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Pacific tsunami: Half the planet affected

Hawaii is looking at 6-foot waves -- on top of the normal waves, mind you. That's a big surge. Arrival time just after 4 p.m. EST, 11 a.m. local. Hawaii is something of the gauge for all of the Pacific. You can't tell the size of the tsunami from what hits the coastline of Chile, because it's too close to the epicenter. It's certainly an expansive event -- covering half the planet, and unfolding over the course of some 24 hours or so. Australia is on alert. Alaska has an advisory as well. this is a wave that will hit Antarctica and the Aleutians.

Here's what I was told this morning by Jenifer Rhoades, Tsunami Program Manager for the National Weather Service:

"Six feet is a lot. Tsunamis have a lot of force behind them... My best analogy for you is to think of a flash flood coming in with potentially very turbulent water. It could have debris in it. Six feet was some of the inundation heights for the Sumatra event in 2004. It's very significant and dangerous."

From the NOAA website:

"Tsunamis can be dangerous waves that are not survivable. Wave heights are amplified by irregular shoreline and are difficult to forecast. Tsunamis often appear as a strong surge and may be preceded by a receding water level. Mariners in water deeper than 600 feet should not be affected by a tsunami. Wave heights will increase rapidly as water shallows. Tsunamis are a series of ocean waves which can be dangerous for several hours after the initial wave arrival. DO NOT return to evacuated areas until an all clear is given by local civil authorities."

Here's the latest from the Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii.

By Joel Achenbach  |  February 27, 2010; 12:32 PM ET
 
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Comments

People keep reblogging and twittering this NOAA image but with no explanation.

It sure looks like an amazing image, but can someone explain what it's actually showing? Thanks.

http://ow.ly/1bXja

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 12:51 PM | Report abuse

Thank you for the continuing updates, Mr. A.

I always knew there was a reason why I lived in the U.S. Midwest!

Has anyone heard from a reliable source on whether the Japan quake and the Chile quake are connected? I realize they involve different plates and all, but their timing seems more than coincidental.

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 12:53 PM | Report abuse

I have not enough clue to comment, TBG.

I doubt the earthquakes are connected any more than celebrity deaths are connected. It is a fantasy imposed by us to connect the Haitian quake with the Chilean quake, merely because the Haitian quake remains in the news (for good reason). Our brains try to interpret patterns in everything.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 27, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

The Okinawa quake of course *is* close in time to the Chilean quake, but without at least three events, we don't have even the beginning of a pattern.

Earthquakes actually happen all the time. Some are bigger than others. I'm sure many quakes happened in the past several days. Two of them happen to have been big bruisers.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 27, 2010 1:02 PM | Report abuse

MsJS was talking about the quake in Okinawa. That seems less far-fetched than the Haiti earthquake to be connected somehow to Chile.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Oh.. OK.. thanks, Tim!

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

How ironic: mudged myself.

Reposting to answer dmd's question, some of which Joel just did:

Generally the tsunami weakens over distance, but we're talking such long distances that it takes a lot of distance to do any serious attenuation. The next factor is what the littoral in front of the land mass looks like, whether it is a long, shallow area such as the US east coast, or basically deep water that shoals fast. Then the nature of the coast line it hits: low and flat, mountainous, etc.

Then there is the problem that it doesn't have to be very tall to do a lot of damage. Remember the Christmas tsunami several years ago in Thailand? It wasn't very high-- only three or four feet, IIRC. But it just came in and washed everything away for long distances.

If the Navy report that it is "only" two feet in open ocean is accurate, there is still the problem of what size it becomes when it hits a shoaling beach: it will surely build. You know those massive waves surfers ride on the North Shore of Hawaii? Those waves are massive only because of the way perfectly normal waves build when they hit that shallow.

They are still talking about a 6- or 7-foot wave hitting Hilo, which I guess is how they expect the 2-foot open-ocean swell to build when it hits the coastline.

