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Earthquake!!!!!!!!!

A few minutes after 5 a.m. today I was awakened by a passing 18-wheeler with a rumbling engine so powerful it shook the house.

No: a helicopter. Right overhead, the rotors causing the walls to vibrate loudly.

Except there was no sound of an actual truck out on the street, nor any sound coming from a chopper overhead. There was only the shaking. Wha....?

Could it be the pipes in the house acting up? You know how old houses are. Pipes get fussy.

Or could it be...an earthquake?????????

Yes! In Montgomery County, just up the road from my house. It was magnitude 3.6 but trust me, it felt EASILY like a 3.7 or a 3.8.

I think it lasted about 30 seconds or so, but it could have been just 10 seconds, or two minutes, because when you're fighting for your life in the middle of a massive temblor, time is hard to judge, and the only thing you can think about is what a weird word "temblor" is.

The geological gyrations woke everyone in my house. Wife thought "it must be an earthquake," because she is always quick to assume the worst and most improbable cause of any particular event. Eldest daughter thought "it must be a bomb on the Mall," because her generation has been told that terrorists are everywhere.

Who knew that earthquakes could strike this part of the country?

Actually, I got a story on that in my files somewhere... yep, from earlier this year, a piece I did on earthquakes and megacities. The whole seaboard can have quakes. They're typically small, like the one this morning. But the big danger is that one will strike New York City: It's an area more tectonically active than the D.C. region and, most importantly, it has a tremendous amount of aging infrastructure built of masonry.

Excerpt of my story:

Earthquakes can turn up closer to home than many Americans realize. Several major tremors have been recorded off the East Coast, including near Newfoundland in 1929 and Boston in 1755. Charleston, S.C., had a quake in 1886 that killed 60 people. Hough, of the USGS, said it might be that all three earthquakes were associated with the edge of the continental shelf and that any coastal city, including Washington, could get rattled by a quake someday.

Another hazard is right in the Mississippi River valley. Memphis is close to the New Madrid fault, which caused powerful earthquakes in 1811 and 1812.

By some measures, the American city at greatest risk of a disastrous earthquake is New York.

Although New York City is rarely thought of as earthquake country, the region experiences many small tremors that indicate that larger ones are possible. The good news is that a magnitude-6 earthquake should happen only every 670 years or so. A magnitude-7 tremor should happen every 3,400 years. That's the calculation by scientists at Columbia University who studied 383 much smaller tremors recorded in the New York area from 1677 to 2007.

The bad news is that there is a massive amount of infrastructure built without earthquakes in mind.

"A lot of old brownstones -- they crumble well," Zoback said.

--

Multimedia Achenblogger: Here I am on the PBS News Hour last night. Jacket borrowed from Fahrenthold, who is out of town. Tie borrowed from Mufson. Unseen: Blue jeans and sneakers. Sorry about excessive hand gestures.

Was also on Diane Rehm yesterday, along with a very bright WSJ reporter. Some interesting calls. Anyone else heard about the Russian sub that supposedly, allegedly, secretly visited the Macondo well after the blowout?

By Joel Achenbach  |  July 16, 2010; 12:07 PM ET
 
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Next: Will feds pull plug on BP gulf well?

Comments

A true right wing nut bar John Birch society survivor would posit the Russian sub visit just prior to the explosion.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Joel, your link to the Diane Rehm show isn't working. Please advise ;-)

I loved your appearance on Newshour. I didn't mind your hand motions but I did wonder about the cut of that jacket, not surprised it wasn't yours.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 16, 2010 1:11 PM | Report abuse

The Other Federal Capital had a bigger one than yours.
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Quake+that+rocked+capital+once+year+event/3279268/story.html

These perfidious Russkies were probably trying to steal BP's sweet oil.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 16, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

14 times bigger?

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 16, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Templars have invaded? Tumblers are shattering? Probably was temblorary.

I need a nap.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Joel you forgot another explanation:

The unholy alchemy of BP execs and our government has aroused the demonic dragons sleeping deep in the earth. This first rumble is yet another portent of the eventual opening of the Hellmouth and the collapse of the entire DC metro area. Has not the Gulf run red? Has not Spain won the World Cup?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 1:23 PM | Report abuse

It's also here badsneakers.

http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2010-07-15/update-bp-oil-disaster-and-drilling-moratorium

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 16, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

It would seem to me that the damage to a place like NYC would be heavily dependent on the condition of the stuff underlying the building. If NYC is anything like many of other old cities, a lot of it is built on fill. The magnitude of the earthquake would likely be low in NYC, but if the shaking lasted long enough to liquefy some of the fill, you could lose some buildings.

Any of the significantly large structures would/should be safe. The bridges should have gone through at least some level of seismic retrofit, and the skyscrapers would all be on solid footing.

Posted by: baldinho | July 16, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Before I nod off I would remind everyone that I noted here yesterday, re Newshour appearance, "Joel talks with his hands". I find it delightful and elucidating.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 1:26 PM | Report abuse

As I had posted in the previous Boodle, 'twas a temblette. :-)

Although the activity at the NukeAbode may possibly have been enhanced by the excited and animated reaction of Stella, the Very Round NukeFeline (it's all muscle, really).

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

Scotty, I presume the cat is named Stella so you can call her with the proper Brando inflection -- "STELLAAAA!"

Posted by: nellie4 | July 16, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

I thought the earthquake was the result of health care getting passed, or financial reform - maybe the combimation of the two. You know, the apocalypse the Republicans predicted? Probably accounts for the Gulf gusher too.

Anyway, glad it was a small one - watch out for those brick buildings.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 16, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

'Zactly, nellie. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

'Zactly, nellie. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Earthquake? we had one up this way about 3 weeks ago. I was on a ladder, cleaning my kitchen window. Not the wisest place to be but I didn't feel a thing, strangely. Everyone else did!

Posted by: MissToronto | July 16, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Although some have reported feeling this temblor (gotta love that word) here in Fairfax, I cannot claim to have done so. I think I might have awoken around 5AM, but this could just be a false memory. You know, like that time I was abducted by aliens. Or the Ford administration.

Anyway, a friend of mine just pointed out that to many natives this could be their first, and perhaps only, earthquake.

And most people, I assert, would be pretty cool with that.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

I love that Joel used the technical term "kablooey" on the News Hour.

Here's a link to the Diane Rehm show:
http://thedianerehmshow.org/audio-player?nid=12733

If that doesn't work, go to the Diane Rehm homepage and navigate to it...

Posted by: seasea1 | July 16, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Amazing. My son from Maryland called me this morning and told me he can take the experience off his bucket list. I think it will give those in the DC area who felt it a bit more empathy to those elsewhere (ie. in San Diego, LA) who have been feeling stronger earthquakes routinely. Not to forget, of course, the recent one in Canada and the dreadful big ones in Hati and Chile, etc.

The 5.6 quake I last experienced in San Diego nearly caused a panic attack...mainly cause you can't control an earthquake!

Posted by: Windy3 | July 16, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Thanks Shriek, I'm listening to Joel now.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 16, 2010 2:26 PM | Report abuse

I loved the PBS interview, Joel. I know you have experience talking on the radio, but I can't help but think there must be an extra level of anxiety when cameras are involved. I think you did a bang-up job. The hand motions just indicated an active mind at work.

I just wish one of those screens in the background had shown the Achenblog.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 2:42 PM | Report abuse

Joel was subconciously conducting a symphony while speaking on the PBS hour.

I was kind of dizzy afterwards but ya still did a good job. (:

Next time, lock those hands togther.

Posted by: Windy3 | July 16, 2010 2:44 PM | Report abuse

This subject is causing me inner temblors considering sonchild's recent (three days ago) relocation to Santa Cruz CA. Why couldn't he just stay in the Rockies where I birthed him in the first place?

I'm not serious, of course, right? Right?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 2:47 PM | Report abuse

Also, I have to say that driving out of New York City into Westchester county from La Guardia feels like experiencing an earthquake weekly. The roads are very very bumpy --car moves up and down and side to side. And the traffic and the swerving. Geesh. Gives me a neck ache.

Such is life at the moment.

Posted by: Windy3 | July 16, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Massive Temblor?????!!!!!

Oh, puh-leese! 1985 Mexico City, 2009 Santiago, 1964 Anchorage, 1906 San Francisco, 1994 Northridge CA. THOSE were "massive temblors." 3.6 wouldn't raise an eyebrow in those cities. Sorry your heart got a workout, but 3.6 would just be a SMALL reminder of what could be possible.

Relax.

Signed,
Born in San Francisco, CA

Posted by: beverly6 | July 16, 2010 2:53 PM | Report abuse

Talitha1, don't panic (hah). Buildings out there are raised to withstand a big earthquake. Not the shaking but they aren't going to fall down. It just kinda feels that way when the walls and floors and furniture are moving.

I did, however, still not like being stopped at a red light under an overpass. I said a few more prayers out there. And I survived! :-)

Posted by: Windy3 | July 16, 2010 2:56 PM | Report abuse

Lovely that our friend Humorless Commentator showed up to the party.

Posted by: Yoki | July 16, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

beverly, I think this massive temblor struck on a little-recognized section of the hewaskidding fault.

Posted by: baldinho | July 16, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

It was the gays, I tell you, the gays! Pat Robertson was right. With all those gays rocking each other's world, it was bound to spread to the rest of us.

* deep breaths *

Sorry, I've been reading a book by Dan Savage.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 16, 2010 2:58 PM | Report abuse

Well you learn something new every day.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/17/world/asia/17polyandry.html?_r=1&hp

That Buddi Devi looks like a pretty, satisfied, 70yo woman.

"The wife decides the delicate question of who is the father of a child, and her word in this matter is law."

Hellllyeah I'll bet it is.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:00 PM | Report abuse

Beverly6--I experienced a 5.6 quake in San Diego in May.

Agree a 3.6 is very benign--although it woke up my son from a deep sleep.

Okay, I must get some real work done.

Later!

Posted by: Windy3 | July 16, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

SciTim, speaking of the gays, my fair state was visited today by NOM, the no-we're-not-the-mormon-church "grassroots" organization against gay marriage.

I think they got dozens to attend their massive anti-gay marriage rally in Manchester.

It gave me another reason to find and watch the NOM "coming storm" commercial parody done by Colbert. Classic.

Posted by: baldinho | July 16, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

I know Yoki. Whenever I see the brutal effects of Irony Impairment I am reduced to tears. Bitter bitter tears.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of the gays, did you pick any of the many many many comments on quake stories saying that the DC quake must be the result of the BP oil release? I think the poor USGS official who the live Q&A got two questions about it, even though he'd answered the first one in the negative? *Sigh*

Posted by: Yoki | July 16, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

I hate to ask, but why is the PBS video clip of the yellow cap dropping on the black thingy so clear that it looks like it was shot in clear, shallow, oil-free water?

Shouldn't it be, you know, cloudy until the capping happens?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

As a transplant to California, I recommend always exagerating the magnitude of a quake by at least .5. "Wha do they mean, 4.2? I know what a 4.2 feels like, that was a 4.7 at least!"

Also, remember to throw in a technical term, like "epicenter" - it shows you know the lingo.

And then you can expand the discussion by talking about the probability of aftershocks - but only if the primary is greater than 5.5!

Posted by: j3hess | July 16, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

"Sorry, I've been reading a book by Dan Savage."

Better than a book by Michael Savage.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

They closed the valves on the choke line before dropping the cap on.

Posted by: Yoki | July 16, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

Interesting observation, Wilbrod. Remember, though, that in the absence of detergents the oil will hold together into a tight ascending plume. You won't get much dispersion. Even when there was a gusher the effluents clung together well.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

Good afternoon, all.

I am relatively close to the epicenter - such as it is - and woke up (really, "grogged up") early this AM, thinking I heard the trash truck. Wasn't until I read the news about the quake that I remembered that Friday isn't trash day.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 16, 2010 3:20 PM | Report abuse

Also, interestingly, any vid of deep water I have seen tends to be really clear. I remember seeing video of deep-water hot springs where the water looked like glass. I assume this is because there isn't much phytoplankton in the deep ocean.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

You were still grogged up at 5AM, bc?

Wow, that BPH must have been truly epic...

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

Actually, Yoki & RD, I'm somewhat impressed that it took so long for Beverly the Irony-Impaired to comment. When I read Joel's slyly amusing description, I expected that we'd get several humor-challenged self-righteous posts pointing out the exaggeration of effect in Joel's account.

I'd remind everyone, again, that RD several weeks ago raised the possibility of Godzilla's return as a consequence of the BP disastrahoochie. I find no credible reason why, having been bestirred on the Gulf floor, Godzilla might not now be disturbing the Seat of Government.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 16, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

LOL.

This is nothing.

When we have the Seattle fault lines go, there is likely to be a massive hot mud flow down the Rainier Valley from our active volcano known as Mount Rainier which will kill many tens of thousands of people and for which the resultant burn survivors will fill hospital wards on the West Coast for years.

In addition, the resulting collapse of the Billionaires Tunnel - which will bankrupt the City of Seattle, as it's not got proper bonding and is built in unstable soils - will kill most of the people trapped inside, all so that a few billionaires could travel from South Lake Union to their Stadiums and avoid the hoi polloi.

Because our city will be bankrupt from that, even more people will die from the resulting earthquake - which we KNOW will happen and will be above Factor 7 and will almost certainly happen by 2040.

Wake me when you get a real earthquake.

Posted by: WillSeattle | July 16, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Ah, a more smoky clip follows.

Was the shiny yellow cap thing just a demo clip? I'm seriously suffering from captioning impairment.

Gestures: not exactly ASL, but I'll free-translate.

Much/big story, wall, such, much, drop, much much much proceeding, lots, lifting, lifting, lots, putting down in place, don't move, much give, buy, rich, future, much dealing, bring this to here, that will happen, drum...

Godfather impression, fine point being made: "if this doesn't happen, I'll do a Donkey Kong style barrel-throw at BP execs, then squash them together and make more barrels out of them to pound on the ground."


(Back to Lehrer.)

I tried not to lipread while transcribing the gestures, but gestures seemed congruent with specific words.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Whaddabout Doc Savage, shrink? :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 3:28 PM | Report abuse

SCC: The free-transcription above was of Joel's handy interview.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 3:32 PM | Report abuse

I liked that there was a written transcript of that interview on the PBS website. Of course, it left out the bits Wilbrod mentions!

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 3:35 PM | Report abuse

Heh, heh.

Whenever someone comes along who spies multivalent humors (bubbling merrily) and who then decides the only thing to do is take it down, point by point, I think Aspbergers, so I can feel sorry for the person who does not get it, because s/he never will.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Oh goodness, ScottyNuke. Hadn't thought of the Man of Bronze for years.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

I think adding CA after San Francisco is pathognomonic.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Bruiser was tested as very, very drunk, to the point of danger. I didn't get the exact alcohol content, just that it was "higher than any they had seen." He is on IV for fluids; he was dehydrated of course.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 16, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

In this economy ------

http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/efi/lowres/efin860l.jpg

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Sorry to hear the dog dough snack had such bad aftereffects... or did he slam down some Heinkens along with the dough?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Whew! I thought he might be a goner; now maybe he'll finally go to rehab, like Lindsay Lohan, like that'll help.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

Poor Bruiser. So, do you think it might have been the yeast?

Posted by: ftb3 | July 16, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

This just in! Pat Robertson clarifies that this was God expressing his displeasure with the Democrats for passing financial reforms for Wall Street.

He is SO helpful in putting these natural disasters into a framework we can understand.

Posted by: B2O2 | July 16, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Here a rover confronts space aliens at seabottom

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 16, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

A bad case of beer belly.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:53 PM | Report abuse

Doh!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIfaxr8po20&feature=related

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 16, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

At the risk of being accused of being irony impaired, I gotta say 3.6 doesn't sound too bad. My house in Palo Alto and I survived the 1989 San Francisco earthquake of 6.9 on the Richter. Books fell off their shelves and an already pretty ugly planter was cracked down the middle by the front door. Otherwise, I think my built-in-1950 house did pretty well.

Posted by: novelera | July 16, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Yes, the yeast and flour make CO2 and alcohol, which usually no one notices because it mostly goes away in baking. I had read long ago that dough-eating by kids and animals would make them drunk, so that came as no surprise. I never knew it was such a pronounced effect. I worried mostly about expansion and ruptures and such.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 16, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

novelera, no it isn't too bad, that is why everybody is joking. If someone, lets say, had gotten hurt, then it wouldn't be funny.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

You sayin' I'm diseased, shrink? For typing CA after Santa Cruz?

Dear Officer Krupke .........

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Pathognomonic is a psychiatrist signing himself Shrink2, Shrink.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 4:02 PM | Report abuse

What Bruiser has experienced
http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/211103.htm

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 16, 2010 4:02 PM | Report abuse

Indeed. The delicious to everyone bar none scent of baking bread would not be the same without the alcohol which as you know, is a great carrier of flavor/scent.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 4:02 PM | Report abuse

I'm afraid there's no cure for you.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I *so* wanted you around when I was watching Mr.A. on the NewsHour. Knowing a little ASL just got me giggling and wondering how a person fluent in sign would view it.

My dad couldn't describe anything technical or artistic without creating a tornado with his arms and hands, probably why I delighted in Joel so much.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

I mean, once you use the word "pathognonomonic" and spell it correctly, you're on the medical road of no return.

I wonder if an addiction to bread dough is symptomatic enough for a 12-step program?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

A 3.8's a "Massive temblor?" LOL! In CA we don't notice anything less than a 5.0. What a bunch of wimpy east coast Obama disciples.

Posted by: Mean_Green | July 16, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

Gesturing improves verbal fluency, so I say to all gesturers, keep it up, and who knows, you could help people lipread you better too.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 16, 2010 4:10 PM | Report abuse

Uh oh, here we go. Now Obama caused DC denizens to be wimpy, this after he criticized the area for closing schools after a mm (ok, or two) of snow.

