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At the Aspen Environment Forum

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The view from my hotel room at the Aspen Meadows. Hard to leave, but the oil spill beckons. Yesterday I moderated a panel at the Aspen Environment Forum. Panelists were a motley crew: Libby Cheney of Shell, Robert Gagosian of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (see his Post op-ed today), former Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt, and actor Kevin Costner.

From my seat, seemed like a good panel, though the moderator should have been more brutal in cutting off the verbal filibustering that seems to be the norm at these conferences. Babbitt was the star of the show, I thought (see this account in the Aspen Daily News), calling for the establishment of a completely independent agency that would regulate the oil and gas industry the way the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates the nuclear power industry. The current system doesn't come close. More on this down the road.

Costner talked about his invention for separating oil and water, with many of his devices now being deployed in the gulf. You know how actors are shorter in real life? He's taller. Tan, looked great, like a movie star, but easy-going and lingered afterward to shoot the breeze with anyone and everyone.

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The Maroon Bells. I tried to play around with the Picasa program to get the maroon to come out. Instead, I wound up making them teal. So here's the unretouched shot. We couldn't stay long because of the aforementioned lack of Internet access and cellphone bars.

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It's a cute mountain town, though a little too Hamptonsish. Hard to find a cheap sandwich. Nice flowers, though. I hiked the Ute Trail a few times, saw no Utes. It's basically just a vertical treadmill.

By Joel Achenbach  |  July 27, 2010; 9:57 AM ET
 
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Comments

Oooooooooooooooooooh!!!!

SKI TRAILS!!! *wiping up drool* :-)

I'm sorry, what was that about Babbitt? :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 10:54 AM | Report abuse

What are those weird green strips down the mountains, between strips of trees? It's like that hill was made for sledding. Has it ever occurred to anyone to do something with those hills in the wintertime? Do they get decent snow there? I bet you could make a real working commercial venture out of an opportunity like that. Rent Flexible Flyers to folks and, I dunno drive them from the bottom of the hill up to the top to maximize sledding time.

I really think it could work.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 27, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

Last snap...is that a giant rubber ducky coming down the road? Might have trouble parking.

I thought two utes were accused of shooting the clerk.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 27, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

That sounds like a fascinating panel. And I wouldn't be too hard on the moderator. I've moderated a panel or two, and it is awfully hard to cut people off. You end up looking dictatorial, which does nobody any good.

I like the Robert Gagosian editorial. There is a big difference between science to understand an environment and science in pursuit of a verdict.

A Petroleum Regulatory Agency (PRA?) makes a certain amount of sense, although I am little leery of solving a problem by establishing a new agency. This isn't a bad idea, of course, but I don't want people to think that once they design a new logo the problem is solved. The key challenge is, again, establishing a sound scientific basis for new regulations and identifying good people to oversee these regulations.

I paused a moment at the name "Libby Cheney," for obvious reasons.

Great pics as always, Joel. Even untweaked the Maroon comes through pretty well.


Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Great pics, Mr. A.

I, too, am curious about that rubber ducky, especially since it's wearing shades in a futile attempt to 'fit in.' Did anyone ask it to show an ID? If it were Arizona, I bet they would have. Can't be too careful, yanno.

Posted by: MsJS | July 27, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Whattaryou, Joe Pesci? It's "youths" Joel "youths" not "utes". Oh, wait, you meant like the tribe Utes- never mind.

Posted by: kguy1 | July 27, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

Beeyootyful place in the summer, isn't it? Wonder how they do in winter...(hehehe).

If PRA can be run as well as NRC, maybe they can steal Scotty to be their PIO. I'll bet he'd go for it, especially if it meant having to go to Colorado, even in the summer.

Posted by: slyness | July 27, 2010 11:21 AM | Report abuse

Is there still a BPH at the DC porching location tomorrow?

Posted by: Moose13 | July 27, 2010 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Right now, I'm not certain whether I can make the BPH tomorrow after all. We are working on creating costume props for an animé convention and I am behind schedule on completing a crossbow. Tonight, I finish assembling the stock, hinge the bows, glue on the various ornamental pieces, cut out and paint the sights, and so forth. But, I still have high hopes. It's possible. And I could use a beer or two after all this construction work.

The nice thing is that I have my table saw out of storage and have been reacquainting myself with its use. Perhaps I can finally get around to making some bird houses and furnishings and such.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 27, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

Howdy y'all. I love the rubber duckie. We stayed in Aspen when I was about ten. It was glamorous then but not quite so much as it is now; back then people who work there could still afford to live there. One day my mother ran into our room, tremendously excited. She shouted "Frogmen! Frogmen!" over and over. Puzzled, we rushed out. She had seen a group of hang gliders hanging out.

I'm glad Costner has been taken seriously enough to test his ideas and devices. It is something of a public sport to scoff at movie stars who direct their talents and resources to an interest other than movies - politics, for example, or science. I've come to think that isn't fair. How many of us are actively involved in interests other than the thing we are paid to do? We view this as a normal part of our lives. It is unfair to constrict celebrities to boxes we would not accept for ourselves. Some of us do well in our outside interests, some not so much. The same is true with celebrities.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 27, 2010 11:51 AM | Report abuse

There are times, I-mom, when it's necessary to scoff at public figures who feel their celebrity gives them carte blanche to substitute their opinion for fact.

That being said, it appears Costner put actual thought and effort into his idea, so he's in a different category altogether.

Kinda like Heddy Lamarr (that's Hedley!). :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

An excellent post Ivansmom, and I agree although I will admit were someone like Lindsay Lohan to take up a serious issue I might have a problem taking her seriously, not unlike Pamela Anderson with PETA.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 12:01 PM | Report abuse

ScienceTim, if you are going to make tiny tables and chairs and beds for the birds, you might want to consult RD Padouk. I understand he makes small boxes. He might have some suggestions on the construction of bird house furnishings.

Or, as so many of us have squirrel trouble, you could perhaps start a line of squirrel furnishings. I'm sure they'd appreciate some nice deck chairs I could scatter about my patio. That way they'd be able to stop for a rest as they eat their way through my vegetables.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 27, 2010 12:03 PM | Report abuse

SciTim, I'm putting in an order for bat houses. It would save us from midnight calls when the young neighbor's persistant visitors return to roost in her attic.

Don't get me started on the Aspenization of Colorado (and other states') ski towns. When the people who work in those communities have to move fifty miles down valley to find affordable housing, when the preservation of "old Victorian mining community" creates dictators of historic preservation boards, etc. I watched it happen more than once, especially in Telluride and Breckinridge. As Joel said "too Hamptionsish".

Rant over.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 12:20 PM | Report abuse

scc: Breckenridge
(spelled 'in' by one clan in our family and I always make that mistake)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse

A big duck in shades. In Aspen.

Suddenly, it all makes sense.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

The secret to making wee little items out of wood is a bench sander, a magnified lamp, and lots and lots of fingertip bandages.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

I have noticed a dearth of fine wooden breadboxes lately.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 27, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Afternoon, all-
What gorgeous pictures. Reminds me that I haven't seen a real mountain for years and years.
Yes to an independent NRC-type agency for regulating oil and gas--and coal, too?
We are basking in restored power after enduring a sub-human, cable TV, internet- and email- free existence for hours and hours and hours. I knew I shouldn't have baked that birthday cake Saturday, but at least had enough sense to get the balancingboys and balancingdog in the basement Sunday after watching the 40-year-old tree across the park snap in two.
Hope everyone is safe and well!

Posted by: balancingact | July 27, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

And maybe Norm Abram on speed-dial, RD_P?

Posted by: ftb3 | July 27, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Everyone! Please be sure to read Weingarten's intro to his livechat today. It's about his friend, cartoonist John Callahan, who died on Sunday. Moving and hilarious.

http://live.washingtonpost.com/chatological-humor-0727.html

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Once, while in Seattle, MrJS took a photo of a pink elephant.

That makes about as much sense as a big shades-wearing duck in Aspen.

*faxing SciTim lots of fingertip bandages in advance*

Posted by: MsJS | July 27, 2010 12:50 PM | Report abuse

If Norm were to see the way I do woodworking he would collapse into a whimpering little mass.

But I do always wear my safety glasses.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

RD, we don't know how he woodworks when not on camera. It could be all sawdust and glue.