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | February 27, 2010 1:08 PM | Report abuse

From what seismologists around here have said, there is little correlation among quakes. There are many, many quakes every day. But until they are these large magnitudes in populated areas, they are little noticed. OTOH, living in an area where a big earthquake is supposedly overdue, quakes in the Pacific rim make me nervous.

Posted by: seasea1 | February 27, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

I guess that's what I was looking for, SciTim. Is there evidence of a third (and possibly additional) data point(s) that the experts are connecting in a meaningful way beyond what happens all time?

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

The two quakes in the last 24 hours--Japan and Chile--not related. The article goes on to explain the difference between strike-slip faults and thrust faults. A good turn-around by the NYT and a good read.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/world/americas/28quake.html?hp

*I'm only online this morning because I was using MapQuest to find the location of Scarborough, Ontario, Canada, where sone doodoo-head is using our credit car to purchase gas. GGGGRRR! I had to guess the Canadian province using MapQuest and guessed right the first time. We got a call from the fraud divison of a credit card company within the last hour. Scarborough directly across from Niagara Falls, the Porter branch of our family written all over the falls, so to speak. See Ginger Strand, etc.*

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Ginger+Strand+Niagara+Falls


Posted by: laloomis | February 27, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

Lots of large quakes go more or less unnoticed because they're in remote areas. There have been several tsunamis in the Pacific recently. The latest, Jan. 10 in the Solomon Islands was hardly noticed by the US media.

The first quake ever to be spotted at a distance was one in Japan in 1855, caught by recently-installed recording tide gauges on the US Pacific coast. The techie in charge at San Diego knew the latest technical literature on the physics of waves and was able to connect his squiggles with reports from our not-so-welcome folks in Japan.

The NOAA image at http://ow.ly/1bXja must be wave height. Tsunami waves in the open ocean aren't very high, but they get higher as they reach shallow water. The map takes into account the underwater topography of the Pacific. That smart techie in San Diego used wave physics of the day (derived from studies of canals) to accurately estimate the average depth of the Pacific between Japan and San Diego.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | February 27, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, so mad at the doodoo-head that I forgot to provide the relevant graf from the NYT:

Experts said the earthquake appeared to have no connection to a magnitude 6.9 quake that struck off the southern coast of Japan on Saturday. The Chilean event also had no connection to the magnitude 7.0 quake that occurred in Haiti on Jan. 12.
***

The Spanish-language broadcast this morning, several hours earlier, had a good graphic of the South American and the Nazca faults.

Posted by: laloomis | February 27, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Scarborough = Toronto, east end.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 1:16 PM | Report abuse

SCC: All typos because when I get really angry, I type poorly and my one good eye gets really angry, too, and doesn't see them!

Posted by: laloomis | February 27, 2010 1:16 PM | Report abuse

According to today's tide tables for the Hawaiian Islands, high tide is (depending on the island) from around 3:30 to 4:00pm. Just in time to coincide with the predicted arrival of the tsunami. I'm pretty sure that can't be a good thing.

Posted by: dschalton | February 27, 2010 1:18 PM | Report abuse

The effects of coastal bathymetry (underwater topography) can be seen when there's an ordinary long-period swell, such as we had from hurricane Bill. Beaches near Melbourne produced some fine plunging waves up to 12 feet or more, a local limestone reef looked like Waikiki with a suitable crowd surfing much smaller spilling waves, while the sand beach next to that reef had what are called "surging" breakers. The water simply rose and moved onto the beach, then receded. The lifeguards posted only their weakest warning flag. Many tsunami seem to behave something like those surging waves from the hurricane.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | February 27, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

My bad! I got my timezone things all in a bunch - actually, the tsunami's arrival will fall almost midway between high and low tides for most of the islands...
duh! mia culpa...

Posted by: dschalton | February 27, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

Here is a graphic of the location of the quake and the aftershocks:

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Maps/10/285_-35.php

Posted by: nellie4 | February 27, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

TBG, here is a quotation from a friend, describing the map you linked earlier: "A map showing how the energy from the Chile quake is likely to propagate across the Pacific. Scale shows the average height displacement of the water surface, as far as I can tell. Displacements get hugely amplified as waves move up onto beaches and into shallower areas. Don't go to the beach this afternoon if you live near the Pacific." I have not found the original page yet.

