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Strasburg to plug Deepwater Horizon well

I told you he was underhyped! Did you see that? Come on. That was ridiculous, that Stephen Strasburg debut. I would say the point where I was really impressed was when, late in the game, having grown bored with simply making the Pirate batters look stupid, he decided to cast a spell turning a player's bat into a wriggling cobra. The look on that guy's face!!!

Seriously, had Strasburg levitated above the mound he could not have been more amazing. He had everyone flailing wildly at every pitch, and I'm just describing the reaction in the stands. We lost our minds. By the time he struck out his 14th and final batter, I was so excited I was speaking in tongues. I felt young again, my skin smoother, all aches and pains dissipated, and my pervasive ennui was suppressed to a point where, for about three hours, I forgot that life is a brutal march toward oblivion.

We're all livin' the dream!

Not to get greedy, but: Has Strasburg ever played quarterback? How's his jumper? 'Cause we got a couple of other teams in D.C. that could use him.

Obviously Strasburg now needs to use his magical powers to plug the leaking gulf well. We need him to take over as National Incident Commander. Nothing against Adm. Thad Allen, but Allen's only got one pitch, and Strasburg has four. Allen's got no "out" pitch, ya dig?

By Joel Achenbach  |  June 9, 2010; 12:37 PM ET
 
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Comments

So I should drive down to near Miami on July 16.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | June 9, 2010 1:40 PM | Report abuse

"The brown current ran swiftly out of the heart of darkness..." Charles Marlow (Joseph Conrad)

I don't think we have oil disaster fatigue.
No one believes anything the Unified Command says, nor should they, so there is no point in keeping track of official pronouncements, but for morbid curiosity.

This did not have to happen, terrible mistakes were made, the destruction is just getting started, the oil is still flowing, it is supposed to stop in August. This was true seven weeks ago and it still is, I suppose there is just nothing more to say.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

I know the feeling, Joel. And I only saw it on television.

We've been witness to so much dreadful history lately. It's a powerful thing to have experienced something that we will actually enjoy remembering.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 1:47 PM | Report abuse

Joel, did you find the astrolabe useful in watching the game? I looked for you out at the shortstop position, but they only had Desmond from "Lost" out there. (The shortstop or second base positions are the second-best places to watch a baseball game from.) (The best is from behind homeplate, right behind the catcher, and ya don't have to be able to move nearly as fast.)

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 1:51 PM | Report abuse

I'm not a sports fan generally, but this is a wonderful kit.

As shrink says, morbid curiousity is the only reason to watch the UC.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 1:54 PM | Report abuse

Joel says, "...for about three hours, I forgot that life is a brutal march toward oblivion."

After Kurz dies, Marlow says,

"Droll thing life is - that mysterious arrangement of logic for a futile purpose. The most you can hope for is some knowledge of yourself - that comes too late - a crop of unextinguishable regrets."

My work, my life actually, is dedicated to the proposition that these sentiments are if not false, at least not the whole story.

This is not the place, but maybe someday, it will be. I'd like to discuss a Rilke passage, several paragraphs from a letter he wrote to a friend...one of the most affirmative statements I have ever come across, to illustrate the point.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Personally, I thought Strasburg's "Vishnu Pitch" was a bit over the top (and sidearm(s) as well). Clearly effective, though.

They'll have to add more baseballs to the mix when they call him in for that Junk Shot, too.

Seriously, the only things he could have done better would have been to beat out that grounder in his first at-bat (and reasonable for him not to given his injury history), and, well, there's the matter of that two-run dinger...

Enjoy him while we can, folks -- I suspect that in a few years he'll be in pinstripes and the only time we'll see him is when he comes up in rotation during interleague play, or if we take a jaunt up to Camden Yards when New York is in town.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | June 9, 2010 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Remind me, who'd Rilke play for? It wasn't the 78-86 Mets, was it? Or am I thinking of somebody else? I believe I once saw him come in as a reliever for Garcia Lorca at the old Spectrum in Philly. The Phillies had Schopenhauer in right field in those days. Great glove, bad attitude.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 2:01 PM | Report abuse

bc- I don't understand the contractual details, but in his 11 AM chat Tom Boswell states that Washington has Strasburg for the next 6 2/3 years.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 2:07 PM | Report abuse

"Great glove, bad attitude."

Yeah, he brought his off-the-field issues into the dugout.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 2:14 PM | Report abuse

RD, baseball contracts get bought and sold on a regular basis. If he's that good and his arm holds up, Strasburg could easily be with a big-payroll club in 2-3 years.

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Mr. A, how were your seats? Anyone mistake you for Ronny Cedeno?

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

"...Allen's only got one pitch..."

mock war chatter, otherwise known as saber rattling

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Padouk, I guessing that what Boswell was referring to has to do with the free agency rule, which basically states that a player is bound to the team that drafted him for six years, and then he is eligible for free agency the following May 1st. (There are all sorts of exceptions and what-ifs, but this is assuming basically six years of continuous play, no trips back to the minors [which seems unthinkable for this guy], and so on.

Strasburg's contract was for 4 years at $15.1 million. But under free agency rules, that contract can be variously extended up until six years (and don't know the terms, but Boswell is postulating that whatever they may be, the Nationals would be insane not to keep him). Since this season is already 1/3 over and past the free agency deadline, Strasburg must play for the Nats (assuming they want him) for six years from yesterday, at which point he becomes eligible for free agency, but only on the following May 1. So he'd have to play that additional 2/3 of a year here, and would be released the following May 1 to play elsewhere. Of course, one hopes he is still pitching well, and that the Nats would make every effort to keep him...and that he'd be happy to stay if his conditions are met.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 2:27 PM | Report abuse

Understood MsJS. I just can't imagine that the Nats would actually sell his contract. But who knows? I guess it depends on if he really brings in more people and gooses the television ratings enough. It is a business.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 2:28 PM | Report abuse

Thanks Mudge!

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

Having been mudged with the phrase "eternal horizontal" hanging out there, I had to laugh at Joel's "brutal march toward oblivion".

I think I became a Nats baseball fan last night. I haven't had that much fun "watching" a game since my high school boyfriend was our star pitcher. Just plain good hollering fun!

Posted by: talitha1 | June 9, 2010 2:33 PM | Report abuse

...seems unthinkable...

heh, heh. I don't know but I have heard, more than once, "Petition The Lord with Prayer? Petition The Lord with prayer? You can NOT petition The Lord with prayer!"

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 2:37 PM | Report abuse

This (from Dan Steinberg in his chat this morning) was pretty cute. For those not familiar with the Passover song, "Dayenu" means, roughly, "it would have satisfied us":


If he had struck out Lastings Milledge but not every hitter in the Pirates lineup, Dayenu.
If he had struck out every hitter in the Pirates lineup but not cracked double digits, Dayenu.
If he had cracked double digits but not set a franchise record, Dayenu.
If he had set a franchise record but not reached 14, Dayenu.
If he had reached 14 but not done so with the fewest pitches in MLB history, Dayenu.
If he had done so with the fewest pitches in MLB history but not also gotten the win, Dayenu.
If he had gotten the win but not also done so on the most beautiful June night for baseball in Washington history, Dayenu.

Posted by: bobsewell | June 9, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Hi all... didn't watch the game last night because I was at Constitution Hall enjoying Conan O'Brien's Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television live show.

Lots of fun, laughs and great musical entertainment by the band and by Conan. We got to meet Andy Richter (he controls the universe, you know!), who posed with the kids for a great picture.

May I be so rude as to bring up last night's remarks by Shiloh again? I'm pretty horrified at his suggestion that Yoki is a racist. I'm sorry I wasn't here to defend her at the time. Thank you... carry on.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 9, 2010 2:56 PM | Report abuse

This country may have a franchise interest in crazy, but we sure don't have a monopoly!

http://www.aolnews.com/world/article/saudi-clerics-advocate-adult-breast-feeding/19504280

Posted by: kguy1 | June 9, 2010 2:56 PM | Report abuse

Not to be Debbie Downer, but Mark Prior's first outing was remarkably similar to Strasburg's. In fact, Prior's first two years were pretty phenomenal, but I don't think that anyone would consider his tenure with the Cubs a success.

Enjoy him Nats fans, but keep your fingers crossed and make sure that Riggleman keeps those pitch counts low.

Posted by: Awal | June 9, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

In the spirit of enjoying the sports moment, TWC is enjoying the lead up to game VI of the Stanley Cup finals. Face off in about 5 hours.

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Philly is beside itself right now.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 3:23 PM | Report abuse

Wow, dbG, if TWC were beside itself it'd be in Lake Michigan.

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

You're right. I guess that means we're really in Jersey.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 3:30 PM | Report abuse

"...it'd be in Lake Michigan..."

or worse, in Gary

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

I know more than a few Boodlers (and perhaps even a Kitter) who'll be beside themselves with this sad news from Connecticut Ave NW:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/09/AR2010060903413.html

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 9, 2010 3:32 PM | Report abuse

dbG has me thinking about Philly-style city nick names.

Why don't we have:

Deecee
Pittsy
Fritzi
'Lanty
Bosty...pronounced Baahsy in a New England way...

We do have Cincy. And, BTW FWIIW IMHO, a mild pox plus calamine on all who say "Cali."

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 3:33 PM | Report abuse

Scottynuke, the sale of P&P is sad news, but you know -- I think it'll find the right buyer and stay more or less as is.

At least, for awhile.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | June 9, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

Would that make TWC "Chicky" or "Go-ey"?

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

Your call, JS. I always think of the old bluesey name of Shytown....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 3:38 PM | Report abuse

I for one would be delighted by a discussion of Rilke and philosophy. Ol' Reiner Maria and I go back to, oh, 1967 or thereabouts. He was widely taught in the Swiss school system, which is perfectly fitting of course.

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

I've also lived in or very near to Cincy too, CqP.

I'm not damning it with faint. Praise when I write it's like a small Philly. Many small, ethnic neighborhoods, great parks, riverside to a great to visit state--but faster to get around in than here.

The BBQ and Cincinnati Chili in Cincy compares favorably with our cheesesteaks and wodder ice.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Talitha, oh poor overtall love!

Among other tragedies, he could never be kissed unexpectedly unless already horizontal or pulled down by surprise, which could give him whiplash.

I'm excessively short myself, and it's a pain to almost fit within normal limits, but never quite make it.

On the bright side, about every guy is definitely tall enough to look up to adoringly.

But don't get me started on neck pain...

Jumper, I agree. Dogs want to be part of the pack and know what they're there for. If given zero direction, they'll make up their own jobs, and that usually gets a dog in trouble.

If anything, I found I had to train Wilbrodog on extra stuff because just listening to stuff wasn't enough to keep him from being bored.

So he's been a nice demo dog for various service dog tasks on a few different occasions, and he loves rehearsing for those show-offs.

Pick up keys, put stuff in the wastebasket, practice stopping at overhead obstacles (I usually use a dowel stick for that), do a front to block, alert to dropped keys, retrieve; alert and then take me to a beeping kitchen timer, react to the door, take objects off table or chairs on direction, object discrimination by name in retrieving, whatever seems apt for the situation.