Posted by: MsJS | July 27, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

The Seattle Times ran Callahan's cartoons in their Sunday magazine section - but I hadn't heard he had died.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2012449143_callahanobit26m.html

Posted by: seasea1 | July 27, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Imagining a group of squirrels on imom's deck, big sunglasses, sunning themselves, Adirondac chairs, mohitos, little towels.

Where are the iclan dogz?

Posted by: -dbG- | July 27, 2010 1:32 PM | Report abuse

People who get casual around power tools usually have nicknames like "Lefty" "Stubby" or "Nine Fingered Frodo." I have actually had the wonderful experience of searching the sawdust pile for my brother-in-law's finger in hopes of reattaching it. There wasn't enough left to bother with. Blade guards exist for a reason.

Posted by: kguy1 | July 27, 2010 1:51 PM | Report abuse

"I even have a nickname already: Ten-Fingers! The old Ten-Fingers wasn't using it anymore."

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 27, 2010 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Quite so kguy. Which is another reason why I rely so heavily on hand tools. Even with great care I fear it would only be a matter of time.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Well, there's casual and then there's casual, kguy. Casual could be "they don't know that by me agreeing to let the folks watch me work with these tools here, I have to be ready at any instant to make a flying tackle to keep any unexpected tomfoolery away from the blade area. I'll just act casual."

And then there's the other "casual."

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 27, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

You know, to get into a little digression, there are many types of woodworkers. What separates them are the scale of their projects and the tools they use.

On one extreme are people like Norm Abram who make large projects and rely heavily on the table saw.

On the other extreme are people like me who make tiny projects and rely on the small circular bench sander.

Completely different beasts.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 2:23 PM | Report abuse

Norm ("Naum") Abrams and Roy Underhill are my gods. I worship their blood-stained shop floors. One of the things that amused my wife and me about Roy on "The Woodwright's Shop" was the number of times that Roy left blood stains on his projects. If there's not a bit of blood on it, then he doesn't care about doing a good job.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 27, 2010 2:30 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of beasts


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Posted by: MsJS | July 27, 2010 2:31 PM | Report abuse

Quick, hide the picnic baskets!

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 27, 2010 2:33 PM | Report abuse

Naw, hide the PBJ!

http://www.twincities.com/weird/ci_15588081?nclick_check=1

Posted by: kguy1 | July 27, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Hide the bamboo?? :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

Hide the birdfeeders!

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 27, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

Roy Underhill is my favorite. I share his fascination with hand tools and the charm of the geometrically-imprecise creations one produces with them. Alas, I do not share his talent. But I do share his appreciation that torn capillaries are an intrinsic part of the creative process. That and the hat. I've always liked the hat.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

Hide the composter!

Posted by: Yoki | July 27, 2010 3:21 PM | Report abuse

Wow, MsJS, wotta beast!

dbG, it is indeed a touching and bucolic picture you paint. Imagine, if you will, the squirrels relaxing in their chairs, with their mojitos, taunting the ivansclan dogz. They're the ones barking frantically behind the chain-link fence. Actually, to be honest, only one would be barking. The other, observing that the squirrels were doing him no harm, would give it up as a bad job and go lie down somewhere.

Don't feel sorry for the dogz. That fence goes around a couple of acres of hilly, tree-filled and squirrel-infested yard. One reason the squirrels need their deck chairs is to rest from their frequent forays in which they taunt the dogs on their own turf.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 27, 2010 3:34 PM | Report abuse

Is Roy Underhill still producing those shows or are they entirely re-runs now? Virginia Public TV tends to show lots of re-runs these days so it's hard to tell.

My favorite Underhill show was the foot-powered lathe he built. It was basically some saplings and leather thongs.* Straight out of the Foxfire books. (That and the hat. ;-))


*don't go there

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 3:36 PM | Report abuse

So not what the gulf needs right now, another spill,

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/americas/oil-spewing-near-bay-already-coping-with-gulf-spill/article1653450/?cmpid=rss1&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheGlobeAndMail-Front+%28The+Globe+and+Mail+-+Latest+News%29&utm_content=Google+International

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 3:46 PM | Report abuse

I have used a table saw, a band saw,a circular saw and a sawsall. And still have all my fingers. I have not used a chain saw nor do I ever intend to.I have also used a miniature table saw and a miniature lathe and any number of hand tools. I have built everything from kitchen cabinets to miniature furniture. Love working with wood. Have also done some wood carving.

Posted by: Manon1 | July 27, 2010 4:00 PM | Report abuse

Moose -- In case I missed someone's reply, yes, a BPH tomorrow, same Bat-time, same Bat-channel. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

The LA Times has a story on Cody, Wyoming. Nice setting, dinky little ski area http://www.skisg.com/ that seems to still be operating, and cheap housing.

Here in Florida, the summer drought is getting ridiculous. The yard is shutting down, caladiums going dormant, grass browning, orchids looking sort of unhappy.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 27, 2010 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, Scotty.

Posted by: Moose13 | July 27, 2010 4:56 PM | Report abuse

Crazy blessed rain! (101 last Sun.)

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 27, 2010 5:14 PM | Report abuse

...and Cody's just a two-hour drive to no-sales-tax Billings, Montana. That's a very important local fact.

I've never figured out how the old guys made everything with hand tools. Especially the stoneworkers who built perfect Greek columns, exquisitely flat walls, and so forth. Those 18th century veneered tables were amazing, too, especially if made of manchineel, an American tropical wood that competed with mahogany. Trouble is, manchineel sap causes severe skin irritation. Nasty.
http://www.regionalconservation.org/beta/nfyn/plantdetail.asp?tx=Hippmanc

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 27, 2010 5:15 PM | Report abuse

DotC, I've been to Cody twice, in 1973 and again in 1981. It's proximity to Yellowstone and the Tetons is a major plus and the ski area is sufficient but hardly worldclass alpine lMO.
One thing that I remember really enjoying was the Cody Museum which, for a town that size, was high end. Their collection of renowned Western artists and photographers and their Amerind art holding are extensive and the facility is excellent.

Sad to hear about Florida gardens suffering. I hope your orchid (photo from last week) is well. I kind of adopted it and smile when I look at my sketch of it.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 5:30 PM | Report abuse

We're in a line of thunderstorms running in an arc from just east of Boone to south of Columbia. It's a gullywasher right now. No complaints here, as long as the power stays on and no trees get hit.

We've done the big tree hit by lightning. It threw bark all over the house and destroyed the electronics of my oven, as well as knocking out the circuit on that end of the house. Fortunately the tree (a full-grown willow oak) was on the right-of-way so the City paid to have it taken down. We replaced it with a tree 8 inches in diameter at the base, which has doubled in size in 10.5 years...

Posted by: slyness | July 27, 2010 6:28 PM | Report abuse

Nice photos Joel. It is a sad thing when people who have lived in a place can't afford it and are moved along by others with greater resources, but such is the history of mankind. Who has the greatest resources takes the best land.

Cody is a marvelous place.It is a fantastic museum. I completely agree with talithas assessment.

mrdr and I have been flexing some of our resources. We almost own some good farmland (or a nice shallow slough and a bunch of resident mosquitoes. It is a little hard to tell). Offer is accepted, only the paperwork remains to be done.

I shall have a garden, a real honest to goodness farm sized, feed yourself garden which the deer, the birds and the bugs will set about consuming as soon as my back is turned.

Posted by: --dr-- | July 27, 2010 6:44 PM | Report abuse

We have to be hypervigilant due to the law of unintended consequences.

Sure, the invisible treehouse built by the Swedes is way cool, but is it worth the risk? Just think of how hard it will be to get rid of the resulting invisible Asian longhorn beetles!

Posted by: baldinho | July 27, 2010 6:46 PM | Report abuse

The Buffalo Bill museum in Cody had a major expansion and re-installation of displays in the early 1980s. In some respects, the Old Trail Town on the tourist strip to the west was a more interesting place. A kind of modest, rural version of a museum near Tokyo that serves as a retirement home for old buildings that would have been demolished. Mostly from the late 1800s. It was a source of inspiration for the animated "Spirited Away". At Trail Town, it would be a different set of ghosts. Maybe someone from Pixar might pass through.

The Sleeping Giant ski area is something of a curiosity. The Cody area evidently had some high-end winter tourism back during the Depression, but the pioneering ski area was utterly superseded by later resorts. It's apparently been a struggle to keep open--I suspect it depends heavily on volunteers.

