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The Anthropocene

I've been thinking a lot about the Anthropocene. You know the drill on that. The Anthropocene is the geological epoch shaped by human beings. The concept is not really as flattering as it sounds. Ideally, we wouldn't have so drastic an impact on the world that it shows up stratigraphically.

The Permian-Triassic boundary is marked by the sudden disappearance of 95 percent of species. The K/T (Cretaceous/Tertiary) boundary not only marks the disappearance of dinosaurs and 70 percent of the other species but has a distinct iridium layer discovered by Luis and Walter Alvarez, suggesting an extraterrestrial bolide. And so on. We're in the Holocene, the epoch that began something like 11,600 years ago with a sudden warming event and the retreat of the glaciers. The Holocene has been an epoch of climate stability in the main. It's been pleasant around here. We like the Holocene.

Except it may be over.

The obvious, anxiety-generating cause of the epochal change is global warming. But there are other signals that haven't gotten as much attention, namely the sudden mixing of species, their relocation to the far side of the planet thanks to human transportation (I call this phenomenon the Mad Scramble). And there is the decrease in biodiversity from that same invasive-species phenomenon and from habitat destruction.

National Geographic's Dennis Dimick opened the Aspen Environment Forum with a slide show he titled "The Man-Made World," a visually arresting tour of what might be described as the transition from the Holocene to the Anthropocene. Dennis's premise is that for most of human existence we survived on contemporary sunshine in some form or another. Then we discovered coal, the genie in the earth. Now we live off ancient sunshine (coal, oil, gas), which has made possible the extraordinary expansion of our population, including the dramatic jump just in the past half century from about 3 billion to 6.8 billion. We're likely going to 9 or 10 billion. Somehow we have to find a way to have a soft landing, because otherwise all trend lines show that this isn't sustainable, species are losing habitat and the planet itself is getting cooked. We have to return to a life based on contemporary sunshine. It was an excellent slide show, extremely sobering.

The first panel of the forum focused on whether the Anthropocene is really upon us. There are scientists actively trying to persuade their peers that this isn't just an esoteric notion, the stuff of environmental conferences, but a stratigraphic fact, a real geological divider every bit as real as the Permian-Triassic boundary or anything else in the record. For example, in sediments from 1945 and later we see the radioactive elements left over from atmospheric tests of atomic bombs. Another date commonly cited as the potential start of the Anthropocene is 1800, when the industrial revolution had taken off. It will likely take years to persuade the international geological community to formally recognize the new epoch, one of the scientists said. A key criterion is that the naming of the new epoch has to be useful in some way. Otherwise it's just arm-waving.

Life in the Anthropocene has many nice qualities. Air conditioning comes to mind. But if it's not sustainable, then it's just another way in which we borrow from the future. We take what isn't ours. We squander resources. We over-consume.

We live like there's no tomorrow.

By Joel Achenbach  |  July 29, 2010; 7:44 AM ET
 
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Comments

*ahem*

May I have the attention of last evening's BPHers?

It is with *ginormous* embarrassment and equally *ginormous* subsequent lack of good manners that I *abjectly* and *humbly* apologize for myself and my guest (who had a terrific time, btw) that we ended up stiffing you all.

I woke up in the middle of the night, with palm smacked against forehead saying "Oh Expletive!" when I realized what we had (or, alternatively, had not) done.

Please do accept our humble and abject apologies. Our actions were not intended and we feel just horrible about it.

*trying not to cry*

Posted by: ftb3 | July 29, 2010 8:58 AM | Report abuse

When I lived in Hogtown, I picked up a classic 1956 two-volume symposium proceedings titled "Man's role in changing the face of the earth." The contributors were far ahead of their time. There's been a lot of fascinating stuff since, ranging from how Native Americans altered their environments (sometimes drastically) to deforestation to preserving forests in Tokugawa-era Japan. The lush green Japan that the Japanese love and we admire is the outcome of many years of policy and practice. Tennessee could learn some lessons.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 29, 2010 9:09 AM | Report abuse

It will probably have to wait several thousand years, but I would suggest marking the beginning of the Anthropocene at the stratgraphic point were coal soot begins showing in significant quantities. Around 1800 is probably an OK marker point, though the major industrial action really began about 50 years later. Another marker point to contemplate is the layer where the first piece of scrap steel shows up.

Posted by: ebtnut | July 29, 2010 9:12 AM | Report abuse

Not to worry, ftb, we're always good hosts for first-time BPHers! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 9:14 AM | Report abuse

We were making big effects on the earth, its biota and climate long before 1800. Think of all those east Asian rice fields.
http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9164.html

Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 29, 2010 9:18 AM | Report abuse

ftb,
In BPH parlance, that is known as pulling a yellojkt. I think I threw in some extra, at least I hope so.

And it truly was an International BPH since we had three nations and two continents represented.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 9:24 AM | Report abuse

I always liked the Holocene episode were Picard and Data pretended to be Holmes and Watson.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 9:26 AM | Report abuse

ebtnut, I'd mark the point at where nonnatural, manufactured stuff first starts appearing -- especially plastic. Kind of like how you can find ancient cities and towns by the pottery and garbage strewn around them. 10,000 years from now there's going to be a very clear dividing line between the pre- and the post-plastic bag era.

Posted by: simpleton1 | July 29, 2010 9:26 AM | Report abuse

Total frenvy for the dr farm garden. Oh, the things I could experiment with. Indian-style multicropping: squash, corn, beans all interspersed. Tree propagation. Big Jim-related chilies. Sigh.

My latest idea is convincing suburbanites to grow their own grass seed in small delineated no-mow zones. It's an acquired taste, but a small plot of tall well-bred turf grass gone to seed has its own beauty. And bounty if the seed is harvested. Speaking of grass, a friend's father grew hay and grass seed exclusively and almost broke even on his farm. He kept it, anyway, better than many did. This was in Florida where rain is almost always nothing to worry about.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 9:33 AM | Report abuse

I would love to grow my own grass from seed because I never know what to do with the leftover seeds and stems. Perhaps make hemp grappa. However, until a few legal issues are resolved, I'm sticking to growing Kentucky Blue.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 9:52 AM | Report abuse

ftb, no problem at all -- please don't worry about it.

As has been pointed out, not the first time a BPH has been yellojacked.

Any of us could lose track of such a thing in the hubub and laughter and hugging on our way out the door.

To Joel's Kit, I'n thinking (again) of the movie "Silent Running," and any number of science fictional ecological scenarios.

Most of them dystopian.

More later.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 29, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

One of the big public awareness pushes when I was a kid was about pollution. Definitely better than nothing, but it seemed to have an OCD thing to it, not a ruining the planet thing. Turning off the lights/radio when we left the room was about the bill, not about the waste of the world's resources. While we may not have a handle on how to deal with the damage done, I think we're at least teaching our children how to be better stewards of Mother Earth. (If Momma ain't happy, ain't nobody happy.)

Speaking of happy, have a happy day all.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 29, 2010 10:03 AM | Report abuse

The past ten years have been the hottest decade in history:

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/28/state-of-the-climate-hottest-decade-ever/

A good time to be in the air conditioning industry, which of course adds its own positive feedback loop to the global climate change process. We better start evolving stegosaurus fins for heat rejection.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 10:25 AM | Report abuse

I remember the first Earth Day and being scared to death by Walter Conkite's reporting on the state of the earth. Doom coming via global cooling caused by pollution, IIRC. I may be wrong about that, but at that moment I envied the family dog her carefree existence.

I hope the changes we have made/are making/will make will be sufficient to save us. I dunno about it, though.

Posted by: slyness | July 29, 2010 10:29 AM | Report abuse

Good day to all!

It's really fun to read of the good time/laughs/hugs at the lBPH. I can feel the energy from you all. What an amazingly wonderful group, this boodle.

yello, I'm with you on the hemp grappa.

I'm going to really enjoy this kit because I ponder the subject often but haven't the real scientific training to assign the correct terms to my more abstract understanding. I expect to learn a lot!