Wilbrod, though it seems unlikely, I teach. That word matters to me. It used to all be Greek to me. But you know, medical training is kind of a concentration camp thing, you get used to things you never thought possible, terrible things, horrible...like words like that and pretty soon you start using them yourself, as if it were no big deal.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, Shrink ... that and cadaver work. Well, ya gotta be well rounded, don't ya?

*flogging MeanGreen with big words, making him/her cower in fear and wimpiness*

Posted by: ftb3 | July 16, 2010 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Hope you humans quit your laughing.
Hope you are quite prepared to pay.
Looks like I'm in a yeasty blither.
One bite has put me out of play.

Don't forget my plight,
It's bound to save a life,
Dog's distress can make you wise.
_________________________________

Th-th-that's all, folks!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 4:28 PM | Report abuse

Shoot, should have said - one gulp has put me out of play. Editor! (Somebody work on that last line for me, too.)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Th-th-that's all, folks!
Posted by: talitha

Hope not, you've got me in stitches.
I am going to get the fake sheet for that song and learn it. Just one more verse...

But I gotta go now too.

Here's hope the haters don't fling poo on your screens,

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 4:34 PM | Report abuse

Reading some drop-in comments here has been pretty funny, no, I mean, LOL-ee.

Posted by: russianthistle | July 16, 2010 4:41 PM | Report abuse

What’s all this I read on the front page about surviving a massive tumbler?

Has the D.C. area been invaded by sentient super-size drink cups from fast-food outlets and convenience stores? Or was it just one really big tumbler, dumping barrels of carbonated cola beverage on our nation’s capital in some sort of perverse symbolic gesture representing the barrels of oil dumped along the shores of FLALLAMS?

*noise of person talking from next room*

Temblor? Well what in tarnation are the Knights Temblor doing in Washington?

*laughing smugly at the tarnation double entendre*

Oh, they’re not. It’s a what? Oh.

*smiling at the computer screen*

Never mind.

Posted by: MsJS | July 16, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Please do not mispell the gnomenclature.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 16, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

//know, medical training is kind of a concentration camp thing, you get used to things you never thought possible, terrible things, horrible...like words like that and pretty soon you start using them yourself, as if it were no big deal.//

Same in IT except the horrible words sound like "I'll work on it until it's fixed.@

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

That was a very funny image, shrink.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 4:48 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, MsJS, for picking up on my templar/tumbler/temblor.

And are you as happy as I am about our comix champion?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Had to go and copy our earthquake didn't you? Looking forward to having some time to enjoy the links for Joel.

Saw these apron pictures and CP immediately came to mind, almost too pretty to be useable. Not that I have ever worn an apron but it I did these would be my choice.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/style/these-arent-your-grandmas-aprons/article1642745/

Posted by: dmd3 | July 16, 2010 5:13 PM | Report abuse

Yes, shrieking_denize, the one that hit Ottawa was 14 times more powerful. However, it was centred in Southwestern Quebec, not directly under Ottawa.

But, Eastern North American earthquakes are pretty flaccid compared to Western North American earthquakes. The Alaska earthquake of 1964, which tore up Anchorage, was 9.2 on the Richter scale, or more than 10000 times as powerful.

And, in 1700, there was an earthquake off the Oregon Coast that created a tsunami that threw driftwood logs several kilometres (sorry, we use the metric system in Canada)inland and that killed several tens of thousands of people in Japan.

So, that weak little event that shook the DC area was pretty small potatoes.

Posted by: gschultens | July 16, 2010 5:19 PM | Report abuse

GeneW gets a mention on the Daily Dish:
http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2010/07/why-america-needs-gene-weingarten.html

Very good Below the Beltway column - about a subject near and dear to the Boodle's heart.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 16, 2010 5:23 PM | Report abuse

Oooooooohhhhhhhhhhh, another Canukistani in our midst. Stick around gschultens! And do *not* apologize for using the metric system. It seems that Americans find it entirely too difficult to use such an easy system. Well, some of us don't, but, well, you know....

Posted by: ftb3 | July 16, 2010 5:24 PM | Report abuse

The thing I most like about the metric system is the naming of the units. Newtons. Pascals. Nice. The founders of science get recognition.

I envision a new system of measurement by the intelligent design folks. Their founders could be likewise honored. The units could be the Robertsons or maybe the Rentboys.

Posted by: baldinho | July 16, 2010 5:44 PM | Report abuse

seasea, thanks to the reference.

Posted by: russianthistle | July 16, 2010 5:48 PM | Report abuse

"By some measures, the American city at greatest risk of a disastrous earthquake is New York."

That's just one reason why, the Founding Fathers in all their wisdom, chose DC over NY for the Nation's Capitol!!

Posted by: wdroller | July 16, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

Dana Milbank has an interesting piece about the aggressive language from the right. Godwin's Law is the general center piece. I am not always a fan of Milbank, but I think he is starting to tire of this, as well and ties everything together fairly neatly.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/16/AR2010071602855.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Posted by: russianthistle | July 16, 2010 6:08 PM | Report abuse

From Mr.A.'s latest update ---

The bulletins of the day have been encouraging in the main. There are no signs, officials said, that the "integrity test" that clamped the well has caused any leakage, erosion, cratering or any other potentially catastrophic side-effect.

But the pressure readings in the well are in an ambiguous range, neither as high as scientists and engineers would like nor so low as to be clearly ominous. That makes the decision about what to do next all the more difficult.

The latest measurement shows pressure at about 6,700 pounds per square inch, upticking slightly over time, retired Adm. Thad Allen said in a Friday afternoon briefing. Allen, the national incident commander, has said that a pressure reading of 8,000 or 9,000 pounds per square inch would be ideal, indicating an uncompromised well casing, while a reading below 6,000 psi might indicate leakage.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/16/AR2010071602518.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 6:32 PM | Report abuse

Apparently there is a difference between West Coast and East of the Rockies quakes, in terms of effect and damage. From the USGS summary for today's Maryland quake:

"EARTHQUAKES IN THE STABLE CONTINENTAL REGION
Most of North America east of the Rocky Mountains has infrequent earthquakes. Here and there earthquakes are more numerous, for example in the New Madrid seismic zone centered on southeastern Missouri, in the Charlevoix-Kamouraska seismic zone of eastern Quebec, in New England, in the New York - Philadelphia - Wilmington urban corridor, and elsewhere. However, most of the enormous region from the Rockies to the Atlantic can go years without an earthquake large enough to be felt, and several U.S. states have never reported a damaging earthquake. The earthquakes that do occur strike anywhere at irregular intervals.

Earthquakes east of the Rocky Mountains, although less frequent than in the West, are typically felt over a much broader region. East of the Rockies, an earthquake can be felt over an area as much as ten times larger than a similar magnitude earthquake on the west coast. A magnitude 4.0 eastern U.S. earthquake typically can be felt at many places as far as 100 km (60 mi) from where it occurred, and it infrequently causes damage near its source. A magnitude 5.5 eastern U.S. earthquake usually can be felt as far as 500 km (300 mi) from where it occurred, and sometimes causes damage as far away as 40 km (25 mi). "

Maybe we are not so wimpy after all!

Cathy D

Posted by: CathyD3 | July 16, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse

Baldinho, one of my great-grandfathers was named Newton and Pascal is a family surname of the same clan. I still calculate fabric in yards and wood in feet. They must have taken away our metric conversion tables when we got off the boat.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 6:42 PM | Report abuse

Is the kittens knitting print framed and ready for hanging in the bunker? I may retreat if a storm is approaching. ;)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 6:46 PM | Report abuse

"By some measures, the American city at greatest risk of a disastrous earthquake is New York."

Are we using the metric system or the Merikan system here?

talitha, I am pleased with the outcome of the comix competition. In a way, though, it felt almost like a set-up. Just on the basis of gender alone, the voting had the potential to get lopsided. Then add in the three rocker-themed finalists splitting the aging male baby boomer vote, the overdone smarta@@ animal themed strips splitting that vote, etc., it felt a bit skewed in favor of the eventual winner. Nonetheless, I am happy for her.

Posted by: MsJS | July 16, 2010 6:51 PM | Report abuse

True, true, MsJS. Your insight is most astute. But ......... Yaaaa!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 6:56 PM | Report abuse

Wow Doc Savage references.

What's next - Gray Lensman?

(We're already top-heavy on the John Carter references here, particularly with regards to DT) (ahem).

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 16, 2010 7:01 PM | Report abuse

The user reviews here are priceless...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000796XXM?ie=UTF8&tag=bkgas-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000796XXM

Posted by: -TBG- | July 16, 2010 7:13 PM | Report abuse

A 3.5 is enough to wake me up. If it's a 3.0 I'll notice if if I'm awake usually. Anything below a 2.0 I don't really notice too much.

Although a 3.5 will wake me up, I'll go right back to sleep without a second thought about it...

I'm very used to earthquakes.

Posted by: Nymous | July 16, 2010 7:20 PM | Report abuse

This has been going around. It is visual evidence of the shocking devastation caused by the Great DC Earthquake.

http://media.sfexaminer.com/images/130727318.jpg

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 7:30 PM | Report abuse

RD, the horror!

TBG thanks for the link, the reviews are great.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 16, 2010 7:34 PM | Report abuse

RD_P, that one deserves a place amongst TBG's snowmageddon chair pics.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 16, 2010 7:37 PM | Report abuse

Oh, the humanity . . .

-Snarky Squirrel

Posted by: 7900rmc | July 16, 2010 7:42 PM | Report abuse

TBG, you should have put a warning label on that link . . . tears streaming in laughter. One of my favorites (and can I adopt this dog?) -----

My dog ate this, and now everytime I turn on the microwave my dog sings Beatles songs, instruments and everything...in stereo.


Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

TBG that one is making the faculty rounds right now, thx!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 16, 2010 7:49 PM | Report abuse

Strasburg - Living life on the edge.

How is this fellow ever going to be able to pitch seven innings when he throws so many so early in the game?

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 8:12 PM | Report abuse

RD, very cute.

TBG, that was wonderful. Sure are a lot of funny people out there, thank goodness.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 16, 2010 8:14 PM | Report abuse

Although my twin sister (we call her the One Out West) lives in LA and I've been there and various other California environs more than three dozen times, the only earthshake I've ever felt was in Greensboro, NC in 1993 - it was similar in magnitude to this quake, occurred about 3:00 am (it was while I was in college, of course, otherwise, I'd never have been up at that hour) and Yes, it felt like an enormous, overloaded 18 wheeler went by even though our street was far too small for that. Read IN THE PAPER (yes, it was '93 and papers were still how we got our news) that it was an earthquake.

Posted by: indy474 | July 16, 2010 8:17 PM | Report abuse

// irons her clothing with the Norton Anthology of English literature.//

I'll never understand why not everyone finds dooce funny.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 8:21 PM | Report abuse

Hi folks,
What a congenial group. May I join in?
I've admired JA's science writing for years. And the tragic aftermath so poignantly captured in the photo posted by RD is visible in my yard as well--I may NEVER get the wind chimes untangled.

Posted by: balancingact | July 16, 2010 8:27 PM | Report abuse

A little late to the festivities tonight, but yes, RD_P, Strasburg's taken a little while to get rolling, but he seems to be back on top of his game now.

Now the question is -- Can the Nats get Nolasco off his game? :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 8:28 PM | Report abuse

Hi balancingact. Welcome!

RD's photo of the catastrophe reminds me of the time a hurricane came through here, knocking out power for thousands of folks in the area--some for several days.

We didn't lose power, but my husband still talks about the horror of the TiVo rebooting every half hour or so that evening.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 16, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

Pull up a chair and set a spell, balancingact. We're an odd lot, but you'll find none finer. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 8:39 PM | Report abuse

A balancing act!
How has our 3-ring circus
held up without one?!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 16, 2010 8:40 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, -TBG-!
I was around for Ivan--I had the kids (and the dog) sleeping in the living room, had bottled water, flashlights--I was ready. But we didn't lose our power either (even DirecTV continued to function) and the worst thing that happened was a nasty little scrub tree I'd been meaning to get rid of got blown over...
But yes, having to reboot TiVo over and over must have been sheer torture. :)

Posted by: balancingact | July 16, 2010 8:43 PM | Report abuse

TBG,

Thanks for that link. I really needed the laugh today!

Posted by: Moose13 | July 16, 2010 8:45 PM | Report abuse

This one is for all the bunny lovers.

http://icanhascheezburger.com/2010/07/16/funny-pictures-floor-it-trixie/

Posted by: Moose13 | July 16, 2010 8:54 PM | Report abuse

Woohooo!!! Willingham 3-run triple!!! Strasburg has a lead to work with!!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 8:55 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, ScottyNuke!
DNA_Girl, the thing about the balancing act? It really is just an act. But I'll start making my way over to the third ring where the clowns are piling out of the volkswagen.

Posted by: balancingact | July 16, 2010 8:55 PM | Report abuse

Ok, back in the saddle...

People had to actually sign in and set the boodle up to knock it down: I know serious earthquakes yadda etc. We must appear to be morons to morons, like a mandala, except stupider, or if brewserwiser, stuporer.

One time in Portland, I was talking to My Boss and out the window I saw the street light going back and forth slowly. Then a stack of papers fell off his desk. We looked at each other and we both said, "earthquake." Then we went our separate ways.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 8:55 PM | Report abuse

And Ivan's sac fly makes it 4-0!!!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 8:58 PM | Report abuse

Hi balancingact! Welcome to our civil little corner of the webverse.

Hilarious, TBG! I hate it for you.

From Mr. T this afternoon:

http://flixxy.com/lucky-dat.htm

Posted by: slyness | July 16, 2010 9:00 PM | Report abuse

Just checked that link, TBG...

*ROFLMAOPMPGETE* :-)))))))))))

And yeah, their marketing spiel is correct (if a bit redundant).

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 9:03 PM | Report abuse

And the Nats defense continues to make life difficult for Strasburg...

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 9:09 PM | Report abuse

But he pitches out of it! His night might be done, but six shutout innings! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 16, 2010 9:12 PM | Report abuse

Yep. Couldn't ask for more from a pitcher, even though Strasburg did make things more interesting than he might have liked. And, thanks to a freakish burst of offense, we might actually win.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Welcome, balancingact!

http://www.iwl.me/ applies algorithms which parse your writing style and return an author's name, someone you write like.

On the same principle as being volunteered for awful assignments in meetings you didn't attend, I've volunteered the lovely TBG as our first experiment. According to analysis of her last post, TBG writes like James Joyce.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Yes, dbG, I've seen this. According to it I write like Douglas Adams.

In. My. Dreams.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 9:20 PM | Report abuse

Another name that seems to pop up when I put in random boodle posts is David Foster Wallace. This disturbs me a bit.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Anyone interested in a great oldies music livestream while boodling? Put this up on your media feeder. The 'dj' has been doing this show on Friday nights for 35 years now and is a bery, bery good friend of mine.

http://www.koto.org/node/138

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 9:34 PM | Report abuse

Should have said "hit PLAY" when you get to the site, but you probably knew that.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 9:36 PM | Report abuse

dbg -- I came up with two very different texts and both say:
David Foster Wallace

I have not read him but I know his sad story.

Wish Mudge would enter some text....

Fun. Thanks.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 9:37 PM | Report abuse

slyness, thanks for the welcome.
And dbG, that link could come in handy during my next performance review.
Need to put children to bed, dogs in the yard, dishes in the dishwasher, etc. I'm looking forward to spending some time here--civil cyberspace is all too rare these days.

Posted by: balancingact | July 16, 2010 9:41 PM | Report abuse

RDP, me too. We are clever but not dark. He was dark, suffered for it, and when he could feel love nor endure pain, well...exit.

I want a do over. Note to selve: Add jocular phrases. Strike a pose of insouciance. BE NOT SO LOGICAL AND SERIOUS.

RDP -- let's experiment and try again in a week.

I begin now with this. The evening is gentle and lovely and purple-pink in it's ministrations. Let the velvet descend upon us, soft and worn. Let us be like a precious violin in a case whose lining is very old, cedar-scented woolen felt. Green, like the pine needles lifted high over a forest in Cremona.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 9:52 PM | Report abuse

RDP -- sprinkle adjectives like rainbow jimmies. NOW, I am Nabokov.

Sobered by this, I shall sleep. Frosti: Just think upon the SWIM MEET YOU DO NOT ATTEND upon the morrow. Tis in La Plata, past Mudge territory. The drive is onepointfivehours. BLechies.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 9:54 PM | Report abuse

Welcome balancingact.

Just talked to #2, who was crying so it took me a minute to understand that #1 dog was hit by a car tonight. He is in the hospital and seems to be unbroken, but they won't know for sure for a while. This is the dog I cared for back in March, so he's sort of special to me. Good wishes and prayers (if applicable) would be appreciated.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 16, 2010 10:00 PM | Report abuse

Very good, CqP!

RD, I can see Douglas Adams.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 10:02 PM | Report abuse

You Canadians will be shocked and dismayed to find that I write like -- Margaret Atwood.

Posted by: nellie4 | July 16, 2010 10:02 PM | Report abuse

Good dog thoughts going to the good dog, sneaks. This is the pointer-y guy, right?

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 10:05 PM | Report abuse

How 'bout dem Nats?

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 16, 2010 10:07 PM | Report abuse

Good dog thoughts going to the good dog, sneaks. This is the pointer-y guy, right?

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 10:08 PM | Report abuse

Nellie! Fun on that.

BSneaks...oh my and they do, do, do, occupy our hearts fully. Prayers. This is one of the gentle giants, right?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 10:09 PM | Report abuse

So we're all David Foster Wallace? You can't imagine the variety of examples I submitted but I got the same results.

Ah, the irony. (wiki says he was known for his ironic style) Well I'm good with an iron. I choose not to leave this mortal coil in the way he chose however.

