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Gobs and gobs of galaxies

hs-2010-01-a-print.jpg

[From Hubble Space Telescope, WFC3]

Here at the American Astronomical Society, I'm thinking there really ought to be more discussion of nearby astronomical objects like the moon, Mars, Venus or even the sun. Familiar stuff you can see with your own eyes at night. But no! There's an eternal prejudice against proximity. Carl Sagan talked about that, back in the day: You were supposed to look at stuff far away. Well, today's astronomers are taking it to the limit. This morning, they unveiled a new Hubble Space Telescope image of primordial galaxies that existed in the very early universe. (I've pasted in a low-pixel, somewhat cropped image above.) Some of these galaxies are so far away that, if you could conceive of the distance, your brain would throw a rod.

There's a big print -- like, 12-feet wide or something -- of the new deep-field panorama taken by the Hubble. (The image is called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey -- or something like that) What you see are a heck of a lot of galaxies. A few, here and there, are familiar-looking spirals and ellipticals. Many are just tiny red specks. The little red ones are out there at redshift 7 or redshift 8 -- which, as you know, is like literally millions of miles from Earth. Actually it's almost all the way back to the origin of the whole shebang. This is fossil light from 13 billion years ago. The universe was then only 600 to 800 million years old.

These primordial galaxies aren't very big, by galactic standards (they're about one-twentieth the size of the Milky Way), and they haven't had time to organize themselves into grandiose spirals or anything pretty. They're extremely deficient in the heavier atoms that are necessary for life -- that stuff comes later, after it's cooked up in stars and exploded into space. These ancient galaxies probably don't even realize that they're "galaxies." No doubt they feel like random nebulosities.

At the presser, an astronomer noted that the Small Magellanic Cloud, a miniature galaxy that orbits the Milky Way, is a rough analog of those early galaxies. That prompted John Grunsfeld, the Hubble repairman/astronaut, to tell a funny story. He said that a few years back, orbiting the Earth on the shuttle, he decided to point out some astronomical sights to fellow astronaut Mike Massimino. With the shuttle on the night side of the Earth, they turned out all the lights and looked through a shuttle window at all the stars.

Said Grunsfeld: "At one point, I complained about a greasy smudge on the window. I tried to wipe it off. That was the Small Magellanic Cloud."

[Sorry about some technical difficulties tonight with the blog...it's just something that's going around.]

By Joel Achenbach  |  January 5, 2010; 10:55 AM ET
 
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Comments

Kits galore!

Posted by: bobsewell | January 5, 2010 12:37 PM | Report abuse

Joel's lo-res jpeg doesn't do the image justice. Go here:

http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/images/hs-2010-01-a-print.jpg

and zoom in.

Posted by: rashomon | January 5, 2010 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Here's one that's even bigger:

http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/images/hs-2010-01-a-full_jpg.jpg

Posted by: rashomon | January 5, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Random nebulousities describes much of my activity.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 5, 2010 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Random nebulousities describes much of my activity.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 5, 2010 12:52 PM | Report abuse

My Droids really liked that comment.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 5, 2010 12:54 PM | Report abuse

"throw a rod" indeed. How utterly 20th century.

Posted by: kguy1 | January 5, 2010 1:07 PM | Report abuse

That Massimino story is funny.

I had a similar experience when I was skywatching with some binoculars in Aruba. Thought there was something going on with the lenses or weird ambient lighting effects, but it turned out to be the SMC.

Being a Northern Hemisphere guy, I'd never seen it before.