Last demo was a pretty complex demo, over 20 different tasks in 15 minutes, and he didn't know exactly what I was going to ask, or in what order. He did very well.

He was worn out afterwards but happy.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 3:47 PM | Report abuse

I'll take you up on that Yoki.
Night time is the right time.

I'll have to type it out...which will take awhile, or, maybe I can find it in the Internets' tubes.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

JS, remember victor, Victoria. A town so great it starts with c h I c chic!

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I bet you've said before, but I don't remember -- do you sign commands to Wilbrodog? If so, do you use auditory attention-getters for him, or does he normally have enough of an eye on you that visual cues work alone? Just curious.

Posted by: -bia- | June 9, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

I'm fond of TWC's motto: Urbs in Horto (City in a Garden).

I'm also fond of the late Mike Royko's version of the motto: Ubi est Mea? (Where's Mine?). Now that Blago's trial has begun, everyone around here is quoting it again.

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 3:53 PM | Report abuse

While waiting for evening riffs on Rilke, listen to this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCtWVyVyDbw&feature=related

Stars, jazz and a Rilke poem. Many others posted by a Rilke lover.

The voice is a bit dramatic BUT helps dispel the myth that the sounds of German are harsh and unpleasant.

Off to pick up/drop off duties....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

"He was worn out afterwards but happy."

Certainly one of the antivenins for our awareness, we the only species capable of contemplating life's brutal march toward oblivion.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

CqP, I'm not quite sure I could handle the likes of these Philly-style names:

Housty
Dalsy
Buttey
Sandy (iego)
'Linsy (Nawlins)
Oksie (where IM lives)
Vegy (Las V)
or
The City of Otherly Love (Mianus)

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

What Yoki said about the Rilke.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

MsJ is ready. The countdown begins!

Posted by: teddymzuri | June 9, 2010 4:01 PM | Report abuse

Before Summer Rain

Suddenly, from all the green around you,
something-you don't know what-has disappeared;
you feel it creeping closer to the window,
in total silence. From the nearby wood

you hear the urgent whistling of a plover,
reminding you of someone's Saint Jerome:
so much solitude and passion come
from that one voice, whose fierce request the downpour

will grant. The walls, with their ancient portraits, glide
away from us, cautiously, as though
they weren't supposed to hear what we are saying.

And reflected on the faded tapestries now;
the chill, uncertain sunlight of those long
childhood hours when you were so afraid.

--R.M. Rilke

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Lots of oldtimers, especially down Eastern Avenue way, call Charm City "Balty-more", though Bawlmer is more common.

Just leave my two favorite southern cities alone. Charleston and Savannah should never be Charley and Savanny!

Posted by: talitha1 | June 9, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Oh, *expletive*! After years upon years of getting my books at Olsson's, I segued over to P&P. And, now . . . . Well, it's the Amazons and the Abebooks and other online book sellers that have taken the place of the independent book sellers. Drat! And it isn't as if the Barnes & Nobles or the Borders of the world are going to do any better, either.

Posted by: -ftb- | June 9, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

The Lovers

See how in their veins all becomes spirit:
into each other they mature and grow.
Like axles, their forms tremblingly orbit,
round which it whirls, bewitching and aglow.
Thirsters, and they receive drink,
watchers, and see: they receive sight.
Let them into one another sink
so as to endure each other outright.

--RMR

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 4:10 PM | Report abuse

Gee, Mudge. Sorry to follow that beautiful Rilke with my silly slang.

Shrink, I'm ready for the discussion. Kindly give a heads up as to date and time.

Posted by: talitha1 | June 9, 2010 4:12 PM | Report abuse

On April 20, BP's closing price on the NYSE was $60.48.

Today it closed at $29.20.

Half its market capitalization gone in just over 7 weeks.

CqP & Mudge, how about:
Minnie and St. Pauli, the Twin Cities
Frisky, where the Golden Gate Bridge is
Dally, near Ft. Worthy
Feeny and Too-ey, down in Arizonee
Albuquerque

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 4:12 PM | Report abuse

Twice. 8-]

Posted by: talitha1 | June 9, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

October

Oh Lord, it's time, it's time. It was a great summer.
Lay your shadow now on the sundials,
and on the open fields let the winds go!
Give the tardy fruits the hint to fill;
give them two more Mediterranean days,
the final sweetness into the heavy wine.
Whoever has no house by now will not build.
Whoever is alone now will remain alone,
will wait up, read, write long letters,
and walk along sidewalks under large trees,
not going home, as leaves fall and blow away.

RMR, from The Book of Pictures, 1902-1906

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 9, 2010 4:16 PM | Report abuse

DC area baseball fans, here is hoping you keep Strasburg healthy for a long time.

As a Red Sox fan, there was nothing that could compare to a day that Pedro was pitching during the 4-5 years of his dominant prime. The whole city was abuzz. You had to watch because every outing could be special.

That type of feeling is what being a sports fan is all about. Washington deserves that feeling.

Posted by: steveboyington | June 9, 2010 4:16 PM | Report abuse

Madison, WI. Mad City.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

I found some nice Rilke poems on Poemhunter. I've never really read him before, thanks for the shout-out Shrink.

You may not realize it, but some days we just share poems back and forth and so expand our communal knowledge of poetry and song. It is here that I have come to know so many 20th century poets.

So never be shy to randomly shout out names of poets around here.

http://www.poemhunter.com/rainer-maria-rilke/poems/

I liked:
A Black Cat,
God Speaks to Each of Us,
I Am Too Much Alone in this World, yet not Alone.
You, who Never Arrived,

and a few others.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

I am a tough SOB,
I have to be,
still Rilke makes me cry.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Bia, he works on visual commands mostly. He usually has his eye sidelong on me-- that's where the herding dog comes in. Good vision.

I don't have to use many voice cues, usually either when my hands are full or when he's getting a little too involved with dogs on walks.

My demo was exclusively with signs. He has a pretty good taught vocabulary and some more spontaneously learned vocabulary.

While many dogs have eye problems that cause blurred or declining vision/blindness, moving hand signs definitely work to a dog's strength.

Dogs communicate by motion and are far more sensitive to motion than humans, and have a broader visual field.

This predisposes them to do well with american sign language, which is inflected through motion; signs with similar patterns but different handshapes are usually closely related in meaning, so he doesn't miss much by not having as much detail vision as I do.

I have come to think that dogs communicate a lot by nuance and combination of motions too scattered and too fast for us to see, as well as use of spatial positioning.

As a native signer, I read motion pretty fast. I actually process it like sound or language without conscious thought (neural rewriting), but sometimes I feel like I just barely caught something on the tip of conscious sight when dogs are talking to each other.

Like when Wilbrodog hustled two puppies out of the street-- I caught that sense of his directing the puppies as he followed them, but had to stop, replay what had happened, to realize that he had did a quick head lift and away gesture, so faint and quick it was drowned by his overall motion, but a definite shooing gesture. To a dog it'd be loud and clear.

Likewise, it's fun to realize a dog can recognize a moving blur as a cat or a rabbit based on the rhythm of the run, not by the shape. Cats and rabbits run similarly, but in a longer rhythm as the neck and tail move up and down, while rabbits' heads are fused to their front bodies, so it's a much more compressed rhythm. (Yes, I've taught myself to spot the difference.)

They probably can't even see the blurred shape, just the rippling motion.

Dogs can't discriminate sounds as well as we do-- they hear more, but that means more "noise." so words that sound alike are easily confused-- while motions that look alike to us may look worlds apart to a dog.

It's probably a miracle that dogs can figure us out as well as they do, given how much random noise we put out in motion, inappropriate gesture and body language and energy level.

Calmer is better in dog training for a good reason.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 4:33 PM | Report abuse

Jeepers TBG - I hadn't seen that ugly little post. Come on Shiloh. You've been here long enough to know better. TBG is about the least racist person on the planet so to imply otherwise to make some abstract point is positively obscene.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 4:34 PM | Report abuse

I meant Yoki. (Although obviously the same applies to TBG)

Sheesh.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 4:37 PM | Report abuse

RD - I make that mistake all the time with Yoki & TBG. I can never remember which one is the racist and which one is the polygamist.

Posted by: bobsewell | June 9, 2010 4:44 PM | Report abuse

The polygamist is probably whoever enjoys a good anal gland cleansing, Bob S.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Wow, I think the Wirty Dird filter definitely needs a new phrase added.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 4:52 PM | Report abuse

I thought she was an onanist.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 9, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

The technique shilo used is as vicious as it is ubiquitous. The world wide web pulls for that kind of thing. Likes-to-fight person picks up on some people having a lively discussion and turns it into something ugly, just for fun.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 5:08 PM | Report abuse

Pedro had a perfect 9 innings with the Spos but the game was still 0-0 after nine. He gave up a hit in the tenth, was replaced but he won the game, 1-0. But he was't credited with a perfect game. Silly rules.
I loved Pedro.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 9, 2010 5:10 PM | Report abuse

Vote for Pedro.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 9, 2010 5:11 PM | Report abuse

Everyone is an onanist. Raised strictly, though not so horribly as in The White Ribbon (which I will never see), I wondered from an early age, waking up in hand, why God made our arms exactly that length. No really, I'm not kidding.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 5:12 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I found your explanation fascinating. Give the boy an extra special scratch around the ears, under the chin and on the tummy from his auntie ftb, k?

Posted by: -ftb- | June 9, 2010 5:19 PM | Report abuse

Afternoon chuckle, not the story, but this headline on my igoogle made me giggle while I was at work, actual story has a more moderate headline.

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/820913--fertilizer-bomb-fears-spur-search-for-man-with-missing-fingers

Shiloh, I am not one to pile on, but I was shocked at your response to Yoki last evening. I know Yoki as a friend and can attest not only is she a fine human being but an animal lover. I have enjoyed your posts in the past and hope that your post last night was an attempt at humour that failed.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 5:25 PM | Report abuse

Early start
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnP4cEgsT1k

Posted by: Jumper1 | June 9, 2010 5:26 PM | Report abuse

Great critical thinking skills early on, shrink.

Of course, my dog probably thinks the same thing about his tongue whenever I suggest he might not want to do that on duty.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 5:31 PM | Report abuse

Hope wilbrodog is recovered from his experience, I had not heard of that particular vet experience until last week, when a co-workers pet had to undergo the same procedure.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 5:34 PM | Report abuse

Here's an oldie by John Wyndham I never seemed to have read.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Out_of_the_Deeps

Posted by: Jumper1 | June 9, 2010 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Deepwater Horizon BP/USA Unified Command update....

"I am the government(!?), and we are not low-balling," [Allen] said, reiterating government estimates of the leaking oil in ranges from 12,000 barrels a day to 25,000 barrels a day."

Hmmm, he also said "production" was going to increase to 28,000 barrels a day by next week.

"We're only at 15,000 now," he said. "We'll be at 28,000 next week."

By we, of course he is referring to British Petroleum, not the Coast Guard, but of course, we understand.