On the homefront we found other weakened lath and plaster in the house and, while the workers are here, are now living in a home better suited in appearance to a haunted mansion. The old "will this marriage survive the remodel" pattern has not reared it's ugly head as yet. Love conquers all, right? Right? 8-))

Thunderstorms expected - stay safe.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 10:40 AM | Report abuse

The late Stephen Schneider was one of the scientists who advanced the global cooling theory. He later reversed his position based on newer evidence and models, something George Will and other climate change deniers see as evidence of misinformation rather than scientific advancement.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 10:52 AM | Report abuse

A core has been drilled through the Greenland ice cap all the way to bedrock. The ice at the bottom is more than 130,000 years old.
http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/07/drilling_projects_hits_greenla.html

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 29, 2010 10:57 AM | Report abuse

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropocene

The term was coined by Paul Crutzen, who worked at GIT (Georgia) and previously promoted the danger of nuclear war term ed "nuclear winter."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Crutzen

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

Talitha, I also am restoring an old old old house, and was thrilled to reach the haunted mansion stage. Definitely a step up. We found a ceiling behind a ceiling (which meant modern light fixtures didn't fit), yet no subfloors (I can watch DC in the basement from the kitchen merely by looking down); an awful lot of spoons and shoes seemed to have made their way into odd spaces, and when replacing the roof, found the support beams closer together than expected (which meant the slate had to be cut). The list goes on and on. Some may call us crazy for taking on such a project. They might have a point. Either way, good luck.


Posted by: LostInThought | July 29, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

The WaPo obituary for John Callahan who Gene Weingarten gave a tribute to in his chat this week:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/28/AR2010072805735.html

I'm not familiar with him by name, but judging from his list of publications, I've probably seen more of his cartoons than I realize.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

The coming bearocene age.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0Xa4bHcJu8

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 11:09 AM | Report abuse


It is an interesting idea, especially when you gloss over the details of the population collapse that will mark the end of the Anthropocene. I am often struck by the "erratics" that will show up in the fossil record like the pieces of flat granite from across the globe that will turn up in strata from this period.

That begs the question of who will be doing the digging.

Posted by: edbyronadams | July 29, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Jumper,
Just a nit-pick, but the Georgia Institute of Technology is always abbreviated as GT (for Georgia Tech). And never, never, do like Stephon Marbury and call it Georgia Tech University.

M.I.T. is the Georgia Tech of the North. I have the tee shirt to prove it.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

I'm so glad to hear the BPH was superb.

A tree-hugging friend of mine calls this the Meocene. As in the growth of personal consumerism and need to continually replace cars, appliances, computers, clothes, bakeware, etc.

To use Mr. A's analogies, she says we've been consuming ancient sunshine (oil, coal, gas) faster than we breathe. She guesses we've got this century to shift back to environmental sustainability before all hill's going to break loose, environmentally, politically, and socioeconomically.

On a cheerier note, I put a couple of large pitchers of cold strawberry lemonade in the ready room. And chewy chocolate cookies, fresh outta the oven.

Posted by: MsJS | July 29, 2010 11:40 AM | Report abuse

what was that movie that came out a year or two ago where in order for the earth to be saved humans had to lose something. that something was electricity. just plain didn't work.

LOL paddle along little doggie!!!

Posted by: nall92 | July 29, 2010 11:46 AM | Report abuse

yello, thanks for posting the link to John Callahan's obit as I might have missed it otherwise. I had put up the link to Gene's piece here on Tuesday and hope everyone reads it. Very funny and moving.
I can't remember where I ran across his work first but think it was a small paper in Colorado. Brilliantly offensively funny sad man. RIP

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

The worst thing to ever happen to planet earth was the Republican.

Posted by: elderbetty | July 29, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

GT it is, yello. I usually just say Georgia Tech in speech. Now git. ;>]

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

I just got out my box of games, Lincoln logs and Viewmasters because bc said the bunker needed a re-stock of such items.

Give the word and I'll send them back to Aspen. 8-]

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 12:17 PM | Report abuse

Yes, indeed (and I may be the last to realize it) front page alert.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

Hopefully we will have a good inventory of the Holocene beast and weeds before the Anthropocene mad scramble homogenizes everything together.
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2010/07/28/ns-deep-sea-discoveries.html

Nice to see that ROV are used for something other than tending to leaky petroleum equipment.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 29, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

Afternoon, all. I'm so far behind on backboodling, but it looks like folks have had quite a lot of fun lately.
Plastic would be a compelling geologic marker indicating the onset of the Anthropocene. The New Yorker had a great article a year or so ago about guys who liberate plastic bags that get caught high in the trees...
Talitha, good luck with the house and keep an eye out for rogue contractors.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 12:29 PM | Report abuse

> The worst thing to ever happen to planet earth was the Republican.

Yes, shame on them for ending the sustainable practice of slavery!

Posted by: AM11 | July 29, 2010 12:38 PM | Report abuse

bc,
I'm reluctant to say or hear the phrase "Is that a laser pointer in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?" It's going to be uncomfortable no matter which tack the conservation takes.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 1:07 PM | Report abuse

AM11, kind of playing fast and loose with the facts there? Like saying Geo Washington, a known womanizer, was homosexual because he had a gay time at parties. Republican means something very different today than it did then.

Lincoln, a former Whig, emancipated slaves in 10 states in an effort to *contain* slavery, not end it. It took a constitutional amendment (submitted by a Democrat) to bring the practice to an end.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 29, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

The storm has us 'teed up' as it barrels down I-270. Oh, boy.

Posted by: russianthistle | July 29, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Hey all!

Question for DIY older home renovations: I'm settling on a 110 yr old Victorian at the end of August, and a lot of the details have been obscured by too many (bad) coats of paint. What's the best way to strip that much old paint?

Thanks in advance!

Posted by: MoftheMountain | July 29, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

MoM, in my experience, the best way to do that is with a tool I like to keep around called "a professional." Seriously though, if you're taking it all the way back to original (harder than you think) there's the possibility of lead in the paint, and you really do need a professional. In my state, those who can remove lead paint have special credentials. Good luck.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 29, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

MoftheM - get a professional if you can afford it. Nasty job. Otherwise I'd go online and see what the latest tricks are because I haven't tackled something like that in a long time. Might be new, less-toxic strippers out there.

btw, we aren't restoring this house (I wish) just maintaining it in it's lovely antiquated state. We're too old with too many other interests. I grew up in a house that was almost 200 years old and under constant restoration of one sort or another. Never again.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

MoftheM - get a professional if you can afford it. Nasty job. Otherwise I'd go online and see what the latest tricks are because I haven't tackled something like that in a long time. Might be new, less-toxic strippers out there.

btw, we aren't restoring this house (I wish) just maintaining it in it's lovely antiquated state. We're too old with too many other interests. I grew up in a house that was almost 200 years old and under constant restoration of one sort or another. Never again.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 1:26 PM | Report abuse

This one is in great shape, really the only thing it needs is for the molding and banister to be stripped and repainted, and the wallpaper replaced. Oh, and the hideous stone fake fireplace removed. Strictly cosmetic, but very necessary.

Yeah, I was looking at IR instead of a chemical or using a heat gun because of the lead paint possibility (really almost a certainty, given the age and that it's molding).

I don't have a lot of money, but maybe I'll get some estimates and see how much it would be for someone else to do it. Hubby can satisfy his DIY itch by repainting once it's stripped.

Posted by: MoftheMountain | July 29, 2010 1:44 PM | Report abuse

MoftheM -- I suggest a winning lottery ticket.

Sorry, currently suffering the home improvement blues m'self. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Excellent kit, JA, and the pictures from the last kit are beautiful. As for this kit, people of every generation live like there's no tomorrow because it's a selfish way of thinking. In other words, not thinking about future generations, just seeing everything from a personal and death perspective. Sort of like, what's the point? Perhaps it's just too big for some people to wrap their minds around, and going back to the beginning of this comment, the ever looming mindset, what's in it for me? And few of us want to make the necessary changes to offset some of this stuff. Green is good if there's no pain.

Anybody see the View? I missed it, just getting in from the Center, and had to hit the laundry room.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 29, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Excellent kit, JA, and the pictures from the last kit are beautiful. As for this kit, people of every generation live like there's no tomorrow because it's a selfish way of thinking. In other words, not thinking about future generations, just seeing everything from a personal and death perspective. Sort of like, what's the point? Perhaps it's just too big for some people to wrap their minds around, and going back to the beginning of this comment, the ever looming mindset, what's in it for me? And few of us want to make the necessary changes to offset some of this stuff. Green is good if there's no pain.

Anybody see the View? I missed it, just getting in from the Center, and had to hit the laundry room.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 29, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

oopsy, sorry for the double post.
As you can see by the time notation, my posts have been hanging in space today.
And I only hit submit once. Anyone else?

And, yeah - a lottery ticket. Just another reason we maintain rather than restore.