'course, I don't think anyone in Aruba's ever sat out in their backyard hammock and watched the Northern Lights, either.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 5, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Repost:

Of course not, Weed. Hume was referring to the Christianity as practiced by Newt Ginrich, Sen. Ensign, Gov. Sanford, Cong. Mark Foley, Larry Craig, Houston talk show host Jon Matthews, Rev. Ted Haggard, Jeffrey Ray Nielsen, Neal Horsley, Cong. Don Sherwood, Mike Hintze, unsuccessful Sen. candidate Jack Ryan, Cong. Ed Shrock, strategist Robin Vanderwall, Cong. Buzz Lukens, Cong. Dan Burton, Cong. Dan Crane, Cong. Helen Chenoweth, Se. Henry Hyde, Cong. Ken Calvert, Cong. Sue Myrick, Cong. Bob Bauman, Mayor/Pres. Candidate Rudy Giuliani, Cong. Bob Livingston, Sen. Bob Packwood, televangelist Jimmy Swaggert, Cong. J.SC. Watts, and activist Randall Terry.

Those Christians.

I may have left out a few.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 5, 2010 9:46 AM

Thanks Mudge, I feel better now. I thought you were talking about those "preachy" types who always want money for one thing or another... and above all, believe that one should do what they say and not what they do. And, then do it again.

Go thing that a proper Christian Hume God is ALL forgiving.

Posted by: russianthistle | January 5, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Can I buy the letters O and D, please?

Posted by: russianthistle | January 5, 2010 1:27 PM | Report abuse

kguy, let me know when you give up your conrods for stators, sir.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 5, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

RE: Grunsfeld -- *SNORT!*

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 5, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

I always love looking at the latest Hubble Deep field images.

Looking that far back...

... sometimes I get the feeling that I may turn into a pillar of salt.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 5, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

SCC: Grunsfeld, not Massimino.

Fie upon me.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 5, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

Fie

Posted by: russianthistle | January 5, 2010 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Kguy... 3D movies? Are they really the future?

Posted by: russianthistle | January 5, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

It's so easy to follow the bouncing science ball here. Usually, this stuff sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher to me. Mwah mwah mwah.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 5, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

You betcha 3D movies are the wave of the future and I can't wait to see "Bwana Devil" when it comes out!!!

Posted by: kguy1 | January 5, 2010 2:08 PM | Report abuse

Joel writes:
"These primordial galaxies aren't very big, by galactic standards..., and they haven't had time to organize themselves into grandiose spirals or anything pretty."

Anything pretty?

You oughtta take a look at my distant-great-grandfather 10^whatever: Tiktaalik.
Of course, this would be the Boodle's and world's distant great-grandpappy 10^whatever, too.

http://www.calacademy.org/science_now/headline_science/images/Tiktaalik_model_500w.jpg

Yu can bet your bippy that a topless Tiktaalik won't grace the cover of Vanity Fair any time soon.

Posted by: laloomis | January 5, 2010 2:19 PM | Report abuse

"...literally millions of miles from Earth."
- Joel

"Everywhere's walking distance, if you've got the time."
- Steven Wright

Posted by: byoolin1 | January 5, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

DreamWorks' animated "How to Train Your Dragon," coming out this spring, will also be in 3D. Trailer for "Dragon" here, after the ad for another movie opening very soon.:

http://www.tribute.ca/trailers/How+to+Train+Your+Dragon:+An+IMAX+3D+Experience/12769

Why do the animation scenes of flying avian dinosaurs remind me so much of Avatar?

Posted by: laloomis | January 5, 2010 2:31 PM | Report abuse

hi boodle. just a drive-by to say that for me this is joel at his finest. science and humor, tongue-and-cheek hyperbole and lay language, etc. just love it.

have a good day!

Posted by: LALurker | January 5, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

Grunsfeld has been appointed as Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute.

Another press release earlier today, for the Spitzer infrared space telescope, casually mentioned something that was news to me: that the Magellanic Clouds in fact might not be orbiting the Milky Way and may just be passing by, on their way somewhere else.

Joel's pretty much on target about the prejudice against proximity, as any planetary scientist could tell you. We are the followers of a disparaged "alternative lifestyle" among the astronomers.

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 5, 2010 3:04 PM | Report abuse

Tim, that was news to me, as well.