Now I am as credulous as the next guy (no fashionable cynicism here) and I know they already increased flow by an order of magnitude when they cut the crimp off the top o' the BOP...but how are they going to increase the flow even more, so they can produce 3000 more barrels a day next week, than the maximum of the flow rate estimate this week?

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 6:20 PM | Report abuse

shrink, the gummint needs to get outta the numbers bidness here. They can't win if they focus on the numbers.

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 6:30 PM | Report abuse

gubmint can't add and subtract, got it, leave the heaving lifting to the bigguns at BP.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 6:43 PM | Report abuse

While there is a break in the action, anyone know how many characters the WaPo Comments allow in one post? Does 800 words, about 4500 characters including spaces sound like too much?

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 6:49 PM | Report abuse

Be careful generalizing here, folks... we've got at least one gummint numbers person in our midst.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 9, 2010 6:53 PM | Report abuse

Was Gary Larson a canine anthropologist? Seems to me he might have been.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sluggerotoole/153603564/

Posted by: steveboyington | June 9, 2010 7:01 PM | Report abuse

That's okay TBG. It's true. I never could master them figures. That's why I rely upon those new-fangled electronic difference engines to do the tricky ciphering for me.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 9, 2010 7:03 PM | Report abuse

Hey, I have worked for government in one way or another for (gulp) decades, I still do, but I would never say, "I am the government."

No, never, not under any circumstances, weeelll except....maybe, if I were being waterboarded by the government, or if someone said, "You have a great dog, I'd hate to see something, you know, bad, happen to him." after he asked me to say, "I am the government." Maybe someone has put a full court press on, reached in, put a touch foul on Admiral Allen.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 7:19 PM | Report abuse

“We feel it’s our responsibility, from the oversight role we have with BP, to make sure this is done effectively,” Admiral Allen told reporters on Wednesday.

Don't laugh. Read this and don't even crack a smile. Don't even smirk, no winking neither. He is serious, he is the government.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 7:26 PM | Report abuse

Shrink - For some reason, a limit of five thousand characters rings a bell. But I wouldn't put a lot of money on that. I don't typically have that much to say, and anything that long I'd want to share, I'd excerpt & link.

Posted by: Bob-S | June 9, 2010 7:27 PM | Report abuse

shrink... it's only our gummint finance person I was thinking of. She can count, I think.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 9, 2010 7:31 PM | Report abuse

I figure it's best to get the figurin' folks figure out the correct figures...

Then I just copy from them. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 9, 2010 7:36 PM | Report abuse

Thank you Bob,

The Boodligentsia are so polite, marvelous.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 7:42 PM | Report abuse

TBG, I used the word "here" in my post to refer aspiffically to this incident and Thad Allen's confrinses about it.

I know from experience that all it takes to undo weeks of painstaking number-crunching and analyses is someone who can't speak to them properly try to explain them in a meeting or conference.

I'm off to cheer. Have a great evening!

Posted by: MsJS | June 9, 2010 7:45 PM | Report abuse

A person isn't who they are during the last conversation you had with them - they're who they've been throughout your whole relationship.
Rainer Maria Rilke

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 9, 2010 8:03 PM | Report abuse

Completely off subject, but here are The Ten Hat Rules from Shushan's hat shop in New Orleans. I believe numbers 7 and 9 are the most helpful. Please accept this "sic" in advance...

THE TEN HAT Rules

1. Never handle your hat, or anyone else's, by the crown. It leaves fingerprints and breaks down the fabric. Always pick up a hat by the brim and adjust it on your head by holding the front and back of the brim.
2. The safest place to keep your hat is on your head.
3. Anytime you take it off, set it upside down on its crown. Otherwise, it will lose it's shape.
4. Never leave your hat in a hot car, closet or anywhere else that gets hot. It will shrink.
5. If you get caught in the rain or snow and your hat gets wet, let it dry out slowly.
6. Never put on anybody else's hat, and don't take it kindly if they put on yours.
7. If you're handing somebody their hat, give it to them upside down, with the back towards you. Otherwise, if they don't look, they are apt to put their hat on backwards.
8. When you meet a woman, tip your hat to her.
9. Take your hat off if you sit down at a table to eat. Leave it on if you're at a counter.
10. Once a week, wipe your hat with a sponge, and when it starts to get loaded with trail dust, have it blocked and cleaned by a professional.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 9, 2010 8:30 PM | Report abuse

Steveboyington, that's one of my favorite dog cartoons by Larson. He actually was a zoology major and may have done field research with a tennis ball and an eager dog, so close enough.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 8:31 PM | Report abuse

perfect.

I can't even imagine having been Rilke's friend.

The World Wars were a catastrophe that destroyed more than the lives of the millions who died. Brilliant people who lived in the period before the wars are not ignored these days, but their failure to somehow have imagined or prevented catastrophe is held against them.


Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 8:31 PM | Report abuse

http://www.sedsu.org/Pdf/Sonesson/The%20mirror%20and%20the%20virtual%20world%20in%20press.pdf

He reproduced himself with so much humble objectivity, with the unquestioning, matter of fact interest of a dog who sees himself in a mirror and thinks: there's another dog.
Rainer Maria Rilke

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 9, 2010 8:32 PM | Report abuse

3 may be helpful too; never heard of that, but it makes sense for hats with a curved brim. I'll try it on my fedora right now.

Interesting random information du jour. Thanks, TBG.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

How do I know thee?
From all your words offered up
freely for judgement;
a gift I often do not
have the courage to present.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

This is the get-lost-in picture that sent me to the Shushan's website where I found the Ten Hat Rules. Make sure you click the "view full size" link...

http://www.shorpy.com/node/8306

Posted by: -TBG- | June 9, 2010 8:43 PM | Report abuse

"humble objectivity"

Nobody would waste time thinking about that construction, now and then, every so often, forever.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 8:45 PM | Report abuse

Interesting link.

Disagreee with the author on a few minor points. It is false that drawing was "the first time knowledge may be stored externally to the organism."

Scent is precisely such a modality designed to discern that; urine marks and scent trails inevitably exist in the past, if by only a second or so.

Humans, instead of scent, depend on spoor marks, broken branches and other signs. We would learn patterns of behavior and predict if the animals would come that day or not.
We would use material objects to store information-- whether by the famous bread crumbs of Hansel and Gretel (think pebbles, or small stone altars) or by more lavish methods.

That makes me think of another point: many pre-literate cultures "store stories" in the landscape, in specific plants, or in the stars, so everytime a person sees a constellation or other feature, he is reminded of that story.

The seeds of mythology begin here in associating stories with objects-- signs.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 9:03 PM | Report abuse

I'll be unavailable for my duties for part of tomorrow. I'd leave Alexander Haig in charge, but alas, I can't. I hope there isn't an urgent need for a reference to any episodes of The Simpsons while I'm out. I'll make sure not to sign anything that Alberto Gonzales hands me until the anesthesia wears off.

Posted by: steveboyington | June 9, 2010 9:04 PM | Report abuse

"Never put on anybody else's hat, and don't take it kindly if they put on yours."

Sorry for a misanthropic spill, this is the only one that has stood the test of time.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 9:06 PM | Report abuse

The technique shilo used is as vicious as it is ubiquitous. The world wide web pulls for that kind of thing. Likes-to-fight person picks up on some people having a lively discussion and turns it into something ugly, just for fun.

"humble objectivity"

Nobody would waste time thinking about that construction, now and then, every so often, forever.

Interesting snap diagnostic and lure. There is a koan in there somewhere, but I've forgotten the word.

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 9, 2010 9:08 PM | Report abuse

I agree Wilbrod with your assessment, but remember that semiotics was not Joseph Campbell's forte'

The development of the new myths is the task we all must own to in order to transmit the story.

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 9, 2010 9:14 PM | Report abuse

If you people are going to talk about semiotics, you better watch out. It is the end science. It is where reality washes our brains.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 9:18 PM | Report abuse

Please.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 9:19 PM | Report abuse

BOO. That was for the 9:08.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 9:20 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh,

I find it odd to read your posts here, given what you wrote last night. You mention Rilke to enter into the conversation. You note Shrink''s comment on your horrific comment couched in several posts last night.

And you invoke the elevated idea of a koan, then mention Joseph Campbell....I would think that an apology for last night is a more natural and much more ethical re-entry.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 9:22 PM | Report abuse

Thank you, CqP.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 9:24 PM | Report abuse

No no no. The capacity to interpret scent is still an internal physical/mental capacity.

shrink2, one of my closest friends is a renowned Canadian (truly!) s3x therapist. She makes exactly that point, over and over again, to her distressed patients.

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 9:25 PM | Report abuse

And then we fall about with laughter.

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 9:26 PM | Report abuse

Don't really know what to make of this, but I guess the Israeli government sent a link to a video mocking the Gaza flotilla.

The video is available as part of the story.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ynews/ynews_wl2491

Since when did the Israeli government become the Tennessee Republican Party?

Posted by: steveboyington | June 9, 2010 9:27 PM | Report abuse

Sboyington, Al Haig spoke at my college, when I was a junior.

His speech was a very standard: youth of America, serve, give back, try hard, achieve...

So odd to hear these bromides as he spoke. The next year, my year, the graduation speaker was Fr. Ignacia Ellacuria, who was assassinated a few years later with fellow Jesuits in San Salvador, with a mother and daughter who worked in the rectory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignacio_Ellacuría

Such contrasts.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 9:29 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, exactly. I could tell you some funny stories, yeah, about making it ok to to be healthy, but I'd feel bad about the fact the people were real.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 9:34 PM | Report abuse

CpQ: I do not apologize to self-appointed umpires who "call me out" in a game they choose to play. I do not apologize to ideas I find loathsome. I do not apologize for the false interpretations and "readings" that people make of what I write. I think you and others need to go back and read IN CONTEXT what I said. And I stand by it. If you and others find it offensive, that is YOUR problem, not mine. Don't lay your prejudices on me. You own them.

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 9, 2010 9:34 PM | Report abuse

Yoki! 28 bottle of Pinot Noir on the wall!!!!

And, I don't know why people need health clubs. They can just hand cork that many bottles.

Posted by: russianthistle | June 9, 2010 9:35 PM | Report abuse

Shiloh, I was there. You have no context excuse. Clearly, you like the verbal parry and spar but have little idea about courtesy or finesse or honor.

Enough. Enjoy the evening as best you can.

---

Yoki, I know a t-pist/scholar on campus who was analyzed by a student of Freud's. So, in an apostolic succession:

Freud shrunk X
X shrunk my friend Y.

Y is the best and kindest person. And, riotously funny.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 9:40 PM | Report abuse

RT, did you make wine?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 9:43 PM | Report abuse

To see a master
teaching is high privilege;
more so in summer.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 9:48 PM | Report abuse

Yes, CollegeQuaParkian1, we did. Three weeks to go. The taste at bottling was a bit thin, but clear and refreshing. It seems that, after a first failure (came up short)... having two sets of hands and sets of eyes helped. Processes became very clear.

Posted by: russianthistle | June 9, 2010 9:49 PM | Report abuse

but have little idea about courtesy or finesse or honor.

I prefer truth.