MofthM, I hope you'll find a treasure under the ugly fake fireplace. When my dad tore out a wall that he knew concealed the fireplace for the original detached kitchen (house had been connected and later swallowed it over the years) the bricks were all handmade and beautiful. They were stamped with the name of our town which had apparently been quite a center for brickmaking in the late18th/early19th centuries. Quite a find and he lovingly restored the floorhearth with some salvedge bricks from another house of the same period.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

I did watch The View - not something I normally do. I thought President Obama did fine, but then I always do. He got some tough questions. The awful Elisabeth Hasselbeck kept asking where are the jobs, as if any right-wingers would approve of the government adding jobs, in a New Deal sort of way.

Posted by: seasea1 | July 29, 2010 2:30 PM | Report abuse

Seasea: You have to understand the lietmotive of the Repubs - they demand that more jobs be created but, whup, the government shouldn't do it. It's by giving away big tax breaks to the corporations (see, not repealing the Bush tax cuts) and then depend on the trickle-down theory. Oh, and don't extend unemployment bennies. It just encourages the wastrels who say they are looking for(nonexistent) jobs but in fact are happy to lounge around on the dole.

Posted by: ebtnut | July 29, 2010 2:46 PM | Report abuse

lol. I'm generally more of a scratch-off gal, but maybe I should go buy one tonight. ;)

talitha, that would be neat, but I have my doubts. I don't think this house ever actually had a fireplace, just a chimney for the stove and furnace. The chimney is in the next wall over. This monstrosity is tiled to the floor and just leans against the plastered wall in a completely random place in the parlor. My bet's the storage above the garage for treasure. The one section of it is made with very old lumber and most of the original doors and storm windows are up there.

Posted by: MoftheMountain | July 29, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

In defense of AM11, that was the very first thought I had when I read elderbetty's comment. But AM11 is new, and so we need to assume the worst.
Not.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Annie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zf052uxFF58&feature=avmsc2

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 2:54 PM | Report abuse

I had seen the elderbetty post, and thought it stood out as whackjob, whereas the am11 post had the whiff of truth while not to it, which is worse. FWIW, I thought I was reasonable in my response. But you're right, I should assume people are just mistaken, not hostile. Thanks.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 29, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

The Post hasn't fired Achenbach yet? He continues these anti-growth posts & it'll happen! I gotta check in occasionally just to find out if he's still there.

Gotta go--I'm below 2800 characters remaining already.

Posted by: Nebreklaw01 | July 29, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

My problem with the comment of AM11 is the implication (I have been working very hard lately on my imply/infer confusion) that slavery is in fact a sustainable practice. Widescale antebellum slavery was in support of the cotton industry which was as bad a monolithic farming practice as corn is today.

Also the slavery system seemed to have been pretty rough on the slaves.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Our receptionist pointed out that she'd just gotten her power turned back on last night after the weekend storm, and she'd sure appreciate it if today's storm doesn't knock it right back out.

Posted by: bobsewell | July 29, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

The extraterrestrial solar flux is 1.366 kilowatts per square meter which sure seems like plenty. We just need a capacitor big enough to capture it.

It does mean you need at least a couple of hundred acres to power even one Delorean Time Machine, which seems pretty greedy, not to mention not very sustainable.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

MotM, a Real Fake fireplace - gotcha. lol
Eeewww, I bet that -is- ugly then. But rummaging in attics is always a treat. Have fun!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Something I enjoyed in the Post...........how could that be?

Posted by: rusty3 | July 29, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Uh, I'm pretty fairly certain that AM11's post was a sarcastic comment upon elderbetty's comment that was au courant in its distaste for the modern Republican party, but historically uninformed regarding the fact that the Republicans were not always the Party Of Unrepentant Evil. In other words, both elderbetty and AM11 are probably decent people that we would like.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Please note that I am not labeling elderbetty as historically uninformed -- the post itself was historically uninformed, which really just means that the casual reader could not be sure from context that elderbetty is aware of the historical background.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 3:33 PM | Report abuse

All very interesting, thought provoking, and...academic. Short of a massive forced reordering of people's lives across the world or mass population reductions, there is nothing that can be done that will be of consequence. Even if the (now defunct) Kyoto accords were fully implemented, it would take 40 more agreements of similar magnitude to even come close to affecting temperatures if CO2 really is affecting the climate. So drive your Prius all you want. You're not making any difference.

Posted by: mpolybius | July 29, 2010 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Oh sure. They decide this just after I buy farm the farm.

Posted by: --dr-- | July 29, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Saw a license plate on a Prius today that said 4RWORLD. Clearly wasn't mpolybius's.

I'm on the record as betting on the over for a peak world population of 10 billion. Humans aren't always rational economic models. I also predict that at that time, starvation/malnutrition as currently defined will be at a lower percentage than it is today, which is a riskier bet. I have a lot of faith in technology. Not so much in governments. Most famines are man-made.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Nebreklaw01, if the Post ever fires JA, it will deserve to die a dead-tree edition death.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

balancingact, we love yew!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Aspend- the richmanmade world...

Posted by: Wildthing1 | July 29, 2010 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Or is Nebreklaw a long lost boodler I've never heard of? I'm always worried about that possibility.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

mpoly writes: "Short of a massive forced reordering of people's lives across the world or mass population reductions, there is nothing that can be done that will be of consequence." Uh, be careful what you imagine, because that scenario might come to pass. Not likely in our lifetime, but that time may come. Maybe driving a Prius doesn't do much by itself. What we need to do is reduce the billions of tons of coal and billions of barrels of oil that the world burns every year. The science says that global warming is already here (don't get side-tracked by that debunked "controversy" earlier this year).

Posted by: ebtnut | July 29, 2010 3:58 PM | Report abuse

re: The Anthropocene

Thanks Joel, for stealing my thunder.

It dawned on me recently that wage slavery as a pastime and slacking as an advocation has missed something really important, since say the dawn of the industrial revolution: Stealing Sunshine.

The length of the daylight hours varies throughout the year. The work day does not, except in the case of the "required" overtime rampant these days.

My question was: If the daylight hours are "family time", and they are, because humans a basically diurnal by default, then what effect would increased overtime on the job have on "family time" ?

I did some "quick" calculations. From December to December, sunrise is a cosine curve, sunset is a sine curve, and both depend on latitude. The work day has to include some commuting time ... I didn't say the calculations were easy.

For identical 50hr(10hr/day) weeks (40hr 5x8hr nominal) wages increase 38%, provided you are paid overtime, which you are probably not.

Not including "free" weekends ...
Dallas: family time down 51%
Milwaukee: family time down 65%

Beijing is on the same latitude as Decatur, IL and the results would be somewhere in between. I mention this because some jerk of a boss is bound to complain that it's all about global competition when in fact it's about being a Chinese jerk or an American jerk.


Posted by: gannon_dick | July 29, 2010 3:58 PM | Report abuse

talitha;

The answer is no, nebreklaw is not a Boodler. Just a irregularly appearing troll.

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse

I for one have very much appreciated Joel's reporting from the Gulf, and sadly could benefit from his skills locally. A broken pipeline has spilled 800,000 to 1 million gallons of oil into a tributary of the Kalamazoo River over the last several days, and it's some 40 miles or so from Lake Michigan.

The progress of its flow suggests that I'll be able to smell it when I get home tonight, as I'm on a hill within 2 miles of the river. Not nearly a disaster on the same scale as Louisiana, but quite meaningful to us in south central Michigan.

Wish you were here, Joel. Or not.

Posted by: Enterprise1701 | July 29, 2010 4:13 PM | Report abuse

Hey there, Enterprise1701. Hope things are resolved quickly and appropriately.

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

That's terrible, Enterprise. Has it received national coverage? I know about the pipe broken by tugs in the Louisiana lake but haven't read of "your" spill.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Yes, the Kalamzoo spill has received national news coverage over the past few days. Clean-up has been hampered by high water from heavy thunderstorms, so it is likely that some of the oil will hit lake Michigan.

Posted by: ebtnut | July 29, 2010 4:25 PM | Report abuse

SCC: Kalamazoo. Sorry.

Posted by: ebtnut | July 29, 2010 4:26 PM | Report abuse

talitha, Enterprise situation is front page news here, as the source is an energy company from here, Enbridge.

Enterprise I hope the situation is resolved quickly and cleaned just as fast.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/enbridge-was-warned-about-pipeline/article1656290/

Posted by: dmd3 | July 29, 2010 4:28 PM | Report abuse

talitha,

Here is the AP story that the WaPo ran today:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/28/AR2010072801421.html

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 4:30 PM | Report abuse

I just saw on CNN the cover on Time magazine, and that is awful to look at, and even worse to think about. What kind of human being does that to someone? I keep thinking this is 2010, but the more I see of the news, it's like the Stone Age. Just horrible, folks.