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 27, 2010 1:34 PM | Report abuse

These photos show amplitude and projection plots.

http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/chile20100227/

Posted by: Martial | February 27, 2010 1:37 PM | Report abuse

I'm wondering if JA has seen Chad Meyer's take on the quake -- something to the effect that Haiti's 7 was more meaningful because of a small area shaking much harder.

And how astounding is it that we can watch live coverage of an event ocurring thousands of miles from our relatively comfortable seat in flight at 28,000 feet?

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 27, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

SCC: CNN's Chad Meyers

Sheesh, I'm away from the Boodle for a few days and my typing goes all to heck.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 27, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

I saw that bit from Chad Meyers on CNN. He was describing how magnitude is calculated. He said it takes the (square mile) area affected into account. So, the shaking in Haiti may have been greater, but was over a small area, so the magnitude came in at 7, while the area in Chile was greater, with lesser shaking, but the magnitude is 8.8. I hadn't realized that before. Also, the population in the 2 places was much different. So vastly more people were affected in Haiti...although the full extent of the damage in Chile is not yet known (but we do know the population is much less in the earthquake area).

Hope Brag is ok. Will be interesting to hear his account.

Posted by: seasea1 | February 27, 2010 1:45 PM | Report abuse

I had no issue with Meyers' math, but I'm afraid he might be forgetting that we don't know what we don't know about the quake, and it's going to take days to figure that out.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 27, 2010 1:51 PM | Report abuse

Regarding TBG's image link and SciTim's response.

Here's the relevant website.
http://wcatwc.arh.noaa.gov/

That's the West Coast & Alaska Tsunami Warning Center.

I wasn't able to find a decent explanation of what the image represents on that site. The explanation provided by SciTim makes sense, though, given what little info I did find.

Cool image. Someone's going to put that on t-shirts, you just know it.

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Well, as Meyers said, we know that there aren't 3 million people in the quake area, in adobe houses with no rebar. He said it was mostly farmland.

Tsunami advisory for Washington (state) coast:
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2011208329_advisory27m.html

Hawaii tsunami cam:
http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/Global/category.asp?C=176904&nav=menu55_1_1

Posted by: seasea1 | February 27, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

The USGS's first shake maps look consistent with Chad Meyers. Huge area affected, but none with shaking equal to the worst felt in Haiti (south and west of Port au Prince).

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | February 27, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

Surveillance video showing the quake in Chile...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/video/2010/02/27/VI2010022701824.html#

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 2:05 PM | Report abuse

Brag's website in under construction. I don't know if it's current, but I did sign the guestbook.

http://alexeybraguine.com/

Posted by: rickoshea1 | February 27, 2010 2:09 PM | Report abuse

Yes DotC, Meyers was using USGS charts, but again, they're very preliminary at this point.

Posted by: Scottynuke | February 27, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Isn't the span of the wave more important than the height? In other words, if the sea rises in one location for 5 seconds and then the wave passes, if it lasted 20 seconds (even though the rise is still 2 feet) the tsunami will be worse?

Posted by: Jumper1 | February 27, 2010 2:44 PM | Report abuse

I don't like the looks of the Gulf of California, either. A big focusing funnel.

Posted by: Jumper1 | February 27, 2010 2:46 PM | Report abuse

BBC has a good story at
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8540522.stm

The earthquake broke the same segment of fault as the 1835 disaster that Charles Darwin witnessed. A recent study identified the area as ripe for a quake.

The Maupo quake is similar to what will eventually happen in the Pacific Northwest. Things are slower there--the last big quake was Jan. 26, 1700.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | February 27, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

San Diego has a "tsunami alert" (not a warning or a watch) for 12:02 p.m. local (3:02 EST) time indicating chance of some boats being tossed about.

