sometimes at midlife men will realize that they simply aren't going to have enough time left to experience all the good things that life has to offer, and panic.

Women, though, will realize that they are never going to become the idealized version of themselves that they desire, and panic as well.

Like I said, this is a hopeless oversimplification, but I think there is something to it.
-----------------

OMG, RD, you may think it is simplistic, but it spoke to me (I can only vouch for the woman part) like nothing I've read before. So very insightful, is all I'm sayin'.


Posted by: jlessl | November 24, 2009 12:46 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company