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 9, 2010 9:49 PM | Report abuse

So how many major muscle groups does hand-corking use at the same time, rt?

I'll mention it at the gym, lol.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 9:50 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, Shrink.

Excessive semiotics may explain a lot about my childhood, actually.

Now I'm reading about asemic writing on Wikipedia. &%^&$^%#!

I always liked this Wittgenstein quote: "If a lion could speak, we would not be able to understand him."

Yeah, because we wouldn't know who were all the lions (hyenas? zebras?) that he kept talking about, why he keeps bragging about his latest scat pile planted yet again in an elliptic with the mythological termite mound of the Serengti Plains, why he's worried about his piss changing a word we finally figure out means some kind of smell, or his complaining the lionnesses don't hunt the food he really likes, and why he's upset that his hair is getting too big and his nose's gotten so black that he might as well be a hyena, and that he has acid stomach yet again.



Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 9:51 PM | Report abuse

RT, my friend and nearly neighbor makes wine, too. About every tenth bottle is a stinker but the others are so hearty and fine.

Bravo for you and I believe you are our boodle vintner.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 9:52 PM | Report abuse

So how many major muscle groups does hand-corking use at the same time, rt?

I'll mention it at the gym :)

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 9:52 PM | Report abuse

Weed!

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 9:53 PM | Report abuse

Would that be the therapist on TV Yoki?

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 9:58 PM | Report abuse

You guys got therapists on TV?

All we have is Lucy VanPelt in the funny pages.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 9:59 PM | Report abuse

Loathe the new SYTYCD format. 10, now 11 finalists, wasting an hour notifying people in their homes. I'd call it tripe, but why slur an innocent food?

Posted by: frostbitten1 | June 9, 2010 10:00 PM | Report abuse

Yoki knows Dr. Ruth? Ruthie cannookie?

:)

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 10:00 PM | Report abuse

CqP is a college professor of rhetoric and English. I've always heeded feedback from good writing critics even when I don't always agree with their suggestions on what I should be writing instead.

If my writing fails to communicate my meaning to its intended party, then it doesn't matter how true it is, really. I might as well just write it privately in my journal (or blog) and sulk.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 10:04 PM | Report abuse

S*x with Sue here

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 10:05 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

Been busy this evening, preparing for a long weekend traveling with some friends. Which means I won't be Boodling much for the next few days, if at all.

Speaking of New Myths, I'll try to report in from the road, or at least when I get back. Unless you see me on TV during some news report regarding some silly misadventure (maladventure?) first.

I'm sure my mug shot would be *spectacular.*

bc

Posted by: -bc- | June 9, 2010 10:06 PM | Report abuse

DNAGirl? You there? Any ideas on Indian basil v. Italian, recipe-wise? And, have you cooked with Holy basil? Can google but would love your take on these differences.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 10:06 PM | Report abuse

Nooooo!

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/821457--fox-news-north-former-harper-spokesman-joins-qmi-bid-for-all-news-network

Being subjected to the real Fox News is bad enough - fortunately you have to choose to pay for it here, I chose not to waste my money but I have a friend who watches it purely for entertainment.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 10:08 PM | Report abuse

Nope! A 50-ish woman (so, half Dr. Ruth's age) with privileges at two Montreal hospitals, McGill sessional, but never so far as I know seen on TV.

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 10:08 PM | Report abuse

MsJS, how are you holding up, just turned on the game after SYTYCD (a Canadian made the top 11 - Yea).

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 10:13 PM | Report abuse

dmd, which one is Canadian? I was flipping around a lot, since I agree with ftb about the time wasting.

Posted by: -bia- | June 9, 2010 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Alex Wong, the dance from the Miami City Ballet - he is from Vancouver.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 9, 2010 10:23 PM | Report abuse

Thank goodness, Yoki.

Sad when renown becomes synonymous with TV fame, isn't it?

Holy basil, I so miss holy basil (tulsi), it has a great fragrant anise smell that is very strong yet clean. Best with chili and garlic and black peppercorns. You don't need much else. Strangely enough, it's not used in Indian cooking; I had an Indian friend who said, "we plant this by our doors, but we never EAT it."

But at least lime basil grows up here, and I do so like it in a summer potato salad.

I also considered growing holy basil but it'd have to be started indoors and our sill space is already taken.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 10:24 PM | Report abuse

Holy Basil Fawlty! I didn't even know "tulsi" bore that name here.
We (like all Indians) had a potted tulsi plant at home, but mom didn't use it in food, only tea (especially at runny nose times). A friend's mom used to make shrimp marinade with tulsi, cilantro, garlic and chillies and use it as garnish on pulao/biryani.

Can't help you much CqP; I like basil, but the holy stuff is too strong for my taste....

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 10:25 PM | Report abuse

Here's what I think.

The Boodle is like an ecosystem. There are niches. Shiloh has stepped in to fill a vacancy.

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 10:30 PM | Report abuse

DNAGirl, then I can keep enjoying it by stroking the leaves as I go in and out. Lovely. It is so pungent but I wondered about how to cook with it. So, the plant simply says keep touching me...and WB, thanks for the advice. I do have a friend who would like a new way to eat such other tastes.

Am I blessed each time I touch this? I like to think so. I feel the same way about the Arp cultivar of rosemary at my door. I used to have costmary but lost it some years back.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 10:30 PM | Report abuse

Thais use tulsi in their cuisine a lot, though. My favorite thai dishes use tulsi.

It IS pretty strong, but garlic and chili and black pepper and maybe tomato paste and strong meat (not shrimp-- beef, lamb, or pork for preference) balances it just fine.

I could smell it for hours. Maybe I should plan to grow some anyway.



Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 10:33 PM | Report abuse

*snort*

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | June 9, 2010 10:34 PM | Report abuse

I saw a note that in India, tulsi is used in garnishes or in sherbets.

You might consider flavoring beverages with it? Not necessarily tea.

Also, consider making a oil-lemon marinade with finely minced tulsi and experiment with it-- mix it with a touch of italian dressing and/or garlic for salads-- lettuce or potato-based.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 10:38 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I thank you for reminding me of asemic writing, a brain jog redirecting me to a subject I've meant to explore further. There is no verbal sense to my textile work but I am "writing" nevertheless, leaving my messages among the knotted threads.

Posted by: talitha1 | June 9, 2010 10:38 PM | Report abuse

Good to know, dmd -- I was already rooting for Alex, but now there's all the more reason. They tried to go for suspense, but he was a shoo in. Of course, based on what they showed us, I would have said the same about Anthony Burrell. The ways of reality show producers are mysterious. Maybe it was ageism, since he's all of 29.

Posted by: -bia- | June 9, 2010 10:39 PM | Report abuse

My mother would agree you are blessed CqP.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 10:40 PM | Report abuse

Does a pound of flesh
taste as good as promised or
as a bitter herb?

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 10:45 PM | Report abuse

Talitha-- Asemic quipus. I like that image. Also, the phrase itself is nearly a onatomopoeia.

"What in the world does asemik-you-hippos mean?"

"asemic quipus don't mean, they just exist."

"Fine, if you're THAT way, you can keep your high-falutin' anemic hippos to yourself."

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 10:46 PM | Report abuse

DNAGirl, remember me to your mother with my greeting. (or silently to yourself if the imaginary friends is just too odd!)

Your poems bless us all.

Talitha -- I think of you now, with all the great weavers....Penelope for one. Mudge wrote about Penelope once, and quite well.

WB -- I keep hearing about the savory sherbets...could be refreshing.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 10:51 PM | Report abuse

DNA Guy and I saw Cy Twombly's work for the first time in Vienna last year.
We must be irredeemable philistines for we giggled from entry to exit, which took all of 15 minutes.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 10:57 PM | Report abuse

CqP-Funny, I was just thinking of savory sherbet today. Mr. F has the cookbook and ice cream freezer in Tampa. I shall be there next week and will give it a try, after several years of meaning to and not.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | June 9, 2010 10:58 PM | Report abuse

DNAGplusG!!!!! I think he is the artist whose works were smudged by somebody "kissing" one of the figures?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 10:59 PM | Report abuse

Tender pork krapow:
Rich garlic and chili meat
to tulsi perfume.

Wilbrod.

BUT:

Cilantro beats shrimp
Then tulsi whups cilantro--
tastebuds on the ropes.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 11:03 PM | Report abuse

Frosti -- fax me a batch of tulsi, k? And, this in return: Am processing more rhubarb tomorrow in the crock pot. I have seven quarts in the freezer now.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 11:06 PM | Report abuse

How could they tell one smudge from another?

Posted by: DNA_Girl | June 9, 2010 11:09 PM | Report abuse

talitha, gtsu.

August 7 seems definite, I'm sure the waitperson will be tired of answering questions about the seafood's origin. I believe TBG is offering lifts, which I promise will be a good time even before the BPH begins. I'm reachable at ka8wp at comcastdotnet if you'd like to arrange off-Boodle. I'll ask the shop steward to announce on-Boodle as we get closer.

Night, all. Don't forget to get some sleep.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 11:11 PM | Report abuse

talitha, gtsu.

August 7 seems definite, I'm sure the waitperson will be tired of answering questions about the seafood's origin. I believe TBG is offering lifts, which I promise will be a good time even before the BPH begins. I'm reachable at ka8wp at comcastdotnet if you'd like to arrange off-Boodle. I'll ask the shop steward to announce on-Boodle as we get closer.

Night, all. Don't forget to get some sleep.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 11:12 PM | Report abuse

I just looked up his online gallery.

http://www.cytwombly.info/twombly_gallery.htm

I think giggling would be a honest, spontaneous response showing that his work has touched the inner child within you, namely that three year old who used to scribble on walls.

I think he should use thicker markers if he really wants to make a bold statement, though. Those fine line look too much like the spidery handwriting of a half-senile great-aunt. Alao, not enough color.

He needs to be in more touch with his own inner child, really.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 11:12 PM | Report abuse

DNAGirl! My thought exactly, though he is better than Leroy Neiman! (Sorry to offend; you may burn three of my "paintings of light.")

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 9, 2010 11:13 PM | Report abuse

Okay, this is the second time tonight I've been told my submission is being held due to posting too often. Yanno, probably not.

Then I'll try again and both times get posted.

Somebody's allegorythm is off.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 9, 2010 11:15 PM | Report abuse

SCC: Alao= alas/also. Also possibly a time-warped Freudian slip to Ibiniyka Alao, who I have never heard of before I googled him.

http://www.ibiyinka.com/

THIS Alao has enough color. More than enough.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 11:18 PM | Report abuse

I just love dbG. Instead of being insulted by being held, she thinks about (and probably fixes in her head) the "algorithm." Whatever that is.

Posted by: Yoki | June 9, 2010 11:23 PM | Report abuse

If a lion could speak, we would not be able to understand him.

Strasburg to plug Deepwater Horizon well.

A pound of flesh.


Second warning, once you get into semiotics, there is no such thing as making sense. No such thing as common sense, no context, linguistic structures are smoke and mirrors.

Semiotics will not prevent crime, nor the sun from rising, it will just, lets just say, you can not transcend your mind.