Posted by: cmyth4u | July 29, 2010 4:30 PM | Report abuse

talitha, Enterprise situation is front page news here, as the source is an energy company from here, Enbridge.

Enterprise I hope the situation is resolved quickly and cleaned just as fast.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/enbridge-was-warned-about-pipeline/article1656290/

Posted by: dmd3 | July 29, 2010 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Enterprise1701, I read about the spill for the first time this morning and it looks like it's finally getting the press it deserves--which is not really a good thing, is it? I hope it's contained soon.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Thanks everyone. I didn't realize how out of the loop I'd been with this house mess. Ten boodle noodle lashes for me!

Have been saving this and it somehow seems appropriate -----

http://www.chron.com/apps/comics/showComick.mpl?date=20081207&name=Rhymes_with_Orange

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 4:35 PM | Report abuse

The transition to the Hispanic Scene is a disaster for California's environment already. The national parks are devastated by it in some areas already. Only Libs support it, because they hate whites and don't want whites to have a national park because they don't want whites to have a nation.

Posted by: OldAtlantic | July 29, 2010 4:51 PM | Report abuse

Huh?

I'm glad I don't understand that last comment.

Posted by: slyness | July 29, 2010 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Wow.

Posted by: Yoki | July 29, 2010 5:00 PM | Report abuse

Well, the ocean's thataway, OldAtlantic. Just make a hard right turn as you head north. You can't miss it.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 5:00 PM | Report abuse

OldAtlantic says: "The transition to the Hispanic Scene is a disaster for California's environment already. The national parks are devastated by it in some areas already. Only Libs support it, because they hate whites and don't want whites to have a national park because they don't want whites to have a nation."

Umm, I am a liberal and I am white and I think you are totally bat-poop crazy, my friend. You are claiming that the people that have only just arrived are responsible for the environmental devastation of a hundred years of extravagant and wasteful industry and agriculture? I think not.

We can have a lot more productive conversation if you would give up the desperately stupid Ann Coulter-derived notion that half the country (you know, the half that voted against GW Bush, the half+10% that voted for Obama) is composed of traitors. It is not actually philosophically possible for a majority to be treasonous. Get over it. Also, the national Parks have been typically among the favorite programs of us liberals, and the favorite targets of right-wingers. You, pal, are not a traitor; you are merely an idiot.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 5:04 PM | Report abuse

OldAtlantic has already made a hard right turn, I suspect.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

If one man driving a Prius makes no difference, what effect does one man's vow to not commit murder do to the murder rate? Practically zip!

So, using the logic of mpolybius, I think I'll begin murdering. Where was it you live, again? (Just kidding.)

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

We take energy mined from the store laid down in past ages, turn it into paint, slather it on our houses, and then turn it into dust and sludge, thereby hastening the heat death of the universe!

The laws of thermodynamics will be obeyed, whether we wish it or not.

Anthropologist Leslie White proposed that stages in the advance of human civilization depend on increase capture of energy:

"the basic law of cultural evolution" was "culture evolves as the amount of energy harnessed per capita per year is increased, or as the efficiency of the instrumental means of putting the energy to work is increased"[2]."

http://pithecus.com/home/100/100wk14.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_White

It may not be that we over-consume, but that we under-produce and use it inefficiently.

The science fiction futurists argue that we aren't even at the first stage of true advancement: capturing and using the energy resources of our own planet, let alone a star or a galaxy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kardashev_scale

As far as impacts that change the environment (rather than just scattering rubbish through it), I've got an anthology from the 1950s of papers documenting how humans have altered environments, largely through agricultural projects using only current/recent solar energy inputs. Slash and burn farming can be amazingly efficient, if you have enough land to allow bioaccumulation of solar energy for long enough to sustain it.

As far as the Anthropocene, isn't if from a philosophico-religious standpoint pretty much what God ordered our ancestors to do? "Here are the keys to the car. It's up to you to figure out what all the knobs and levers and pedals do."

So let's date it from the Biblical timeline for Adam and Eve - 6,000 YBP - which is only a blink in geographic time.

Posted by: j3hess | July 29, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

True, Snuke, but I couldn't resist.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 5:09 PM | Report abuse

Curse you, DNAgirl! Now I'm hooked!
http://www.sinfest.net/
It's on kit, sure.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 5:09 PM | Report abuse

S'cuse me - SciTim. Hard right just hit me when I read that and I couldn't shake it

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 5:11 PM | Report abuse

Thank you for that post SciTim, and talitha you made me giggle.

Cassandra you made me curious about the time cover, it is a powerful cover. The Globe and Mail did a multimedia series called behind the veil (Emmy nominated) I believe that womans story was included, it was a great but difficult series to follow but one that needs to be told.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/behind-the-veil/

Posted by: dmd3 | July 29, 2010 5:19 PM | Report abuse

The end of politeness started with the endless whine of Democrats when Al Gore lost fair and square to otherwise responsible Republican leadership in 2000. Democrats never got over it. In revenge, Democrats were willing to ruin the economy, denigrate our efforts in wars of necessity and feed out our national wealth to deadbeats that couldn't pay their bills. Democrats are the ruination of the landscape the last 10 years and the culmination of it all is Barak Husseini Obama and Charlie Rangle. Hilarious. Harmful, destructive, catastrophic, disastrous, but hey, you laugh to keep from crying. And here we are, in steep Democrat-inspired decline in the economy, military, space, all forms of tech, the entire Democrat leadership corrupt and surrendering waiting once again, just like in 1980 and 2000, waiting for responsible, adult and stand-up Republican leadership, hold our collective breath hoping Democrats aren't allowed to go too far in the ruination.

Posted by: JamesChristian | July 29, 2010 5:20 PM | Report abuse

Um, who ran the country for eight of the last ten years? Would somebody check for a Front Page Alert? The trolls are getting mighty thick in here. I hope those Parcheesi boards have made it to the bunker.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 5:27 PM | Report abuse

I put up the front page alert hours ago, yello.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 5:29 PM | Report abuse

I just got out my box of games, Lincoln logs and Viewmasters because bc said the bunker needed a re-stock of such items.

Give the word and I'll send them back to Aspen. 8-]

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 12:17 PM |

Yes, indeed (and I may be the last to realize it) front page alert.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 12:19 PM |

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 5:31 PM | Report abuse

I'm on my way to the grocery store and ABC, anyway. Got a supply list or request ready?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 5:35 PM | Report abuse

Ten billion population is sustainable with soylent green and I recommend JamesChristian for the first batch, however unpalatable his opinions.

Posted by: -tao- | July 29, 2010 5:35 PM | Report abuse

I'm in shock and awe that someone somewhere thinks the Dubya government was "responsible" and "adult."

Posted by: MoftheMountain | July 29, 2010 5:41 PM | Report abuse

Just exterminate the human infestation on this planet and everything will be ok.

Posted by: AmericanWithABrain | July 29, 2010 5:57 PM | Report abuse

Just exterminate the infestation of humans on this planet and everything will be ok.

Posted by: AmericanWithABrain | July 29, 2010 5:58 PM | Report abuse

Just to counter popular opinion, not every random thought I have goes on the boodle. Some go to Twitter.

https://twitter.com/yellojkt/status/19850833237

Thus beating -tao- to the Soylent Green call-out by at least an hour. Only because bc or RD weren't around.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 6:12 PM | Report abuse

talitha,
My apologies for missing the FPA. And I wasn't trying to pile on earlier with the Kalamazoo oil spill link. I was just showing off my mad WaPo search box skilz.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 6:18 PM | Report abuse

I got very tired of 'waiting for responsible, adult and stand-up Republican leadership.' And I am a Republican. Or at least a RINO.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 29, 2010 6:23 PM | Report abuse

I want to make some kind of pithy, ironic, extremely intelligent observation about the posts by OldAtlantic and JamesChristian, but I am so appalled I just can't.
I mean, I don't get it at all. But my wonderful balancingbeau tells me that sometimes there's nothing to get.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 6:51 PM | Report abuse

But I do like the phrase bat-poop crazy. Thanks, ScienceTim.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 6:57 PM | Report abuse

yello, no problem. Glad you all are here to rattle my cage about current events this week. I've been running in circles between the construction workers and trying to finish a couple of commissions. I take breaks only to catch up with the boodle - newspaper reading fell to the wayside.