CqP, I could smell the cedar in your violin case.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 10:09 PM | Report abuse

So we're all David Foster Wallace? You can't imagine the variety of examples I submitted but I got the same results.

Ah, the irony. (wiki says he was known for his ironic style) Well I'm good with an iron. I choose not to leave this mortal coil in the way he chose however.

CqP, I could smell the cedar in your violin case.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 10:11 PM | Report abuse

Oh badsneaks, I am so sorry, sending my best:

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 10:11 PM | Report abuse

Nah, I'm Gertrude Stein.

talitha, you may be good with an iron but how are you with the Norton Anthology of English literature?

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 10:14 PM | Report abuse

Nellie! Fun on that.

BSneaks...oh my and they do, do, do, occupy our hearts fully. Prayers. This is one of the gentle giants, right?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 10:15 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, boodle. Things hung up for a while and then I received the dreaded "rejected by the Achenblog" notice. W.E.I.R.D.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 10:16 PM | Report abuse

Nellie! Fun on that.

BSneaks...oh my and they do, do, do, occupy our hearts fully. Prayers. This is one of the gentle giants, right?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 10:16 PM | Report abuse

Nellie! Fun on that.

BSneaks...oh my and they do, do, do, occupy our hearts fully. Prayers. This is one of the gentle giants, right?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Nah, I'm Gertrude Stein.

talitha, you may be unmatched with an iron, but how about the Norton Anthology of English literature?

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Especially for Nellie,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkkwEXi-zZI

Not shocked or dismayed but delighted. I am afraid to find out what author I might be, perhaps one of those who won the worst writing contest.

Welcome balancingact.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 16, 2010 10:18 PM | Report abuse

badsneakers: so sorry about the doggy. I hope all is well for him.

Posted by: Manon1 | July 16, 2010 10:18 PM | Report abuse

Sneaks, I'm so sorry to hear that and will remember her and the dog in my prayers.

Posted by: slyness | July 16, 2010 10:19 PM | Report abuse

The comment bot is delaying comments then reposting.

Just happy I don't have to fix it.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 10:20 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for the good thoughts. No dbG, this is the Catahoula. The pointer-y guy is the one who always digs under the fence so it's strange that it was the other one that got out. He has never done that before.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 16, 2010 10:24 PM | Report abuse

Arthur Conan Doyle - I don't even know what to think of that.

Sneaks hope all turns out well.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 16, 2010 10:25 PM | Report abuse

Ricocheting boodles or
Boomerang boodles.

I press flowers in heavy books, dbG. Does that count?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 10:26 PM | Report abuse

dmd, I really did LOL!

Posted by: nellie4 | July 16, 2010 10:26 PM | Report abuse

This is difficult for me, since the Broccoli dog at 14 is ancient with very little use of his back-end, day to day good or bad, and the Libs is now 8, nearly past the statistical life-span of Bernese, and Joel wrote of the Phoebster, sublimating.

Glad we can do for the pets what we can't do for our parents or children.

I have had a lovely evening at Himself's house, not just surrounded by Bernese and Collies and Siamese, but cuddling them all.

Posted by: Yoki | July 16, 2010 10:27 PM | Report abuse

And dmd, you say "Arthur Conan Doyle? It is a mystery!"

Posted by: nellie4 | July 16, 2010 10:29 PM | Report abuse

To distract myself I tried the analyzer and it said James Joyce! Yikes! At least I don't look like him.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 16, 2010 10:37 PM | Report abuse

At the top of the list of my childhood memories is sitting under a tree with one arm draped around my dog's neck, his muzzle on my shoulder, and whispering my fear and hope into his non-judgemental and loving ear.

My prayers for all boodle-beloved dogs this evening.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 16, 2010 10:37 PM | Report abuse

talitha, that was my Jeff (a mutt) when I was twelve and just back from Europe, still a little girl-child, not ready for all the North American sexy-girls my age; half lab, half springer, half underachiever, he was. A dear soft ear into which I whispered. He heard everything I said, and reassured me I'd be fine.

I was!

Posted by: Yoki | July 16, 2010 10:59 PM | Report abuse

I chucked some of my little piles of shıt into that thing and got Kurt Vonnegut. But if I could write like Kurt Vonnegut, I'd be a writer, a brilliant writer, so it can't be true.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 11:21 PM | Report abuse

Boots, Cowgirl elkhound mix
Christobel small collie but not shelty
Really Rainbow Rosie O'Grady elkhound mix
Marlybone standard poodle
CPBarkian (mini poodle who acts like a big dog)

Left Boots behind at 17 for big and sudden move. Have not recovered. She went to a farm but I never asked and will not ask about what "farm" meant.

Boots and Chrissy were working dogs, dairy cattle. Chrissy retired into our home after a bad kick by a bad, bad, Bessie/Bosie Bovine.


Other than Boots (not recovered!) I buried them all. I know where all their resting spots are. Chrissie is in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We brought her to the place, living, and through the special access of a med student friend, well. You know. The rock near by is granite. A dairy is visible on a good day; a lemon grove always.

Two buried -- Rosie and Marly -- at midnight, years apart, because such dog diggery would freak out a neighbor. And, said neighbor would call the authorities on this. "Not sanitary!" Doggies buried in suburban yards deserve dustings of lime in layers in the deep womb recess. Rosie and Marly are at the site of the ashes of a wee people baby who did not wake at birth. So, two guard and the mysterious one knows the grace of a paired brace of doggies.

CPBarkian asks that I not tell her name; identity theft, you know.

I rose from my repose to take her outside one last time. She went -- you know the going, going -- nearly nothing but rejoiced in removing the raccoon-interlopers from the back fence. So, now I write this.

You know, dogs are amazing, each being the best dog ever. Like Santa being in many places....AND this post is seen as in the STYLE OF STEPHEN KING!

Good night, all, doggies attend thee.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 16, 2010 11:30 PM | Report abuse

gschultens (& others) - The jiggling of our bellies (in amusement at the lack understanding you bring to this conversation) dwarfs (dwarves?) the little ground-shaker in question.

But I'm hesitant to be so lighthearted about your ignorance when plenty of folks (that we know, at least a bit) are still dealing with serious problems from serious earthquakes.

So how 'bout you stick your condescending attitude somewhere it's useful? Just a bit of reading back through the archives here would give you plenty of ideas. And if don't think we're you're kinda people (for some reason, I suspect you ain't mine!), feel free to go to www.unitedway.org or www.redcross.org or (given your apparent difficulty with sorting social interactions into meaningful categories) almost any randomly chosen mental health-care organization, for help in choosing more satisfying outlets for your energy.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 16, 2010 11:40 PM | Report abuse

Oh I heard that, The Best Dog is buried nearby.

Meanwhile, if you all never have any respect for what I do, I understand, I'm not sure I do. This profession continues to disgrace itself. I don't know why. Good night.

"Columbia University has quietly suspended research at a nationally prominent brain-imaging center and reassigned its top managers after federal investigators found that it had routinely injected mental patients with drugs that contained potentially dangerous impurities."
NYT

Posted by: shrink2 | July 16, 2010 11:44 PM | Report abuse

CQuaP -- but Stephen King can really write! I remember a similar conversation where Mudge and I agreed on that, that he really, really can write -- we just didn't like to read what he wrote.

Posted by: nellie4 | July 16, 2010 11:47 PM | Report abuse

Yes, my deranged dudgeon led me to give you a "you're kinda people" when I really wants (and I mean I really, really wants it bad!) a "your kinda people".

Stupid fingers!

Posted by: Bob-S | July 16, 2010 11:47 PM | Report abuse

Shrink, the number of researchers "at a nationally prominent brain-imaging center" that have "routinely injected mental patients with drugs that contained potentially dangerous impurities" is laughably small compared to the number of amateurs that perform the same service every day & night.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 16, 2010 11:54 PM | Report abuse

Bob-S, that may be the funniest thing you've ever written here.

CqP, you make me cry, laugh and cry again. Thank you.

'Night, all.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 16, 2010 11:59 PM | Report abuse

Who'da thunk it? I think San Francisco and a bunch of other lily gardens better gird up their loins for a tourist-dollar fight. The big boys are checking in:

"Mexico City offers honeymoon to first gay Argentines to wed"

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/travel/Mexico+City+offers+honeymoon+first+Argentines/3286170/story.html?cid=megadrop_story


Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 12:01 AM | Report abuse

Poor Boodle-dogs! And dots. Hope they recover quickly.

I write like DFW, Stephanie Meyer (Twilight), Vladimir Nabokov (yay!) and Jack London - ok! Apparently I have no style. No class, either.

Welcome, balancingact. Now I must do the dishes.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 17, 2010 12:01 AM | Report abuse

I got Edgar Allan Poe for a letter on grief I pasted in. A dark rap poem about Schrodinger's cat got compared to William Gibson. Honestly? I don't think Gibson can write rap poetry. A cowboy poem got compared to Bram Stoker.

Wilbrodog's epic haiku, "No Help here from Gnomes" got compared to Neil Gaiman.
His profound "Physics for Dog Poets" was compared to David Foster Wallace (author of "Consider the Lobster" and other stuff.) His recent boodling on dinner was compared to Vladimar Nabokov. Well, he does have extreme attractions to food...

Interestingly, two of my poems and some recent boodle entries got compared to that same guy-- Wallace, who I don't think writes poetry.

Another poem got compared to James Joyce, probably because of the sweat and grinding (not used in THAT context.) A poem about the praire got compared to Stephen King. A poem about vultures-- Ian Fleming.

King, Poe, Joyce, Stoker, Gibson, Fleming, Wallace. Who knew I was so dark, technical, and exciting, and apparently only 33% alive?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 12:03 AM | Report abuse

i never post anything remotely political at this hour. the intolerant rhetoric from the right that is directed to our President is so over the top that it makes me ill. gets on my last nerve. i strongly believe in free speech, but consider how this sort of public posting would be greeted had it occurred during Arbusto's administration. any responsible politician from the right would be wise to put a stop to this.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/16/AR2010071602855.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

the worst case scenarios resulting from this form of expression are scary, and considering the proliferation of arms in this country, imho, have at statistically significant possibility of occurring. this is repugnant and unbecoming of any form of political discourse.

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 12:04 AM | Report abuse

At the risk of reposting, this seems to have been lost:

shrink, that's them. You're you. Why would we judge you by their actions?

Individuals R Us.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 17, 2010 12:05 AM | Report abuse

CQP...

Your post was spooky,
like a pet semetary:
dead doggies, waiting...

Eep.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 12:10 AM | Report abuse

Sigh. I just had to tell him his girlfriend from last summer died suddenly. Now he'll either have nightmares or want to go digging up graves to be sure nobody's still undead underneath.

Ix-nay on all the ead-day ogs-day, please.

Stephen King is a fine writer, I don't read too much of him because horror isn't my thing, but the ones I've chosen actually have been pretty good.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 12:15 AM | Report abuse

"...and the kids all dance and shake their bones, and the politicians throwing stones, singing ashes, ashes, all fall down..."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oy1UeZP3C2I&feature=related

from the annual benefit for the Bridge School, ca. 1988. *that* is a cool charity.

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 12:27 AM | Report abuse

re: 12.04:

http://www.radioiowa.com/2010/07/15/mason-city-may-face-boycott-over-obamahitler-billboard/

not cool.

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 12:35 AM | Report abuse

No no no. Neither one nor t'other. Gus was my Best Dog, and so I don't speak of him, long lost.

I hope we're none of us in competition for articulation. All Boodlers express. Beautiful writers.

Posted by: Yoki | July 17, 2010 12:38 AM | Report abuse

I've said it once if I've said it a hundred times, Stephen King is one of the best writers of American dialog going.

I also think he needs a harsh editor to cut his indulgent books from 900 pages to 300. And she shouldn't take any carp from him.

Posted by: Yoki | July 17, 2010 12:42 AM | Report abuse

Not all of his books are that long, Yoki. The ones I've chosen to read aren't.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 12:46 AM | Report abuse

just thinking of firestarter gives me chicken skin. my favourite is christine.

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 12:48 AM | Report abuse

And mine is The Stand.

Posted by: Yoki | July 17, 2010 12:50 AM | Report abuse

#2's favourite

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUP7YkPsjiw&feature=related

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 12:54 AM | Report abuse

=======
=======
> the only thing you can think about is what a weird word "temblor" is.

Yeah, and it always makes me think of Jeffery Tambor in Max Headroom, the show which will be described in the 2110 Wikipedia as:

"The last intelligent thing ever shown on American Television. Though no one in the twentieth century knew at the time, the airwaves were soon to be choked with bowling, "Lumpy's Proletariat", "George Bush on Deal or No Deal", and Chimpanzees dressed as humans hitting people with plastic baseball bats while 'fart' noises were dubbed in. It was a good time for the rural, white, republican trailer trash; retarded citizens; and the 'baggers.

"The republican party was so adept at manipulating these people with lies, fear, and anger; that the Dark Age of America began with the election of President Palin in 2012. Less than a decade later, the 1,000 wealthiest Americans owned every single dollar in America.

After the Great Patriotic Privatization Act, the common people were left without a pot to p1ss in-- mainly because free-market entrepreneurs had removed all the fixtures in every public bathroom in the country and sold them to the third-world.

--faye kane, homeless idiot savant
Read more of my smartmouth opinions at http://tinyurl.com/fayescave

Posted by: Knee_Cheese_Zarathustra | July 17, 2010 1:07 AM | Report abuse

Hey Knee_Cheese; Max Headroom looks exactly like my brother Peter. And Jeffrey Tambor makes me laugh.

Posted by: Yoki | July 17, 2010 1:16 AM | Report abuse

hmmm. drive by from white house watch. ymmv.

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 1:17 AM | Report abuse

Isn't boycotting Mason City somewhat akin to deciding you're finally gonna stop eating at that restaurant that wasn't very good anyway? Or cutting loose from that jerk (man/woman/girl/boy) that you've been tolerating (at too much cost) for too long?

It's probably best for everybody involved. As the great philosopher Nick Lowe (?) once opined, "Sometimes, you've got to be cruel to be kind."

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 1:22 AM | Report abuse

I got a "David Foster Wallace" for a fairly long multi-subject, utterly utilitarian email. "Dan Brown" for a short book review at Amazon.com, "William Gibson" for a letter, and Gibson again for a similar letter.

jack,
I feel your pain.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 17, 2010 1:25 AM | Report abuse

thanks, dave. we finally found an ornamental bed plant that we can't kill. and it will be forever known as lantana. give me anything else, and it won't make it for three months, if that. i know botany, but not horticulture.

Posted by: -jack- | July 17, 2010 1:33 AM | Report abuse

While KneeCheeseZ seemed a bit frantic, I'm hardly in a position to criticize. It (that whole "he/she" formulation seems a bit contrived. "KneeCheeseZ" may well be a Google construct or a joke elaborately formulated by Joel & Diane Rehm just to tug our tibiae, so I'll stick with "it" till I'm working with better information) amused me. I'd love to hear more.

[Why does Jack Handey's "Big Thick Novel" come to mind?]

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 1:37 AM | Report abuse

Difficult to believe it if you've only seen the movie, but "The Running Man" is a heckuva good piece of writing.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 1:42 AM | Report abuse

EYE would so love to read a big thick novel

Posted by: Yoki | July 17, 2010 1:47 AM | Report abuse

There are many paths to my amousement. Leaving that last comment more-or-less alone is one of them.

Have I earned my cheese?

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 2:49 AM | Report abuse

Hi Frosti. Bye Frosti.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 17, 2010 6:11 AM | Report abuse

More book discussion? I think Madeleine Kahn in "Yellowbeard" put it bestest.

Betty: If there's one thing I've learned, it's learning things never taught me nuthin'. And books is the worst.


My dad was/is a huge Stephen King fan. I read probably all of his first 15 or so things. His shorter stuff was excellent, in its own way.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 6:40 AM | Report abuse

Count me among the King-ly or Foster-ly writers... At least when I'm hunting for 'Mudge. :-)

Nice bit in the NYT about Secretary Chu riding herd on the science undergirding the well control efforts:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/17/us/politics/17chu.html

Well done indeed for Strasburg and the Nats! :-)

*debating-exactly-what-sorta-chores-are-called-for-in-this-heat Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 6:54 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. I won't take the literary/literacy test, for obvious reasons.
I'm on record as a King reader. Insomnia, The Dark Tower (in particular the spoof of the Magnificent Seven/Seven Samourai, the Wolves of the Calla), the first part of It are my favs. And The Regulators of course.

Yoki, if you are into James Lee Burke the unusually thick (651 pages!) Rain Gods is purty good. It is about violence and depravation but this is Texas after all.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 17, 2010 7:35 AM | Report abuse

I agree with Yoki on King. This is why I like his short stories. He works best when he has some constraints.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 17, 2010 8:15 AM | Report abuse

Good news, #1 dog is okay, daughter is going to pick him up this morning. He is bruised but not broken and in much better shape than the car bumper he encountered (solid dog!). She and SIL are still trying to figure out why he dug under the fence. The fence is wired and the other dog wears a collar to keep him from escaping, but #1 dog has never shown interest in getting out. However, there are feral cats in the woods next door and the neighbors feed them. Daughter says all neighborhood dogs have been acting up recently and she assumes it has to do with those cats. Or it's a new Stephen King story in the making. My favorite was also The Stand.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 17, 2010 8:35 AM | Report abuse

King was/is superb at writing about people that spend lots of effort keeping their outward appearance "normal" while inside they are far from normal. Inside they are rotten. They are aware that they are rotten. They battle within themselves. Should they attempt to repair what is bad... or just give in to the horror?

This recurs in most of his early work. He is/was amazing at making me care about what the rotten people will do.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 8:43 AM | Report abuse

Good news, sneaks!

So much of Stephen King scares me to death. I remember parts of whatever the vampire book was and they still frighten me when I think of them, 30 years later. He really knows how to tell a story, though.