When we explore the trap within which we must exist, then we start to talk about truth.

One day, I had a dog. This dog was fascinated by the toilet. He drank from the place we peed and pooped. Whenever someone flushed he came, rushing to watch the miracle.

I explained it to him using every symbol I could imagine. I took the top off the tank and showed him the moving parts. I imagine, he thought I knew what I was talking about, I could tell by his eyes. But I could tell by his, no one can explain the great mysteries.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 11:24 PM | Report abuse

Shrink, since puppyhood, my dog has gone to the toilet with me and seen what I do and other do in there.

He has never drunk from the toilet. Sometimes the first step is first to share experience to build signs on.

But I like your reasoning.

I once caught myself trying to explain to my dog why mirrors work, by showing how a flashlight's light will bounce back and such. Did it in the dark, and in full light, etc.

He was very interested throughout, but not sure how much it sunk in, since he kept wanting to look behind the mirror to see where the rest of him was.

He hadn't often barked at himself in the mirror-- if he sees me, he seems to be fine, but if he sees himself only or the mirror is dark black glass, he flips out and thinks it's another dog.

This led to a very embarrassing incident in a McDonalds' once when he saw a "big black monster" in the curved black glass of a movie display. WAHHOOOO HOOOOOOOOOOO WAHOOO HOOOOO.

This may be the time to mention that he could easily be voice-cast for the Hound of Baskervilles, by the way. Hollywood is definitely going to be astounded by his vigor of expression.

All was silent for a few seconds after I took him away and shut him up. Then somebody said (according to family) "He was just barking his orders."

Then the whole McD's dissolved into laughter.

...And that's why I was trying to explain to my dog just how mirrors worked. So I understand your need there.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 11:35 PM | Report abuse

Hippo ya'muse!

Wilbrod, thank you. My son just rolled in two days early and unannounced. So much to say and this lovely distraction prevents me. See y'all later.

Posted by: talitha1 | June 9, 2010 11:36 PM | Report abuse

Since you are deaf, I think you know.
You are pretty sure he makes that much noise,
you can tell. Well that is how everyone else knows anything, we are all deaf.

Appreciating reality is collective.


Posted by: shrink2 | June 9, 2010 11:47 PM | Report abuse

Shrink, I got the only dog whose barks I have ever been able to hear. That was not on purpose. I was a nervous wreck the first two weeks to a month until I managed to teach him to shut up after one bark and then not bark at so many things.

The secret to shutting up a barking dog is always to respond before he has a chance to draw a second bark. Even if you have just awakened with your body two inches above your mattress.

Still, I lost whatever slim quantum of hearing I still had from his howling at ambulances.

I found that when I was foolish enough to put my cheekbone next to his howling, my cheekbone was actually vibrating from his howls. I started wondering if my bones might have, like wineglasses do, a fundamental frequency at which they might shatter.

Fortunately he developed an indoors voice, and also stopped trying to out-howl them and just stuck with the sit alert as I trained him with.

I wish I was exaggerating this. To a person accustomed to silence in the midst of bedlam, every bark was a shock.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 9, 2010 11:56 PM | Report abuse

Somebody please tell yellojkt the hockey season is over, and he can now change the channel. Congrats all around.

Posted by: engelmann | June 9, 2010 11:58 PM | Report abuse

And now I must bid good night to the boodle.

Today has been a binge of expression and a feast of new ideas and thoughts to sleep on.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 12:00 AM | Report abuse

"I found that when I was foolish enough to put my cheekbone next to his howling, my cheekbone was actually vibrating from his howls. I started wondering if my bones might have, like wineglasses do, a fundamental frequency at which they might shatter."

Yes, since a dog can not know deaf, he has to make sure he tries hard enough to make hearing work. That failing, he does not have to know deaf, but he can live happily without knowing, always wondering, why, how, or not. Happily without knowing, the dog's prerogative.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 12:11 AM | Report abuse

NYT reports that GM is now discouraging use of the term "Chevy" to refer to its Chevrolet cars.

Could someone install a sign saying "Chevrolet Pursuit" at an entrance to Chevy Chase? Or maybe "Cheviot Foxhunt"?

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | June 10, 2010 1:01 AM | Report abuse

Wow. Grad school and Zen and the Art of Something meet, and we have, ignition!

Posted by: Yoki | June 10, 2010 1:43 AM | Report abuse

the graphic of the ice cream kid sums up my attitude on certain days when if simply becomes too much. first iteration of this diddy. became much slower in subsequent years.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_DUHgauPGw

Posted by: -jack- | June 10, 2010 2:11 AM | Report abuse

flip side, with lyrics of, imho, eternal optimism.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX3Tdlmtbzg

...and the annotated lyrics, with credit to garcia and hunter:

http://artsites.ucsc.edu/gdead/agdl/eyes.html



Posted by: -jack- | June 10, 2010 2:19 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. Congrats to the Black Hawks and their fan. I'm mostly happy for Marian Hossa, a great player who was on the losing team for the past two finals! Finally, he was on the right side.
Just short of fifty years after their last success the Hawks hold the Stanley Cup.
The Maple Leafs will hopefully be reaching this Golden Anniversary of Futility in 2017.

Off to walk a neurastenic Very Large Puppy.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 10, 2010 5:43 AM | Report abuse

Great job, Blackhawks. In honor of the first cup in 49 years.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIqLsGT2wbQ

Posted by: steveboyington | June 10, 2010 6:14 AM | Report abuse

'Morning, Boodle.

I've been thinking about it all evening, and am now convinced Wittgenstein was completely wrong.

Next on my list: Dear Fermat: x cubed plus y cubed equals 42.

One of these days I'm going to need to give Husserl a strong talking-to.

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | June 10, 2010 6:36 AM | Report abuse

About lions, I mean.

Posted by: Curmudgeon5 | June 10, 2010 6:39 AM | Report abuse

Morning everyone!

Wittgenstein? Wasn't he, like, the catcher for the Mets at one point?

And, yes, all enlightened people understand that the answer is always 42. You just have to adjust the base and/or units accordingly.

Ever notice that it is the second morning after you stay up past your bedtime that really hits you?

And that it is super easy to ramble off random stuff before the coffee has kicked in?


Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 10, 2010 6:44 AM | Report abuse

Congratulations to the Blackhawks and their fans!

Philadelphia is strangely silent this morning. No talks about the loss, no radio songs, just a grief so deep it can't be uttered. We'll survive and turn our attention to baseball. Well, the sports fans will anyway. And so it goes.

Happy belated birthday, Shrink. Pie for breakfast sounds like an excellent start.

Yoki, you're too kind. I fix far fewer problems than I think about. Someday they'll find out I make it all up.

Off to go fake it. :) As N Ephron says, "a$$ in chair."

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 7:15 AM | Report abuse

Good morning people!
Grace Slick

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 8:19 AM | Report abuse

There are no rehearsals for life, really... We all make it up as we go along.

Some of us are just more imaginative, that's all. :-)

*bosses-are-away-today-yippee Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 8:34 AM | Report abuse

Morning Al!

Yay for the Blackhawks! I was desperately tired last night, but made myself stay awake for the winning goal. Thank the FSM it was only 4 minutes into overtime.

I think TBG was summoning me last night as the gummint numbers person. I don't follow the calculations Adm. Allen presented, but am not really trying that hard. But then, I'm not much for explaining other people's numbers. Hard enough to explain my own.

frosti, I agree about the SYTYCD format last night. I watch the show to see dancing, not people talking on the phone.

Posted by: Raysmom | June 10, 2010 8:35 AM | Report abuse

An allegoryrhythm to fill a vacancy in the system:

the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls
e.e. cummings (1894-1962)

the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls
are unbeautiful and have comfortable minds
(also, with the church's protestant blessings
daughters, unscented shapeless spirited)
they believe in Christ and Longfellow, both dead,
are invariably interested in so many things--
at the present writing one still finds
delighted fingers knitting for the is it Poles?
perhaps. While permanent faces coyly bandy
scandal of Mrs. N and Professor D
.... the Cambridge ladies do not care, above
Cambridge if sometimes in its box of
sky lavender and cornerless, the
moon rattles like a fragment of angry candy

Posted by: -shiloh- | June 10, 2010 8:41 AM | Report abuse

From the it can get any worse department, or maybe the be careful what you wish for department:

If BP stock drifts any lower, it will become such an attractive target (undervalued assets = low hanging fruit) its disappearance will be assured.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 8:50 AM | Report abuse

**voice still hoarse after last night's shouting**

**tipping my hat in respect to the Flyers, Sharks, Canucks and Predators for their awesome playoff performances**

**pointing to usual breakfast offerings on the table**

**heading off to pull more confetti out of my hair**

Posted by: MsJS | June 10, 2010 8:53 AM | Report abuse

Shiloh, your post quoting ee cummings...okay, you went to eighth grade. But if that was aimed at the women on the boodle, the arrow missed its mark.

Also, you do realize that the town of Shiloh was described as featureless, and was eventually destroyed, don't you? Nice choice.

Posted by: LostInThought | June 10, 2010 9:04 AM | Report abuse

S'nuke, if you're making it up as you go along, that's a far more disturbing image than me doing so. For work, not life.

If the banking sector is any example, shrink, I'd think there wouldn't be a takeover until a buyer is able to factor in what costs, penalties, etc. will be.

Sad when someone believes all his problems are someone else's fault.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 9:06 AM | Report abuse

In the also sad department, Microsoft Security is offering to Twitter me updates. Apparently the almost-daily emails aren't enough.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 9:14 AM | Report abuse

*faxin' MsJS a confetti attachment for her hair dryer* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 9:15 AM | Report abuse

"...I'd think there wouldn't be a takeover until a buyer is able to factor in what costs, penalties, etc. will be."

I am frantically searching for answers in this regard and am only finding more questions. What if China buys all or part of BP, can we say to China, you have to pay other oil companies' laid off roughnecks?
To whom will we address the nasty gram demand letters? Can't assets be insulated from liabilities? Johns Manville was liquidated in the face of its asbestos liabilities while a trust was set up to pay (some)claims. But what requires BP to worry about US claims? The court in The Hague? The mayor of London reminds us today that BP is needed by many English pensioners. It is a sticky wicket.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 9:16 AM | Report abuse

No no no, dbG, it's LIFE that I make up. Work is very much grounded in facts and analysis. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

Thank goodness. You scarede there :)

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Shrink, I don't think hearing PEOPLE really know "deaf."

Actually I've noticed animals-- cats and dogs alike-- often catch on better than people. Must be a predator-sensing-the-weak-prey thing.

I once catsat a cat who liked to meow whenever I petted her. She also had litterbox issues and generally was not considered an Einstein among cats. By day two, I felt fluttering at my ankles, and I looked down. She made eye contact, THEN she meowed to be petted.

When I think of all the people who nod when I indicate I'm deaf and keep trying to talk at me, that cat comes across as a freakin' genius to realize that to me the unseen meow is not the true meow.