Posted by: Jumper1 | February 27, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

Yes Jumper. That's exactly right. Tsunami waves can have very long wavelengths (the distance between crest to crest.) This means that even a modest amplitude can be associated with a huge amount of water.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

Civil defense will be shutting down roads in the inundation areas on Oahu in two minutes. Big Island and Maui County have already shut their roads and evacuated coastal areas. Oahu is moving a bit slower but we're getting there. Lots of people moving into the heights around Honolulu to watch and wait. Still, some dodoheads sitting at the beach waiting to see the water change and some went to try and surf. Crazy fools. It's been an interesting 12 hours and we're down to about an hour and a half out to Tsunami time. Cross your fingers for all of us please, especially those in Hilo.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

The wave is supposed to hit La Jolla, CA right about now. California coast officials are going to check out what happens there before issuing any warnings or advisories for the rest of the state.

As of about an hour ago, they weren't anticipating any significant episodes.

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

The difference between high frequency waves and low frequency waves.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AV3cIFDRbjk

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

I have not figured out the crackpot notion of trying to surf a tsunami. I think a few small tsunamis may possibly have been surfed, unintentionally, but I wouldn't count on being able to find a verifiable story. For the most part, a tsunami doesn't look anything like a wind-generated swell. Not to mention that even if a tsunami wave were to break (rather than just bringing a rapid rise in water level), it would be well nigh impossible to position yourself at the right spot to catch it.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | February 27, 2010 3:07 PM | Report abuse

MotP - best wishes for you all.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

According to this great WaPo graphic ("great"="easy to read"), the wave should have already hit American Samoa...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/graphic/2010/02/27/GR2010022702138.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 3:12 PM | Report abuse

You *can't* surf a tsunami. The shape is completely different. It isn't just a regular wind-generated wave you see at the beach, but taller. It is a whole different beast. There is no "face" at all.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 3:14 PM | Report abuse

Live video cam of Waikiki Beach.

http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/99999999/MOGULUS02/399990001&template=mogulus

Posted by: rickoshea1 | February 27, 2010 3:15 PM | Report abuse

Stay safe MotP!

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 3:15 PM | Report abuse

MotP... glad you checked in. Keep us posted on the happenings out there.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 3:19 PM | Report abuse

MoTP, we're pulling for you all there in and along the not-so-Pacific.

Boodle Mojo set to 11.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | February 27, 2010 3:20 PM | Report abuse

Friends who live on Oahu's north shore (near Sunset for those familiar) report the local gas station and grocery slammed earlier today. Neighborhoods emptied as people head for high ground. Marijuana growers were the first to head for the hills. Protecting their investment no doubt.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | February 27, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

MotP-good to see your handle. Keeping an extra good thought for all. None of those beach sitters or surfers can have gone to the tsunami museum in Hilo, or they'd know better.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | February 27, 2010 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Thanks everybody! We're safe on high ground and far inland. People are starting to leave the streets and stay indoors. Road closures help with that and hopefully the foolish ones are paying heed and clearing out of the inundation zones.

Yeah, the bozos who think this means awesome surf have no idea what this means. Hence the stupid notion that going to the beach now is a good idea. Worst of all, they put the first responders in danger by rescuers having to go and get those guys out of the water.

On Oahu, our biggest worry is losing a power plant...or two. Our two largest power stations sit on the south and west shores of the island to take advantage of the cooling seawater. Unfortunately, if they become flooded our grid goes down and would stay down for a long time. We're stocked with batteries, charged up our phones, laptops, cameras, etc., put our fridge on coldest setting and have pots and tub filled with water. Now we just wait and see what happens.

First waves should be getting to Hilo in a half hour.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Sirens going off again as they have been on the hour for since 6 a.m.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Joel's latest reporting. He's really on top of things.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/27/AR2010022701580.html?hpid=topnews

The Boodle is amazing today. Stay safe, ALL islanders!

Posted by: laloomis | February 27, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Please check in when you can MotP!