Breakfast? Your choice of cold Chinese takeout or reheated potroast.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 17, 2010 8:45 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

Cheese biscuits and fruit salad on the sideboard for all comers.

Sneaks, so glad to hear that #1 dog is okay. Has he perhaps been watching the original Lassie movie recently? She was very good at tunneling under fences, but then she was trying to get home, not escape from it. Wonder how Bruiser is doing this morning?

Out of curiousity I applied my first two boodle posts (from the Confederate storm) to the writers analysis. Nabokov. I am quite relieved.

Happy Saturday to all.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 8:45 AM | Report abuse

top of the morning,

"Wonder how Bruiser is doing this morning?"

Yes, lets have another round (sorry) of good news. Bet he has a ferocious headache, but hope its no worse than that. *scratching Buster behind his ears, still wondering how I mock Kurt Vonnegut*

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 9:04 AM | Report abuse

"...making me care about what the rotten people will do." Speaking of amazing, this so succinctly is why, I have read books in stacks, all my life and never a page of Stephen King. The boodle is talented and gifted.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 9:13 AM | Report abuse

I write like James Joyce, eh? Hmmm.. he's pretty interesting, isn't he?

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 9:20 AM | Report abuse

I'm making scrambled eggs to order this morning. My specialty today is with American cheese melted on top. Who wants some?

The Stand is also my favorite Stephen King book and a great read. Daughter is getting ready to read it now. Her best friend is a voracious reader and has recommended all sorts of books to Daughter that I've been trying to get her to read for a while. Nice.

BTW... Does anyone else get distracted by the character count reducing while you type?

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 9:29 AM | Report abuse

jack,
lantana is a synthetic plant, a polyploid (extra sets of chromosomes) that came about long ago in the aristocratic greenhouses of Europe. Taken to the home of its tropical ancestors or to lantana-less moist tropical locales, it goes absolutely crazy. Major pest.

Most of today's horticultural varieties sold in the US are reasonably safe, but Florida has essentially lost its native diploid (normal 2 sets of chromosomes) Lantana depressa to hybridization with the polyploids. Most of the apparent L. depressa in the wild is in fact triploid (or maybe polyploid??) hybrids with the cultivated stuff.
http://www.regionalconservation.org/beta/nfyn/plantdetail.asp?tx=Lantdeprflor

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 17, 2010 9:34 AM | Report abuse

TBG, I got James Joyce too but I think it was because I used part of an email to a cousin as my sample. Pure stream of consciousness stuff.

I read all the early Stephen King novels, his later stuff seems to be phoned in. The short stories were very good as I remember...

Posted by: badsneakers | July 17, 2010 9:37 AM | Report abuse

TBG, I remember your scrambled eggs. Yes, please.

A big shoutout to SoG today, fingers crossed for that job.

Bruiser has been seen nursing a prairie oyster, sadder but none the wiser.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 17, 2010 9:46 AM | Report abuse

Don't think you have to belong to Facebook to view this page...

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=144657415549386

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 9:52 AM | Report abuse

I missed SonofG going for a job? Where? When? Good luck to him!

I try not to look at the character count, TBG. It would drive me nutz. I notice, however, that spaces also count.

I think I'll pass on the writer thing. I'd be afraid to see...not into horror, so I've never read King.

Of course, you all know me for the Austen nut that I am.

Posted by: slyness | July 17, 2010 9:57 AM | Report abuse

A local (to you) Large Electronics Store. Could use a bit of Boodle Mojo as this would be a great job for him, I think.

Of course, at this point, any job would be a great job for him (says the mom putting him through college).

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 10:08 AM | Report abuse

Excellent! Mojo headed his way.

Also glad to hear about the Sneaks family dog doing okay.

Posted by: slyness | July 17, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Glad Dog #1 is OK, Sneaks!! Best thoughts to Bruiser, too.

Go get 'em, SoG!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 10:13 AM | Report abuse

We have achieved pickling cukes and filet bean. Yeah! I see miniature tomatoes (Harlequin) in my near future. Orange Santas won't be far behind.
This was my vacuous gardening comment of the day.
Slyness, Mrs. D is also a big Austen fan. On her Cambridge adventure she picked up a couple of Barbara Pym novels (Excellent Women and another one I can't remember). She loves them, Austen in the 1950's she says.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 17, 2010 10:27 AM | Report abuse

NukeSpouse's raised-bed gardens are going nuts with cukes, and the tomatoes are catching up... :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 10:31 AM | Report abuse

I made TBG's refrigerator pickles last night as we too have many many cukes. Also made stuffed zucchini, which was quite good.

Good luck to SoG!! I just got back from an interview for a part-time job. Think it went well.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 17, 2010 10:55 AM | Report abuse

Mucho job mojo to SonofG. Bless all job-seekers for that matter.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 10:55 AM | Report abuse

What is it you veteran boodlers say when posts overlap in content/message? Was it Beelzebub? My brain is a sieve sometimes.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

I believe you're referring to BOO -- Boodling Out of Order -- talitha. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Thanks, Snuke. Maybe I dreamt beelzebub, who knows?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Wow...

Eric Roberts REALLY doesn't read the script before he takes the part, now does he?

http://www.blameitonthevoices.com/2010/07/sharktopus.html

*L*

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Oh Scotty, that was hilarious! Especially the very last scene. Thanks for the link.

I assume Eric Roberts takes whatever he can get these days as long as the check doesn't bounce!

Posted by: badsneakers | July 17, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

Badsneakers, I'm very glad your dog is on the mend.
Re King, I still get nervous every time I turn on the garbage disposal.
Need to go spend some quality time with the yard. Have a good afternoon, everyone!

Posted by: balancingact | July 17, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

balancing, my King flashbacks are much better. We have a state park about 15 miles from us that has a good network of hiking/walking trails. It is an area that had been cleared for pasturing and farming in colonial times, and has grown over to forest.

One of our favorite walkabouts takes us to the top of a ridge. We visit a fire tower then drop back into a valley. There is a logging road that at one time accessed a farm. There are stone walls. Old stone foundations. Better yet, there is an old cemetery. The headstones are barely legible, but they date to the 1790s and 1810s. We get to see how a couple generations of a family lived. Several people passed very young, as infants or young children. It appears that disease got about six one winter.

That area is now grown over and shaded, and the only way there is by foot or ATV along a winding dirt road.

That is my personal Jerusalem's Lot.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 12:07 PM | Report abuse

Salem's Lot was the 1st Stephen King book I read - liked it a lot. I've said this before, The Shining was the scariest book I've ever read. The ambiguity of the father - whether he's crazy, evil, or misunderstood - was brilliant. But it's the last book of King's I've read, although I started some of his later ones. Will have to try The Stand.

TBG, the character counter bugged me at first, now I don't notice it.

AP article on the "Write Like" site:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/16/AR2010071605080.html?hpid=sec-tech
CP noticed the word content influence. My nature-related blog posts are what turned up as Nabokov and London.

2336 characters remaining...no, 2308, 2298...arrrrghhh!!!

Posted by: seasea1 | July 17, 2010 12:49 PM | Report abuse

It's the animation of the character counter that distracts me--the movement below the comment box catches my

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 12:57 PM | Report abuse

I love this - The Gettysburg Address came up as H.P. Lovecraft on "I Write Like . . ." That site is dangerously addictive.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

BobS, do you think it was a tad harsh to lump gschultens with the "others"?

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 17, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

I have no insider information, but for some reason I'm thinking that gschultens is the unintentional real-name login of someone we may know by a different name.

And YES! DNA Girl... I was thinking the same thing, but got distracted by

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Aaaaaaand, a Lovecraft paragraph was Shakespeare while Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 (let me not to the marriage of true minds) was Dickens.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

the two bruisy dogs'
dog days aren't for the dogs;
doggone that's good news!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 17, 2010 1:20 PM | Report abuse

The trick, TBG, is to hide the counter just below the bottom of the screen. You'll soon find that

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 1:22 PM | Report abuse

King is extraordinarily attuned to the wants, needs, & fears of the child inside nearly all of us. One may (I have, sometimes) dismiss his choice of story vehicle and/or his manner of execution, but there aren't all that many writers who've explored the messy innards of the psyche as thoroughly and readably as he's done.

And when he's on his game (which is often) the man can flat-out turn a phrase.

IMHO.

[I say this as a man who has bought only a few of his books, and has probably read less than a third of his output over the past twenty years.]

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

DNA_Girl, you are (of course) correct. gschultens is a unique creature, whose individual virtues I shall cherish forever. There'll never be another like it/her/him, and that saddens me immensely.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Whenever I experience a particularly chair-rumbling expellation of flatus, I'll think fondly of gschultens, who (I just know) would tell everyone that it doesn't matter a whit, because it ain't living up to gschult's idea of a really fun tremor.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

102 on the deck today with gadzookies of humditouchies (Hi Brag; glad you saw my comments on your intricate thriller).

Thanks for that SSea about the Writing Analysis...word choice and syntax would tip the program in a number of ways.

Glad for bruised but healing doggie. MoGoMojoitios for SonofTEEBEEGEE.

Stephen King, and Iris Murdoch, are uneven, mostly as concerns heft. I like both, those, ST better, actually. I like early Iris but later, not so much.

SD -- I AM A PYM GROUPIE....I so want to write a loving yet exacting novel of modern manners about soccer moms, catechism teachers, neighbors with orderly taste foundation plantings and neighbors with earnest but floppy meadows....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 17, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

In memory of songwriter Hank Cochran who died in Nashville on Thursday. His songlist, including this gem, is vast. He's also responsible for Willie Nelson's start as a singer-songwriter.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuZTk1hdpMs

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Happiness unbound!

Freaks & Geeks is playing on IFC on Fridays at 11 (repeated on Mondays at 11). If you haven't watched this excellent Judd Apatow/Paul Feig show from the late 90s, you're in for a treat.

http://www.ifc.com/freaks-and-geeks/

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 2:26 PM | Report abuse

Here's the last thing I'll say about my new favorite Achenblogger, gschultens. Oops, actually, mostly I'll let gschultens speak for itself:
--------------------------------------
[From a silly user poll: "Will you watch 'Real Housewives of D.C.'?"]

"Please tell me that this garbage is not indicative of the decline of North American culture."
Posted by: gschultens | June 16, 2010 10:28 AM
-----------------------------------------
[From a silly user poll: "Do you agree with Supreme Court's ruling on gun rights?"]

- A "well-regulated militia" seems to be something the gun-nuts has overlooked. A well-regulated militia is not every gun wacko packing heat wherever they think they have to to try and prove their manhood. And the other question is why do they have this obsessive need to prove their manhood? -
Posted by: gschultens | June 28, 2010 4:59 PM
-----------------------------------------
[From an EJ Dionne PostPartisan piece: "Surprise, surprise: Tea Partyers are Republicans"

"Take one human being, give them less than a high school education, fill them up with toxic talk from the althernate reality of talk radio and Fox "News", play on their xenophobia, throw in some of that ol' time religion and you get someone bamboozled into voting for a party whose only true constituency is the corporate and wealthy elite. Oh, yeh, and also label the other guys as "elitists" as part of your War on Science.

Then pump massive amounts of money into the Military Industrial Complex and let the financial markets run amok to create the biggest liquidity bubble the world has ever seen and then load the financial markets with financial toxic waste. Then you have a faux economy that gives the illusion of national wealth and props it up for a few years.

Then promote a medical system that is the most costly in the world and has poorer outcomes than most other advanced economies as "the best in the world".

What you've got then is Tea Bagger heaven!

Posted by: gschultens | July 2, 2010 5:42 PM

--------------------------------------------

DNA_Girl, are you sure that I was harsh in lumping our girl/boy in with the others? Seems pretty predictable and lacking in humour to me.

HEY, GSCHULTENS!!!--- Come join us at the McCormick & Schmicks on K Street in DC sometime. We actually have intelligent, politically-liberal Canadians with a sense of humor show up occasionally. They're much like you, but totally different. It'll be a new experience for you!


Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 2:30 PM | Report abuse

We are all David Foster Wallace, then.

I found The Stand to be interminable and don't much care for any of King's eschatological-themed stories. The short work is the finest. Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption is one fine piece of writing. So is The Body, story "Stand By Me" was from. This leads me to think his non-supernatural workis better than the other.

Bruiser is home with a $450 bill his owner can't pay.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 17, 2010 2:35 PM | Report abuse

Ah, back from a long walk with the dog.

http://picasaweb.google.com/boodlestuff/S2#5494896227991527346

Poor bruiser, still no news I see. You know sometimes deer get so drunk on fermenting apples and pears gone to ground, in the Fall orchards, they can barely stagger away. Once I saw one turn to go and fall backwards like the horse Mongo punched in Blazing Saddles.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 2:40 PM | Report abuse

I BOO!

"a $450 bill his owner can't pay"

You live in the projects?

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 2:44 PM | Report abuse

Shriek, Le Samouraï is a French movie by Jean-Pierre Melville. Seven Samurai is Kurosawa's. Which leads to a question: since Japanese as presented in Roman characters is standardized. Did the French see fit to improve on the Japanese?

Housekeeping: via Kitchen Kaboodle (Portland kitchen stuff store) I discovered that vinyl place mats, which seemed to have gone extinct, are available, if pricey, from an outfit called Liora Manné. Practical necessity revived as fashion item.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 17, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Bob, having been on the receiving end of some of your cracks, I don't mind. You took Billy Wilder's advice. Something like, if you are going to tell people the truth you'd better make them laugh or they'll kill you. The only thing more annoying than a sanctimonious, more-outraged-than-thou leftist is every humorless person to the the political right of that person. If you add humor, I can take people as far right as "moderates", but that is it.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Yikes, $450! That's some serious dough. Some serious bread, too.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Hey, I got no problems with gschults' politics. But the delivery drives me to distraction, obviously.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Er, no, shrink. Jumper lives in the real world.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 3:05 PM | Report abuse

OK, OK. I'll donate $25 for the vet bill, and toss in some yeastless dough for future snacks.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 17, 2010 3:08 PM | Report abuse

Yes Bob, exactly, it is all in the wrist.

Jumper, lets cut to the chaser, are you going to get stuck with the bill?

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

Good afternoon, all.

Busy running around doing what I can to see to it that my children have what they need and to pump up the economy.

If there ever were a story about an offshore oil rig accident off of the Maine coast, I think King would write it (if he hasn't already). Something thick and sinious and slowly quietly malevolent coming from the dark hot places inside the Earth...

I'm with the group that think's he's a ferociously talented and fearless writer, though I don't always enjoy the stories.

I'd consider my writing life complete if I ever wrote anything half as good as "The Stand." (And my financial life complete if it sold 1/1000th as many copies).

And Wilbrod, some would say that the End Days would be approaching if the USA won the World Cup...

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 17, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

So, we are approaching the 48 hour point on the test. I wonder if there will be some kind of announcement?

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 17, 2010 3:12 PM | Report abuse

Next up: A website that tells you which famous actors your various body parts most resemble!

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 17, 2010 3:15 PM | Report abuse

RD, I've been scanning the news looking for any updates but have seen none. Hoping the Boss might check in but he deserves some time off after his media blitz this week.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 3:16 PM | Report abuse

Not at all, bc -- THIS is a Sign of the Apocalypse:

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/comic-riffs/2010/07/justin_bieber_comic_book.html

*headin' for ze hills* :-)

Does this count, RD_P?

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/18/us/18spill.html

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 3:20 PM | Report abuse

The BBC is exultant,

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Pet Semetary, Cujo, Carrie, The Dead Zone, maybe the Stand, I know I've forgotten a couple more I did read.

Stephen King's "On Writing" is enjoyable He said he was told second draft is first draft -10%, used that advice, and got published after that. I personally prefer to cut more, but that is a fine book and a look at how some writers work.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

The graphics slide-show at the bottom of that BBC site (continuance of story>) is excellent. Very clearly shows the various stages and/or options for containment and capping.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Well BobS, you may be better informed than me, but you'll never be better....
http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=3037

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 17, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

Oh Scotty... I forgot to mention to you that Nick Jonas is not new to Broadway.

Daughter and I saw him as Chip in Beauty & the Beast several years ago. Of course, we didn't know him at the time, but have confirmed that he was, indeed, in the cast we saw on Broadway.

Say what you want, those kids are great performers. I think he'll be good in Les Miz.

Justin Bieber, now.... Maybe a comic book is the perfect medium for him.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 3:53 PM | Report abuse

DNA_Girl, your sense of humors scars me.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

The "Who do I write like?" magic 8-ball thingy was intriguing. I plugged in the first couple paragraphs of Sarah Palin's resignation speech, from the press conference in Alaska.

She writes like Bram Stoker. Honest. I gotta try this on a few more things.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

It appears that when Sir Mix-a-lot wrote "Baby Got Back" he was channelling..... Mark Twain.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 4:29 PM | Report abuse

Well... Twain did love big butts.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Stop it, I can't breathe!

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 4:44 PM | Report abuse

Also, look up Bram Stoker's work once again. I remember the story, but not the prose style.

I'm still scratching my head over the cowboy poem being in his style; it's written in a sort of mock cowboy dialect.

The poem has: God, bite, life, needles, shot, rustle, dog, dead, fuller, away, knew, shouldn't and a lot of "no"s and "mores"

Palin's speech has dead, should, god, (wild)life, away, full, and over 100 "no"s and 28 "more"s.

... Dang. No matter how I pluralize quoted words, they never look right.

I'm guessing Bram Stoker uses a lot of negatives and comparatives in his prose, then.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

Bam Stroker would be a funny name.


Posted by: Boomslang | July 17, 2010 4:50 PM | Report abuse

Lee Elia's famous rant after the Cubs lost to the Dodgers one day in 1983 sounds a lot like the work of...... David Foster Wallace.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Mark Twain also wrote in black dialect. No surprise there, baby.

Twain also wrote about sex in Letters to the Earth, and also "1601", privately (Elizabethian ribaldry: think Rabelais-- fart and innuendo, and lots of butt.)