Guide dogs also know the difference between the blind and non-blind by their eye behavior, and that's how Wilbrodog developed the basis for deciding on what to alert to in a crowded, noisy urban environment.
How did he go from alerting to cars behind me to people and cars coming at us around corners or behind hills and so forth? He found I praised him for things I didn't see before he directed my attention to.
The key was so simple, yet so powerful. That moment when I saw stuff eventually became the reward marker, not the praise and pets that followed.
Once, fairly early on, he tried to show me a man walking over 30 yards behind me, hidden behind a hill, and I was like "yeah I see it, now stop alerting." He wouldn't quit alerting ever few steps until that man came in sight and I finally saw him on yet another of my now-tiresome check backs. Then he stopped; the eye contact on the right thing had become more important than getting praised.

It also explained why at night he would alert me to people in front of me I didn't see, but not in daytime. The difference was in my eye behavior.

We also have evolved a way to cue when a sound is unseen-- he will just repeat the inital alert when I ask him to show me where it is.

Haven't walked into a door opening unexpectedly in a long time, and I'm aware of people around corners, behind doors, or moving towards me behind hedges, which was very helpful in an urban environment.

He's also gotten me out of a car making a rapid right turn into us, and out of the way of an ambulance.

To think I was merely hoping for a few reliable alerts indoors and the occasional "like, dude, there's a car coming."

But I'm glad he decided to improvise. Embellish. Integrate all his instincts as much as he could-- flushing, herding, whatnot.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 9:29 AM | Report abuse

**faxing cleansing breaths to shrink**

**heading off to play with my new confetti attachment--woo hoo!**

Posted by: MsJS | June 10, 2010 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Shrink, I don't think hearing PEOPLE really know "deaf." I've noticed animals-- cats and dogs alike-- often understand better than people. Must be a predator-sensing-the-weak-prey thing.

I once catsat a cat who liked to meow whenever I petted her. She also had litterbox issues and generally was not considered an Einstein among cats.

By day two, I felt fluttering at my ankles, and I looked down. She made eye contact, THEN she meowed to be petted.

When I think of all the people who nod when I indicate I'm deaf and keep trying to talk at me, that cat comes across as a freakin' genius to realize that to me the unseen meow is not the true meow.

Guide dogs also know the difference between the blind and non-blind by their eye behavior. Turns out that's how Wilbrodog developed the basis for deciding on what to alert to in a crowded, noisy urban environment.

Happily, without knowing, was also my prerogative. Until he came and realized as he began offering alerts, that I would praise him the most for things I hadn't seen before he showed me; cars, people, and such.
That is, I wasn't looking at them first before he made me look. (Please, never show him the "fly's open trick.")
The key was so simple, yet so powerful.

Once, fairly early on, he tried to show me a man walking over 30 yards behind me, hidden behind a hill, and I was like "yeah I see it, now stop alerting." He wouldn't quit alerting ever few steps until that man came in sight and I finally saw him on yet another of my now-tiresome check backs. The second I saw the man, he relaxed and stopped alerting. It was like "bingo, at last."
It also explains why at night he would alert me to people right in front of me I hadn't seen-- something he never did at day. All the confusing feedback, to him, had boiled down to a simple rule.

We also have evolved a way to cue when a sound is unseen-- he will just repeat the inital alert when I ask him to show me where it is.

Haven't walked into a door opening unexpectedly in a long time, and I'm aware of people around corners, behind doors, or moving towards me behind hedges, which was very helpful in an urban environment.

He's also gotten me out of the path of a car making a rapid right turn into us, and out of the way of an ambulance.

To think I was merely hoping for a few reliable alerts indoors and the occasional "like, dude, there's a car coming."

But I'm extremely glad for who I have.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 9:40 AM | Report abuse

I need to have a talk with that preview function-- preferably with a heavy stick ready for kneecapping.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

The current BP was born a few years back from the merger of British Petroleum and Amoco (remember them?). BP has thus considerable fixed assets in the US (refineries, tank farms, pipelines, distribution systems, wells, etc). In addition it currently has the rights to 18 billion bbl of proven reserves in its possession. It's not a shell operation that can vanish overnight and its value cannot be reduced to zero either. It will be there to pay the claims and penalties, as it should.

Seizing or nationalizing it would send the wrong message. It would tell the world that private ownership of oil wells is fine when the oil production goes smoothly and the gunmint takes over when the goop hits the fan, the sea or the sandy beaches of Louisiana. I'd rather see the gunmint go full Chávez and nationalize the whole lot if it nationalises something. I wouldn't want to own only the problem child.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 10, 2010 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, in defense of us freakin' idiots (and having grown up in a town with a school for the deaf, read: playmates), we continue to talk because 1/many deaf people read lips (we probably articulate every last syllable, which probably isn't the brightest thing, but well-intentioned), 2/many deaf people who don't read lips still gain some info from watching us express our language (as we gain some info watching someone sign even though we don't know ASL), and 3/our facial expressions change as we speak (sometimes word to word, sometimes just one word jumps out), offering other avenues of info. No matter how you look at it though, the intention is not to talk at you, but to communicate with you.

Posted by: LostInThought | June 10, 2010 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Little doggie reads CPBoy's mood before he enters the house. Either, she looks like "snuggle me because I am cute and you know you want to" OR she launches into testosterone-ready mode for a game of tug of war over tennis-ball-tube-sock thingie. OR the eyes that say "AP Stat is hard but you are wonderful."

She knows by his walk on the outside path. Wow!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 10, 2010 9:47 AM | Report abuse

I am always amazed at how perceptive dogs can be. Back when my in-laws lived in Lancaster County we used to drive up all the time. The length of this trip varied from two to three hours, depending on traffic. Regardless of the length of the trip, and despite our deliberate effort to make no comment or display any outward sign, our dog would start to bounce around in anticipation whenever we would get close.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | June 10, 2010 10:01 AM | Report abuse

"It will be there to pay the claims and penalties, as it should."

Brilliant minds are working 'round the clock to figure out how to protect BP from claims and penalties. Suitors are exploring options. Eric Holder better be up to the task.

Just as Union Carbide vanished and Dow owes Bhopal survivors nothing, I am certain, absolutely certain, BP will only pay for some fraction of the damage they caused. It makes me crazy thinking about all the mistakes both of omission and commission and those to come. So cleansing breaths are appreciated, friendly one.

Wilbrod, no worries on double posts, as you know many if not most blogs nowadays have people who post the same thing dozens of times over, we know how to scroll.

And it is true, our discussion of semiotics has to end up in the same place, always and forever, how do we know who knows what when symbols are interpreted? Once we know all communication is modified by projection, in the case of dogs, our anthropomorphism, in the case of the hearing and the deaf, our wishes and fears, things can seem pretty lonely pretty fast. Fortunately, there is love and compassion. We'll get to that Rilke piece eventually.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Even tho' we don't own a dog (just have granddogs), I watch the Dog Whisperer often. His manner of training plus the things said here have helped me to understand better how dogs get their information. It also explains my childhood dog's behavior when going to the vet. He absolutely loved to ride in the car. Even if you just opened the door to check on something he was right there jumping into the backseat. However, whenever we were headed to the vet, we had to drag him to the car and he shook all the way there. The vet was on a street that we traveled frequently and he was never nervous on routine trips that passed by that location.

Posted by: badsneakers | June 10, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

LiT, I have many hearing friends who get it pretty good. I'm not talking about them. I'm talking about the other people.

I have friends who are excellent lipreaders with some hearing who have gotten people exploding at them because "they ignored them" when they've been talking behind them without the friend knowing they were there.

On at least one major occasion, the person was actually aware she was hearing impaired, and had a deaf relative herself. Yet, that first impulse was to believe my friend was ignoring them on purpose, not failing to hear them. My friend turned to see this woman, formerly a friendly acquaintance screaming at her and refusing to believe it wasn't on purpose.

My friend said she went into flashbacks of all the fights she had with her own mother growing up about her "ignoring" her.

That's just one tiny part of what I mean when the cat looked like a freaking genius in comparison. After just one day, she got it and found another way to get attention, no fuss.

Some people never get it after ten years. Twenty years. Thirty years. They think if they are stubborn enough, deaf people will somehow be able to lipread them through the back of their heads.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 10:13 AM | Report abuse

Hope you don't get mad Wilbrod, but I have to tell you a story, a funny counterpoint, I hope. Long ago, I was married to a woman whose hearing was all but destroyed by streptomycin when she was six. She had hearing aids set at a volume (I tried them, once) that made me worry about detached retinas and terminal epistaxis. But there was an upside; when she found anything annoying, she would simply turn them off and she appreciated the instant silence, quite often. Yes, she would ignore people on purpose, it was her prerogative.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 10:27 AM | Report abuse

Mothers complaining about daughters ignoring them isn't limited to the deaf community.

Having typed that, Wilbrod, you know people who know some crazy and/or ignorant people.

Posted by: LostInThought | June 10, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

You know, there's something to be said for an office that manages to schedule a building-wide evacuation exercise on such a lovely day. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

A colleague with limited vision once commented that everyone ought to have a guide dog. Hers was fabulously competent.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | June 10, 2010 11:10 AM | Report abuse

Shrink, I kind of think it should be more people's prerogative to ignore strangers who don't do the courtesy of stepping in front of them and waiting for their attention to be undivided before blathering on.

Sadly, lipreading even with more hearing than your former wife had is very hard work even in ideal conditions (fluorescent lights, high light/dark contrast in the room and so forth can really cause problems-- migraines even.)
And that kind of volume really sounds like it would cause tinnitis and headaches if listened at too long.

Sorry, but sometimes deaf people gotta be... deaf. That's why I always favor sign language and allowing deaf kids to talk with each other. They can develop normal communication strategies on an even footing, not dysfunctional ones in which they're doing all the talking or tuning out and guessing and hoping they can get through the encounter without looking stupid.
That makes a big difference socially and psychologically. People who are late-deafened don't need sign language as much for psychological health... maybe.

LiT, too many people assume deaf people do understand more than they do, because they've learned how to nod and smile and fake it and wait for the next batch they do understand,

The better you lipread (or speak), the more problems you actually have in conversations as a deaf person.

I once knew a late-deafened man who gave up telling people he was deaf by his speech and just gestured for them to write. He said it was faster that way, because whenever he spoke, they'd go oh, and then talk at him-- and he had zero lipreading skills.

He went totally deaf overnight and hadn't lost his speech, but neither had he suddenly mastered lipreading overnight, nor did he have the resources to be taught, nor to learn sign for many years.

So his communication became very dysfunctional. He monopolized conversations, often loudly He wouldn't let anybody else say anything but yes or no to his questions.

He pretended to understand others because he was tired of admitting he was deaf, and so wildly guessed in giving answers to questions.

Yeah, those strategies are very common, but when you see it that extreme, you're dealing with somebody who has lost the practice of all normal two-way communication skills-- even nonverbal, and barely can do turn-taking in writing.

Every deaf person should learn to speak and lipread if they can, of course, but the alternative should never be the hell of having no healthy communication with anyone.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 11:15 AM | Report abuse

Dave, I tend to agree with her myself.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

I just want you all to know that I have just completed my mandatory, online, annual security training course, and that I now am the proud possessor of a PDF so stating, which I have printed out and may consider framing and hnaging on my wall next to my "attaboy" awards for excellent attendence and for using my Sherlock Holmesian acument to track down international plagarists. So, yanno, I am now secure.