Here's a site that those would-be surfers should have visited..

http://www.uhh.hawaii.edu/~nat_haz/tsunamis/surfing.php

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

MSNBC is showing some idiot swimming in the ocean in Hawaii.

Posted by: rickoshea1 | February 27, 2010 3:33 PM | Report abuse

The British Geological Survey says:

"A 1.3 m tsunami wave was observed at Valparaiso, 200km north of the epicentre about 20 minutes after the earthquake."

http://bit.ly/chkWlI

That works out to a wave moving along at ~375mph.

Posted by: byoolin1 | February 27, 2010 3:34 PM | Report abuse

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/Global/category.asp?C=176904&nav=menu55_1_5

News cast... something posted earlier.

I am starting to tune my ear to the pigeon English

Posted by: russianthistle | February 27, 2010 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Will do RD! Big Island is ready as they can be. The best part of all of this is that we have the element of time to prepare. There's no excuse for us to not be prepared.

Lots of people reported on the Pali highway and lookout waiting to see what happens. Roads are empty in Waikiki, Downtown, Ala Moana... eerie. Police are using loudspeakers to tell people to get away from the shore. Homeless are being bused into inland areas.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

The pidgin never leaves you Dolphin Michael!

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:39 PM | Report abuse

MotP -- so glad to hear from you! And, yes, I agree, that there are far too many stupid people around who -- despite the evidence from the tsunami in Indonesia in 2004 -- would actually think that they would be safe sitting on the beach (you can't outrun a tsunami) and (2) a tsunami would be a really cool surfing experience. The existential (so to speak) happiness coefficient from this whole thing is that after the tsunami hits, there will be fewer stupid people in the world.

Always follow the elephants. When they go to higher ground, so should you.

I do hope Brag is alive and well -- certainly alive. And, MotP, stay alive and well yourself (you and yours, that is).

Posted by: -ftb- | February 27, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Thanks ftb! As I mentioned before, we're out of the inundation zones and are up on high ground. If it comes up here, it'll be one heck of a tsunami.

KGMB new station reporting unusual tidal changes already. Signs point to a tsunami imminent. They've got a live camera trained on Hilo Bay, which is supposed to be hit at 11:05 a.m. HST. We're five hours behind the east coast.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

So cool to think that we know of these things ahead of time and know how to 1) avoid them and 2) report on them and possibly capture them on film.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

Heard Samoa and French Polynesia have experienced big waves from 6 ft high.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

Watching this from my couch is positively surreal.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/hawaii-tsunami-on-the-volcano-live-shots-of-coean-kalapana

Watch the ocean off the south shore of the Big Island.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

Nothing happening yet...

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

I hope it's not a bad sign for humanity that the Tarheels beat Wake Forest today.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Really appeciating all the info and updates today, I can't watch as it disturbs me to watch this live, but feel so informed reading all the comments.

An off topic note a a bit of light on a dark morning, at our gathering last night we were discussing the prices for tickets purchased through scalpers/ebay for the gold medal hockey game, the figure of $25,000 was thrown out for the price of ticket on ebay (each). When they say Canadians are insane about hockey they are not kidding. Too many Canada/US gold and silver finals for my liking on the last two days makes it hard to cheer, so much easier if we are battling against other nations.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 4:26 PM | Report abuse

The coverage of the tsunami in Hawaii is not disturbing, dmd, because the people have evacuated. If anything is damaged, it shouldn't include people.

It's fascinating to watch but not in a train-wreck kind of way.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 4:35 PM | Report abuse

KHON anchor: "It's funny to think we pinpointed the time of the tsunami to be 11:04 and now we find out it could be an hour either way."

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 4:38 PM | Report abuse

Water receding in Hilo Bay...

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Weird that I can't watch it when I have spent two weeks watching people throw themselves down mountains. I have a livelong fear of water - think that factors in.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 4:41 PM | Report abuse

If I were there with a news team I'd set up a camera about 7 feet above the water level, with a reticle aligned exactly at the horizon, and zoomed all the way out. This would give me a horizon line, and if I monitored it, I would see an abrupt rise or fall. At that height the horizon is several miles out. This would give a minute or so warning.