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 5:06 PM | Report abuse

Wallace wrote new journalism, so he captured a lot of contemporary voices, Baldin'

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 5:09 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I just realized that to some my handle could be

baldin' ho

I like it even more.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 5:28 PM | Report abuse

For the last check, it appears that most of Gunnery Sergeant Hartman's lines in "Full Metal Jacket" could easily have been written by..... Stephen King.

I agree.

Posted by: baldinho | July 17, 2010 5:37 PM | Report abuse

Kurt Vonnegut writes like Dan Brown. I am going to plug in some DaVC and see whether Dan Brown writes like Kurt Vonnegut.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 5:58 PM | Report abuse

Well good, I tossed in several sections of Da Vinci Code prose and dialog and got...Dan Brown.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 6:02 PM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Hello, friends. Just wanted to stop and say that I've recommended the Achenblog to a friend of mine that wants to blog. I gave you guys high marks, I'm hoping she will join the fun. Hope everyone is doing well, and families are fine. We're having a thunderboomer so can't stay long.

Enjoy your weekend, and hope to see you in church! Love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 17, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

I don't like ho as a term for women, Baldinho.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 6:49 PM | Report abuse

However, you are a guy, so...

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

Cassandra! *HUGS* :-)

Speaking of R. Lee Ermey (GSgt. Hartman in FMJ), the latest GEICO commercial with him as a "therapist" is quite chuckle-worthy. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 17, 2010 7:10 PM | Report abuse

I pasted in some text by George Will and got back -- William Shakespeare.

(It was part of a column I had saved where he wrote about the death of his mother. Not a political rant.)

Posted by: nellie4 | July 17, 2010 7:15 PM | Report abuse

How I write depends on my audience, so I had to check a number of samples for myself:

Publication Abstract and Introduction – like Arthur C. Clarke
Proposal executive summary – like Isaac Asimov
Long Boodle comment – like George Orwell
Children’s story #1 – like Stephenie Meyer (!!!)
Children’s story #2 – like J. R. R. Tolkien
Children’s story #3 – like Arthur C. Clarke (again)

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 17, 2010 7:28 PM | Report abuse

I watched Freaks and Geeks not long ago on DVD. It's a bit spotty, but it kind of grew on me. I love the way they ended it. And I had forgotten Linda Cardellini was the female lead, and that Busy Philipps was in it.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 17, 2010 7:33 PM | Report abuse

I think the author-resemblance site "holds onto" a certain designation unless one re-loads the original page
http://www.iwl.me/
before starting with a new submission.

Because after I did that, I became Dickens after a separate submission.

Thanks for the offer, Bob S., hold onto that for a while, though.

Took a fat yellow crooknecked squash and diced it and an onion. Fried three pieces of bacon, used that fat and browned the Sq & O. Added sprigs of fresh chopped thyme with pepper and salt. Once color was right, crumbled in the bacon and added handful of the leftover roast pork with the paprika bark, cubed. Done, toasted stack of flour tortillas on griddle, flipping and moving tortillas towards center of stack as needed. Pace picante sauce, moderate dribbles.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 17, 2010 7:43 PM | Report abuse

I see they are extended the containment test for another day. I have no idea if this is good news or bad news, although my guess is good news. If they were truly worried about breaching oil I assume they would open the cap sooner rather than later.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 17, 2010 8:13 PM | Report abuse

I checked an abstract from a recent grant proposal. Turns out Margaret Atwood got funding from the NIH.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 17, 2010 8:33 PM | Report abuse

Oh my. Even when I copied and pasted Jumper's dinner into the I Write Like... it came up as James Joyce.

Interesting.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 17, 2010 8:43 PM | Report abuse

TBG, I knew you had some Irish in ye!

Posted by: seasea1 | July 17, 2010 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Amazingly, I typed in the first paragraph of "It was a dark and stormy night..." and I got that I write like —

Chuck Norris!!!!

Posted by: rickoshea11 | July 17, 2010 8:54 PM | Report abuse

Sir Mixalot also writes a lot like Gilbert and Sullivan:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkJdEFf_Qg4

Posted by: yellojkt | July 17, 2010 9:25 PM | Report abuse

Dubliners.

He was 23 when he wrote it.
I was 23 when I read it. I realized I'd never be a writer.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 9:27 PM | Report abuse

RDP, your 3:15 PM floored me.

talitha, I see by Wpedia that Hank Cochran wrote "I Fall to Pieces," which I had mistakenly thought was by Willie Nelson. But it's "Crazy" that Willie Nelson wrote. Both songs do some jazzy things with the country form.

Posted by: woofin | July 17, 2010 9:38 PM | Report abuse

I admire Stephen King, too, though I haven't read too many of his books. I am way too susceptible to the horror-genre tricks even at the same time as I know what's being done... I remember Salem's Lot had parts that were downright funny, in fact, but while one part of my brain objected to the wholesale importation of cliches, the other part was full of heebie-jeebies. In one of his essays on writing, King said it's important as an honest writer to actually show what's behind the dreaded closet door instead of being sly and clever and ambiguous about it and leaving the door closed. I've never forgotten that maxim and I think it has analogues that apply in other areas.

Posted by: woofin | July 17, 2010 9:49 PM | Report abuse

Shrink, that was me, too. I was 21 when I read Milton's On the Morning of Christ's Nativity, written when he was 21, and realized I'd never be the great American novelist as I had dreamed. So I became a competent public servant and was happy in that career and even happier to retire from it.

Posted by: slyness | July 17, 2010 9:51 PM | Report abuse

I has kilt it...

Posted by: woofin | July 17, 2010 9:52 PM | Report abuse

Nope, still here.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 17, 2010 10:01 PM | Report abuse

Nope, still here.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 17, 2010 10:04 PM | Report abuse

Just to keep things going I'll report that we saw Despicable Me tonight. It was cute, I think I expected it to be funnier, but it was enjoyable enough. And a few hours in A/C was appreciated. Nice on the porch right now, a bit of breeze. Watching Sawx in 11th inning, bases loaded no outs.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 17, 2010 10:07 PM | Report abuse

I've not been dissauded from writing yet. I believe that if you're writing to be the best around, you're not writing for the right reasons.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 17, 2010 10:12 PM | Report abuse

slyness, you got me.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 17, 2010 10:16 PM | Report abuse

We chopped a hole in his front door at almost 6:00 a.m., his swarthy, untrustworthy landlord and I, who had roused the man with several telephone calls, imploring and relentlessly browbeating him until the man had shown up in front of Luther's apartment down in the chemical zone, angry, but fearing the worst, like me.
Inside we found no one. There was a strange smell in the apartment, like coffee kept hot far too long, or ozone, or a feverish sickroom for cats. A wrong smell. Luther was gone. On his kitchen counter was the recipe, written on a scrap of notebook paper, next to the now-empty blender containing mere drops of the potion which had led to his uncanny transmogrification and preternatural removal from our universe.

Still James Joyce...

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 17, 2010 10:59 PM | Report abuse

yep, woofin, that's why I linked to 'I Fall to Pieces' in my memorial post to Hank Cochran.

The story I heard about Willie is that, many years ago, he and Hank were jamming at a club in Nashville and Hank asked Willie who'd written the song he was playing. When he learned Willie wrote it Hank talked his publisher (who was paying him $50/month to write songs back then) to publish Willie. The guy told Hank he was going to offer him a raise and Hank said give it to Willie and sign him. And the rest is . . . . .

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 11:12 PM | Report abuse

Have you ever had this happen to you? You always assumed or were fairly certain that you'd read a classic novel. I mean, you did graduate work in modern American Lit, so it must have been on some required list at some point. One evening you run across it on the shelf while looking for something casual to read (in this case something to read in the tub that I didn't mind getting wet) and realize that you never actually read it in the first place.

For Whom the Bell Tolls. (and Papa H. didn't always write in short sentences I might add)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 11:25 PM | Report abuse

talitha -- The Great Gatsby.

All new and golly, that guy can write quite well!

Posted by: nellie4 | July 17, 2010 11:39 PM | Report abuse

Nellie, I think I was well into my 30s before I read Gatsby and loved it. Sometimes I ponder exactly what works were on those college reading lists, but then realize that a lifetime isn't enough to read all I would like.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 17, 2010 11:47 PM | Report abuse

My Missiles of Solomon story (anybody remember that?) is supposedly like Neil Gaiman.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 17, 2010 11:48 PM | Report abuse

Even worse is re-reading books that I know I read as a teenager, and finding them completely different (or unreadable) from what I remembered! Wuthering Heights was one that I was amazed I ever got through in the first place.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 17, 2010 11:52 PM | Report abuse

I know I read half of Shakespeare's plays. And I do wonder why.

I took a Scandinavian lit course from a dear little professor who was very kind and very nice and accepted no ideas other than his own. The class would get a good discussion going and he would just patiently wait for a break in the voices, and go on reading the same old remarks he probably wrote 20 years before.

Of course, I met him again in several people I later worked for ---

Posted by: nellie4 | July 17, 2010 11:58 PM | Report abuse

I know I read half of Shakespeare's plays. And I do wonder why.

I took a Scandinavian lit course from a dear little professor who was very kind and very nice and accepted no ideas other than his own. The class would get a good discussion going and he would just patiently wait for a break in the voices, and go on reading the same old remarks he probably wrote 20 years before.

Of course, I met him again in several people I later worked for ---

Posted by: nellie4 | July 17, 2010 11:58 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

Tried the "I Write Like..." site with a couple of samples of work from Guest Kits and the 10thcircle.

Sample #1: Chuck Palahniuk (hey, I liked "Fight Club")
Sample #2: David Foster Wallace
Sample #3: Stephen King

And I decided to stop tempting fate there, lest the next one tell me I write like Foster Brooks or Norm Crosby delivering Celebrity Roast speeches in character.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 18, 2010 12:06 AM | Report abuse

Both theaters in town are playing "I am Love," so we watched a cheap pre-lunch showing. Milanese industrial aristocracy. I dug up Anthony Lane's review at the New Yorker: "The best sex you will get all year, if that’s what you crave in your moviegoing, is between Tilda Swinton and a prawn..."

Um, yes. The food is lovely. So is Ms Swinton. So is the photography, and the score by John Adams. It turns out the music was cunningly culled from existing recordings of Adams' music, including some of his best-known pieces, even "The Chairman Dances." A sound track CD is available.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 12:09 AM | Report abuse

Nellie, read most of them. Never wondered why.

Talitha, try picking up a classic you're sure you've never read then finding things fairly unfamiliar until say, page 125 and a dim horror creeps over you as your memory finally wakes up...

I can't remember if I've read For Whom the Bell Tolls. I've read the Old Man and the Sea... I think. Most of his short stories.

I am not fond of Hemingway. Only two to five stories are worth going back to for me. Five might be generous, really.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 12:16 AM | Report abuse

Good, er, morning.

Joel's latest piece re. the Gulf:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/17/AR2010071702793.html

As he points out, could be years, even decades before it's all over, but maybe that miasma of hopelessness may be lifting a bit.

There is some question of when we get to hear Brunhilde's aria.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 18, 2010 12:20 AM | Report abuse

I'm actually enjoying For Whom the Bell Tolls and am about 125 pages into it. It's been at least 30 years since I read any Hemingway and I bet this will be the last one for me.

Shakespeare, hmmmm, probably half of the plays and all the poetry, over and over again. I also just re-read East of Eden because TCM ran the movie and I realized it had been ages since I'd read it. My all-time favorite Steinbeck though is Travels with Charley.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 12:29 AM | Report abuse

Not my favorite--
Now, "Travels with Wilbrodog"
that's a real title.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 12:43 AM | Report abuse

Gratuitous namedropping. I am related to the guy who wrote The Great Gatsby. Tempered is this, I suppose, by how unhappy the family was with his many problems. And, I descend from the farming side in Chippewa Falls/Eu Clair, WI side.

I always like these passages:

'Look at that,' she whispered, and then after a moment: 'I'd like to just get one of those pink clouds and put you in it and push you around' (Daisy to Jay)

“It’s stopped raining.”

-----
“Has it?” When he realized what I was talking about, that there were twinkle-bells of sunshine in the room, he smiled like a weather man, like an ecstatic patron of recurrent light, and repeated the news to Daisy. “What do you think of that? It’s stopped raining.”
-----
(Nick, with Jay and Daisy)

TWINKLE-bells. Lovely. And predates Tinkle Bell by a mile.

And, this from I Write Like: The dashed passage is thought to be like:

IAN FLEMING!
G=Nite

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 18, 2010 12:49 AM | Report abuse

I bet Travels with Wilbrodog is delightful!
Goodnight dear boodle.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 12:53 AM | Report abuse

Compared to NY Times and a couple of others, the latest Achenbach story is a model of concision and clarity. Or maybe I'm too sleepy to judge properly. Yawn.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 12:55 AM | Report abuse

Tinker Bell...whoopsies...

Clap, if you believe in fairies...

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 18, 2010 12:55 AM | Report abuse

I used to read books like a thirsty boy overfilling himself with water on a hot day. And most of the books stuck with me about as much as that water did. My attitudes about a lot of things have been changing the last couple of years, and I haven't managed to take stock yet. Or maybe, under fire from advancing middle age, I'm being more honest with myself. I'm not as interested as I used to be in alleged -- or even real -- profundity of thought. Mainly, I want to get up in the morning and do more or less the right things through the day.

Posted by: woofin | July 18, 2010 1:05 AM | Report abuse

Wilbrodog's better-travelled than most pups, but I haven't taken him to Yellowstone, just Voyageurs National Park, the National Zoo and so forth.

I always remember that passage about Charley and the bears at Yellowstone. Wilbrodog's not daft enough to charge a bear, so far, but I haven't taken him to the bear preserve yet. Kind of worried he'll do a Charley even from the observation deck.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 1:06 AM | Report abuse

Me too. Fiction is also about that, mostly the "less right" things.

G'night boodle.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 1:08 AM | Report abuse

One last thing. (y'all know I'm not into cute, but I was googling something else before turning in and ran across this - could not resist. Prickly cute?)

http://www.bing.com/featured/content/search?q=Wildlife%3a+Hedgehogs&FORM=RQHOME

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 1:39 AM | Report abuse

Slyness, I came across a very nice BBC TV miniseries, North and South. The miniseries is an adaptation of Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel. There are some similarities with Jane Austen’s P & P. I think the Richard Armitage can dethrone Colin Firth in brooding. RA is much more handsome than CF. I think you and some our broodlers who are JA fans would like the miniseries if you haven’t already watched it. I watched it on youtube and the buffering nearly drove me mad.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_and_South_(TV_serial)

Posted by: rainforest1 | July 18, 2010 1:42 AM | Report abuse

Yeah, Beverly6. I've survived Bakersfield in 1952[?], Sylmar and Northridge just 3 miles away. For a 3.5 shaking in LA, we check the web to see if Mexico or Missouri was destroyed, but if it was a 3.5 nearby, we don't worry.

LTL-CA

Posted by: Jim19 | July 18, 2010 3:28 AM | Report abuse

Likely off the topic for this blog, but a lot of Supreme Court rulings seem to be from a position that government should not exist in many areas, which IMO should include a Supreme Court. I wonder if they would go so far as to conclude from their own findings that their court should be dissolved.

LTL-CA

Posted by: Jim19 | July 18, 2010 3:47 AM | Report abuse

The Northridge quake was the morning of my elder daughter's 6th birthday party. We had the party anyway (power came back on at noon) as we didn't have much broken glass or other stuff, and it gave the neighbors a couple of hours to clean up without their kids being present.

All the concrete block walls were knocked over and had to be repaired or rebuilt.

LTL-CA

Posted by: Jim19 | July 18, 2010 4:01 AM | Report abuse

Widbrod_Gnome: think about the wider audience you'd get if you published the same novel but with a friendlier title: Tuesdays with Wilbrodog.

Posted by: baldinho | July 18, 2010 6:40 AM | Report abuse

Seasea!!!

I was lucky enough to joke with GW about the maggots line that to which you so kindly referred me.

A good customer who used to be in the fish business in a major way in Alaska and Washington State was asking yesterday if those commenters who post all the racist and anti-Obama stuff at the end of Joel's articles on the gulf are paid. Right now, I am of two minds: (1) very possible that they are paid to keep reinforcing the hysteria and wrong-headed thinking as a distraction to the real goals of the money; (2) they are so stupid in concept that they couldn't actually be the work of conscience people and therefore, couldn't be capable of getting paid for anything.

Posted by: russianthistle | July 18, 2010 7:26 AM | Report abuse

Woofin! Hail fellow Boodler well-met! How goes it? :-)

Yep, good concise piece from JA, although I see what he did there in the second graf... ;-)

Yaayyyyyy for Youk & the Sawx! For the Nats, not so much...

Interesting question in this article -- do you really want it live, or do you prefer the Memorex?

http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/magazine/articles/2010/07/18/with_80s_rockers_is_it_the_journey_or_the_destination/

*really-not-inclined-to-do-much-resembling-chores-in-this-weather Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 18, 2010 7:38 AM | Report abuse

I've spent the last two weeks touring central Europe with a pair of English teachers so this unread classics thread is giving me bad flashbacks of our late night beer drinking sessions. The debates over the Five Greatest Novels Ever were endless. I knew when we got to which Steinbecks were worth reading that we had all had too much to drink and it was time to go to bed.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 7:38 AM | Report abuse

Snuke,
Great article. I fall on the Original Singers Only side of the debate:

http://livebythefoma.blogspot.com/2006/08/take-me-to-your-leader.html

I read the find print before buying tickets to any 80s act on tour to make sure the line-up includes enough original members to not qualify as a tribute act.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 7:49 AM | Report abuse

Just to clear out some back threads:

The only Stephen King book I ever read was 'Christine'. He was every bit as scary as people told me he was. I've never felt the need for further supporting evidence.