Last week's orchid flower is going strong, the petals becoming less greenish, more yellow as they age.

Slyness--I hope the replacement tree for the willow oak is something that gets a little less huge, a little less fast. My town has a problem with laurel oaks, which were planted because they were believed to be faster than live oaks. In fact, a happy young live oak is not at all slow, even if it's laying down some of the densest wood in North America.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 27, 2010 6:47 PM | Report abuse

Nope, Dave, we put another willow oak in. That's what the arborist recommended. It fits with the other four willow oaks on the lot. Lotsa leaves in the fall...

Posted by: slyness | July 27, 2010 7:12 PM | Report abuse

dr... congrats on the new homestead! Will you be moving there? I hope the process goes through with few or no hitches.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 27, 2010 7:19 PM | Report abuse

Strasburg didn't even make it out of the bullpen warmup session tonight... He didn't look "hurt" in the video clips, and no word on the reason yet. :-(

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 7:31 PM | Report abuse

dr, that is such great news, best to you both, my kids are heading to your area in a week and will have the short and necessary visit to the Mall before heading off to the mountains for their first visit to the Rockies.

Wish I was going with them.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 7:33 PM | Report abuse

And the team says Strasburg "couldn't get loose" in the 'pen. MRI to follow... *fingers crossed*

Nats are up 1-0, however, on two consecutive Nyjer Morgan stolen bases and a throwing error by Braves catcher McCann.

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 7:37 PM | Report abuse

I'd think if he could cross his fingers, he could probably pitch, don't you, Scotty?

Oh. Never mind.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 27, 2010 7:41 PM | Report abuse

*faxin' some 20-foot fencing and best wishes to dr* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 27, 2010 7:42 PM | Report abuse

Important breaking news of the garden variety - my first Moonflower bloom appeared about 10 minutes ago, noticed lots of blossoms but thought they were still a week or so away but one surprised me, smell delicious, also have many fragrant lillies in bloom, nice aromas on a warm summer night.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

for --dr--

And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or
two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew
before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service
to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
- Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 7:47 PM | Report abuse

Photo evidence of the moonflower and a few others I like.

http://dmdgarden.blogspot.com/

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 7:58 PM | Report abuse

Congratulations dr. Oh boy, a huge garden, I hope you have lots of spare time and miles of fencing ;-)

dmd, great pics. I planted moonflowers but they don't seem to be anywhere near blooming, I'll check them tomorrow tho'. My lilies are long gone. All my flowers are suffering a bit from the heat, lack of rain and water restrictions.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 27, 2010 8:12 PM | Report abuse

Moonflower is lovely, dmd. (Mine succumbed to the heat but the morning glories are thriving.) All your flowers are beauteous but I really smiled at the bleeding hearts, so old-fashioned, so fleeting.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 8:18 PM | Report abuse

Those are ever blooming bleeding hearts just stopped blooming in the last week or so, not sure if they are resting or the squirrels/rabbits/skunks had a little snack with them, my front garden has varmint issues.

bad sneaks these lillies are shaded in the afternoon so they last longer, same variety out front was breakfast for the wildlife, again this year.

And thank you,

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

Didn't know about the extra fence, Ivansmom, it makes all the difference. I think I'll call that picture "Squirrels in Oklahoma."

Busy watering and working. Reading what you guys are doing takes me into life. :)

dr, you gotta buy you a dog.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 27, 2010 8:54 PM | Report abuse

Delightful!

Posted by: Windy3 | July 27, 2010 9:10 PM | Report abuse

Wish I could make the BPH. One of these days!

Posted by: Windy3 | July 27, 2010 9:12 PM | Report abuse

Colorado is so beautiful...except for the storms.

Posted by: Windy3 | July 27, 2010 9:14 PM | Report abuse

Gosh, Windy. The snowstorms were my favorite part. Cozy and silent with the expectation of fresh powder on the slopes next day. Even thunderstorms in the mountains, while rare, were crackling excitement that echoed off the ridges, the rain settling the dust.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 27, 2010 9:26 PM | Report abuse

How 'bout dem Nats.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 27, 2010 9:36 PM | Report abuse

dr, good luck! Oh, room for a real vegetable garden! A gimpse of heaven from afar.

dmd, I got my first moonflower night before last. I had just about given up on them, figuring the heat of June did them in. But there are lots of buds!

Mr. T says the storm left us 2.7 inches in the rain gauge. Much ran off, of course, but hopefully some did sink in. Now it's beyond humid, all the way to muggy.

Posted by: slyness | July 27, 2010 9:41 PM | Report abuse

Beautiful flowers, as always, dmd. My moonflowers never got going, neither did the Heavenly Blue morning glories. Too weird a spring and summer. It's so nice to know others are having success! dr, congrats! I need to expand my veggie garden too, somehow.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 27, 2010 10:00 PM | Report abuse

dmd, very nice Oriental or orienpet lily.

The climate here seems OK for Easter lilies. This year, the plants were tall and strong, up to 6 feet. Maybe fertilizer at the right time? Cold winter?

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 27, 2010 10:02 PM | Report abuse

Maybe Dave, lilies are easy to grow here, plant bulbs and leave alone is all I have ever done, had a number of them at my old house but knew the dog would trample them here so just have a few.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 27, 2010 10:28 PM | Report abuse

Looks like the Gulf oil is disappearing (Kaufman with Mufson at the Post). The NY Times stories is oozing with positive assessments.

I think the Louisianans would like to see the Loop Current make a big super loopy loop and move everything out into the Atlantic.

Thinking of Atlantic, Diana Nyad, age 60, is planning a Cuba-Florida swim.
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/jul/26/sports/la-sp-dwyre-diana-nyad-20100727

The NPR story on the swim mentions our isolation from Cuba. Maybe, but a lot of Cuba is now north of the strait.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 27, 2010 10:40 PM | Report abuse

I wonder if Costner was actually being chauffeured in the giant rubber duck? Probably an environmentally friendly amphibious vehicle that would take Costner back across land to the Gulf, and thence upon the water back to his oil/water separator ship. Powered by duck feed and highway bugs (y'know, those that leave three-inch green smears on the windshield), I would think.

Also, why's that person on the right (in white shirt and demim capris) holding that post and flower basket up? Or are they swinging around it (I've done that when having a Gene Kelly moment)?

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 27, 2010 10:50 PM | Report abuse

Wow. Sharks wouldn't worry me half as much as the oil spill visiting over there at last.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 27, 2010 10:59 PM | Report abuse

I just love that second picture,the classic photo.I bet there are nice fish in that lake. It would be fun to kayak that lake and no rocks to run in to. It just looks so cool and refreshing.

I would love to go to an environmental forum and hang out with all the people.

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 28, 2010 12:07 AM | Report abuse

Ecologists and such tend to meet in nice places. Portland seems an inordinately frequent choice, despite its lack of a major university. Ski areas, too. Especially Utah, with its great flight connections.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 28, 2010 12:25 AM | Report abuse

Any great botanical gardens in Portland?

I guess Powells with its vast used-book mecca alone would give Portland merit. That and its oodles of cafes for the jetlagged.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 12:35 AM | Report abuse

"Wish I could make the BPH. One of these days!"
Posted by: Windy3 | July 27, 2010 9:12 PM

Not to worry, Windy. If you don't come to us, eventually, some of us will come to you.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 28, 2010 1:11 AM | Report abuse

While I fully understand the typical & necessary patriarchal/matriarchal urge to manage the energies of the young folk, sometimes you've just got to watch a force of nature go to work.

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-News/2010/0727/14-year-old-Laura-Dekker-has-Dutch-court-s-and-her-mom-s-permission-to-sail-around-the-world

Not only does this young woman apparently not take well to being unshipped, but I'm not convinced she has any business on land for much longer than it takes to re-provision. Young sailor record-breaker or not, we may have a genuine boat person here.

Such creatures exist.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 28, 2010 1:42 AM | Report abuse

That’s one fierce sparrow.….

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1298038/Stop-squawking-Kung-fu-sparrow-rowdy-friend.html

I have never studied the sparrows around my house. Maybe I should.