Back from the store with beverages, steamed shrimp, tons of peaches and sweet corn and a run by the Chinese takeout for Singapore mei fun, dumplings and ribs. That should hold us, bunker or no bunker. Dig in!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 7:02 PM | Report abuse


The question is whether the Anthropocene will be any thicker that the Iridium rich layer at the K-T boundary. I'm uncertain that it will and, in discussing matters on a geologic time scale, politics means nothing.

On more acute matters,NOAA director Jane Lubchenco, admits that microbes are doing most of the work in the Gulf cleanup. That is a good thing. Inject politics if you must.

Posted by: edbyronadams | July 29, 2010 7:26 PM | Report abuse

I wish WaPo would let me use a huge headline-sized font here to say THANK YOU!!!!! to my fellow Fed who generously gave me exact change for the bus fare I needed to get home when the trains were stopped by fallen wires! THANK YOU DUDE!!!! :-)))

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 7:31 PM | Report abuse

What's with this new sign-in process? i forgot what i wanted to say after many red messages. Is wapo punishing lurkers?

Posted by: bh72 | July 29, 2010 7:42 PM | Report abuse

Your comment submission failed for the following reasons:

Too many comments have been submitted from you in a short period of time. Please try again in a short while.
Maybe Wapo doesn't like Crome

Posted by: bh72 | July 29, 2010 7:44 PM | Report abuse

If microbes are cleaning up the oil, it means they must have evolved to eat petroleum products.

Which means that oil spills are a natural phenomenum.

Which means human impacts are also just part of the natural order.

Which means: drill, baby, drill!

(Is that political enough?)

Perhaps I'll place a small pan of 30 weight in my garden in order to cultivate some of the said microbes so I'll be ready when we start drilling off of Santa barbara again.

Posted by: j3hess | July 29, 2010 7:50 PM | Report abuse

Joel, the Sign in computer has run amuck. After ten minutes I forgot what I wanted to say

Posted by: bh72 | July 29, 2010 7:51 PM | Report abuse

Crom laughs at your WaPo servers. He laughs from his mountain. And if I die I have to go before him and he will ask me, "What is the Riddle of of the Boodle?" If I don't know he will cast me out of Valhalla, laughing.

Oh, wait...

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 7:51 PM | Report abuse

It's a mystery.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 7:53 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I guess we all "whine." I see that accusation a lot from the Great Unable to Freakin Spell crowd. Must be downloaded from the tentacles of the Kraken of Moronicity on a daily basis.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 8:04 PM | Report abuse

So Shirley Sherrod is going to lawyer up on Andrew Breitbart.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/29/AR2010072902884.html?hpid=topnews

Well, she has my blessings and best wishes, but I suspect it ain't gonna be as much fun as she thinks it's going to be.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 29, 2010 8:06 PM | Report abuse

If you could sue people for lying, I'd be rich.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 8:13 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I'd say there's a very reasonable argument to be made against DimBart for slander... *shrug*

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 29, 2010 8:21 PM | Report abuse

DaveoftheCoonties: I love the ice core projects. I try to read the details when I find them. I think they have hit the 130,000 year threshhold in China, too, and they got some really old ice in South America a few years back.

I love that stuff.

I vote for plastic in the sediment layers as the true anthropomorphic boundary. It largely corresponds with the atom bomb radioisotopes, so either is good, I guess.

We will ravage the Earth a lot more before we turn away from the ravaging. There will have to be large world-wide wars with hundreds of millions involved before we change a thing.

That won't really happen until resource depletion gets bad.... the fight over the last bit of coal or of oil or of gas. I peg that time to arrive in about 50 years.

I really am a person with a very positive outlook. Really. My positivity is near-term and local, in general.

Posted by: baldinho | July 29, 2010 8:31 PM | Report abuse

As well you should be, baldinho, with a young one and a wee one on the way. Makes me smile whenever I think of it. :~)

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 8:39 PM | Report abuse

Sheesh, this probably isn't the kit to brag about murdering fish in. But hey, since when haven't I been tone-deaf?

just came back from fishin' and I caught a 32 inch Northern Pike on a 10-pound test line. The fish weighed in at 8 1/2 pounds and it felt a lot heavier in the water. Easily my biggest fish ever, and it cleaned out enough flesh to feed six people.

We all fished in full awareness of the size and catch limits in an effort to keep fishing sustainable.

Can't say the same about some corporations, but that subject has been kitted already.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 29, 2010 8:44 PM | Report abuse

I have no doubt that the Anthropocene isn't sustainable. I just have no idea how things are going to evolve. This isn't an excuse for fatalism or inaction, but a simple recognition of fundamental ignorance. The future surprises us. And even if there are elements of the future that would horrify us, I like to think that humanity is adaptive enough to find a way to thrive and be happy.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 29, 2010 8:44 PM | Report abuse

Silicon is cheap and widely available. We will all create avatars and businesses on Second Life and begin living there.

Do you want an Escalade, vacation home, and modest yacht? You can have them without draining the world of resources!

When 330 million US residents live in cubicles and subsist on 2000 calories of high-fructose corn syrup a day, we'll cut our energy requirements by a factor of 6 and save the planet!

Posted by: j3hess | July 29, 2010 8:44 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, talitha. I smile a lot thinking about them, too.

Backboodling a bit, one thing must be said.

Today's Republican party should get as much credit for abolishing slavery as today's group of day laborers in Queens gets credit for building the Brooklyn bridge.

Posted by: baldinho | July 29, 2010 8:45 PM | Report abuse

There's a heck of a good argument for slander, although it's hardly a slam-dunk winning argument. But even a winning legal argument doesn't always turn out to be worth the various investments that went into making it.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 29, 2010 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Wow, Wilbrod! That's something to brag about. How's Wilbrodog, btw?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Microbes do, in fact, eat petroleum. Petroleum seeps are, in fact, natural. As is poop, which also is eaten by microbes. That does not make it any more attractive or desirable to dump our raw sewage into our reservoirs. You need to let the little microbes do their thing BEFORE a noticeable quantity of the organic goo gets concentrated into systems where it doesn't belong in large quantities, like the Gulf of Mexico, or a plate of shrimp, or a plate, or shrimp. It's synchronicity, I tell you.

Oh, wait, sorry, that last bit is from "Repo Man" (not to be confused with "Repo Men.").

Plate. Shrimp. Plate of shrimp.

2353 characters remaining. I can keep this up all night.

Oops -- 2308.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 8:51 PM | Report abuse

More on ice cores. Lonnie Thompson is the man. I'd love to see him speak or meet him with a chance to just talk sometime. I have read a few articles and at least one book of his. One of the people I most admire nowadays.

Posted by: baldinho | July 29, 2010 8:52 PM | Report abuse

Hi all, got power back at 8 am, have spent a hectic day carrying once-frozen vegetables to the compost pile, buying new food, and other suchlike necessities.

The resemblance to Snowmageddon is uncanny. There's nothing like seeing a lot of huge, industrial-strength trucks rumbling through your neighborhood to solve some soluble problem. No matter what flaws there may or may not be in the advance planning or in the infrastructure itself, there is an instant, unstoppable, reflex of gratitude. However, I still think PEPCO is due some after-action scrutiny. The grid in MoCo seems kinda fragile...

I loved the kit, by the way. Very thought-provoking. When I first started reading Joel, I thought, "Wow! The Post finally has a decent science writer!" -- but it's become clear since then that Joel is a contender for the all-around.

Posted by: woofin | July 29, 2010 8:56 PM | Report abuse

Moping and hoping
hours for the gnome's return with
tummy quiet--nose warm.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 29, 2010 9:07 PM | Report abuse

Fish already cleaned,
so no dog entertainment,
just the smell of fun.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 29, 2010 9:09 PM | Report abuse

Yes, Wilbrod, I'd like to know that Wilbrodog is feeling well today, myself. How is he?

Posted by: slyness | July 29, 2010 9:10 PM | Report abuse

Reading the "where has the oil gone" story today in the Post, I was struck by comments from the scientists who were finding oil trapped between a crab's shell and its body and thinking that perhaps the oil got trapped while the crabs were molting and between shells. Ouch. The disappearing oil seems like a "we don't know what we don't know and won't know we didn't know until we see it" situation for sure.
I've think I've used up my quote mark quota for the night.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 9:11 PM | Report abuse

balancingact, until we get italics, which I'm informed is a lost cause, sail along. Others may disagree with my punctuation formulations but it's a forgiving bunch on the whole.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Glad to hear that, Wilbrodog! Even if I did BOOO.