Jumper,
That is quite a vet bill. I hope you can cough up the Fi-dough.

'Freaks and Geeks' is about my favorite show ever. I was going to watch the boxset last summer with my son, but he burned through the entire series while I was at work. Besides my wife insists I don't need to watch the show since I lived it. It's like the writers were following me around in high school.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 8:02 AM | Report abuse

Steinbeck! I knew when I read East of Eden that American lit wasn't for me.

Jane Austen forever!

I haven't read any Elizabeth Gaskell, rainforest, but I know she was a popular novelist during Austen's lifetime. Now I enjoyed The Secret Garden, but I haven't read anything else by Frances Hodgson Burnett, another woman novelist of that era. Seems like the only trades open to women at that time were governess and novelist.

Posted by: slyness | July 18, 2010 8:03 AM | Report abuse

As a teenager I had access to a cousin's bookshelf. She was ten years older and had a collection of Hemingway, Steinbeck, Fitzgerald and many other works of 'literature' that she probably read in college. I read most of them at that time and I feel sure that if I went back to them now, I'd have a whole different take on each one.

I agree Yello, it's the original or nothing. Altho' sometimes that can be painful. We have tickets to see Aretha in a few weeks. I know her voice will still be great but I worry about her health.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 18, 2010 8:06 AM | Report abuse

Scottynuke, as I read that excellent article by Joel I did find myself thinking, at one point, that somewhere to the northeast of me a eyebrow was being raised.

Of course, it isn't so much the technical nature of the events, but rather the emotional and, perhaps, political impact that is being compared.


Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 18, 2010 8:26 AM | Report abuse

Morning, y'all.

I see now that I'm in a serious boodle minority of one in my love of Steinbeck, Hemingway, Faulkner, etc. Also love Twain and Whitman and . . . . . American history out the wazoo and the Tao de ching. Have also read everything Austen wrote at least twice. Read, read, read, live, weave, live, knit, cook. Rinse and repeat.

*sigh* I have deprived myself of Stephen King, however.

Joel's new piece beats everything out there on The Well. Give that man a Pulitzer now and get it over with.

Slyness, rainforest's recommendation of Gaskell's North and South is available through Netflix on two discs.

Have a great Sunday and keep cool, y'all.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 8:49 AM | Report abuse

Morning, y'all.

I see now that I'm in a serious boodle minority of one in my love of Steinbeck, Hemingway, Faulkner, etc. Also love Twain and Whitman and . . . . . American history out the wazoo and the Tao de ching. Have also read everything Austen wrote at least twice. Read, read, read, live, weave, live, knit, cook. Rinse and repeat.

*sigh* I have deprived myself of Stephen King, however.

Joel's new piece beats everything out there on The Well. Give that man a Pulitzer now and get it over with.

Slyness, rainforest's recommendation of Gaskell's North and South is available through Netflix on two discs.

Have a great Sunday and keep cool, y'all.

[anyone else having their posts thrown back at them?]

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 8:53 AM | Report abuse

Weird. soooorrry.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 8:55 AM | Report abuse

One other thing about Stephen King... For every other person with his first name, I have to stop and think whether to spell it with a "ph" or a "v" -- but not him.

It's all I got.

Happy Sunday, and have a fine day.

Posted by: woofin | July 18, 2010 9:02 AM | Report abuse

A sign of true love:

"The next morning, April 17, they drove to the Montgomery County Courthouse and picked up a marriage license. Later that day they each got an intertwined design of their Zodiac signs tattooed on the backs of their necks."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/16/AR2010071603505.html?sid=ST2010071604183

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 9:07 AM | Report abuse

No one will be surprised to see this:

LONDON (Reuters) - Under-fire oil company BP Plc has started canvassing shareholders about a restructuring in the wake of its Gulf of Mexico oil spill which could include a break up of the business, the Sunday Times newspaper reported.

The newspaper, citing unnamed BP insiders, said options included selling the group's refineries and petrol stations, scaling back its U.S. operations and ramping-up in-house engineering instead of outsourcing.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 9:08 AM | Report abuse

Here is a good follow-on to Joel's piece on the grid,

http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2010/07/too_much_of_a_good_thing_growt.html

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 9:12 AM | Report abuse

Days 1-8 of this trip itinerary pretty much followed the first half of my vacation:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/15/AR2010071506025.html

While we didn't do all the things the article suggested, the baths in Budapest were well worth the sidetrip. You haven't lived until you've seen chubby speedo-wearing old men playing chess in the pool.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 9:15 AM | Report abuse

yello, would those be the "chubby speedo-wearing old men playing chess in the pool" from the movie The Unbearable Lightness of Being? The scene popped into my mind immediately when I read your "recommendation".

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

The Unbearable Lightness of Being takes place in Prague, but I bet the concept is the same. Gonna have to add that movie to my Gotta See List.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Morning all... Dave's 12:09 was written in the style of Mary Shelley. And yello's 7:38 this morning was Nabokov.

The text underneath the "Post a Comment" heading right above this box is written like Cory Doctorow, who I'd never heard of. Turns out he's Canadian. Of course.

And since he is a blogger who was named one of Forbes Magazine's Web Celebrities in 2007-2010, maybe he actually did write the text under the "Post a Comment" box.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 9:50 AM | Report abuse

for travelers -----

http://www.bing.com/travel/content/search?q=Tiny+Hotel+Rooms%3a+Qbic+Hotels&cid=msn1154154&form=TRVCON>1=41000

I'll take a nice train berth or a vintage Airstream, thank you.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 9:58 AM | Report abuse

Well, maybe the treehouse. Sonchild stayed at the Jane Hotel in NYC and liked it quite well.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Son of G stayed at the Pod hotel, talitha, and loved it. I've stayed in NYC hotel rooms that may have been smaller, but quite nice. There was one (Hotel 41 in Times Square) that had about 6 inches of space on either side of the double bed and probably about 5 feet between the foot of the bed and the other wall.

The furniture was built into the walls and the shower was open to the bathroom and separated by a piece of glass. It was quite lovely and Daughter and I fit quite fine inside. The use of what space there was was just perfect.

How much time do you actually spend in a hotel room in NYC anyway?

As for small spaces... have you ever visited the Pope-Leighey house in Alexandria? It's a Frank Lloyd Wright "Usonian" home that was originally built and lived in in Falls Church, Va. Talk about making small spaces lovely and usable.

http://popeleighey1940.org/

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 10:14 AM | Report abuse

This article was also written in the style of Cory Doctorow...

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/books/article/837164--i-write-like-finds-your-inner-author

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

CqP, love the Pope-Leighey "Usonian" house. Did I dream it or was a Usonian model once erected on the Mall in front of the Castle back in the 80s?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 10:23 AM | Report abuse

Is it possible a novel is alive, and has a lifespan? Can a novel be like a brilliant young man who then, in old age, becomes a grumbly old man who tells the same old story, and everyone is sick of it? Or the opposite, the young woman who no one pays much attention to, but years pass and her wisdom becomes clearer each day?

The analogy breaks down, as a story is immortal in a sense. A novel can become an old ghost, I suppose. Or a monument, perhaps a beloved fountain in an old city square. Covered in moss, but the water still fresh.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 18, 2010 10:24 AM | Report abuse

T mixed up me with TeeBeeGee, which is very fun. So, in a way, CEEPEEBOY is SON OF TEEBEEGEE, making him, sorta, Son of CEEPEE. I will let TEEBEEGEE have CEEPEEBOY -- momentum is conserved, etc. QED.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 18, 2010 10:32 AM | Report abuse

Lovely, Jumper.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

OK, so... BP has decided to keep the cap on the well because, they say...

"No one wants to see oil flowing back into the sea, and to initiate containment would require that to occur. Unfortunately, we would first have to open the flow back up into the Gulf of Mexico."

But the Post article points out this key fact...

Hooking the well up to those pipes would have provided a key statistic: since all the well's oil would have been gathered, there would finally be a concrete measurement of how much oil was leaking.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Sorry, TEEBEEGEE and CEEQPEE.

TOOTOODOH!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 10:40 AM | Report abuse

Good point TBG. But won't that number come from the relief well? Didn't I see something about them thinking the pressure might indicate that the well was depleting quickly?

Granted, no one wants to see it was a dumb thing to say. But could he have meant that opening it up and then running into a problem would mean they might not be able to re-cap it yet again and no one wants to see that?

Posted by: LostInThought | July 18, 2010 10:42 AM | Report abuse

Jumper, your poet-post captures that eminent man o'letters Harold Bloom.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | July 18, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

TBG,
Very interesting. Further evidence that BP really doesn't want anybody to ever know how much was actually flowing. Even so, if they opened up the pipes again, all it would do would be to give a lower bound to how much oil was flowing since the new cap stack and attached valves, hoses, etc. add their own restrictions to the flow.

On the other hand, keeping the wellhead shut-off silences conspiracy theorists (like me) who think BP wants to keep this well producing. But then since they have pledged all the proceeds from captured oil to charity (a hollow promise since money, like oil, is fungible) they have no financial incentive to capture the oil anymore.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 10:58 AM | Report abuse

May I say I am incredibly honored to have been mixed up with CqP.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 11:04 AM | Report abuse

LiT,

The relief well will never produce oil. It will only be used to pump material into the leaking well to stop it. Afterwords, it will presumably be capped and abandoned.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Thanks YJ. I had no idea if they would be able to gather numbers (however inaccurate) from a relief well just in the course of getting it operational, but I stared out the window in most science classes.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 18, 2010 11:09 AM | Report abuse

Well, the times I actually went to science class.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 18, 2010 11:12 AM | Report abuse

*snort*

That's what I was thinking, too, LiT. (your 11:12)

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 11:15 AM | Report abuse

I'd been slighty puzzled as to why, if the cap seemed to be working, that the default option would to reopen the well and resume collecting oil.

The Post story on the vast majority of the oil industry being owned by governments made a good point, indirectly--it's probably in the US's interest to encourage a restructured, reformed BP or its private successors to explore, produce, refine, and distribute in the US.
___________________

My parents' bookshelves had a bit of college reading. John Hersey's "Hiroshima," Evelyn Waugh's "Brideshead Revisited" (an attempt to read it was not successful), "Zotz!,"Franny and Zoe," and "A Subtreasury of American Humor," which got read in its entirety. Also a horror compendium that introduced Lovecraft and Maupassant.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

Maupassant's Le Horla scared me sleepless when I was 8 or 9. But what a writer of short stories he was

I picked some veggies this morning, took some pictures of them, added a few more pics and here they are. There is a cat in the mix and a dog or two as well. http://picasaweb.google.ca/ShriekingDenizen/Ete2010#

Another beautiful day in the Other Federal capital.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 18, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Any boodlers read Edith Wharton? I got on a Wharton kick several years ago. Of course, I also got on an Anne Tyler kick ten years ago and read everything she'd written to that point in about two weeks. Just compulsive that way I suppose.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

LiT,
Your observation that BP may be hesitant to do anything that could restart the leaking is rather perceptive. No science class needed to observe that leave well enough alone is a good rule to follow.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

They assembled the capacity to "siphon off" [Not that it matters, but that is a phrase I despise almost as much as "we are winning the battle offshore," or that all evidence suggested the environmental damage would be "very, very, modest."] 80,000 barrels a day, had the capping process not worked as it has.

I imagine the panel of judges who decide how much oil was released will use that number as the high boundary and settle the case at 60,000 per day, post BOPtopchop. The flow prior, maybe 20,000, is a number perhaps least accessible of all the flow rate variables.

On to the conspiracy theories... one has to wonder whether someone has the drilling logs said to have gone down with the rig (searching through the rig, another job for the ROVs). So far the post hoc blame game has depended upon memory of a time prior to a terrible trauma, perhaps the least reliable of all memory.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 11:31 AM | Report abuse

If BP chooses not to open the well it is, clearly, part of a big conspiracy to prevent anyone from ever knowing the actual flow rate.

If BP chooses to open the well it is, clearly, part of a big conspiracy to extract as much oil as is possible.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 18, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Shriek... your veggies and your yard are gorgeous. Love the toads, too.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Shrieking_D, love the pix. Dogs, cats, toads (!), flora. And the handprints in cement by the pool are icing on the cake.
Thanks for sharing.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

I went to science class. But I must admit I spent a lot of the time surreptitiously looking at the pretty girls staring out the window.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 18, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

wow, just beautiful shreikingd, abundant life, well ordered, Voltaire would approve.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

Shrink, I think regulatory agencies and courts might find it pretty hard to believe that logs weren't automatically recorded and backed-up elsewhere. Even the most naive businesses changed that policy after 9/11.

Shreik, while I'll get a good take on this year's garden, your gardens/yard make mine look like they were done by a small child. Of course, DC did help, and she thinks a bright orange skirt looks way cool with a purple and red polka dot top and a pink and white plastic hawaiian lei. But I'm just making excuses for myself. Yours looks great. Well done.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 18, 2010 11:51 AM | Report abuse

The should be arriving at the Bunker by DHL any day now, but I wanted to give you all an advance look at some new decorations I picked up in Lucerne.

Because you can never have too many porcelain unicorns:

http://picasaweb.google.com/boodlestuff/YellojktSEuropeanVacation#5495268247666845554

And at 35,000 swiss francs (~US$5.95), this Cinderella set was a steal:

http://picasaweb.google.com/boodlestuff/YellojktSEuropeanVacation#5495268258872972274

I just used the emergency boodle credit card. That way they do all the currency conversion for us.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

Handprint and pawprint Talitha. The cat bit me when I rinsed the cement off her paw in a pail of water but that was worth it. I'm thinking of a small patch to mold the VLP's...

The garden is very nice indeed this year, it counterbalances last year's disaster. Pretty much all the plants died of black rot in frikking July.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 18, 2010 12:05 PM | Report abuse

I'm eating a sandwich made of two slices of leftover pizza (sausage & mushroom) with a fried egg, tomato slices, and a bit of barbecue sauce.

It can't be a good sign that it occurred to me to create such a thing, but it is pretty tasty.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 18, 2010 12:07 PM | Report abuse

sd,
What a gorgeous garden. And some cute critters too.

rd,
Perzactly. It's the perfect no-lose conspiracy. BP has all their bases covered.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

Note to self/boodle: don't let yellojkt carry the credit card anymore.

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 12:10 PM | Report abuse

yello you are funny, which you can't learn in science class...reminds me of someones on the Antiques Roadshow who brings in something they know darn well is almost priceless and announce, coyly, they have no idea what it is worth and of course they bought it at a flea market for $5.95...you know the rest...

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 12:11 PM | Report abuse

And if you head to Munich, you may still be able to catch this movie:

http://picasaweb.google.com/boodlestuff/YellojktSEuropeanVacation#5495278995377882354

Only there it is called 'Vergebung'. I even found the trailer online:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iguhd2PlprE

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

LiT, really, you don't think the archaic, all our records were lost at sea (a subset of the Act of God/God's Plan) defense will hold up? I agree, I don't either.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 12:17 PM | Report abuse

Um, maybe I got the Swiss franc confused with the Vietnamese dong. Anyway, we needed a few new items to replace the ones that broken during the World Cup soccer finals riot, er, party.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

Shreik, good pictures of wonderful fauna and flora. Daylilies, hosta and roses are my favorites, too. And you have no escargot in Quebec? It must be so, to grow all those hosta with such beautiful leaves!

Posted by: nellie4 | July 18, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

RDP, you are on a roll. Your 11:33 seems to me like a good description of how corporate strategy operates. These companies are so humongous that anything they do can be turned to their advantage somehow, and if they put their foot in it too badly, then they are of course too big to fail. Being caught in the spotlight with one's hand in the till and a blank, wide-eyed expression on one's face is something that doesn't happen to them very often. (It did with Enron, I guess, but that was a house of cards all the way down to the foundation.)

Posted by: woofin | July 18, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

SD, your gardens are so beautiful! My cousin near Pittsburgh has similar ones - they make mine look puny. Of course, they have actual soil, acres of it, not glacial till. You're very talented. You caught the Liquid Cat in some classic poses. And what a nice pic of the old dog.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 18, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Shriek's pastorale d'été looks fine, but for scarabée japonais. Yuk. One pest we don't have here.
A hybrid orchid living on a tree in the yard has its first flower. Not bad considering all the cold last winter.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/oejaxEkNIBFXj224BPOKig?feat=directlink

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 12:47 PM | Report abuse

BP says it now plans to keep oil well closed -----

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/18/AR2010071800814.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

My point, actually, is that if you work hard enough you can turn just about any decision into an indication of nefarious intent whether it is intended to be or not. It's classic conspiracy theory thinking. You begin with the assumption of a conspiracy and work backwards by interpreting all observed facts in light of your desired conclusion.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 18, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Good afternoon, all-
talitha, I love Steinbeck, love Wharton, love Twain, love Austen, and many, many more. Started reading James Thurber when I was seven because his books were the only books with child-sized print on the shelves in my house. I eventually made my way through the whole gang at the Algonquin Round Table--and one night in the Algonquin bar, my father had a drink with Thorton Wilder, which my family considers one of its highest achievements.

Posted by: balancingact | July 18, 2010 1:56 PM | Report abuse

And you don't even have to twist the facts to reach the conclusion of your choice! It's win/win/win (or should that be lose/lose/lose with conspiracies?).

Love the pets and plants, SD. Is't summer wonderful? And the orchid, DofC! It was worth a 4-year wait, IMHO.

Posted by: slyness | July 18, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

I think BP pays people to pose as conspiracy theorists attacking BP. It's a conspiracy.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 18, 2010 2:11 PM | Report abuse

Shriek, loved your pictures especially the progression of your annual garden. I could take a similar photo of today's harvest except for many more cukes. How many pickles can I make?

Borrowed The Great Gatsby from a friend this morning and plan to start on it later today. I know I read it in high school but probably not since.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 18, 2010 2:16 PM | Report abuse

Balancingact, my belated greetings and welcome . . . reckon we'll get along well. I read Thurber as a little girl, too.