Posted by: rainforest1 | July 28, 2010 4:00 AM | Report abuse

The Booker Prize nominees are out.

http://www.themanbookerprize.com/news/stories/1427

I haven't heard of any of them.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 5:40 AM | Report abuse

The criminal investigation has begun, as I (and others) predicted it would:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/27/AR2010072706052.html?hpid=topnews

Possible charges include "potential violations of environmental laws, ...whether company officials made false statements to regulators, obstructed justice or falsified test results for devices such as the rig's failed blowout preventer."

But actual indictments are probably at least a year away.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 7:03 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, you all.

RDP, have you ever made furniture for doll houses? There has got to be money in that! Our toy store in Vienna, "Once Upon A Time" has an enormous line of doll houses, even lighthouses and furnishings, including wall paper, rugs, household items. And, they are so pricy, Who can afford to furnish a dollhouse in 18th Century reproductions, or other period pieces? One year we bought a fireplace mantel for my mother's dollhouse, a teeny tiny mahogany Christmas gift, complete with a teeny, tiny wreath, but not a teeny, tiny price tag.

Joel, your photos are lovely, I remember staying in Aspen, but not the rubber ducky, a recent resident maybe; can't believe I could forget him/her/it.

I just read about the porching hour scheduled for tonight. I am so sorry I will miss seeing you all. I think I was lucky to go to the one, two years ago, was it? Maybe another time I will be so lucky, again. Some of you live so far away, but manage to see each other fairly frequently. Please tell all about tonight tomorrow, and then I will feel somewhat included. Blessings.

Posted by: VintageLady | July 28, 2010 7:23 AM | Report abuse

And in the "Why Did They Make This Much Ado About Nothing?" Dept.:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/27/AR2010072705976.html

I certainly understand the need to ensure the proper mother is breast-feeding the proper baby, but the article harps on the parents' demands for the other mother's medical records. Anyone ever heard of HIPAA's privacy rules? If a competent interpreter of medical information (the hospital) gives the parents the bottom-line answer, that's about all you can expect.

*shrug*

The kerfuffle over the purported "undiscovered" Ansel Adams negatives is interesting, and I had to chuckle when one of Adams' heirs suggested carbon-dating the items -- not the preferred method for dating something that's less than a century old. :-)

*watching-the-clock-tick-slowly-towards-BPH-time Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 28, 2010 7:28 AM | Report abuse

VL - Once, a number of years ago, my daughter was briefly into "American Girl" dolls. These are 18 inch dolls known for their workmanship, historical themes, and tremendous profit margins. To go with her doll I made my daughter a scale bed complete with the requested "fancy stuff." But that's about it when it comes to furniture of any sort.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 7:40 AM | Report abuse

What a good Dad you are, RDP. Not being familiar with American Girl Dolls, I took a peek:

http://store.americangirl.com/agshop/html/item/id/166887/uid/91

A pretend bubble bathtub ($58.) with all sorts of pretend accessories.

Scotty, whatever happened to wet nurses?

Posted by: VintageLady | July 28, 2010 8:02 AM | Report abuse

Very good point, VL!

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 28, 2010 8:11 AM | Report abuse

Thank you for the kind words VL!

Did you note the plastic bed for $85? Sheesh.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 8:11 AM | Report abuse

While I'm sure JA will bring back some interesting studies and white papers, I do hope he brings back new give-aways for the bunker. Toys/games would be nice. The old ones are broken, and while we could use a coffee cup or two, more than that is like getting socks for Christmas.

Have a happy day all.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 28, 2010 8:19 AM | Report abuse

VintageLady, I expect nobody but you and I know what a wet nurse is...I saw the headline, think I'll skip the story.

Good morning, all; Cassandra, I hope you are cool and dry this morning. Mr. T poured 2.8" out of the rain gauge. Quite the storm we had! There's no need to fill the birdbath today...

The dottirs were beyond dolls when American Girls became popular (we did Cabbage Patch, remember them?), but the niece has a couple and loooves them. Cute idea, doll, clothes and accessories and books, but not cheap. Definitely for well-to-do families. And incredibly politically correct. I suppose that's okay.

I suppose I should jump back into spreadsheet of addresses to send info on the fire station symposium. It's coming up at the end of October and we need to advertise effectively.

Later, folks!

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 8:19 AM | Report abuse

Morning, y'all!

I was thinking of wetnurses, too, VL. Not to mention those poor Islamic women who are expected to provide breastmilk for adult men!

And you and RD made me smile discussing doll furniture. I still have many pieces of handmade doll furniture that "Santa" created. Cradles and chests for Marquerite, the baby doll, and suites of furniture for Betsy McCall and Barbie. When I got older he taught me a few woodworking skills so that I could add to the collection. I even learned a little upholstery in the process. Sweet memories.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 8:22 AM | Report abuse

The hook the American Girl company tries to use with parents is that these "Historical Character Dolls" can be used as a buffer against a premature assimilation into Teenaged Culture.

In other words, the advertising implies that if you just buy your tweener girls these really, really, really expensive dolls (Accessories Sold Separately) your precious little sweetpeas will spend more time thinking about Empowered Women of the Past and less time thinking about Justin Bieber.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 8:22 AM | Report abuse

I agree LiT. I want some more Zhu Zhu pets. Mine is getting lonely.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 8:25 AM | Report abuse

There's a problem getting socks for Christmas?

I think I'm feeling faint...

Both dottirs get socks in their stockings, the really good hiking/walking ones that set Santa back $10 a pair...they seem to be happy to receive them, but who knew?

;-)

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 8:33 AM | Report abuse

Oh no slyness. Hiking gear of any kind is appreciated. I meant school socks. That's really Santa helping out Mom and Dad, and doesn't quite rank up there with an Official Red Ryder carbon-action 200-shot range model BB rifle with a compass in the stock.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 28, 2010 8:41 AM | Report abuse

My neices were very into American Girl, complete with their own costumes, my girls liked their books (quiz books, relationship books not the novels - although they like the movies). I went to the store in Chicago, not having girls who like dolls I purchased a small stuff dog for each of them. It is quite the store in Chicago, the stuff is expensive but if it can spark an interest in history for girls not a bad thing.

I highly recommend their series of books on feelings, friendship, quizzes etc for young girls they are excellent and can help in those turbulent child/young girl years 8-11.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 8:42 AM | Report abuse

LiT, you gonna throw in the fish-net oolala floor lamp with that?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 8:46 AM | Report abuse

Certain things are just wanted so much they become needs.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 28, 2010 9:05 AM | Report abuse

Whew, LiT, that will certainly ease Santa's mind!

Not that Santa would bring a BB gun to either of the dottirs...they are more into home goods, clothes, and the like.

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 9:05 AM | Report abuse

Crazy for mangoes,

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/840906--americans-flock-to-toronto-to-buy-coveted-pakistani-mango

This reminds me of a commercial from my childhood (Aqua Velva?) where a man would whisper, "Psst wanna buy..." then open his trench coat to reveal the product - only available in Canada. Always made me giggle.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

I imagine that whatever Joel brings back for the Bunker will be biodegradable, so it may not be around for posteritiy too long.

Or it may be made out of hemp.
And if that disappears, I don't want to know.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 28, 2010 9:28 AM | Report abuse

Mango diplomacy. Somehow I think our problems with Pakistan are more complicated than that but if Hillary wants to try it, why not?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

Wilbrod,
The Portland garden situation seems a bit unusual. The city has two botanical gardens, each the home of a plant enthusiast. Neither is anything like the big botanical gardens in other cities. There's also the Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden on two peninsulas in a smallish artificial lake, with its broad views over an ancient municipal golf course. The huge Rose Garden. And the Classical Chinese Garden, which takes up a (small) block downtown and the Portland Japanese Garden, which isn't terribly large, either but has a spectacular setting overlooking the city. The Japanese Garden was designed as a teaching garden, with subgardens in distinct styles. It's one of the best outside of Japan, and is a showcase of quality maintenance. They're working toward becoming an educational center on how to build and maintain Japanese gardens. It turns out that more such gardens are being created outside Japan than within.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 28, 2010 9:39 AM | Report abuse

I was also thinking of wet nurses and a big "so what?" to the mixed-up milk article.

I pity the daycare providers when this mom realizes that the toys little Spencer is playing with might have been previously drooled upon. Will she demand every classmate's records to assuage her fears?

Posted by: MoftheMountain | July 28, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

Thinking of Sec. Clinton, we haven't seen much attention paid to Pakistani mangoes in Florida.