Posted by: slyness | July 29, 2010 9:23 PM | Report abuse

But . . . but aren't well dogs supposed to have cool noses? Moping for the gnome and knowing he missed the fun means he's not up to par yet, right?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Shh, still guilting gnomes:
Sick dogs need real pampering
and quality food.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 29, 2010 9:36 PM | Report abuse

Yes, bogey dog here:
or, double eagle dog? STILL.
Not whole in one day.

-Wilbrodog-

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 29, 2010 9:42 PM | Report abuse

Startling news: I am now making silhouette models of the Browning Hi-Power P35 single-action automatic pistol. For my wife.

I just thought you ought to know that.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 10:00 PM | Report abuse

Ray Bradbury, speaking to insurgent students in the '60s, told them to not burn their draft cards, burn their drivers' licenses instead, and not to shoot cops, but shoot the guts out of every third car they saw.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 10:02 PM | Report abuse

Ah, SciTim's got his saw employed. Excellent! Hope you're taking photos of these implements of destruction and other creations.

Jumper, did Bradbury say anything about burning bras?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 10:18 PM | Report abuse

William Shatner in Judgement at Nuremberg?!
And so many movies to see before I sleep....

Posted by: DNA_Girl | July 29, 2010 10:28 PM | Report abuse

No, talitha, I think that was Marion Zimmer Bradley.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 29, 2010 10:33 PM | Report abuse

If you have extra models of the pistols you could keep them in your bag and when you see somebody you think needs a good laugh run up and give them one. People need a good laugh now and then.

Posted by: engelmann | July 29, 2010 10:36 PM | Report abuse

Hah! touche', Jumper.

I've been watching the 1956 movie Rock Around the Clock on TCM while k-nitting and boodling this evening, soooooo just because . . . and give the video a chance until the dancers get their feet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tI4qO5Y9M1Q

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 10:49 PM | Report abuse

Perhaps I should keep one in the back of my Manly Vest.

I also discovered that you can use thin oak-veneer board to make a very nice vampire-killing stake (Mr. Pointy™) suitable for storing inside a loose-leaf binder pocket for use at college. If only Buffy had been so equipped. It also would be much better for slipping through the ribs than the thick round phallic sort of stake that Buffy favored.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 29, 2010 10:59 PM | Report abuse

Happy is as happy does. I choose joy.

Posted by: Yoki | July 29, 2010 11:08 PM | Report abuse

Had a few minutes, catching up.

*Tim, your 3:30ish...thanks. I'll have to pay attention to how FPAs influence me. Also, so sorry I missed you at yet another BPH. Glad a good time was had by all.

Outta time. A very happy night to all....

Posted by: LostInThought | July 29, 2010 11:12 PM | Report abuse

"Say friend, nice guitar you got there."
(oops, more quotes.)
Love the clip, Talitha! Makes me want to head out to Glen Echo for awhile, but I'd better head to bed instead--the traffic lights probably aren't working, anyway. Goodnight, all.

Posted by: balancingact | July 29, 2010 11:12 PM | Report abuse

Has anyone noticed that Jon Stewart looks really good with the new beard? Perhaps it's just my attraction to men of 60s (18s & 19s) but I'm rather beguiled.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 11:21 PM | Report abuse

scc: "the" 60s. (more beguiled that I realized, apparently) 8~]

Posted by: talitha1 | July 29, 2010 11:23 PM | Report abuse

Jumper, Bradbury said that? He was a bit of a futurist.

By the pricking of his thumbs....

Posted by: baldinho | July 29, 2010 11:57 PM | Report abuse

Publix is selling fresh Florida shrimp and fresh Alaska salmon. The shrimps have become a rarity for a number of reasons. Cheap imports, loss of dock space to cruiseliners at Port Canaveral, the list goes on.

This brings to mind a shrimp-related story.

In Jacksonville, the high-rise Mathews Bridge across the St. Johns had a metal grate deck, disconcerting to drive on and not providing great traction. One day, a young woman's car spun out of control. She got out. She fell overboard. Almost immediately, a passing shrimp boat picked her up, more or less unhurt.

Locally, it was low 81, high 94. Once again no rain.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 30, 2010 12:44 AM | Report abuse

Sleep and dream of rain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CB1tBjcWug

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 2:11 AM | Report abuse

baldinho, I read that Bradbury quote minutes before I posted it. From the context, he was more pointing out the extent of crash deaths and how inured to the carnage people had become. (I guess still have) But such a good quote.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 30, 2010 4:47 AM | Report abuse

Apaprently the power-line-across-the-tracks affair will make the Dawn Patrol an adventure as well... *SIGHHHHHHHHHH*

*off-to-battle-the-commuting-hordes Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 5:31 AM | Report abuse

Why does it not surprise me that these crooks are huge Dubya supporters?

http://tinyurl.com/32568d5

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 7:13 AM | Report abuse

Welcome to The DMV:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/29/AR2010072905868.html

Not the Department of Motor Vehicles, the DC-Maryland-Virginia Greater Metropolitan Area. It's enough to make me want to fly to the ATL.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 7:16 AM | Report abuse

So you folks aren't "The Beltway" any more?

Posted by: baldinho | July 30, 2010 7:18 AM | Report abuse

Happy Friday, everybody! We're looking forward to a pleasant weekend. The high tomorrow is supposed to be 85, a real change from the mid-90's.

I have a busy day ahead, including a stay with a friend who is dealing with a disease that has the doctors scratching their heads. It's not a good thing when they don't know what's going on or what to do about it. However, he feels fine, just can't be left by himself.

Hi Cassandra! I hope you have a pleasant day and don't overdo.

Posted by: slyness | July 30, 2010 7:20 AM | Report abuse

Why lie? Because you can make tax-free offshore millions, that is why lie. Wasn't Enron headquartered in these guys neck of the woods? Texas is like illegal offshore account nirvana.

Posted by: baldinho | July 30, 2010 7:23 AM | Report abuse

'miorning all. We are having the first cool morning in ages. Barely 13C/55F early on and the max is supposed to be 21C/70F today, all this on a wonderful sunny day.

Congrats Wilbrod, that is a serious pike by any standard. I haven't been fishing this year, the water level in the rivers I usually fish are so low it is depressing.

Last day at work before a 2-weeks vacation. Yeah! With the Civic holiday coming up on Monday the place is empty. Tumbleweeds rolling in the hallways and the sound of my steps reverberating against the walls of empty cubicles empty. So empty I'm the medium boss today. Big management was really scraping the bottom of the barrel...

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 30, 2010 8:08 AM | Report abuse

"The beltway" seems about like Frank Baum's Deadly Desert. As his books about Oz proliferated, ever-larger tracts beyond the Desert were annexed to his world.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 30, 2010 8:12 AM | Report abuse

Perfect time for a coup, Shriek... :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 8:20 AM | Report abuse

Good morning you all!

The kit and the boodle (the whole kaboodle) make for fascinating reading and as usual have learned from both.

Scotty! What a mess that was and so glad you weren't in the car with the wire(s) down on it (you weren't, were you?). We saw it on local news and vintage husband was concerned about no bathrooms for the passengers who had to be onboard for hours.

To whoever/whomever I read besmirching The Magical Prius, you need to get on Rt. 66 during rush hour and see the hundreds/thousands of hybrids moving along at a nice clip in HOV (along with bikers). Pot shots at us greenies is sport these daze......

Just now my effort is to buy less/no plastic. All containers should be cardboard, glass or metal, the way it was back in my folks time and to some extent, my childhood. I do not have a vegetable garden, but I sure do appreciate our local out-of-doors produce markets. Off to buy silver queen corn, squash&onions, tomatoes, cucs and possibly a little watermelon or peaches or both for the weekend. Recycled cloth grocery bags. Hiho, hiho, off in the magical prius we go.

Posted by: VintageLady | July 30, 2010 8:50 AM | Report abuse

Hey VL! :-)

No worries, I was still in the office when the storm came through and the wires came down. I was able to get home with minimal fuss, and only had to stand around for 30 minutes this morning to start the trek to work.

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 8:52 AM | Report abuse

Welcome to all the new folks who appreciate Joel's efforts. Some of us don't always agree with him, but we recognize his genius, plus he is a very nice fellow.

Posted by: VintageLady | July 30, 2010 8:56 AM | Report abuse

Welcome to all the new folks who appreciate Joel's efforts. Some of us don't always agree with him, but we recognize his genius, plus he is a very nice fellow.