Posted by: russianthistle | January 5, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

In a vote for proximity, there is now a plate of big soft ginger cookies orbiting the Boodle table.

Posted by: MsJS | January 5, 2010 3:12 PM | Report abuse

*Mfgmmghhmffgh* these are delicious MsJs. Thanks! Keep 'em coming!

Posted by: -TBG- | January 5, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

Thank you MsJS.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 5, 2010 3:38 PM | Report abuse

Hmmmmmm... I guess the smudge was on the OUTside of the window.

(rimshot)

Posted by: Gomer144 | January 5, 2010 3:47 PM | Report abuse

Reading Shales' article about Brit Hume, Shales invokes Saturday Night Live. The best possible use of this moment that I can imagine would be for SNL to open on a dramatic reenactment of the show with verbatim dialogue, then Hume drops his bomb, then the rest of the cast -- I mean, commentators -- just stare at him. For, like 5 or ten seconds. Until "Hume" says "What?" and starts examining his necktie and clothes and nose for boogers or other oddities. Then an SNL cast member walks out on the stage, looks at the audience, then looks confused and looks back at Hume, who mouths "what?"; then he looks back at the audience and, with some confusion, delivers the iconic "Live... from New York... it's Saturday Night?"

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 5, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

*laughing with mouth full*

*swallowing*

Live from my kitchen, it's chewy chocolate cookies!

Posted by: MsJS | January 5, 2010 4:19 PM | Report abuse

The Hume affair opens up the larger issue that we've unfortunately become accustomed to: Blatant religious intolerance and bigotry. Read some of the comments on some of the other blog sites and it will curl your hair. It is part of the reason for 9/11 and the subsequent wars we're in now - the fanatic Muslims say they are justified in murdering any non-believers because of a few lines taken out of context in the Koran. President Bush initially called for a "crusade" against the terrorists, a catch-word for evangelical Christians that implies much the same attitude towards the non-Christians as well. The concept of live and let live, with respect for other approaches to religion and enlightenment, seems to have been cowed by the shouters on all sides. For the fanatics, it's "convert or die", and sometimes not just metaphorically.

Posted by: ebtnut | January 5, 2010 4:41 PM | Report abuse

Joel wrote: "These primordial galaxies aren't very big, by galactic standards (they're about one-twentieth the size of the Milky Way), and they haven't had time to organize themselves into grandiose spirals or anything pretty. They're extremely deficient in the heavier atoms that are necessary for life -- that stuff comes later"

Wrong. Not "They aren't" - they weren't. Not "haven't had time" - they have had about, oh, 13 billion years since the light that appears on these photos were taken. What we're seeing in this picture is how these galaxies appeared 13 billion years ago. We're looking into the past.

Who knows what they look like now. We'll have to wait another 13 billion years to find out.

Posted by: garyoke | January 5, 2010 5:06 PM | Report abuse

The Small Magellenic Cloud "smudge" story reminds me of yet another moment when I covered myself with ridicule. ("Le ridicule ne tue pas", I'm the living proof of that).
All the family was in the (dark) boonies looking at the stars with the new very good binoculars. I was arguing that the binocs were defective or it wasn't Sirius we were looking at as there were TWO stars. The Dependents informed me with contempt that Sirius was indeed a binary star. Oh well.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 5, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

Thank you Garyo, I'm sure Joel had no clue. He's thick that way.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 5, 2010 5:09 PM | Report abuse

Did they use a flash fpr that picture?

Posted by: garyoke | January 5, 2010 5:10 PM | Report abuse

Maybe this explains that styrofoam-consistency planet:

http://views.washingtonpost.com/climate-change/post-carbon/?hpid=news-col-blog

Some alien race pumped more and more CO2 underground, until one hot summer day the whole place puffed up into one Galactus-sized piece of popcorn. I wonder if they had enough butter.