Posted by: Jumper1 | February 27, 2010 4:43 PM | Report abuse

Did the online news show the bozo that was playing in the water off Waikiki Beach about a half hour ago? Coast Guard had to fly over in a helicopter to tell the guy to get the heck out of the water. Sheesh.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

Water rushing out of Hilo Bay, much more dramatically now. Kahului Harbor on Maui is receding as well too.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 4:59 PM | Report abuse

The primitive novelty-seeking part of my brain was expecting something more exciting, but these gradual changes are just fine. Let's hope nothing more dramatic happens.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 5:01 PM | Report abuse

KGMB online has the best feed. CNN is using our local Fox station's feed which is pretty bad. Reports say Kahului Harbor dropped 6 feets.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

Oops, sorry, 3 feet drop in Kahului Harbor. Sorry, my metric conversion is poor.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 5:10 PM | Report abuse

Awww man, looters reported at homes on the Big Island. Jerks!

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 5:15 PM | Report abuse

Looters! That's bad news. Yes.. big jerks.

I did smile, though, when I read a news report that said lots of people had been seen coming out of Wal-mart with "rice, saimin and toilet paper."

Sounds like a snow storm is coming!

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 5:18 PM | Report abuse

My memory is that tsunami are acoustic waves (sound waves) and travel at a velocity more like sound speed than the speed of surface swells. Several hundred miles per hour is normal, until the wave hits shallow water -- then the energy has to convert from small motion of mass at high speed to large motions of mass at low speed

Posted by: ScienceTim | February 27, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

http://chilepersonfinder.appspot.com/

I've typed in Brag's name, but not quite ready to add him a list of "missing persons." I'll just keep looking for him.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 5:23 PM | Report abuse

The KGMB coverage is good. They just showed some fish out of water and the commentator said, "if the fish are being caught by surprise, you know something is happening!"

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 5:28 PM | Report abuse

Looks like things are going to be okay. No damag!

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

I'm glad to hear that, MotP. I'll take better than expected over worse than expected any day.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 5:53 PM | Report abuse

Back in Canuckistan, the final run of the men's 4-men bobsleigh is underway. Merikans and Canickistanis are 1, 2 after the 3rd run. Those two teams will go last.

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 6:13 PM | Report abuse

That's good to hear, MotP.

Posted by: seasea1 | February 27, 2010 6:23 PM | Report abuse

USA, Germany, Canada are unofficially 1,2,3 in the 4-man bobsleigh.

Canada up 1-0 over Norway in men's curling final after 2 ends.

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 6:36 PM | Report abuse

Such a relief to know that damage is minimal to nonexistent and that no life is lost. I hope Brag will check in soon. Earthquake in Argentina, yikes!

On the local news front, projected snow totals have been significantly downgraded. Carolina beat Wake! That's the best news of the day.

Posted by: slyness | February 27, 2010 6:37 PM | Report abuse

I am watching the curling, cheering for Canada, but enjoying watching the Norwegian skip - heart a flutter.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 6:39 PM | Report abuse

Real pitcher's duel going in the curling championship.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 6:40 PM | Report abuse

With all that went on today, this was probably missed but Tom Brokaw had a great special on the people of Gander, NFLD and what they did for those 7,000 passangers stranded in their town following 9-11. A well known story (repeated in several other maritime cities) here but not so much outside Canada.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse

This GE commercial is really bugging me. I don't care how good a surgeon you are, you don't fix an appendix, you remove it.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 6:44 PM | Report abuse

My daughter has taken note of that skip as well. Joy.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 6:59 PM | Report abuse

I was expecting to watch the Maryland/Virginia Tech basketball game at 4,but the time has been pushed back to 7. For a situation I have never heard of before, a Beer Truck delay.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/terps/bal-terps0227,0,5898220.story

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 27, 2010 7:01 PM | Report abuse

I've filed a story for tomorrow's paper (will probably go online soon). So glad no damage in Middle of the Pacific!