A lot of mango varieties grow happily here. An old one near my house is a big, graceful shade tree. Some varieties are inherently small, even suited for growing in pots. My tiny 'Mallika' from India is only about six feet tall, and loaded with at least a dozen plump fruits.

Mango varieties developed in Florida are popular worldwide. The latest is a UF introduction named 'Tebow.'
http://www.tropicalfruitnursery.com/mango-viewer/index.htm

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 28, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

S'nuke-- this is somebody trying to stir up enough pressure for a lawsuit-- note the "bodily fluids" image.

My first concern would be that this mix up could have led to them going home with the wrong baby. My second concern is that this woman must not have many friends and will set a poor social example for her son.

On the upside, I did get to thinking about all the bodily fluids of strange cows that I've drunk in my life, like a milk-vampire.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:46 AM | Report abuse

I'm going to assume part of the family's reaction stems from 1. Finding the baby was missing and the residual panic and 2.. the hospital not owning up to the mistake (being breastfed by the stranger) immediately.

Scotty's right about how much information they can learn about the other patient.

The larger issue is how failure to read Id bracelets leads to all kinds of medical mistakes--medication and all kinds of treatments.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 10:51 AM | Report abuse

I will add (from all the training I've received since coming here, yes, they even make dbas take it) that my employer would have taken this very seriously as a bodily fluid and patient safety issue. Failure to report it immediately would mean immediate dismissal. Report it, they'd be much happier with you.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

That sounded nasty, but accusing others of being diseased drug addicts isn't behavior guaranteed to win friends.

That woman was just handed the wrong baby. She's innocent of wrongdoing and deserves no invasion of her privacy.

If she had any conditions that made breastfeeding problematic, she would have been advised not to feed her own baby.

Now if her name had been dragged through the mud she'd have a perfect lawsuit against the hysterical accuser.

Yes, that just sounds like somebody who's good at making friends.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Dbg, I do agree. Still, is it worth a newspaper story in which the mother paints the other mother as a potential leper, and demands all her medical records?

If it was me, I'd want to have the hospital test my baby for the most common milk-borne diseases over the three years and be financially liable for any treatment resulting from any infection diagnosed in that time frame: Hepatitis, HIV, anything. No need to "prove" it came from that one exposure, just that it could have originated then.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, where is she painting the other woman as a leper and hor could she force the article be written? Really?

While the new mom may be wrapped a little tight, it doesn't mitigate this as a patient safety issue. She's entitled to her own feelings and it's not as if there aren't hospitals that would lie.

I sent the article to someone I know here in that department. They're horrified. It's not how important the layperson thinks it is. When the professional thinks it's an issue, that's when it is--because they understand all the ramifications.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 11:35 AM | Report abuse

The hospital where my children were born had had a baby removed from the hospital and it took several days for the parents and child to be reunited - in fact a movie was made of it. When I had my kids security was very tight, bands on both parents and the child, visitors had to be escorted onto the floor (it was locked).

I remember the first thing I did with each child was look for identifying marks so that I would know I had the correct child, in my case easy as both girls had birthmarks on their foreheads.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

Exactly. Many hospitals have a special code to broadcast which indicates a missing child, security lockdowns, etc. It's gotta be scary to a parent.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 11:51 AM | Report abuse

I can see being upset that day, and getting tests run, making sure the hospital takes action to see this (or something worse) doesn't happen again. But I noticed the mother is an attorney, and that 6 months later, this is still her biggest problem and she has time to spend on it. Amazing. Maybe she has a nanny? Wonder what personal details of the nanny she knows.

Also, either she or her husband stayed awake and with the baby at all times? The baby stayed in her room until 4 the next day. Don't know about others, but after giving birth I slept like the dead.

Seems to me too that she's got a beef with her husband for handing off the baby to an aide, and not personally seeing the baby to the nursery in the first place.

Poor Spence is probably never going to see the insides of a Chuck E. Cheese. And I feel sorry for the parents of the playmate in pre-school/daycare who bites him. (Wait until the mother finds out what a germ-infested pool a school is, and how she'll be sending him there every day.)

Posted by: LostInThought | July 28, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

After a series of brain cramps today, part of a song got into my head. After a few minutes, I looked up the actual lyrics. I am now humming it and giggling under my breath. Here it is:

I would not be just a nothin' my head all full of stuffin'
My heart all full of pain.
I would dance and be merry, life would be a ding-a-derry,
If I only had a brain.


Hope life is a ding-a-derry to everyone today. Gotta go to some training now.

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

Nah, she'll let the nanny home-school him. 8-O

I know the history of infant/early childhood mortality rates, but it is honestly a wonder to me when I read about parents who are so over-protective these days. When I think of the crazy things we got into without our parents blinking an eye . . . well, some parents these days would keel over.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

*cough* Hand me my cane somebody, I've become the old geezerlady waggling my finger at the whippersnappers.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 12:12 PM | Report abuse

I guess my attitude is this is NOT a problem that would be fixed by demanding the other mother's medical records.

If this happened, who knows what else happened when the mom wasn't there, such as mix-ups on tests, vaccines, etc.?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 12:13 PM | Report abuse

I have to admit the image of an exchange pops into my head:

Brod: "Aaak! Thag! What you give to baby? Do not know where mammoth tail has been!"
Thag: "Brod? Thag just kill mammoth yesterday. Thag and Grok drag mammoth from next valley. Mammoth safely stored in larder just next to waste pit."
Brod: "Oh, my bad."

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 12:14 PM | Report abuse

Does anyone else think that the picture of the ships on the WaPo homepage look like tiny models? I think this is the result of a really shallow depth of field.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Does anyone else think that the picture of the ships on the WaPo homepage look like tiny models? I think this is the result of a really shallow depth of field.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

'scuse me.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

Nope, RD, but I'll double check.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

OK, I done read the whole article. Mama never actually says direct bad things about The Other Mother in the article, although there was the whole bit about "She's got my baby! She's got my baby!" which sounds a little off-the-rails.

Something that certainly does not help at all is the quotation from a guy running an entirely different hospital, in different circumstances, that "She got lucky" with respect to the baby *not* getting HIV or hepatitis or other bad things. Really? It is the norm for his hospital to have patients with life-threatening infectious illnesses in the normal population of their maternity ward, with no special procedures related to them? I rather doubt it.

Suzanne Libby was not lucky -- she had fairly normal luck (except for getting a poorly-prepared aide). Instead, she was not unlucky. According to the CDC, there are about 1.1 million people in the U.S. living with HIV at this time -- about 1/3rd of a percent. In the U.S., my understanding is that AIDS remains most prevalent among two populations: gay men and intravenous drug abusers. At least, this is my understanding. It is obviously possible to be in one of these populations and be HIV-free, and it is obviously possible to be out of these populations and still have HIV. We are talking only about probabilities here. There are very few gay male women capable of breast-feeding, and this is a private suburban hospital, not pulling from a population dominated by well-heeled junkies. Putting all these things together, the odds of Ms. Libby's baby having been exposed to HIV in his one little escapade are really rather low. The *hospital* was extremely lucky, because if their procedures could let this happen once, it probably has happened on other occasions. Ms. Libby, on the other hand, managed to avoid being extraordinarily UN-lucky.

I understand being very emotional as a parent, especially when the child is newborn, and fixating on some magic incident, fantasizing that if that moment had happened differently, everything would be wonderful. Understanding is not the same as agreeing. The mother needs to move past this moment. Unfortunately, I have no doubt that every problem that befalls this child for the rest of his life will risk being blamed on this incident. Woe betide that hospital if little Spencer is autistic.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 28, 2010 12:22 PM | Report abuse

Yes RD, looks like it is off, kguy - special lens.

I have seen other photos done like this but as we all know my memory is swiss cheese so forget how it is down or the name - I like it though makes everything look like it belongs in a train set village.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 12:25 PM | Report abuse

"The Cody area evidently had some high-end winter tourism back during the Depression."

DotC, I've been through Cody once and kicked myself since for not stopping. I've stopped in North Platte, NE, though, the self-acclaimed hometown of William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody who operated a dude ranch and hunting lodge somewhere near Cody, WY, around 1900, hence the name.