Posted by: rashomon | January 5, 2010 5:15 PM | Report abuse

OK to keep with the subject, yes, it is way off forum topic on the scientific pictures, but since you brough up the neat-O 3D films currently, the best is Avatar, and no im not caught up in the hype as EVERYONE was with that incredibly lame and stupid movie Paranormal Activity. Back to my inital point. If 3D is wave of future, and i can't wait till TB&JD's Alice in wonderland, but i regress. How zbout home future of Hallagramic movies, or hollagramic porn movies. One might be able to feel that qeeff of that young cat's, and no not a kitten
's, breath on one's neck. But please, keep the smell o vision away ;p

Posted by: ursofakingdumb1 | January 5, 2010 5:16 PM | Report abuse

Um, what?

Posted by: slyness | January 5, 2010 5:31 PM | Report abuse

The 3D in Avatar is absolutely fantastic. The rest of it is highly, and even interestingly, debatable. In keeping with yellojkt's stance, I will save that topic for another day, after those who might be inclined to see the movie have had a chance to do so. I will note only that the ScienceKids, who should be in the prime demographic by age and by political and philosophical leanings, were distinctly unmoved.

I would be disinclined to attend with my offspring the kind of 3D film proposed by ursofakingdumb1.

I would note for the benefit of garyoke that simultaneity in a relativistic universe is a fluid concept. Two events that are perceptibly simultaneous in one frame of reference are non-simultaneous in another frame of reference. To say that something happened 13 billion years ago but the light from that event is only reaching us now, is not really meaningful -- there is no absolute frame of reference in which we can actually define what is "really" happening at any given time. We can only evaluate events as evidence of their occurrence comes to us. By that standard, the events in distant galaxies ARE happening right now. Colloquial English simply does not have the tools to concisely designate a relativistically correct description of past, present, or future.

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 5, 2010 5:32 PM | Report abuse

The events in the kitchen happening right now include mini-wieners in blankets and Niece3's version of Chili's Paradise Pie.

Next up: oatmeal craisin cookies!

Posted by: MsJS | January 5, 2010 5:37 PM | Report abuse

Ursofakingdumb1, you kiss your momma with that mouth?

Class is something other than a subdivision of a phylum. You ought to consider getting some.

Look around. When in Rome....

Posted by: LostInThought | January 5, 2010 5:43 PM | Report abuse

"Here at the American Astronomical Society, I'm thinking there really ought to be more discussion of nearby astronomical objects like the moon, Mars, Venus or even the sun. Familiar stuff you can see with your own eyes at night."

ZOMG!!! You can see the sun at night?

Now back to your regularly scheduled trolling. =)

Posted by: tk221 | January 5, 2010 5:48 PM | Report abuse

I think Shanahan will be a great coach...

Is this the Redskins blog?

Posted by: aasser1 | January 5, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

LIT, like he said, he regresses. Back to the Paleolithic, I think.

Posted by: rashomon | January 5, 2010 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Ah, a reading comprehension level that high means you're no troll, tk221.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 5, 2010 6:01 PM | Report abuse

At 19:30 ET (16:30 PT) there will be the final for the gold medal of the world junior championship. It's Canada vs the USA, may the best team win.
It's on TSN/RDS in Canada, on the NFL network in the US.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 5, 2010 6:02 PM | Report abuse

Coming up for air. . . .

After a couple of months of having to keep my nose jusssssssst above the water line, more work is coming in and I'm trying to get my clients to actually fork over what they owe me. *sigh*

Nevertheless, I've been busy all day, and it's pretty invigorating. Just to tell the Boodle.

ebtnut -- you are so right about Hume. I am completely convinced that if Christ were alive today, Hume & his ilk would be the very first in line to kill him. Hume's behavior (and others like him) are simply breathtaking in their hypocrisy.

I'll tell ya, if anybody tries to convert me, there'll be HEL L to pay! And I'm an atheist, so go figure. . . .

Other than that, how was your day everyone?

Posted by: -ftb- | January 5, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

SCC -- fix up the grammar as ye see fit.