So don't try any funny stuff, buster.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 10, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

There's this UK lottery award I need some help with, 'Mudge...

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 11:23 AM | Report abuse

Mudge... I just got a "final notice" from a bank in Nigeria. I need help editing my response.

Thanks!

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Which reminds me, "Buster" has got to be the all-time lamest nickname, doncha think? Worse, even, than "Butch," Skipper," or "Chip"? I mean, "Bud" (or Buddy) and "Mac" pale by comparison.

The only two Busters I can think of are Buster Brown, whose shoes I once wore, and Buster Crabbe, whom I liked when he was in the French Foreign Legion.

Wait: two more: Buster Keaton and Buster Poindexter.

Incredibly true but highly obscure factoid: Buster Crabbe was raised in Hawaii and graduated from the Punahou School, which Obama also graduated from (class of '79, if you believe that sort of thing). Both men are the only two people to have ever played Tarzan, Buck Rogers, and Flash Gordon or been elected the 44th president.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 10, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

TBG, do they want your helping retrieving $28.4 million from a strongbox smuggled out of the Congo? If so, I say go for it.

Scotty, just give them your SS number and password. I'm sure they'll send you your winnings. And congratulations, by the way. I'm sure Nukespouse will be pleased.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 10, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

Buster Posey plays for the SF Giants.
Buster Douglas once knocked out Mike Tyson.

Posted by: MsJS | June 10, 2010 11:49 AM | Report abuse

My kids named our puppy Buster, two years ago, for obvious reasons and it stuck. Now he is full size, 75lb of long, lean English Setter. But despite his name, so long as he gets to hunt our field, all day every day, he is very good indoors, for up to one hour anyway. Birds on the brain, he is happiest with his feathers covered in stickers, soaking wet from the dew, panting like a steam engine at full throttle. "Go get those birds," I say and he is off for another round. Sometimes I can only see the tip of his tail, straight up, over the grass, pointing is his good fortune, frozen in time like a Currier and Ives lithograph.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 11:51 AM | Report abuse

I choose not to hear people all the time. Their reaction to that seldom concerns me very much.

Posted by: bobsewell | June 10, 2010 11:51 AM | Report abuse

Whaddabout that Buster Rhymes rapping artist sort of person?

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 11:52 AM | Report abuse

Could be. Never heard of Busters Posey, Douglas or Rhymes, though. But I'll take your words for it. As I have mentioned, there are significant interstices in my education.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 10, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

I'm late to the party, I see.

First off, congrats to MsJS and TWC for getting to hoist Stanley after so many years. My only caveat is that if Hossa had played as well for the Detroit Red Wings *last* year, my Wings probably woulda won.

*putting sour grapes back into the fridge for now*

Totally agree with Frosti and Raysmom (I think) about SYTYCD. Terrible changes to this season. Some of the dancers they threw off this year after Vegas were wonderful, and I hope they come back next year, which was probably the point of that exercise, but the way they're doing it really stinks. Hoping it's gonna be nice to watch, but over time, I've gotten pretty irritated at the show and at the judges.

Finally, Wilbrod, I've learned so much from you about deafness and coping/living with same. And to those people who marginalize "animals" (or, indeed, "dumb animals") I feel compelled to raise *yet again* my example of the elephants and others hitting the high ground early enough to survive the tsunami in Indonesia several years ago, whereas the *much more intelligent* humans (a/k/a "human animals") died by the bucketsful because they paid no attention to what the "animals" were doing or wondered why.

Grump over. Cyall later.

Posted by: -ftb- | June 10, 2010 12:01 PM | Report abuse

And don't forget Buster Poindexter! More formally, David Johansen. He was the Ghost of Christmas Past in 'Scrooged' and the lead singer of the New York Dolls, among other things.

Posted by: bobsewell | June 10, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

See my 11:36, Bob.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 10, 2010 12:11 PM | Report abuse

I notice that Tom Toles shares Joel's sense of wonder at Mr. Strasburg's abilities:

"Okay, so, first, in contrast to some of those commenters who said I was wrong to complain about tennis players who swoon to the ground at the magnificence of their own performance, apparently Strasburg managed to stay vertical after his impressive win. How did he DO it? He's even BETTER than they said! Win AND stand!"

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/tomtoles/2010/06/roberts_rules_of_order.html#more

Posted by: byoolin1 | June 10, 2010 12:11 PM | Report abuse

My father, in his early eighties, is famous for his selective hearing.

The VLP is a very dumb dog but he is surprisingly keen at catching my moods. When he is giving me any attention anyway. Unlike the old lab this dog can ignore me for longish periods of time. He would be a terrible service dog. Unless the service to be provided is to scare other dogs fluidless that is. Pretty small market for that service though.

Union Carbide paid all it was ordered by the courts in India and then some. They could have survived the $500-600M financial hit but safety was at the heart of the organization's values so Bhopal killed the spirit of the people making UC. It became a disfunctional company and had to be dismantled and was absorbed in Dow. A company in for a quick buck, or with a better leadership maybe, would still be around.

PM/President Putin would have seized BP and thrown Tony "Pants-on-Fire" Hayward in jail by now but the US is a nation that still goes by the rule of law.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 10, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, the communication problems you speak of so often are very similar to those of anyone not knowing the language. How many times do you think an immigrant hears 'speak English' (or worse, speak American) shouted at them? It's so common it's a joke that Americans in France who don't speak French often find the other person talking louder, yet still in French. And they think us rude. And we all know people who dominate conversations and it has nothing to do with their ability to hear.

I don't understand how it is possible that additional communication skills of any kind, including lipreading and talking, lead to poorer communications, and if they do as you say, why you'd recommend they be learned.

Certainly, it seems to me that DC's English/Spanish skills add significantly to her understanding of the world (and make it a whole lot easier for me to shop in Spain).

Having said that, kids don't need a common language to play together, or even be BFFs.

Mudge, I'm so proud of you. Let's put it under the star magnet right in the middle of the bunker fridge, so everyone can see it. And how about a special dessert tonight...you choose. This latest award should make you a shoe-in for the bunker's employee-of-the-month parking space.

Today was the last day of school, so I'm off to help DC celebrate. Have a really happy day all!

Posted by: LostInThought | June 10, 2010 12:24 PM | Report abuse

Oops, Mudge!

Posted by: bobsewell | June 10, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

I had a good week too. I got a USB key and an attaboy! note for not leaving classified files on my desk and locking my file cabinets and drawers.

Last year the same security people gave me a foam train engine to queeze when I'm stressed out so I'm a repeat good boy.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 10, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Hearty congratulations to Mudge for completing his security training and receiving a lovely PDF, and to shrieking D for recognition for good security practices. I for one feel much safer.

Congratulations also to LiT's DC for reaching the last day of school. The Boy's been out for a while and is in zoo camp (teenage "zoology") this week before heading out to the summer arts institute.

I myself will be leaving shortly for a two-day retreat. I expect to enjoy some of it a great deal, but may be Boodleless. Carry on as best you can.

Posted by: Ivansmom | June 10, 2010 12:42 PM | Report abuse

Lunch today: no knead Sullivan Street bread on the table. Add thin slices of bull milk mozie plus torn basil leaves to taste. Top with sliced tomato. Dash of sea salt, course grind from Three Brothers' deli....mangia.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | June 10, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

Aren't you people who eat sea salt afraid that your desalinization of the ocean will cause irreparable harm to the delicate ecosystem?

Posted by: bobsewell | June 10, 2010 12:48 PM | Report abuse

I ordered a Chef's salad for lunch, but got a Cobb salad instead. Some days are just horrible, aren't they? It's a wonder I even stay at this crummy place.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 12:50 PM | Report abuse

BP said it “is not aware of any reason which justifies this share price movement.”

Heh, heh, the free market is great, except when it isn't, then markets are accused of irrational behavior. Whether long or short stock positions are all bets, just as are mortgages bets made between borrowers and lenders, it is all about confidence. So the Brits are saying there is no reason for investors to be losing confidence in BP's share price.

But no, this is not a political problem, nor is it a public relations problem.

I'll bet BP does not survive, which means, if I held a stock position, I'd sell it. Those people buying BP these days, you have to admire their courage or laugh at their greed.


Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, your comments remind me of my father, who has been hearing impaired from birth. He is a skilled lip reader, and even in our childhood when his hearing aid was not nearly as good as it is now, we've never had a huge problem communicating verbally. (Other than when he used his "selective" hearing or his tendency to repeat the same advice several times over.) However, I know he used to sign in grade school, and at a recent reunion, my sister said he became very animated and lively with all of his friends. He never taught my mother, my sister or me to sign, and even though my sister has since learned, they never sign to each other. Also, no one else in his family, even his more severely impaired brother, ever learned to sign.

Based on your comments, I wonder if his advice repetition is because he misses our acknowledgment of the comment, or feels we didn't understand him, as he often doesn't understand us. We've always attributed it to his stubbornness (he's never wrong), but I'll have to keep my eye out for clues next time it happens.

Posted by: MoftheMountain | June 10, 2010 12:58 PM | Report abuse

EYE know why you stay there, TBG. I mean, I've seen the washrooms.

Posted by: Yoki | June 10, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, on the off-topic of people attempting to communicate to the sensory impaired...

There's a good number of people out there that will approach an intersection while driving a car and notice a blind person on the corner waiting to cross the street. Then they will stop and wave the blind person to cross with a hand signal...

It gets worse, they will sit and idle their car and get more and more impatient with their hand motion as the blind person continues to ignore their signal.

No way am I going to walk in front of an idling car at an intersection.

Entertaining for the folks at the bus stop though.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | June 10, 2010 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Talitha... check your email.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 1:05 PM | Report abuse

There is such a thing as a free lunch, you just don't always get what you order.

Was that on Take an imaginary Friend to Work Day, Yoki? (coz, I mean, she's never taken me there. I had to wait in the car.) :)

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

I fear that was my fault, dbG. After my tour, visitors were strictly banned :)

Posted by: Yoki | June 10, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Poor TBG indeed. I had what was supposed to be Il buon tonno e fagioli from my friends at the Rio Mare canning company over lettuce. Not bad but there was much more fagioli than tonno in that can.

It wasn't easy being a gladiator. It wasn't all about olive oil and sandals. "Several of the York skulls had holes that may have been caused by terminal hammer blows"
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/news/worlds-bestpreserved-gladiatorial-relics-are-discovered-in-the-suburbs-of-york-1993282.html

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | June 10, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

Kind of you to say, and while we all know what a wild woman you are, maybe it's not the whole truth. She took me to a funeral and made me wait in the car too. She did crack the windows, however. :)

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 1:32 PM | Report abuse

People can be pretty thick WWeasel and Wilbrod. When #2 had was injured two years ago and wore a knee brace and limped, she was approached repeatedly by strangers asking her what happened or why she was limping. Common sense, sensitivity and manners should be taught in school far more often than they are.