Posted by: Entenpfuhl | July 28, 2010 12:26 PM | Report abuse

Here's a wiki about deliberately creating this effect:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miniature_faking

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

Yup, the town of Cody's profited handsomely from the use of Mr. Cody's name. I checked Google Street View recently and found that my humble Cody row house is still there. The adjacent shopping center has a much-improved supermarket.

I recall sitting at the laundromat, eavesdropping on a guy calling home to New Jersey on the pay phone. He was raving about how much cheaper real estate was in Cody, as opposed to Jackson. That was back before Jackson became really, truly expensive.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 28, 2010 12:36 PM | Report abuse

Calling Mudge! :-), one of your lost boats has been found.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/arctic-archaeologists-find-ship-lost-in-search-for-franklin-expedition/article1654528/

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 12:42 PM | Report abuse

SciTim, it was demanding the other woman's medical records that got me.

My concern is that by fixating at the breastfeeding incident and overlooking the fact that errors could have introduced other problems (overdose of vaccines, missed blood tests, etc.), to demand her records would actually only provide false reassurance.

In short, if the woman didn't have, say, hepatitis, it doesn't mean that her baby was NOT exposed to hepatitis at the hospital.

Also, a HIV-infected mother breastfeeding a baby exclusively up to 6 months old only causes a 5% transmission rate of HIV (this increases with longer breastfeeding periods). So the HIV risk is near zero even if she was known to be HIV+.

Also, medical records only report what a patient complained about, was diagnosed with, and was treated for, and thus can never be complete.

In short, it's not only inappropriate to ask for these medical records, but it actually could be harmful to her baby's health to base all testing and diagnosis on what might be disclosed in that woman's medical records.

Medicine isn't an exact science and many things remain deeply unknown.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

It is nice to know someone is still enjoying the unreality of elite Aspen now that the Euro's are leaving... a good place for shelling out

Posted by: Wildthing1 | July 28, 2010 12:49 PM | Report abuse

SciTim's take is good.

Comment on us -- writ large -- these days. Does not our relative wealth, ease, health, technology, etc. cause us to over-interpret or fixate on events?

I do not want to diminish anyone's feelings of intensity about such a moment. However, the moment is largely past. (The hospital should revise procedures, apologize, and somehow address the test findings keeping the name private.)

I suppose that much of this is a window dressing on a basic human grab for money: 10K-100K, to put in darlingprecioussingularsopecialbabyboy's college fund.

And, again, I agree with dbG too.

But, speaking as someone who got really bad news about a baby -- serious kidney troubles, brain tumor protocol, major autoimmune disregulation -- my goodness, if asked, I would say gently:

small stuff. Sweating? Here's a towel and cool and calming drink.

No. Go enjoy wonderbaby and count your lucky stars.

--
PS -- modern meds have largely taken care of my wonderchild. I feel lucky each and every day. One family member does not, reliving some of this still. That complex reaction to fear and grief, if left to fester, casts a pall on so much.

Off to water plants and then type more for pennies in the tin cup outside my door....

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | July 28, 2010 12:53 PM | Report abuse

What CP said.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 28, 2010 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Indeed, CqP.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Amen, CqP. This is the story of a woman who has been too privileged for too long. Wonder how she would react to real adversity?

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

Iirc, they're asking for specific tests and results, not the woman's entire record. They won't get anything specific unless the woman consents.

Again, the mom seems wound a little tightly. Keeping the baby with her, recording everything, she seems to think perfection is an option. There are families where they would have said, "thank the fsm!" and turned this into a family joke so familiar that at Spencer's wedding his dad gets up and talks about how good his son has always been with the ladies. Why, when he was 1 day old ...This isn't that family.

But, you need to trust your hospital. Breech that trust by the missing baby, not fessing up until the next day, why would you believe anything else they said without validation?

If you had a relative who'd received poor care (and this was poor care), what assurances would make you feel better?

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 1:05 PM | Report abuse

And, back from the plants, who say "hi!".

All dogs are the bestestdogintheword. And so too babies, even the ones not boodled.

But here is the drift. We love them thusly. Tis our job and joy (woe to the people who do NOT love and care for their bundles!). But, hey, simultaneously, lots of loved ones around....so, we also need to learn to take our turns.

Not sure this family situation will easily understand two truths:

everybody is fancy (cue Mr. Rodgers who I miss daily).

take turns.

===

Also, chill pills are very nice as is the release that results in unclenched orifices.

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | July 28, 2010 1:16 PM | Report abuse

I'm with dbG; the errors made by the hospital are grave and should be the focus of concern. However, I think I would freak out a bit on learning that my baby had been fed by a stranger. I don't think comparing that to a wet nurse is fair; traditionally wet nurses had a real relationship (even if employer-employee) with the mothers of the babies they fed. And when that was a profession, nobody really knew about the dangers of bodily fluid exchange.

Posted by: Yoki | July 28, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Agreed, CqP. I would not be acting like this family (I think).


But we all are who we are despite the best attempts of others to amend us. :)

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 1:22 PM | Report abuse

O dbG, yes.

We is what we is (Popeye voice)

Eye yam what Eye yam!

--
I have a colleague who is rather difficult at times. We tend to say, privately, Dr. ZYX is the very best ZYX he can be.

--
Now, how about this one: I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a Brandywine tomato today!

Report, please. How are them thar love apples?

Posted by: CollegequaParkian | July 28, 2010 1:36 PM | Report abuse

Lots of green. So far, the Rutgers have begun to red.
Early girl was dev'd from Rutgers and not only were the rutgers earlier, their flavor and texture is superior.

If I bring you a b'wine green will it ripen on the sill?

Will also bring mixed herb/ zinnia bouquet for you.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 28, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Cassandra! Pete Seeger's new song says

God is counting on me
God is counting on you

(BP debacle song)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CybaNMZzo2A

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 28, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Did everyone leave early for the BPH?

Posted by: Moose13 | July 28, 2010 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Just picked the first red Romas Monday, the Early Girls are still green/white. Sigh. The hot weather in June seems to have set them back three weeks.

Love the new Pete Seeger, thanks for the link, CqP.

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

Hi CqP.
http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=3582

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 3:34 PM | Report abuse

We planted early and got lucky with no frost. We have so many Romas I've already made one batch of sauce and have cherry tomatoes out the wazoo.

Hi al!

*climbing back into the salt mines*

Posted by: Raysmom | July 28, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

And now we return to StrasburgMania --

Mr. Kilgore needs a little more tinfoil to line his ballcap, methinks:

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/nationalsjournal/2010/07/the_real_concern_for_stephen_s.html

I mean really. Rizzo says the MRI shows no change from the baseline when they signed Strasburg. Anyone think the Nats would have signed someone with discernable shoulder problems? Kilgore's really off the deep end. *SIGH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 28, 2010 3:51 PM | Report abuse

For all you knitting earthmothers out there.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/99522884@N00/3312291099/

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 3:58 PM | Report abuse

I almost read that as knitting earthworms, talitha!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 28, 2010 4:14 PM | Report abuse

As I look at those Venusses (?) I realise that I am beautiful, only I am born in the wrong millenium.

Posted by: gmbka | July 28, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

gmbka, I *aged* in the wrong century. The 20th had me lookin' pretty good. ;)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 4:24 PM | Report abuse

I'll knit you an earthworm if you need one, Snuke. 8-]

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 4:28 PM | Report abuse

*heading-to-the-BPH Grover waves*

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 28, 2010 4:30 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of the last century, I'm crocheting an afghan from a pattern that was published in 1980. I've kept it all these years, and rediscovered it a couple of weeks ago. Variation of a granny square, with a couple of rounds of popcorn stitch, in white and 3 shades of blue. Originally it reminded me of an afghan my mom made, and which I couldn't find the pattern for, and couldn't quite figure out (although I should take another run at that). Anyway, it's turning out very pretty...3 squares done, 117 to go!

Posted by: seasea1 | July 28, 2010 4:38 PM | Report abuse

Power coming on bit by bit to eastern MoCo, but still not to the woofinhaus. Have seen some electrical trucks from New Jersey out doin' stuff.

DotC, if Montana was the magic land of no-sales-tax for some, then Wyoming was the magic land of beer stronger than 3.2 for others.

Posted by: woofin | July 28, 2010 4:48 PM | Report abuse

Saving a table. Get yet three Buck burgers.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 5:00 PM | Report abuse

Rub it in, willya, Yello?!