Posted by: -ftb- | January 5, 2010 6:04 PM | Report abuse

Oh dear. ScienceTim has elegantly reminded me that time as we currently keep it is an artificial construct. We insist on linear progression where it does not fit. I'd successfully moved this realization to the back of my consciousness as time (see, there it is again) marched on, or as Daylight Savings Time Change Day moved away from us. Now it is back. Astonishing how hard it is to move beyond our own perceived realities, even when we know better.

Fortunately, there's nothing "perceived" about paradise pie, piglets in blankets, or tasty cookies. Thanks, MsJS, for keeping my feet on the ground.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 5, 2010 6:23 PM | Report abuse

"paradise pie"? "piglets in blankets"? "tasty cookies"?

*stomach rumbling*

Well, paradise pie better have something to do with chocolate!

Posted by: -ftb- | January 5, 2010 6:26 PM | Report abuse

The flying critters in Avatar look like refugees from Pern.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 5, 2010 6:59 PM | Report abuse

The flying critters in Avatar look like refugees from Pern.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 5, 2010 7:00 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry, what have you guys been discussing? I confess I haven't been paying attentin. Been watching this really terrific Hallagramic movie on cable.

(Which is now no longer a googlenope, for those who were wondering.)

It stars Jon Hall (remember him from Ramar of the Jungle? Of course you do, if you're an old fart), Anthony Michael Hall, Kevin Peter Hall, Albert Hall (the actor, not the building; he was Chief Phillips in Apocalypse Now and Judge Walsh on Ally McBeal), Michael C. Hall, Henry Hall, Stevie Hall, Robert David Hall, George Hall, and William Hall in "The Halls of Montezuma."

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | January 5, 2010 7:07 PM | Report abuse

I think Annie Hall is on later tonight, Mudge.

Posted by: rashomon | January 5, 2010 7:17 PM | Report abuse

I am looking forward to the US/Canada game, hope it is as exciting as the game the other day. Not sure if there are any Halls on either roster.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 5, 2010 7:30 PM | Report abuse

dmd, Stephen Colbert had a piece on last night about trying out for the US Curling team. I saw it and thought of you. Woke up this morning with a sore wrist, otherwise my tennis lesson was uneventful. Busy day getting last minute instructions from #2 regarding handling her mail and bill paying while she and SIL are in Costa Rica. They leave tomorrow.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 5, 2010 8:27 PM | Report abuse

dmd, Stephen Colbert had a piece on last night about trying out for the US Curling team. I saw it and thought of you. Woke up this morning with a sore wrist, otherwise my tennis lesson was uneventful. Busy day getting last minute instructions from #2 regarding handling her mail and bill paying while she and SIL are in Costa Rica. They leave tomorrow.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 5, 2010 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Watching the Orange Bowl I realize that southerners refer to Iowa with the same word babies use when they first learn to kiss your cheek. "Owwa."

Posted by: -TBG- | January 5, 2010 8:29 PM | Report abuse

dmd, Stephen Colbert had a piece on last night about trying out for the US Curling team. I saw it and thought of you. Woke up this morning with a sore wrist, otherwise my tennis lesson was uneventful. Busy day getting last minute instructions from #2 regarding handling her mail and bill paying while she and SIL are in Costa Rica. They leave tomorrow.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 5, 2010 8:30 PM | Report abuse

ftb: Yes, there's a layer of semi-sweet chocolate in Niece3's version of paradise pie. Also coconut, walnuts, and a graham cracker crust. Best served a la mode.

Did I put out the oatmeal craisin cookies? I forget.

Somewhere in there we watched 'The Producers' (Lane-Broderick version).

Am I the only boodler who saw 'Avatar' and didn't like it?

Yes, time is an invention to keep us from missing the train. Regardless, Niece3 and I had a fabulous time this afternoon.

Now to settle down and watch the Orange Bowl. I'm rooting based on geographical proximity--Go Hawkeyes!