DotC, beautiful orchid! I've penciled a color study of it for an embroidery - velvet lemon and fuchsia against the rough grey lichen.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

talitha, my orchid is flattered.

While it's been a slow grower, that orchid has received almost no maintenance, other than occasional squirts of water. It has roots extending about 5 feet up the trunk.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 2:28 PM | Report abuse

Talitha, I am extremely fond of 19th century American Literature. Not so fond of the stereotypical "great" 20th century American Literature.

I like Steinbeck (of Mice and Men, yes), but couldn't read "Cannery Row." I've read Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, some Eudora Welty (I find her prose style heavy, but I like "Why I live at the PO" a lot. A southern friend explained the cultural context to me.)

Wharton's "Ethan Frome" is simply too depressing to make teenagers read, IMO, but she's a better writer than Hemingway by a mile.

My real favorite 20th century American authors aren't much represented in anthologies or considered "literary" and that's ridiculous-- Wouk, Bellow, etc. all won Pultizers or Nobels. So many gaps. Immigrant American authors are underrepresented, too, like Isaac Bashevis Singer.

We're losing the real prizes of the mid- 20th century in favor of short stories about, what, alcoholics in swimming pools? Alcoholics writing about midlife crises? Stories that are all about Americans in Europe or being terribly white-guy tennis types in a Stepford Wife world? Midlife crises (Babbit)?

I felt that there was a strong bias against Jewish authors in one anthology I had to buy for American Literature. Even the Jungle wasn't mentioned, probably because Sinclair Lewis was a Socialist.

It had a good selection of black literature (which I love), but that silence struck me as strange. I refused to take the 20th century lit class and took Early American lit instead, and in that section there was exactly one mention of Jews-- in a poem by Longfellow.

I really don't think Hemingway was a better writer and storyteller than all the other authors I've mentioned.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

rd,

aka The Scientific Method

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 2:56 PM | Report abuse

BP is much more devious than that. They pay me to make comments about Jumper's remarks about paying people to pose as conspiracy theorists, just so it will seem unlikely.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 18, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I'm not on a soapbox for Hemingway just because I happened to pick up and start reading Bell Tolls last night. And he's certainly not my favorite American writer. That would be Twain, by a mile.

Welty and Cather, Sinclair Lewis and Ralph Ellison, Whitman and cummings, my list goes on and on. And we ain't even got to U-rope, A-sha, or the Kamu Sutra for that matter.

We're all voracious readers and we all have our pets and peeves, I reckon. I've read many things recommended here that I'd never heard of before I boodled ----- including some haiku by a dog, of all wonderful things.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

I believe FrancDong is still available as a Boodling handle...

And I really want to know -- did the lucky couple yello likned to also note whether they're suffrican or diocisian in their tattoos?

It's amazing how much time a non-cook can spend peeling, seeding and choppping a huge donated zucchini, as well as blanching and chopping several fresh-from-the-garden maters. Then again, being distracted by several consecutive MP episodes on IFC doesn't help. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 18, 2010 3:05 PM | Report abuse

Just wanted to clarify my hatred for Hemingway is more for the hype, Talitha. There are so many good writers out there.

I was very fond of Singer and Wouk and Bellow in my teens. But yes, Twain is the Royal Nonesuch of American Lit.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Hey! What's with the gratuitous SciMeth bashing?!
http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=2641

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 18, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, you must run with a pretty literary crowd. It's been a long time since I heard anyone hype Hemingway.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 18, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

I realized not long ago that I had not read much Hemingway, beyond The Old Man and the Sea in high school. So I read The Sun Also Rises (I think - the one about the American guy in Italy who falls in love with a nurse - or was it A Farewell to Arms?). Anyway, thought it was quite good - so sad at the end. And I read A Moveable Feast a couple months ago - liked it too. I suppose I like his straightforward style, and he captures that time so well.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 18, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

A Farewell to Arms, seasea.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 4:13 PM | Report abuse

RD Padouk: I like your thinking. Have you ever worked as a political campaign strategist?

In politics, every decision has two options, and both are nefarious.... to both parties.

Posted by: baldinho | July 18, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

Okay, here's a game to play: Who among the 20th century authors we've mentioned today will be read in the 22nd century?

We can eliminate Dan Brown and Jacqueline Susann right now.

Posted by: slyness | July 18, 2010 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Still backboodling but want to say how much I enjoyed the pictures from Shreiks garden, and the dog and the cat.

Spent much of the last two days gardening, yesterday climbing under a row of dogwood to clean out over grown grass and working on installing a new front bed both at a house that friends are renovating, and then selling as well as trimming shrubs for a customer from last year, I am tired and sore but the new garden looks lovely and I am pleased with it.

For anyone with way to much time on their hands, and is completely bored yesterday I put my photos from the garden in one folder - (243 photos I think), browse if you want.

http://picasaweb.google.ca/dmd2921/Summer2010#

Now to go back and get caught up.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 18, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

I read Wharton's "Age of Innocence" in college. I liked it quite a bit. I think that's the only Wharton I've read.

I think I've only read two or three novels in the last 15 years or so. I don't think that's a good thing but non-fiction has been strange enough for me that novels just haven't interested me. Alas, one of the novels I read was "Da Vinci Code." But I checked the illustrated version out of the library, so I had some nice pictures to look at while reading the not very good prose. I will recommend one of the books he stole from and credited - "Holy Blood, Holy Grail." Lots of fun paranoid conspiracy theories in that one. Got a strong review from Anthony Burgess when it came out, which is usually a good recommendation for me.

I wish Sara was around to disabuse us of any attraction to Steinbeck. Dry as dust, she used to say. Arid. Parched. Need water. Lots of water.

Posted by: -pj- | July 18, 2010 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Cannery row and The Grapes of Wrath, definitely, pj.

Bob S-- you have no idea. None.

I seem to remember some hyping of Hemingway on the boodle some months ago, and I know a few people IRL who really like Hemingway, and they see something I don't, and I'm not sure I WANT to see that something.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 4:54 PM | Report abuse

In the 22nd century, slyness? From this whole boodle or just from today?

Twain, Shakespeare, Austen.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 4:54 PM | Report abuse

Herman Wouk: The Caine Mutiny.
Upton Sinclair: the Jungle (for historical appeal).
Longfellow, as long as our country is still around. The Ride of Paul Revere, natch.

Dickens.
Anthony Burgess.

Dark horses: Singer and King.

And what Talitha said.

Wilbrodog claims he will be read.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 5:00 PM | Report abuse

Ooops. I see now that you said 20th century authors.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 5:03 PM | Report abuse

dmd, the caladiums look good. They're fussy about cool weather, so must be a challenge in the not-so-far north. Yours are probably Florida cardinal red and candidum.

Hellebores are neat, but unless something's changed, they are slow to get started, so are really expensive. In Portland, at least, well-established plants grew automatically, scarcely any maintenance needed. A bit like the patches of cast-iron plants (Aspidistra) in my yard that have been imperceptibly expanding, meaning I have to move a few plants this fall.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

I just want to jump into dmd's or shriekingd's pool and forget about reading for a while. After I've admired their flowers in person and petted the animals, of course. (dmd, in Baltimore I grew the deep dusty pink and the pale orange sherbert daylilies you have - sigh - your garden is a beautiful sanctuary.)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 5:11 PM | Report abuse

Vonnegut. Roth. Clancy.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 5:17 PM | Report abuse

Cannery Row is on my list to read, Wilbrod. I started his Sea of Cortez book. Made it about halfway through and got bogged down.

I read "The Jungle" in high school. Very much worth reading. Sinclair wanted to start a social revolution with it but got clean food and drug laws instead. That's a different kind of social revolution but a very real one. He ran for political office in California a few times. There was a book about one of his races a few years ago that was well received.

Posted by: -pj- | July 18, 2010 5:22 PM | Report abuse

Not necessarily from the boodle discussion but from the 20th century -----

Camus, Auden, G.B.Shaw, O'Neill, Nabakov, Arthur Miller, Joyce, Frost, maybe Tolkein?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 5:39 PM | Report abuse

scc: Tolkien

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 5:42 PM | Report abuse

Must be something in my soil DotC as my Hellebores have thrived, growing quite quickly - they are certainly not the cheapest of plants I think around $25 a plant at the nursery. One of the reasons I started my side business - trade discount!, my goal is to balance out what I make with what I spend on the gardens/plants for the house each each, of course I don't have enough time to devote to the gardens but I try.

The calladium and a few other cold sensitive plants are started indoors and moved out when I can, I put them in the garage over night during cool late spring nights. These ones are replacements for the ones I tryed to overwinter but my husband threw out - have to clearly mark my winter storage area in the crawl space - Do Not Enter :-)

Posted by: dmd3 | July 18, 2010 5:48 PM | Report abuse

Nothing very literary here, but another hilarious video from the Onion News Network:

http://www.theonion.com/video/girl-raised-from-birth-by-wolf-blitzer-taken-into,17714/

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Can anyone find the lyrics to Reelin' Down?
[who loves the songs of Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks and also, J.J. Cale?]...I''l do it later, but for me now, the search engines are bogging here.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 6:17 PM | Report abuse

Hi Padouk, I knew what point you were trying to make; I was just trying to twist it around into a more deeply paranoid vision and then give the credit to you.

No thanks are necessary.

But seriously, I realize that large organizations, like small ones, are human creations, that integrity requires a strong effort at logical fairness in discussion, that an unreasoning cynicism is actually the enemy of cogent social analysis, and all that. But it sure is a lot more fun to blame them for stuff. How sweet is the dark but plausible rant!

Posted by: woofin | July 18, 2010 6:28 PM | Report abuse

I am not remotely knowledgeable enough to figure out who will be read in the 22nd century.

One thought I have is that authors who wrote well about things that defined their times are the ones that endure.

I think the 20th century is defined somewhat by the technological advances achieved during it. That means science fiction. It is also defined by its political movements and conflict.

I bet there will be a lot of people still reading Orwell and H.G. Wells and Ray Bradbury and Philip Dick.

Posted by: baldinho | July 18, 2010 6:47 PM | Report abuse

My praying mantises are hatching! One egg case anyway. Before they've hatched in May. I moved some aphid-infested rose buds close to them so they can eat aphids instead of each other. Hope that works.

Also spent time deadheading roses and saving the spent blossoms in a basket to dry. Haven't done that for years.

One nice thing about doing Census work is running across all sorts of beautiful gardens. Shasta daisies are out now - they look gorgeous in masses, and set off other flowers so nicely.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 18, 2010 6:48 PM | Report abuse

What woofin said.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 6:49 PM | Report abuse

My pictures from Berlin are up:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/sets/72157624405768681/

One city down, eight more to go.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 6:51 PM | Report abuse

I think John Le Carre's work will endure because of that, baldinho. Anyone studying the Cold War needs to read him. Plus he's a fabulous writer of character and dialog, not to mention plot.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 18, 2010 6:54 PM | Report abuse

shrink, if the printed lyrics to Reelin' Down are out there they've been deep sixed. Here's a youtube link (with bad video but good audio) of the song. You should be able to discern the words.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUPnHoqGGMA&feature=related

My favorite Dan Hicks---

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0h6FBbw8jY&feature=related

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 7:01 PM | Report abuse

Yes talitha, got it and thank you.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 7:05 PM | Report abuse

Is everybody still there? (actually, I initially typed "three", snorted and then fixed it)......

I picked up my bro this morning at Dulles. He's so lucky that he can sleep on an airplane. I know I can't. From there we went to gas up the car, and proceeded to the Silver Diner on Rockville Pike for a late breakfast. As many times as I've passed by that place in my going-on-30-years down here (the early years of which clearly predated the diner itself, I recognize so you don't have to), I've never been in there. Not sure I'd go back, even though the food is pretty good, as the noise level is astronomical! Geez, is it loud in there!

We each took naps, had a very lite dinner and he's now pounding away at his laptop, ever the working guy. His two-week course starts tomorrow, so we're sort of getting in sync.

Is it time for winter yet? I don't know how much more of this heat I can take, whether I'm in it or just looking at it from outside. Yoki, you got any winter up where you are? Can you fax me some?

As for Steinbeck, I've read a fair amount of him, in my much earlier days, and I recall that I liked Winter of Our Discontent, but for the life of me, I can no longer remember what it was about. I think I still have it (in hardback, too), so it will go on my re-read pile. The only books I've actually enjoyed by Le Carre were those that comprised the Karla trilogy, and I treasure that writing. His later stuff was a bit too turgid for me. I'm sure I've read Hemingway, too, and I know I've got some of his stuff, but can't remember -- so the re-read pile gets higher.

Toodley Boodley for now.

Posted by: ftb3 | July 18, 2010 7:10 PM | Report abuse

dmd,
Garaging the plants was a Jacksonville tradition, so much so that the long-time meteorologist at the local Washington Post TV station did a stop-action animation of potted plants making their way in the door.

Less of that here. The non-tree orchids, potted palms and some bromeliads spent a week or so in the dining room this past winter.

Over at the NY Times, "Nightmare in Apartment 9B" has this passage:

"The housekeeper, June Gordon, pushed past the dogs in the pantry that May morning in 2005. She moved deeper into the apartment that was like some cobwebby Miss Havisham version of high-end Manhattan living, with peeling paint, torn furniture and a permanent stink of cigarettes."

It IWL's as David Foster Wallace.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 7:19 PM | Report abuse

Good pictures, yello. Thanks for posting!

What was the deal with all the batchelorette parties?

Posted by: -TBG- | July 18, 2010 7:27 PM | Report abuse

Well, I am in heaven. TCM is screening Jean Cocteau's La Belle et la Bete at 8:00pm tonight as part of their summer children's series. It's one of those movies I keep meaning to add to my library and carelessly forgetting. Wish I had some kids around to watch with me.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 18, 2010 7:38 PM | Report abuse

Yello, thank you so much for the photos. I was in Berlin in May last year and your pictures brought up the fondest memories. I cannot wait to see your other photos.

Posted by: gmbka | July 18, 2010 7:40 PM | Report abuse

The Berlin Bachelorette Parties were inexplicable to both us and our semi-native Berliner tour guide. The general format was that a group of four to ten women in matching tee shirts would go out with the bride-to-be who had to do some stunt all afternoon.

The first one we saw had the BTB come up to me while I was sitting at a fountain and ask "Are you a [my real name]? You look like a [my real name]." I thought it was some sort of con game used on tourists, but we saw her approaching other men as well. It seems she had a whole list of names she had to meet.

On Saturday during the World Cup quarter finals there were several more parties prowling. One group just watching the game on a jumboscreen demanded money to let me take their picture. Another was selling little items form a basket around her neck including airline sized booze bottles, condoms, and assorted toiletries.

A week later in Munich we ran across the same thing again, only there were bachelor parties as well. One group had the groom-to-be dressed in a giant animal suit. One was break dancing. All the guy groups were way more drunk than the ladies, leading our tour guide to wonder why anyone would want to marry them in the first place.

When pressed if this was some tradition, he said that traditions required time and this was all new to him.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 8:18 PM | Report abuse

If you are in a chipper mood, ya might want to skip this,

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/18/moral-camouflage-or-moral-monkeys/?hp

We deplore our evil, our addictions to drugs and oil. American drug addicts together with the Americans who fight the wars on drugs have been killing, killing innocent and guilty for decades, here and there. But it has gotten to the point where it looks like we are only willing to fight, only willing to kill and die where our oil and drugs are the issue.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

The interesting thing about that bachelor/bachelorette street party/parade/embarrassade 'tradition' is that german observers seem to be contemptuous of it.

They were probably too drunk to remember the time they did it.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 18, 2010 8:37 PM | Report abuse

Old guys playing chess in the pool for you folks that can't make it to Budapest for the real thing:

http://picasaweb.google.com/boodlestuff/YellojktSEuropeanVacation#5495414183531670242

It's worth the trip.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 8:55 PM | Report abuse

As for those bachelorette parties, I found on the net (Jungesellinnenabschied, hen night, vrijgesellenafschied) that it is just an evening for the bride and her female friends to celebrate the upcoming wedding. The party may include tasks for the bride, such as selling trinkets or identifying people, and matching t-shirts for the participants, but more common are just dinner and dancing. This particular incident does not seem to have been a case of trapping tourists.

Posted by: gmbka | July 18, 2010 8:58 PM | Report abuse

If I'm merely in a spry mood, can I still skip that, Shrink?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 9:05 PM | Report abuse

no!

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 9:06 PM | Report abuse

well ok fine, but only if you are perky and spry, that might be chippy enough.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 9:12 PM | Report abuse

gmbka,
No. It became clear that I was just a player in their reindeer games, not a victim of anything simply because I was a foreigner. If you look at the pictures you can see that everybody was getting along fine.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/4805678963/in/set-72157624405768681/

I'm just suspicious when somebody in a former Eastern bloc nation asks for my identification to prove my name, no matter how ridiculous she and her friends look.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 9:15 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

Sorry I missed so much today, good discussions, all.

Back to the Gulf for a minute, I've said since Day 1 that the Deepwater Horizon rig wreckage is a tricky situation. Where 11 people perished, and also may hold evidence for investigations towards various proceedings. (Don't worry, I won't use that phrase that gets folks agitated - for the moment).

I still think that they may uncap the well when they breach the pipe for the kill shot via the relief well. Under 7000 or so psi, the initial breach might lead to an uncontrolled burst or split of the pipe (rather than a nice drill-bit sized hole), making it more difficult to get a good seal for the bottom kill.

But that's just me thinking out loud.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 18, 2010 9:28 PM | Report abuse

-bc-

There has never been a "relief well" drilled into this kind of pressure, ever.

But people have said the "relief well" will be filled with mud so there is no risk of a "relief well" blowout.

Still they stopped drilling the "relief well" when they put the cap on, as a precaution.

A precaution against what?


Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 9:44 PM | Report abuse

Interesting article about Jerry Brown, who(m?) we were talking about some time ago. I can't believe he's 72.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/18/AR2010071802839.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: seasea1 | July 18, 2010 9:59 PM | Report abuse

Plenty of successful relief wells have been drilled in greater pressure, and also in cases of crossover - reservoirs venting into higher reservoirs - and also casing with holes in it. Just not in the deep water. Which is not to say BP can't mess up again. They have wisely subbed out the kill process to a qualified third party.

yellojkt's chess pic has me puzzled. The board in foreground has odd bishops: the white bishop with black hat, black bishop, white hat.

I suspect much of what will be seen as great 20th century lit in future, we haven't heard of. Obviously some of present famous works too.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 18, 2010 10:02 PM | Report abuse

I would say a precaution against want to be know it alls or people who think they know everything under the flippin sun........

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 18, 2010 10:07 PM | Report abuse

You are doing a great thing here.
Thank you.

Posted by: shrink2 | July 18, 2010 10:25 PM | Report abuse

Well... white attacks, black defends, so black should be the white hats, and vice versa.

Meta-obscure western humor?


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 18, 2010 10:35 PM | Report abuse

Shrink, I think I saw somewhere that they were afraid of another gas build-up and then another big ka-boom.

I sorta kinda thought they had to open it up again *just a smidge* when they bust through, sort of like you do with a can opener, so that when they do go to put the mud in, it doesn't just start spraying all over the place. But again, while I kicked @ss in other classes, science class I was down at the bodega getting myself an afternoon snack.

Also, why relief well in quotes? I don't get it.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 18, 2010 10:37 PM | Report abuse

Yello's photo of a replica of the first traffic light in Berlin looks like something in a photo of "Potsdamer Platz from the Café Josty. SV-Bilderdienst / Scherl." used on the cover of "Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy" by Eric D. Weitz (Princeton 2007).

It's a memorable photo, portraying the Platz as if it had been designed by Portland, Oregon's city planners, with an odd-looking tower at the left.

http://books.google.com/books/princeton?id=9iGYgtykzToC&printsec=frontcover&vq=cover+illustration&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Yello's photo is at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/sets/72157624405768681/

And yes, it's a more impersonal-looking Potsdamer Platz. I wonder what the Weimars would have thought of boardshorts with tropical flowers. Not a fedora in sight.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 18, 2010 10:43 PM | Report abuse

your welcome........ Herbert.......

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 18, 2010 10:43 PM | Report abuse

Our tour guide had nothing bur contempt for the redevelopment of Potsdamer Platz. He told a story of his peripheral involvement in a protest over a park that technically belonged to East Berlin but was inside the perimeter of The Wall. The two Berlins had arranged a land swap to reassign this parcel to West Berlin.

Some hippie types had staged a sit-in to protest the transfer out of fear the park would become an office building. As long as the land technically belonged to the East, the cops couldn't stop the protest. As soon as the deed swap was finalized, the West Berlin cops donned full riot gear to evict the protesters.

Rather than let the protesters get arrested, the East German border guards helped them climb over The Wall into East Berlin where the cops had no jurisdiction. The protesters then walked back into West Berlin through a checkpoint unharmed.

It is one of the rare cases of people escaping West Berlin into East Berlin. There is a small plaque commemorating the event on the wall of the office building that now stands where the park used to be.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 18, 2010 11:06 PM | Report abuse

shrink, not sure you're understanding me here. I wasn't thinking so much of the relief well per se. I was more concerned with the capped well as a pressurized vessel and the effects of piercing it with a drill bit.

I've worked with with plenty of pressurized systems - plumbing, automotive brakes, cooling/AC, fuel systems, steam and hot water systems, pneumatics and hydraulics - to have experienced burst vessels, pipes and hoses firsthand. And in high pressure systems, a tiny hole (say, the tip of a drill bit) can burst into a large rip or gash muy pronto as pressures try to equalize. In this case, I would be concerned that a lot of oil and gas are going to try to get out of that little hole in a hurry, and rip the metal casing.

If I were doing that work, I'd try to reduce the inside and outside pressure differentials as much as possible before I opened anything else to reduce the chance of an uncontrolled burst. How do you reduce the pressure in that vessel? Well, one way would be to open the top valves back up, and monitor the pressures to see that they come down and stabilize, as much as possible.

I don't have anyone standing on the brake pedal when I'm going to change brake hoses, I don't turn the igntion key on and pressurize the fuel system when I'm going to change the pressure regulator, and I don't run the hot water heater if I'm going to change out a bad valve. I've had brake hoses burst in my hand, injector fuel lines rip in my face (never work with fuel systems without eye protection, kids), and house plumbing pop from not being careful about such things.

Just seems to me that you'd want the system to have a low a pressure as possible when one was going to pierce it with a bit, that's all. Get a better result from a clean hole rather than a torn gash, I would think.

Whatever comes and goes on the relief well line(s) after the - oil, mud, cement, etc. - would all be subsequent to that.

But I'm no expert on oil drilling.

Greenie, ya comin' with us to Eden, man?

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 19, 2010 12:01 AM | Report abuse

Hah! Greenman.

Posted by: Yoki | July 19, 2010 12:01 AM | Report abuse

yeah bc,Eden ,almost heaven, or the river.....Eden is whatever you make it man......

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 19, 2010 12:11 AM | Report abuse

and there are many times that i find my Eden right here with everyone here......

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 19, 2010 1:01 AM | Report abuse

Ahhh. The fireworks were just fired. And so Stampede officially ends at midnight MDT. Yay!

6 horses and 1 calf died in action and 1 rider was critically injured, I couldn't navigate my own home street except with a permit between 17:00 and 22:00 every evening for the last 10 days, and 10 teenagers were seriously (or less seriously, but 1 critically) injured when a midway ride collapsed mid-fling on Wednesday.

What a wonderful way to celebrate the great conservatism of the West.

Posted by: Yoki | July 19, 2010 1:04 AM | Report abuse

Glad the Stampede's over, Yoki, for your sake. A few years ago some friends of ours - Vietnamese immigrants - went on vacation to Calgary during the Stampede. They were quite surprised, to say the least!

Posted by: seasea1 | July 19, 2010 1:50 AM | Report abuse

Thank you for understanding my *deep bitter hatred* of Stampede, seasea1.

Posted by: Yoki | July 19, 2010 2:03 AM | Report abuse

Yello, being asked for an id would have given me the creeps, too. This is the country where the secret service employed more than half a million "informal informants" over 40 years, out of roughly 20 million citizens. The film "The Life of Others" comes to mind. But then again, those young people were babies at best when the wall came down. I was amused by your story about the demonstrators escaping over the wall to the east until I remembered that the GDR also provided a safe place for the West-German terrorists, which was not so funny.

Posted by: gmbka | July 19, 2010 4:54 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. I watered all the new transplant yesterday so of course it rained buckets all night. I'm the Rain God.

Wow dmd, really nice hellebores you've got there. We have two that are doing well, we should have more. They are really low maintenance and trouble free.

I'm not looking forward to navigating the big city traffic at rush hour but there is no choice, Witch no.2 is coming back from her sojourn in the Socialist Paradise of Cuba. We'll be at full complement for the first time in quite a while.

Ooops, a seep? http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/18/AR2010071800814.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 19, 2010 5:48 AM | Report abuse

Hiya gmbka, willkommen zum Boodle. :-)

Never did get to Berlin while I was over there, much to my chagrin -- my jealousy of yello only increases. ;-)

Even with a few factual errors and being a day or so behind the news, this is a very interesting editorial. :-)

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/18/AR2010071802520.html

And it seems the "to cap or not to cap" question could soon be overtaken by events:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/18/AR2010071800814.html

*staying-home-with-a-tweaked-back-but-laying-about-in-weather-such-as-this-ain't-a-bad-idea Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 19, 2010 5:50 AM | Report abuse

Farenthold had a busy weekend for sure...

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 19, 2010 5:57 AM | Report abuse

pssst, Yoki, Stampede doesn't celebrate the conservatism of the west, only the history. The Stampede is apolitical.

Otherwise, coffee is on. Good and sturdy too. It is Monday style coffee.

Posted by: --dr-- | July 19, 2010 5:57 AM | Report abuse

I have yet to tell the tale of our encounter with the jack-booted thugs of the Hungarian Transit Authority. Now there was a frightening encounter.

Someone is going to have to explain better how reopening the well requires three days of uncaptured release. Something there doesn't pass the sniff test.

Since the only way to flow mud and cement into the bottom of the well is to release something at the top of the well (basic gozinta and gozouta mass balance) the well is going to have to opened sooner or later. You would think you you would want a system where you could do that on demand.

Since I don't have the automotive background bc has, my mental analogy has to do with fixing a bicycle tire flat. You don't put the patch on with the tube fully inflated.

If the well is currently not leaking I say leave well enough alone (and I will continue to use that pun until someone snorts) and not mess with success, however low you are defining it.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 6:10 AM | Report abuse

To the cynical mind, BP would prefer to have oil seep out of the well through geological fissures rather than through a wellhead where the quantity can be measured. If and when (and how) a seep could be confirmed, some factor on the quantity leaching out through the seabed would have to be added to any measured amounts coming through the wellhead.

The official BP story that the lower than expected pressures are the result of the oil pocket being depleted doesn't fully pass muster either since that should have been matched by a slowly decreasing volume of oil leaking, but since nobody was (or even could) measure that, there is no way to validate that hypothesis.

These guys are getting better at keeping their lies and obfuscations more plausible. Sorry, I couldn't hold onto my objectivity that long.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 6:22 AM | Report abuse

A) This is a very sad and tragic loss

B) I want to smack the copy editor something fierce...

http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20100719-NEWS-7190326

*SIGH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 19, 2010 6:23 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. Just getting started for the day, and feel a headache trying to slip in. Perhaps if I keep moving, it will go away. I can dream, right?

Hope your day gets better, Scotty, and thanks for the hug.

Talitha(sp)thanks for your beautiful comments in one of the earlier kits. I don't get to read all the comments for every kit, but sometimes I do, and I've been meaning to thank you, just can't remember like I used to.

And yours too, CQP. Hope all is well with you and family.

And anybody I missed. TBG, hope sis is still hanging in there. And I'm adjusting to pain, if that's possible. Of course, with the help of pain medications, but don't want to get too friendly with those; however, the damage may be done.

Have a wonderful day, folks. And try to cool. We're going to have the extreme heat this week, so folks will be dragging. Heat just saps the energy.

Slyness, still trying to get to your neck of the woods, will holler if and when I get there.

Love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 19, 2010 6:42 AM | Report abuse

WaPo has a new online feature about the secret portions of the government:

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/top-secret-america/

Time to go read the dead trees.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 6:46 AM | Report abuse

S'nuke,
You are assuming there was a copy editor.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 6:49 AM | Report abuse

Dang. No paper. I wasn't supposed to be here today.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 6:52 AM | Report abuse

True, yello, we ARE discussing the AP... *SIGH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 19, 2010 6:58 AM | Report abuse

Good morning you all yeah for Dawn Patrol!!

Got the same rain last night, crashingthumderandlighteningattenPM. Also was awake before the tremor and knew instantly what it was about as handles on china cabinet in dining room were rattling.

I love reading everyones' posts.

Pet Sematary was my bench mark for King.

TBG, hope your sister did well last week.

badsneakers, glad to hear dear doggy got to go home. faxing jumper a little to help out with bruiser.

Austin, forever slyness, Emma was on PBS again, last week.

Read some "summertime light" a la Costco,

Rebecca Well's, The Crowning Glory of Calla Lily Ponder, very disappointing, but...a great book title.

Richard Russo's, That Old Cape Magic, an easy pleasant read, has humor, which helps.

Good to see Casandra, everybody else, too. Must try to catch up, almost impossible, tho.

Posted by: VintageLady | July 19, 2010 7:18 AM | Report abuse

Happy Monday, all! Hi Cassandra, it's good to see that you are up and going today.

We had a nice little shower just before dark last night. This was after the Geekdottir and I helped Mr. T mix and pour 20 forty-pound bags of cement for a pad for one of the rain barrels. It wasn't enough and he has to get more today. Stoopid too big hole!

The Geekdottir goes back to Alabama the end of the week. It's been so nice having her here, and I will miss her. But it's time, I suppose.

For me, this is the week I should get moving on all those projects around the house I didn't do because there was so much stuff going on. No excuses anymore!

Posted by: slyness | July 19, 2010 7:37 AM | Report abuse

Hi VL, hope you're feeling well. As for you Scotty, your back goes out more often than mine does. Hope you feel better quickly, awful to waste a day off on actually being unwell!

I saw the #1 dog yesterday and he doesn't look bad. A big roadrash scrap on his face and another on his hip, but he was moving around just fine and was happy to see me. I gave him a lecture about looking both ways, but he got that 'look' he gets when he's decided to tune me out ;-)

Very pleasant here this morning, not cool but much less hot. It won't last. I'm watering the vegetable garden and the very brown patch of grass out front. We have an odd/even water restriction here so need to get everything wet today. T-storms are forecast but who knows if we'll get any of them.

Enjoy the day everyone.

Posted by: badsneakers | July 19, 2010 7:44 AM | Report abuse

Oops, it's the 19th, which I believe is an odd number. I shoulda watered yesterday ;-(
I wonder if being clueless is a good excuse?

Posted by: badsneakers | July 19, 2010 8:26 AM | Report abuse

Good Morning Everyone!

That was quite some electrical storm that went through our area last night. Those things can be terribly dangerous. If our dog had been much larger I might have ended up smothered in my sleep.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 19, 2010 8:44 AM | Report abuse

sneaks,

Just water twice as long tomorrow.

You're welcome.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 8:44 AM | Report abuse

Except everything was super dry yesterday, yello. Am finishing up the veggie garden, then will stop until tomorrow ;-)

Posted by: badsneakers | July 19, 2010 8:52 AM | Report abuse

Yello, re. the cap - that is indeed along the lines of what I was thinking. As you suggest (and I was trying -poorly- to say), it makes sense to keep it closed up to the point where they begin operations to breach the well pipe.

I, too, am somewhat leery of the lower pressures inside the sealed cap. Was discussing with a friend, and suggested that if there were well damage below the surface of the sea bed, and that oil/gas were seeping or leaching into the sea floor, that was probably better than it gushing into the open ocean from the well head, all things considered. I think oil and gas seep up into that sea bed from the reservoirs in any case, though there's still no denying that this would be far worse than that. Still, purely speculation on my part.

Thanks for the updates from your European Vacation, too.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 19, 2010 9:18 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

(Special good morning to Cassandra. Dear lady, if you and I both can't remember, did I really say it? Big hug!) ;-)

Looking forward (not) to another day of piles-o'stuff reorganization and redistribution. For an old hippie-gypsy I've sure accumulated a lot of wonderful things in my life but some of it has got to go. Like George Carlin said, "A house is just a place to keep your stuff while you go out and get more stuff." *sigh*

Take care of your back, Snuke. Send more pictures, yello - those were fun (watertowers !).

Good Monday to all.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 19, 2010 9:28 AM | Report abuse

jkt, hi!!! not been around much here, but I did very much enjoy the pics from the trip. I found the beers refreshing.

Govt Secrecy? Large intelligence gathering groups teaming up to know anything and everything about everyone? But, we don't know anything about these organizations ...
until now!

Darn Washington Post.

Posted by: russianthistle | July 19, 2010 9:30 AM | Report abuse

The seeping oil would not only be tough to quantify, it would also be nearly impossible to absolutely attribute to the Menudo well. Also, the sea bed network may have a lot of capacitance in that the oil leaking may take longer to reach the open gulf, perhaps by years. Long after BP has closed the books.

Speaking of which, BP's latest estimate is that they have spend US$4Billion on this disaster so far. Boo-effin-hoo.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

Yello, In Berlin's tragic and sometimes weird history, the Great Potsdamer Platz Escape has to be one of the weirdest stories.

Big day for Dana Priest and William Arkin.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 19, 2010 9:54 AM | Report abuse

Morning, all.

I worked most of the weekend on weekend 1 of a new installation and was called just as I was getting into bed last night. Finally got to bed so late I don't even know what time it was. Meeting at 11 and right now I'm happy it's raining so I don't have to water the garden.

The offending issue isn't strictly within my purview, but as boss agreed this morning, it won't get fixed without us. Mainly I'm pulling resources together, saying "no, you can't put this into production at 3 am, untested, when we've all been up for 24+ hours" and directing traffic. Glad that while it's not an easy problem it's not an issue of patient safety.

Next I'll threaten them with RD's little dog.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 19, 2010 9:55 AM | Report abuse

An idea whose time may have come-

http://www.vhemt.org/

Posted by: kguy1 | July 19, 2010 9:57 AM | Report abuse

New kit!!! Mr. A's heading back to N'Awlins.

Posted by: MsJS | July 19, 2010 10:01 AM | Report abuse

New Kit!

Posted by: seasea1 | July 19, 2010 10:01 AM | Report abuse

rt,
The gist of this series seems to be about three things:

1) Nobody knows how much additional intelligence gathering capacity we've added but we don't seem to be getting any more bang for the buck.

2) An enormous amount of the expanded intelligence capability is being done by contractors where the for-profit nature of the work could be affecting the mission.

3) The ONDI is still completely toothless and has no idea what is going on.

I would want to see some focus on issues only hinted at in today's article. A lot more of the intelligence seems to be domestically directed, often using some slim foreign contact connection as a wedge. Just what is the scope and scale of current domestic surveillance and what agencies are engaging in it?

DoD scrapped their Counterintelligence Field Activity (CIFA) organization which would have been the domestic analog to NSA. According to Wikipedia, the CIFA roles have been absorbed by DIA, but I don't know if there has been a change in scope or magnitude of the domestic surveillance of alleged threat groups like Quakers and other peace activists.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 19, 2010 10:05 AM | Report abuse

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