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 5:20 PM | Report abuse

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/07/despite-public-support-shark-to-be-removed-from-cardiff-kook-.html

It's a strange headline. I take it you can't envelop statues in Washington.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 28, 2010 5:22 PM | Report abuse

woofin,
I recall a trip with Wyomingites to Fort Collins. We had some time to waste, so visited a local bar with goofy decor. What was served seemed like beer but had no particular effect. It took a while for any of us to remember about Colorado's daytime beer.

Driving to Laramie form the north involved going through Shirley Basin, which after 5 hours in a pickup seemed like the end of the known universe. Always kind of surprising that overpopulation was so close to Laramie, on the other side.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 28, 2010 5:26 PM | Report abuse

A friend of mine made it to the Food section. What a pleasant surprise pick up the section and say "Hey, I know her!"

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/27/AR2010072702911.html?hpid=artslot

Posted by: -pj- | July 28, 2010 5:42 PM | Report abuse

MD enacts -- or is close to -- a no child left INSIDE grad. requirement:

http://www.cbf.org/Page.aspx?pid=757&srctid=1&erid=3848050

Off to swim. Now, swimming as a grad. requ. That's an idea.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 28, 2010 5:55 PM | Report abuse

Not much beats a good Rutgers. A bit inconsistent from year to year, but when all is well, they are mighty fine.

RD Scheimpflug, you inspired me with neat knowledge today.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 28, 2010 5:59 PM | Report abuse

Where in the hell is everyone tonight......

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 28, 2010 7:16 PM | Report abuse

BPH - Yoki is in town, rest of us are moping.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 7:19 PM | Report abuse

Sad day in dog land:
Tummy aches. No cheeseburgers,
just vets, pokes, and pills.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 7:23 PM | Report abuse

Does Wilbrodog feel like this?

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://canined.com/dogs/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/black-labrador-retriever-puppy-dog-face-paws-upclose-cute.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/review-2010-opel-insignia-20-diesel/&usg=__G2XpZ9rDfLbcC2ryGQuixDodNbE=&h=960&w=1280&sz=151&hl=en&start=0&tbnid=dkKLk-Pz2bnGmM:&tbnh=163&tbnw=214&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dsad%2Bblack%2Blabrador%2Bimages%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX%26biw%3D1076%26bih%3D466%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=365&vpy=161&dur=3167&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=139&ty=158&ei=hr5QTLWSK4T7lweY5JTMCQ&page=1&ndsp=10&ved=1t:429,r:6,s:0

That's gotta be the longest link I've ever posted in my life!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 7:38 PM | Report abuse

Worse, Talitha. That dog looks more relaxed than he was.
He refused his breakfast after rampant diarrhea. The usual home remedies weren't going to cut it.

There's no Pedilyte for dogs as far as I know, so I wound up giving him a little milk then cooked an egg in chicken bouillion to help replace some electrolytes, which perked him up slightly.

The Vet gave me three different kinds of medicine to cork the gusher, soothe his
tract, and fight infection.

His appetite is back a bit tonight.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 8:21 PM | Report abuse

Oh that explains it....good thing for copy and paste eh Talitha

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 28, 2010 8:23 PM | Report abuse

I'm so sorry, Wilbrod. *HUGS* to you both and major mojo.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, green. When it popped up I hesitated but it was so outlandish that I just decided what the h*ll.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Mojo order: health,
more egg soup, cheeseburgers and
Yoki on the side

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 8:30 PM | Report abuse

Since we're short on entertainment tonight ----- someone asked me to find a link to these for her today. You all have probably seen them but on the off chance that you haven't, kinda fun.

http://www.moinid.com/2010/04/att-painted-hands

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 8:33 PM | Report abuse

That picture was great talitha, hope Wilbrodog feels better soon, dmddog goes to the vet Friday for the first of a series of test, all day long blood test and I think ultrasound. Followed by surgery, biopsy and perhaps colonoscopy at a later date.

Crossing my fingers and hoping for good results.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

Yikes, dmd. Mojo for dmddog too.

I'll just make Wilbrodog drop it and share.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 8:37 PM | Report abuse

Poor Wilbrodog! I hope he feels better tomorrow! And I trust everything will be well with dmddog. Going to the doctor/vet Is.Not.Fun.

Thirddottir shared on Facebook that W (27 months) announced while she was cooking supper that he needed to peepee. She got the potty out and put it on the kitchen floor where she could monitor it. But when she turned her back, he found a tupperware bowl and peed in it. Yay W!

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 8:43 PM | Report abuse

Thanks.

In the lull of the BPH, good article on Arcarde Fire, great band from Montreal.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/arts/music/01arcade.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 8:50 PM | Report abuse

It's pee story night?!
Let me get tucked in soft--Ah.
Carry on, Slyness.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Insert joke about hosting a tupperware potty.

I like to say that the boy is a regular potty animal nowadays.

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 8:52 PM | Report abuse

More! More!

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 9:02 PM | Report abuse

Patent: to turn pee
into a river of gold--
tupperware pull-ups!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 9:19 PM | Report abuse

Dogs eating the wrong thing stories? Here's mine --

my daughter and her family are back from Europe as of Sunday. They had left the dog and cat at home, with various people coming over to feed/care for them. She said the dog was so glad to see them he just ran in circles yipping for five minutes.

Monday while everyone was doing all the things you do when you get back from a trip, the dog found a package intended for one of the house sitters.

He tore off the paper, pulled out a metal canister, opened IT (it had one of those metal hook-like fasteners) and pulled out a plastic bag and opened it, and ate the contents --- 62 individually wrapped chocolate covered coffee beans -- most of them in still in the wrappers! He went to the vet, was made to throw up, and spent the night at the vet's with an IV! Home now and o.k. The dog is a cockerpoo! I wouldn't believe he could contain that many candies!

Posted by: nellie4 | July 28, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

It looks like I'm the first to report back after a truly international BPH.

I had a great time with ScottyNuke, bc, Yellojkt and Mrs. Yellojkt, SciTim, bobsewell, TBG, FTB and her brother, Mo, and Yoki and Himself(!).

I think I got everyone. A thousand apologies if I missed you!

It was a fun night with lots of laughter and lots of hugging.

Posted by: Moose13 | July 28, 2010 9:33 PM | Report abuse

We have threats of T-storms but no storms. And Gawd it's hot. Again. I made 6 little tubs of pesto/pistou with the garden's basil, parmigiano, olive oil, butter, pine nuts and garlic from Argentina . Nobody in California can grow garlic anymore?. Really, it is summer packed in a little plastic container.

The Very Large Puppy is hot and letting everyone know it. Pant, pant, pant.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 28, 2010 9:34 PM | Report abuse

Oh, DNA_Girl, that was good!
I'll take 100 shares.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 9:34 PM | Report abuse

I hope Wilbrodog is feeling better very soon!

Posted by: Moose13 | July 28, 2010 9:35 PM | Report abuse

Sounds great, Moose!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 9:38 PM | Report abuse

I'm in, DNA_Girl! Put me down for 100 shares also.

Yoki brought Himself? Oh man, no fair that we all couldn't be there!

Posted by: slyness | July 28, 2010 9:41 PM | Report abuse

To combine them all
mood rings, tupperware, pullups
Moodpullupperware

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 9:44 PM | Report abuse

Best. BPH. Ever.

Scottynuke, bc, mo, TBG, Yoki, Hisself, ftb, her African houseguest, Bob-S, Moose. Did I miss anyone?

A Boy And His Dog. Crossbows vs. longbows. Otakon vs. Balticon. Helena Bonham Carter. Moose beats Shazam. Rip Van Winkle Motel. Vest inventory.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 9:44 PM | Report abuse

My inner 8-year old is loose tonight; I'm still giggling about "tupperware potty"...now with a baker's dozen of IBPHers in it.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 9:45 PM | Report abuse

Or better: moodpullupperwear

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 9:45 PM | Report abuse

Cocoa coffee beans
bring out inner cockapoos
in DNA girl...

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 9:52 PM | Report abuse

baldinho, I like the mashup but can't tell the difference between the two.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 9:53 PM | Report abuse

Or was that vice-versa?

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 9:57 PM | Report abuse

Moose beat me to the Mouseketeer Roll Call. Hers is probably more accurate.