Posted by: MsJS | January 5, 2010 8:32 PM | Report abuse

Sorry for the triple, this site is acting up on me.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 5, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

Watching the Orange Bowl I realize that southerners refer to Iowa with the same word babies use when they first learn to kiss your cheek. "Owwa."

Posted by: -TBG- | January 5, 2010 8:36 PM | Report abuse

Yessssss! Aye-eh-ah draws first blood.

*The trick is to not pronounce the 'w'*

Posted by: MsJS | January 5, 2010 8:40 PM | Report abuse

I saw that badsneaks,can't say I thought the US team did much to bring interest to curling - at least mention the tradition of beers after the game.

Hockey game is really good, and yes there is a Hall playing for Team Canada.

Glad the boodle is back.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 5, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

I saw that badsneaks,can't say I thought the US team did much to bring interest to curling - at least mention the tradition of beers after the game.

Hockey game is really good, and yes there is a Hall playing for Team Canada.

Glad the boodle is back.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 5, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

Yello's Trade School is playing the Pittsburgh Steelers. It doesn't seem fair.

The Caps won over the Canadien. All our hope is on Canada vs USA.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 5, 2010 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Because Ovechkin is music on blades, I can forgive them.

Posted by: Yoki | January 5, 2010 9:49 PM | Report abuse

Is it safe?

US up 2 goals in the 3rd - very exciting game.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 5, 2010 9:53 PM | Report abuse

I think they've moved on dmd

Posted by: Yoki | January 5, 2010 9:55 PM | Report abuse

Overtime!

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 5, 2010 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Of course, now that I'm here, I have nothing to say. Missed you!

Posted by: seasea1 | January 5, 2010 10:36 PM | Report abuse

oh crap.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 5, 2010 10:41 PM | Report abuse

Testing...

Well, maybe this thing will stay fixed for awhile now...

yello, last I looked, the Jackets were hanging tough despite a pretty woeful offensive display in the 1st half. Hopefully they'll turn it around for the second half.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 5, 2010 10:44 PM | Report abuse

Woohoo, I can get in again! Now I can at last post my staggeringly pedantic explanation of the star name T Pyxidis, from a couple of kits ago. It means this star was the third variable star to be discovered in the constellation Pyxis. Variable stars (ones that vary measurably in brightness) are named starting with R in a given constellation. The names go R-Z, RR-RZ, SS-SZ, then AA-AZ, BB-BZ, etc., and after ZZ they give up and start numbering them, V-something, like V1234, in order. This weird naming system was started when astronomers thought variable stars were incredibly rare, but they turned out to be incredibly common instead. So the system kept getting extended. Onward: Pyxidis is the genitive case of Pyxis. What is Pyxis? It's the navigator's compass of the good ship Argo. Many southern constellations are actually pieces of the Argo, such as the sails (Vela), the poopdeck (Puppis), and others. Hah! Woof! I've been waiting to say that all day!

Posted by: woofin | January 5, 2010 10:48 PM | Report abuse

sd,
I noticed the resemblance as well.

Oh well, time for basketball.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 6, 2010 12:13 AM | Report abuse

Wow. I had the last comment before the boodle done blowed up.

New kit, btw.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 6, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Hello? Earth calling, earth calling. Come in, mothership. Our plan to shut down global communications successfully completed beta testing this morning.

Standing by and awaiting your orders to commence the next phase.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 6, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

WHEW! That took long enough...

My condolences on the game, yello...

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 6, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Ohhhh... NEW KIT! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 6, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

shrieking_denizen...I had a similar story and i can't help but smile reading your comment.

Tracy, Velocity Fulfillment

Posted by: VelocityFulfillment | January 6, 2010 6:57 PM | Report abuse

I had a similar experience and I can't help but smile reading this post!

Tracy, Status Now

Posted by: VelocityFulfillment | January 6, 2010 7:00 PM | Report abuse

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