Posted by: VintageLady | July 30, 2010 8:58 AM | Report abuse

VintageLady: the no plastic packaging thing is very hard to do. Any normal supermarket is awash in the stuff. It is disheartening.

Posted by: baldinho | July 30, 2010 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.
Getting back to the Kit for a second:

I think that the general public isn't going to buy into an "Anthropocene," particularly as a transition from the Holocene with which we've all become accustomed to for lo these thousands of years.

You can just hear the questions, "Anthropo - what? ???"

In this 24-hour Internetted, Reality-TV-onlinevideo-FaceTwittering world, marketers are going to suggest changing the name, for sure.

Anthroplology (and that prefix) reminds many dark rooms full of dusty books and guys with round wire-rim glasses smoking pipes over desks strewn with yellowed papers in front of chalkboards with timelines scrawled upon them.

Besides, everybody knows we're not Anthropeople, we're *Homo Sapiens*.

So, how to brand this Brave New world we're making and the ecological situation in order to draw people's attention to it?

Calling it the 'Sapiencene' has some attractive alliteration, but isn't really representative of the human condition if you look at it objectively, is it? [Certainly not *my* condition, if you ask anyone who knows me.]

So, what's next? From a 21st century marketing perspective, I'm sure many would want to brand it the "HomoScene."

Very hip, very now. And perfect for raising awareness for conditions on a Hot Planet, some would say. Others might even call it "Planet Hot." And how great is it that it sits between Venus and Mars?

Don't know that I'm going to have time to expand on this HomoScene idea later, how to market it with commericals featuring climate scientists dancing sweatily on a sun-drenched Kansas ocean beach like they're in a beer or fashion swimwear ad, or how to apply the HomoScene campaign to other related situations, such as population growth.

Feel free to discuss among yourselves.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 30, 2010 9:09 AM | Report abuse

Please. Planet Hott. Much better.

And here is the only anthropologist I know. Not a wire rims and bow-tie kinda guy. He rocks the mohawk, eats a carb-free diet, and does charity work in Ghana.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_bF-IP24kY

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Sort of depressing Kit, but no doubt that it's true and I have not got a lot of faith in people's ability to see the future and make the necessary changes!

On a happier note, we also have nice cooler weather. I'm getting some stuff done before going to buy corn and then getting ready for my little part time job. The granddaughters are coming tomorrow to stay overnight. We will be taking them to the John Alden house and then to a Shakespeare play tomorrow night. Gotta get some learnin' into them even tho' it's summer!

Posted by: badsneakers | July 30, 2010 9:29 AM | Report abuse

DotC, thanks for the memories of the Matthews Bridge, very scary for a brand new driver in the rain. Were you there when the Maxwell House coffee factory made Jax smell like a kitchen in the morning? And way back to the mango discussion, when we lived in Miami Hayden mangoes were the yummy choice, my Mom could pick them out just by the scent.

Posted by: -CB- | July 30, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

bc, loved your little discussion, but just as long as the climate scientists aren't retiring to a pair of bathtubs ... ching ching that champagne, baby!

Posted by: russianthistle | July 30, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

My recommendation Plasticene.

VL, love your attempt to stay away from plastic packaging, so much overkill on most products.

bc, I am thinking certain segments of society might not like Homoscene, although that in itself might be a good enough reason to choose it - great post.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 30, 2010 9:53 AM | Report abuse

yello, great tip-in.
Still, I'm not sure, but I think "Hott" is done, like "Hawt" or "Teh Hottness." Or Jon Gosselin.

But what do I know? I sure don't know you're anthropology guy, but it sounds like he could work for that ad. Come to think of it, might be helpful to record it with those scientists when Burning Man becomes a beach party. (That is, when the ocean comes to Burning Man, rather than the other way around).

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 30, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

Paul Crutzen is just jumping on that 'no homo' thing all the kidz are doing nowadayz. Perhaps even in The MVA.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJnlPP7jm5s&playnext=1&videos=LV2ftoHQ21Y

I feel like telling them to pull up their pantz and get off my lawn.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 10:00 AM | Report abuse

I have changed my mind just thought that we would be able to say Pat Robertson lived during the Homoscene era - totally makes it the number 1 choice and puts a huge grin on my face.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 30, 2010 10:07 AM | Report abuse

CB, when Maxwell House consolidated its coffee roasting, the Jacksonville plant on the St. Johns won out over the plant in New Jersey whose big sign was highly visible from Manhattan.

In the mango department, Publix had lots of big green Keitt mangos from Homestead on sale in 1992 when hurricane Andrew hit and destroyed the groves. It felt creepy to be enjoying the fruit of deceased trees.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 30, 2010 10:29 AM | Report abuse

Seen on the back of an expensive fancy-a$$ BMW SUV this morning:

Don't let the car fool you
My treasure is in heaven

I think there is much that escapes the understanding of this individual.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 30, 2010 10:37 AM | Report abuse

I wouldn't worry about the DMV moniker. As I recall -they- tried the GBW (Greater Baltimore Washington) moniker a decade or so ago, even arguing over whether it should be GBW or GWB (because shouldn't size win out over alphabetical order?) and that didn't stick.

Maybe I'm in the minority but I still call that landing zone on the Potomac "National Airport". *shrug*

I have something to say about plastic and grocery shopping but someone with a paint can in his hands is beckoning.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Kinda like a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 10:54 AM | Report abuse

GDC is okay by me. "Greater DC."
Some go-go types promoted the greater Charlotte area (in NC but the area extends into SC) as "Metrolina" and it was received with a resounding... clunk.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 30, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Good morning. I like Anthropocene. I also like Plasticine, HomoScene, and Planet Hott.

I don't share bc's concern that it will be difficult to convince the general public to accept the change of name to a new geologic era. Of the general public I most frequently meet, including the pretty educated folk with whom I work, most are unaware on any conscious level that we live in the Holocene. That information was fed to us many years ago, in middle or high school or college. Some of us ingested it and some didn't. Of those who took in the information, some of us retained it and some didn't. Of those who retained the information, some of us still have it buried somewhere in our subconscious. Others have lost those particular brain cells, due to aging, riotous living, or that sedate glass of wine with dinner. I myself am happy to trade the Holocene for a good Burgundy. It makes it easier to learn that we live in the Anthropocene now; nothing to replace.

While it makes sense to measure the era from the start of true industrialization, I like the idea of plastic.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 30, 2010 11:37 AM | Report abuse

'Metrolina' sounds too much like 'metrosexual' which leads us right back to snickering 12-year-old 'homocene' territory.

Personally, I think the idea of associating DC with the same initials as the largest most unresponsive bureaucracy most people deal with as too symbolic to even be ironic.

It also evokes the classic Seinfeld line:

"95% of the population is undateable! Been to the DMV lately? It's like a leper colony."

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 11:37 AM | Report abuse

Thanks, jkt, I need to go out to the DMV soon. I'm going to make sure that I go with Father Damien.

Posted by: russianthistle | July 30, 2010 11:52 AM | Report abuse

Discardocene era.

Posted by: baldinho | July 30, 2010 12:03 PM | Report abuse

DMV = "fake identities 'R' us." At least here in NC.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 30, 2010 12:14 PM | Report abuse

la Yello, now I will have The Boys of Summer with me all the livelong day....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqYBGcv41M8&feature=player_embedded

Don Henley's best haircut & song.

Posted by: VintageLady | July 30, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

Well, for today at least it is Planet Nice. 80 degrees, sunny, breeze from the NW. 'Course we're working here, then have to go look at new flooring for the dining room at LL.

Posted by: ebtnut | July 30, 2010 12:52 PM | Report abuse

I-mom, it's hard to argue against the idea that aa far as geological strata/dividing lines go, there will be a film of plastic in the ground to mark the HomoScene.

[I do like "Plasticene," though. That's snortworthy. In a good way.]

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 30, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Picture yourself on a train in a station
With plasticine porters with looking glass ties
Suddenly someone is there at the turnstile
The girl with kaleidoscope eyes

Just changing tune cooties.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMMkgPKbky0&feature=fvw

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 1:16 PM | Report abuse

Hello boodle,

Good news bad news: the anthropocene (based on oil/plastic) will never be thick enough to be more than a little boundary layer into another geological period or in the current one. I'd personally like to make it to the other side.

Aside, can someone explain to me lincoln log as a game? Because in local parlance it was not something you would play with if you intended to have a social life.

Posted by: qgaliana | July 30, 2010 1:20 PM | Report abuse

SCC: "... thin film of plastic to go with the atom bomb-sourced cesium and strontium in the ground."