Posted by: joelache | February 27, 2010 7:02 PM | Report abuse

The Norwegian skip is rather dreamy. A little bit of a Harry Hamlin vibe.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 7:03 PM | Report abuse

It's truly wonderful when the warning systems work.

Posted by: slyness | February 27, 2010 7:11 PM | Report abuse

Way better looking than Hamelin.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 7:14 PM | Report abuse

I would expect the wave, reflected and re-reflected across the Pacific basin will dissolve into chaos, then turbulence and then froth. For a time, chance waves will re-enforce and cause unpredictable swells in locales near shores or at sea. I wouldn't be surprised to hear of a few isolated mariners or cove-dwellers who are surprised by a 30 foot swell which then disappears.

Posted by: Jumper1 | February 27, 2010 7:17 PM | Report abuse

RD your daughter is in excellent company. Tell her, me too.

It's really hard when he curls against Canada.

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 7:20 PM | Report abuse

Big sigh of relief that tsunami turned out to be insignificant. One thing we did was prove that we were prepared. That in itself was a win. Now, I gotta take a nap, been up since 10 last night!

Thanks to all for your well-wishes!

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | February 27, 2010 7:20 PM | Report abuse

John Morris isn't too bad either, and he has a really hot hand today.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 7:23 PM | Report abuse

Glad all is calm now, MotP. Get some rest.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 7:25 PM | Report abuse

Yes noted about Morris.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 7:26 PM | Report abuse

Sweet dreams, MotP!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcqHxnGfV7c&feature=related

Posted by: MsJS | February 27, 2010 7:31 PM | Report abuse

Glad you can sleep now, MotP! I'm grateful all is well there.

I dunno, that little tick Ulsrud has with his eyes puts me off. Of course, I've been too open about my "type" being lithe and dark and long-boned; he'd otherwise qualify (except for the funny nose -- like I can talk!). So sad.

Posted by: Yoki | February 27, 2010 7:49 PM | Report abuse

Just read that Marie Osmond's 18 year old son has died, very sad.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 7:51 PM | Report abuse

WinOly split second symphony:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/02/26/sports/olympics/20100226-olysymphony.html?hp

Posted by: DNA_Girl | February 27, 2010 7:58 PM | Report abuse

Martin's might be the best curling throw ever.

Posted by: Yoki | February 27, 2010 8:00 PM | Report abuse

Yes, the curling is a pleasure to watch, on many levels. (Go, Canada!) Donald Sutherland in the house, too.

I've heard that an appendectomy is a surgeon's dream - they get to cut it out, end of story.

Posted by: seasea1 | February 27, 2010 8:23 PM | Report abuse

You've said it Yoki. Martin is as good as it gets.

But when Ulsrude smiles? Be still my beating heart.

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 8:25 PM | Report abuse

If you think I am not crying, you would be wrong.

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 8:33 PM | Report abuse

WooHoo. Hurrah for the Canadians!

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

I confess to small pitter when Ulsrud smiles, dmd.

Gold.

Only, you know, not GOLD.

Posted by: Yoki | February 27, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

They make it look so easy. Now I'm going to watch the women's curling final until ice skating comes on.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 8:36 PM | Report abuse

The record for gold medals at Winter Olympics is 13. Canada just tied.

No predictions for tomorrow (and how sad am I that I won't see the hockey game? Very.); I expect the US to take that one.

Posted by: Yoki | February 27, 2010 8:37 PM | Report abuse

Colleen Jones just made a profound point. Curling has kind of turned the corner as an international sport. People have learned how entertaining it is. It's become, well, almost hip.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 8:44 PM | Report abuse

Paging DR -- the lovely garter knitted blue multiply lopi-escue sweaters on the flower/medal bearing gals....!!!! i want one, but in green.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | February 27, 2010 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Just found someone on Twitter also looking for word of Brag. Small world--and Brag has conquered much of it.