From Otakon 2005 (2815 views):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/42627063@N00/37234117/

From Balticon 38 (759 views):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/155142071/in/photostream/

Case closed.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 10:03 PM | Report abuse

Cacatuidae:
cockatoo family or
cockapoo? Tee hee

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 10:06 PM | Report abuse

small ceramic squares
with nude photos and brown acid
my vice versa-tiles

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 10:07 PM | Report abuse

Vice versa, I think, Wilbrodog.

Posted by: nellie4 | July 28, 2010 10:08 PM | Report abuse

You just missed *Tim and, um, your wife.

Don't worry, though. I won't tell her.

Posted by: Moose13 | July 28, 2010 10:10 PM | Report abuse

Did you folks hear of this.

Curses! Foiled again!

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128728718

Posted by: baldinho | July 28, 2010 10:12 PM | Report abuse

If the aliens were reading the boodle tonight what would they surmise about earthlings?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 10:13 PM | Report abuse

Good pun haiku, baldin'ho.
It took a while for it all to sink in.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:15 PM | Report abuse

I meant the vice versa-tiles, which foiled me for a few seconds before I broke free.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:17 PM | Report abuse

That some of us do have a sense of humor after all?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:22 PM | Report abuse

If fed, does ET
not poop? And if it taunts us,
shall we not revenge?

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 10:26 PM | Report abuse

I have been to five of the places on this list including Baltimore's own Atomic Books.

http://www.bizarremag.com/weird-news/bizarre-life/9694/geek_road_trip.html

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 10:34 PM | Report abuse

A dog's best revenge:
puppy eyes, then stealing food
while they're still on "cute."

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:37 PM | Report abuse

E.T.'s "It's got DNA. That's confirmed, it has DNA!" is one of the most cringeworthy movie dialog lines ever.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 10:40 PM | Report abuse

Thank goodness for that, Wilbrod.
And some great hearts here, too.


Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 10:40 PM | Report abuse

No quibble there, yello. I cringed every time I read that dialog.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:43 PM | Report abuse

What a piece of work
is 'dog! How charming in look!
In act how crafty!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 10:45 PM | Report abuse

A greater mystery:
Was E.T. housebroken--
Or constipated?

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 10:49 PM | Report abuse

'It's got DNA'
is science nonsense. Why should
E.T.s be like us?

Posted by: yellojkt | July 28, 2010 10:51 PM | Report abuse

"HE'S got DNA!"
E.T. was a boy fer sure.
Elliot said so.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 10:55 PM | Report abuse

There *was* a lot of hugging, wasn't there?

Posted by: Bob-S | July 28, 2010 11:01 PM | Report abuse

The ancients sprinkled
DNA on many worlds;
now find those Stargates!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 28, 2010 11:02 PM | Report abuse

Talitha - Wow! Those painted hands are too cool!

Posted by: Bob-S | July 28, 2010 11:13 PM | Report abuse

I forgot to mention how much I enjoyed the painted hands as well, hadn't seen t before and it was delightful.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 28, 2010 11:18 PM | Report abuse

Yes, gorgeous- I missed the link and had to backboodle.

I did wince at seeing the forehand designs-- I find painting my palms to be very ticklish.

Those models actually earned their money far more than usual.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 28, 2010 11:31 PM | Report abuse

Re. Hugging: It's OK, I'm Italian.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 28, 2010 11:41 PM | Report abuse

I'm glad you all enjoyed the handart. The product placement was somewhat hamfisted *yuck yuck* but I thought it was brilliant work.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 28, 2010 11:51 PM | Report abuse

the reeses pieces
went in, did they then become
new species feces?

Posted by: baldinho | July 29, 2010 5:39 AM | Report abuse

Thanks you for the farming best wishes. Sorry for the delay reading them, but I was felled by a a period of unwellness, more reasonably defined as a headache with no pain, just tightness of the head so I cannot properly see. I think I remembered the last time we owned big land for farming in which we went broke.

There is nothing there but bare land. No house, no barn, just land. It really is just a big garden so to speak. Most of it is going to be farmed by whoever rented it last year or so I very fondly hope(or I will be weeding a LOT) and only a little will be set aside for the beginning of the garden.
I only wished for a garden, but the dollar difference between 5 acres and 80 acres is unbelievably small. The difference is a reasonable investment.

I hope to establish an orchard of sorts along with vast fields of vegetables. Mrdr and I have already been dreaming of raspberries, rhubarb and gooseberries, cherries, apples, plums, Saskatoons, blueberries, and a few other things. You never know what the garden catalogues will bring.

Maybe one day I will convince mrdr that we need to live at the farm. Till then I shall only dream of sheep and chickens.

Posted by: --dr-- | July 29, 2010 5:57 AM | Report abuse

"It's OK, I'm Italian."

The line worked on my wife, so there must be something to it. I just don't have the nose to pull it off.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 6:09 AM | Report abuse

This morning's bear invasion story:

http://www.wmur.com/news/24424525/detail.html

The bear walked into the house, ate all the fruit on the counter, knocked over the fishbowl (the fish lived) and stole a teddy bear.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 6:27 AM | Report abuse

Surely, he injests
hmmm, what? how?, did he expect'?
alimentary!

Posted by: baldinho | July 29, 2010 6:35 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. I think the world would a much better place if we remembered that we have a soul, and make as much preparation for that soul, as we do the body. It needs food too. It needs Christ. So much of the time we forget that, myself included.

I am dragging this morning. Today the children will leave a bit early. My grandsons are with my daughter, they get to hang out, so it's all good. They came by last night and kissed me and told me they would be back today. Just that simple kiss from them was worth more than anything I can think of that the world has to offer. It is a keepsake, a jewel I will take out and look at from time to time, and hold close.

Have a beautiful day, folks, and take your keepsakes out and think on them, treasure them, hold them close. Love to all.

Slyness, we still have the hot, but slowly losing one degree a day. Perhaps there is an end in sight. For some reason I'm craving collards. I don't know why.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 29, 2010 6:38 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. I think the world would a much better place if we remembered that we have a soul, and make as much preparation for that soul, as we do the body. It needs food too. It needs Christ. So much of the time we forget that, myself included.

I am dragging this morning. Today the children will leave a bit early. My grandsons are with my daughter, they get to hang out, so it's all good. They came by last night and kissed me and told me they would be back today. Just that simple kiss from them was worth more than anything I can think of that the world has to offer. It is a keepsake, a jewel I will take out and look at from time to time, and hold close.

Have a beautiful day, folks, and take your keepsakes out and think on them, treasure them, hold them close. Love to all.

Slyness, we still have the hot, but slowly losing one degree a day. Perhaps there is an end in sight. For some reason I'm craving collards. I don't know why.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 29, 2010 6:38 AM | Report abuse

*trying to catch up*

Cassandra!! *HUGSSS*

I keep forgetting to mention -- the Dawn Patrol takes me past a certain county fairgrounds that have been overrun the past few days by utility and tree-clearing trucks. Very nice to see them prepping and breakfasting so diligently in order to take full advantage of daylight.

*back-to-backBoodling Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 7:18 AM | Report abuse

Sounds wonderful, dr. Congratulations!

Morning, all. I'll meet you at the diner for breakfast.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 29, 2010 7:40 AM | Report abuse

Yes indeed, the IBPH was a wonderful time, great to finally meet Himself, see ftb and Moose for the first time in forever, and *Tim was his *Tim-tacular self. And again with the mo *HUGSSSSSSSSSSSSS*!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 7:49 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

Cassandra, I'm glad to hear that you're enjoying the grandkids. They grow up so fast, don't they? Don't overdo, please.

Good to hear that the IBPH was such a success.

Onward into the day!

Posted by: slyness | July 29, 2010 8:08 AM | Report abuse

New Kit!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 9:04 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

yellokt, it worked on your wife, but how did it work on you? Or *Tim, for that matter? [Think I have a bruise on my hip from *Tim's laser pointer courtesy his Vest of Wonders. I *hope* it was a laser pointer. You know what it's all about with him.]

On a completely different topic (that of relatively little-known parts of DC), I saw this video of the H street corridor.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/artsandliving/scene-in/index.html?hpid=artslot

I've seen some great music at the Rock & Roll Hotel, though every time my friends and I try to get into the burlesque shows they're sold out and have long lines down the block for SRO. I'm glad for this video - good to see what we've been missing.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 29, 2010 9:16 AM | Report abuse

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