Posted by: badsneakers | June 10, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Agreed and at home too.

For those who asked, the little guy is doing better. He's transferred to a less specialized ward. His mother is grateful for the kindness of strangers, so please keep those thoughts coming. Thanks.

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 2:10 PM | Report abuse

Paging the Manchurian Candidate:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/10/AR2010061002499.html

*raised unibrow*

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 2:11 PM | Report abuse

LostinThought - for your 9:04am post - I praise you to the sweet blue sky.

Posted by: talitha1 | June 10, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

I make everyone stay in the car. People hate to go shopping with me.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Looks like electronic voting machine rigging in SC.

Posted by: Jumper1 | June 10, 2010 2:20 PM | Report abuse

I feel much better knowing that, TBG. :)

Posted by: -dbG- | June 10, 2010 2:24 PM | Report abuse

Perhaps we could arrange a Boodle bulk buy of Dr. Wang's smartypants-

http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/06/09/test/life-us-underpants-health.html?_r=2&hp

Posted by: kguy1 | June 10, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

TBG, last night I had a nightmare (very rare for me), in it we had told the kids to wait in the car, but we were delayed, they fell asleep, in the dream I turned around to them stumbling towards me, suffering heat exhaustion. The pounding of my heart woke me up.

I had been feeling guilty when I went to sleep so that probably explains the dream, younger child was tested and apparently when she told us "I am trying, I can't do it, I forgot" she was correct (at least for now). Turns out she has some visual learning/memory issues that she will need help with, feeling a little like someone who yells at a deaf or blind person for not paying attention today.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 10, 2010 2:36 PM | Report abuse

Whackyweasel, that's pretty funny.

MoTheMountain, I do think you might be right that he's not sure you're understanding him sometimes.

LiT, The reason why I say lipreading and speech is useful because there are many conditions where a detailed conversation is not needed. It's faster, less fuss. I can lipread "paper or plastic" and that kind of stuff.

I've outlined why oral communication can fail without either party being aware, leading to misunderstandings, and that's one-on-one communication.

The real world isn't exclusively one-on-one conversations in good listening conditions. It's people talking over you without you knowing; people interrupting from out of the room behind your back, others being distracted by phones ringing, the TV blaring music, people trying to multitask conversations while attending to you.

Group discussions are a nightmare for anybody reliant on lipreading for comprehension. You look at one person, somebody else begins talking, you look around, find that mid-sentence, and then somebody else starts. It's like a tennis match with 10, 30 people in a small space. Even talking to two people is hard.

You just nod and pretend to follow along and bide your time trying to figure out what will happen next. Maybe you catch a few words and guess wildly at the topic. You're not participating.

With sign language, you CAN participate in group discussions. You can have that social experience. You could learn how to enter and exit an ongoing conversation without being rude. You can learn to regard groups as good things, not nightmares.

There could be dinner table conversations. Imagine yourself in college, age 18, you've struggled to learn sign and one day and you are sitting with friends and you're talking across the table as you're eating. And you understand it. You reply back. You don't have to worry about missing stuff while you're eating.

Then it hits you... this is how it should be. This is how your family always had their dinner table conversations-- without you.

Imagine how you'd feel at that very moment about growing up without that, always feeling left out the minute somebody else interrupted.

Yeah, it's nice to have your deaf child speak and lipread so well "you wouldn't know she's deaf." But your child knows.

When everybody around her is not validating her reality of deafness, she is going to feel alienated, imperfect, alternatively thinking she must be really unique and yet isolated, like she's a fraud all the time.

Lipreading and speech alone doesn't cause that. What causes that is others thinking it's enough to live a social life.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, thank you for teaching me today. I'm still pondering the depth & elegance of "the unseen meow"...thanks for that, too!

Posted by: Enterprise1701 | June 10, 2010 2:46 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, my ex used to have the experience you describe. Her hearing aids were impossible in group situations, restaurants etc. People would project all kinds of things on her, she was too stupid to get the joke, she was a smart ass who acted aloof, too cool for the topic the group was discussing, all in all, a bad listener.
Seems obvious but aren't bad listeners generally despised?

Psychiatrists know, everyone loves people who listen to them, so much so, some will even fall in love with people who are paid to listen to them. Well the flip side is, we don't seem to be able to tolerate people who don't, even if they can't.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

Oh, and that group participation skill does carry over to non-signing situations; I'm fine at BPHs for that reason.

But I've seen a lot of deaf people raised orally shut down completely in group situations; they're too afraid to jump in during a lull, they won't initate conversations with strangers at all, not even a brief "how are you doing?"

They can't. They learned again and again from their families that they were to sit in a corner and not bother anybody the minute any big discussion started with others. At school, probably the same thing; wait to be called on, never speak out of turn in case you're accidentally interrupting somebody.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

We got so used to writing down our conversations with Wilbrod at the BPHs that some of us would forget and continue to write out conversations with the rest of the folks, too!

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 2:56 PM | Report abuse

dmd3, how old is your younger child?

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

I have no hearing in one ear, and limited hearing in the other. I think of it as an advantage. I can sit at a crowded table/meeting with my bad ear pointing towards the folks I don't really want to hear. Wonderful.

If camping/tenting and trying to sleep in a crowded area with snoring, I just roll onto the good one.

Couple bad hearing with my tinnitus, and I am blissfully unaware of all conversations by other people on the phone or yapping in the office.

Posted by: steveboyington | June 10, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

She is 9 Shrink, and the difficulties just became really apparent falling behind in school/behaviour at school changed, preliminary test shows a few issues but we with probably proceed with further testing.

In terms you might understand one issue, when asked to draw a square that has been divided into four equal parts, she was shown the picture and then had to draw from memory, instead of drawing a large square then putting a line vertically and horizontally to create four squares, she drew for small squares and put them together to recreate the shape, similar for other shapes she was given, she got all the lines but could not always figure out how to construct the shapes, chosing the less direct route.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 10, 2010 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Stop whining. She makes me stay in the trunk.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | June 10, 2010 3:08 PM | Report abuse

steveb... how are you today? Al Haig never showed up

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

steveb, I am running that Reach the Beach thing in September, Franconia Notch to Hampton Beach. Since our entire team is over fifty, we are Grand Masters. A practitioner I work with wants to diagnose my ongoing interest in distance running, masochism, attention seeking through self-harming behavior, but I don't care.

Everybody wants to diagnose everybody. It is a post-postmodern parlor game. Watching people using psychobabble to flame each other on blogs is either funny or boring, depending upon how bad they are at manipulating the symbols. Truth is, I've just always wanted to be a Grand Master.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 3:16 PM | Report abuse

Then it's a good thing you don't fish, shrink...

You could've become a Grand Master Baiter.

Or something.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | June 10, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Yeah Wilbrod, I know what you mean. sometimes I feel like a fraud, like when I pretend to pay attention to the boss's Powerpoint presentation though I rarely get a thing out of them.

But somehow I doubt I'm the only one.

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | June 10, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

dmd, this balance you reference, between motivating kids to exceed their own expectations of their capacity and pushing them to do things they can not do (whether yet, or ever) is every parent's worry. They forgive us better than we ourselves.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 3:34 PM | Report abuse

Whacky, you're probably the only one not doodling or checking his Blackberry.

Posted by: Raysmom | June 10, 2010 3:40 PM | Report abuse

True, Shrink. How true regarding "bad listening." Even when silent, you have to participate nonverbally, echoing others' moods and looking interested and relaxed, not tense or shut-down.

If you look like you're having a great time even if you don't know a thing going on, you're great company.

Which is probably why one tip to hearing-impaired people for coping with holidays suggested the possibility of a glass or two of wine to make lipreading much, much easier and more fun. Par-tay time!

It's really good that the BPH is full of people who enjoy writing, for sure. Never had a problem feeling included.

Good for them too-- there definitely wouldn't be enough room for me and Wilbrodog to dance on tables, me two sheets to the wind.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Whacky... I guess YOU'RE the reason they always read every word of the PowerPoint presentation in every meeting.

Posted by: -TBG- | June 10, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

You and me both, Whackyweasel.

I just used to go by and ask the presenter what he wanted to say with the presentation and ask questions based on what little I gleaned, or ask them to e-mail me their notes and such.

But it's always so tempting to skip those meetings. You are not missing much. Think a slide show of a vacation spent at, da-dum, the office (wow, boy!) then combine that with business minutae written in white on some kind of dark blue. If it's a woman or a real "winner type" guy, maybe it's on purple or red. It could even be black text on purple with dancing gold corporate logos spinning around.

Honestly, it's probably a miracle everybody in the room is not clawing their eyes out just watching. I've been tempted, but thank goodness for doodling.

Just try not to say to your boss after the presentation, "your presentation was a sight for sore eyes."

Dmd, don't beat yourself up. Kids are resilent and forgive. You are learning along with her, and if she picks that up, that's good.

I did see some literature on visuospatial memory that suggests that anxiety makes it much worse-- while not affecting verbal memory as much.

This is why we never can remember where we put the keys when we're in a hurry-- but we sure can remember the word "key" and tend to chant it while we look, like it'll somehow appear magically.

So the best thing you can do for now is just relax about this, and coach her on relaxing whenever she gets stuck on forgetting, pending professional advice.

And give her a hug from Wilbrodog.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | June 10, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, my daughter is just happy people believe her, she is thrilled to be going to tutoring - and it will go on through the summer.

Posted by: dmd3 | June 10, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

Why? Why?! Why?!!
Nancy Kerrigan

So, why do people read aloud every word of PowerPoint slides, the same words on the handout, the same projected on the screen?
This is one of the great mysteries of American post-postmodernism. But I'll bet if we had a competition on mandatory training stupidity, I might not achieve Grand Master status x2 this year, but I'd be close.

I won't brag about my best ever stupid training cert. (I don't think you'd believe it), but here are two of the mandatory training certificates of completion I have recently earned, (1) First Aid (my official title where I work is Chief Medical Officer) and (2) Using a Fire Extinguisher.

Posted by: shrink2 | June 10, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

Seems they've lost track of one of the 'round-the-world teen sailors. Let's hope it's just equipment trouble & maybe a dunking.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/10/AR2010061003191.html?hpid=moreheadlines

Posted by: bobsewell | June 10, 2010 4:13 PM | Report abuse

TBG, that'll be the day somebody thanks me for not showing up.

If I was a real honest guy, I'd occasionally thank the boss for a good nap.

And as far as those mandatory computer training courses go... Last year I was required to take the "Discrimination in the Workplace" course, but it was impossible for me to complete because the design of the course wasn't section 508 compliant which violates the Americans with Disabilities Act.

If i didn't have a sense of humor about this stuff, I'd be a raving lunatic. (Not that I'm not a lunatic, just not a raving one.. yet)

Posted by: WhackyWeasel | June 10, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

The Big Guy has a Big Story.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/10/AR2010061003683.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: LostInThought | June 10, 2010 4:37 PM | Report abuse

And a new Kit!

Posted by: bobsewell | June 10, 2010 4:40 PM | Report abuse

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