Posted by: -TBG- | February 27, 2010 8:55 PM | Report abuse

The sweaters by the medal presenters were designed by a Vancouver designer, she three outfits, black coat with spider web bottom, and plaid quilt jacket, all with beautiful scarves.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 8:55 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry I was going to say something profound. But I have to watch this.

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 8:57 PM | Report abuse

What a nice moment! Although I wish someone would jump up and down on that air-horn..

Posted by: RD_Padouk | February 27, 2010 9:01 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for looking TBG

Posted by: DNA_Girl | February 27, 2010 9:06 PM | Report abuse

I know CqP. Aren't they gorgeous?

This whole spiel has been just wonderful to watch. I'm a little sad to see it end.

However, the Brier is soon.

http://www.seasonofchampions.ca/2010brier/

and there is more good stuff to come.

http://www.worldcurling.org/events

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 9:15 PM | Report abuse

Commentary and photo on the presenter designs:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=178207

Garter knit on oversized needles: fab. And, the dark blue is a foil to the athletes' colorful garb. Dark enough to make a nice line on all body types, particularly on TV. Knitting! A subtle center stage. Ah, Canada. We raise our yarn to thee!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | February 27, 2010 9:18 PM | Report abuse

Sorry Rd. The airhorn thing is, much though we dislike it, a Canadian thing.

Now the cowbells. Give me more.

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 9:18 PM | Report abuse

I spotted "An Entirely Synthetic Fish" last week, while going to the Yale University Press website to look at something else.

The Post review looks promising. The issues the book raises with respect to the much-loved and much-detested rainbow trout have been known to biologists for a very long time (I think I started to get clued in as a freshman taking Dr. Wright's introductory genetics seasoned with tales from his own work on trout at the hatchery down the road). An accessible Rainbow book is long overdue.

Yale University Press seems an ideal publisher--I think they do angling, leaving birds to Princeton. By that logic, Harvard should do golf, but they don't.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | February 27, 2010 9:20 PM | Report abuse

Good to see you DNA Girl.
Hope Brag is okay; tried to find him via the Internets.
Glad Aloha et al are unharmed.
Thanks again for Oly coverage, curling comment. I have been going to bed very early. It was a long week - but no earthquakes or tsunami (tsumanis? Tsunamie?). Life is good.

Posted by: Ivansmom | February 27, 2010 9:20 PM | Report abuse

I'm just hoping Brag is being his wily, stealthy self. If anybody knows about survival, it is he.

Oh, Lambiel skating to Brel! Now I've got a little inappropriate crush going.

Posted by: Yoki | February 27, 2010 9:24 PM | Report abuse

And this.

http://www.wingsstadium.com/curlingnationals/

Posted by: --dr-- | February 27, 2010 9:28 PM | Report abuse

double OT for terps and hokies

Posted by: greenwithenvy | February 27, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

I was joking to my wife that if you add 'topless' to the description of any sport, it improves it. Little did I know that womens curling already had that covered.

http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/sport_paa_vrangen/article1285189.ece

Uh, not safe for work and sure to cement my reputation, whatever that may be.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

Hi IMom
http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=2125

Posted by: DNA_Girl | February 27, 2010 9:37 PM | Report abuse

New Kit.

Posted by: dmd3 | February 27, 2010 9:51 PM | Report abuse

There's always the Potomac Curling Club. They have a Learn To Curl event tomorrow.

http://www.curldc.org/

But I think they are already oversubscribed.

Posted by: yellojkt | February 27, 2010 9:56 PM | Report abuse

I was working in Hawaii IIRC 1965, LBJ was on a stopover when we had a tsunami warning. He caused a big hullabloo because he and Ladybird wouldn’t and didn't evacuate from the Royal Hawaiian hotel when the authorities were trying to get everyone else out of Waikiki.

Posted by: bh72 | February 28, 2010 1:07 PM | Report abuse

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