At least, I think there were isotopes of cesium and strontium in the fallout...

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 30, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

"Bat-poop crazy" has become the favorite phrase in the office, although we're not using it in official documents. Well, not yet, anyway.

Posted by: balancingact | July 30, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

Lincoln Logs, a game? I thought they were a toy?

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 30, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

They're an indoctrination tool for structural engineers, Jumper... :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Tinker toys, Lincoln logs, Lego; some of the building blocks of childhood, perfect for the ready room bunker.

Vintage Group that I loved:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8s9dmuAKvU&feature=channel

Posted by: VintageLady | July 30, 2010 1:47 PM | Report abuse

It's a game for the 7-9 age group. You and your friends mix Lincoln Logs with blocks, erector sets, K-nex, the odd lego, parts from Mouse Trap, etc., and you each build a quadrant of a city. You put a Littlest Pet Shop dog inside what you think is your most well-protected structure. You then take turns launching checkers with a rubber band/bent paper clip slingshot, and try to knock down each other's quadrant of the city. (Try not to hit your own). You can move your dog to a new building at any time (because, hey...it's a dog). Last with a dog inside a building is Mayor, and gets to decide which game you're all going to play next.

This game is usually played during a blizzard.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 30, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Oh right, those little notched logs. Haven't seen them in decades. Never heard the trade name before somehow.

Posted by: qgaliana | July 30, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

But now I'm curious as to what you thought it meant in "local parlance", qgaliana...

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 2:11 PM | Report abuse

LiT,
I'm coming over to your house for the next blizzard.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Wow, LiT. That sounds niftier than just building stuff. I especially like the "last puppy standing" rule.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 2:14 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod,
Let me UrbanDictionary that for you:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=urban+dictionary+lincoln+log

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

I used to build little Lincoln Log garages with my basic set of Lincoln Logs, then populate them with my Matchbox cars. The motorcycle was the leader of the community by general approbation of all the other cars (even the Lincoln). When riding in his trailer, the motorcycle could fly and commit acts of bravery, derring-do, and social justice not conceivable by any vehicle with doors.

The little VW 1200 Saloon also was, of course, highly respected in the community. A lower-level superhero. Robin to the motorcycle as Batman, if you will. Because of the power of flight, I would have made the motorcycle Superman in this comparison, except that I never found Superman a very compelling character (too powerful), Superman has no meaningful sidekicks (Jimmy Olsen? Get real), and the motorcycle needed an auxiliary device to fly. Perhaps he was more like Hercules in the animated series. I do not recall who acted as villains. I'm pretty sure that the usual problems facing the Matchbox community were forces of nature, acts of God, and social frictions created by honest misunderstandings between friends and the tensions between the incompatible emotional needs of individuals.

I do not believe romantic love was an issue between any of the vehicles, although I sometimes wonder what that little white convertible with the red interior used to get up to.

I believe the comment about the disjunction between "playing with Lincoln Logs" and "having a social life" was spot on target, even if "Lincoln Log" were assigned its standard, non-colloquial, non-Urban Dictionary definition.

Posted by: ScienceTim | July 30, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

Yellojkt, thanks. I think.

SciTim, thanks for your retrospective on boyish car play-- I didn't know what kind of stories were created internally. I always thought that kind of matchbox car play was pretty much, VROOM, VROOM.

Shows how little I know about little boys.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

My best friend and I played GI Joe back when Joe was a bearded eco-adventurer with kung-fu grip. My friend had one poor clothesless Barbie which he had acquired somehow.

The typical adventure usually revolved around Barbie getting herself into some predicament requiring Joe to rescue her. This often involved scaling walls, crossing shark-infested pools, driving his zebra-striped jeep over sundry obstacles and finally reaching Barbie.

Barbie was always VERY grateful in a way that only an anatomically incorrect doll in the hands of ten-year-olds can be.

This perhaps explains more than it should.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

Incidentally, half of that northern pike yesterday will be for supper tonight, coated in pancake batter and lemon. It'll be good.

Please share any other good northern pike recipes.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 3:13 PM | Report abuse

Sounds like most of the male romances out there, yellojkt. (Take most Carl Hiaasen novels as an example of this genre.)

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 3:24 PM | Report abuse

I only recall a partial set of lincoln logs or something similar. Without the short pieces to make doorways the resulting structure could be a corral or more commonly, an outdoor internment camp.

Also explaining more than it should.

Posted by: engelmann | July 30, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

Other childhood toys:

Miniature Cars: Every time we went shopping with my mom she promised us a new Hot Wheels car if we were good. I was over 30 with a kid of my own before I realized how cheaply my silence was being bought. At home we built tracks that circled the family room starting from the table mounted vice-grip starter station. The track wasn't complete until all pieces of track and connectors including banks, loops, and battery-powered accelerators were used.

Lincoln logs: Basically forts and fences. One of the most boring toys ever made. I did become very good at tiling the roofs with those long green sticks that made nasty splinters if you accidentally stepped on the building.

Lego: Wheeled vehicles of all varieties, many worthy of being included in Damnation Alley. Also enormously elaborate perfectly rectangular buildings in color patterns that would make a Bauhaus artist green with envy.

Erector sets: Tall monstrosities with numerous sharp extensions guaranteed to cause injury and permanent eye damage as well as enough lost screws and bolts to create a navigation hazard to anybody daring to cross the shag-carpeted family room barefoot. Anything with a motor never worked.

I eventually graduated to plastic model military aircraft. I never deliberately inhaled the glue, but my bedroom was always so poorly ventilated that I enjoyed the hobby more than I should have otherwise.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 3:29 PM | Report abuse

And of course there was the disassembly of various handheld calculators in an attempt to power said Lincoln-log structures...

But we shall speak no more of this.

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Well. After almost two *very* eventful weeks, not to mention two-way bumper-to-bumper traffic to and from Dulles, my very own Himself is at the airport, I am back to my computer (which (thankfully) works) and just about to prepare for a conference call.

And I miss him most terribly. We shopped for his son this morning at Toys R Us and went grocery shopping for me, too, mainly to replace what I'd lost during the power outage.

*sigh*

Don't know when he'll be back, but he wants to tell the Boodlers who met him, either at the BPH and otherwise, he just loved the camaraderie, the good humor and the shrimp scampi. I think in that order. . . .

I suspect that I will do the laundry later or tomorrow, just to have it out of the way. But still . . . .

{miss him}

Posted by: ftb3 | July 30, 2010 3:32 PM | Report abuse

I bet SciTim can build you a northern pike. Or a mace. Or a morning star.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 30, 2010 3:33 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod's a piker? Who knew?

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 3:46 PM | Report abuse

Whenever the logs were made into forts the little green army guys would grouse too much about the design inadequacies.

Posted by: engelmann | July 30, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

I sure hope nobody comes along and steals our lunch money. I need it for the long weekend.

Posted by: engelmann | July 30, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Turned the out-of-the-office button on at 15:00. Maybe it was 14:59:58 but who was counting.

I can't help you here Wilbrod, I'm a catch&release guys. Maybe once a year, neh not even that, we have a perch or bass fry-up but that is about it. The only pike recipe I ever enjoyed were Quenelles de Brochet. The MIL made them with a small pike caught "on order" by myself. The recipe is useful for extending a small amount of fish but it's too much work for me.
I had one pike culinary disaster with a big fish caught by a young cousin in the St-Lawrence. I couldn't convince him to release his trophy, about as big as yours, so I filletted it and his mother cooked it even as I told them it wouldn't be edible. The water in the shallows of the Boucherville island in July is too hot and the flesh of most predator fish gets contaminated by a bacteria that renders it inedible (it liquefies upon cooking and taste like rotting vegetation). Lesson's learned for the kid. He's now a marine biologist and remembers the pike story well.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 30, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for the construction images. When he was very small the Boy and I used to take the Fisher-Price barn, city and miscellaneous pieces and build Metropolis. I later learned that having thousands of Lego pieces and thousands of MegaBlock pieces meant, not one big happy building family, but thousands of similar but incompatible small toys which hurt when stepped on in the dark.

The Boy also inherited Ivansdad's Matchbox track, which we looped all over the house for days at a time. While one may be able to destroy this stuff, it appears impervious to any natural aging process.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 30, 2010 4:11 PM | Report abuse

The Boy had a few green army men, but they didn't dare to complain. They were mixed freely with the tiny plastic dinosaurs, Digimon and Pokemon figures, and Star Wars guys. Epic battles, I tell you, epic.

Posted by: Ivansmom | July 30, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Alright, youse guys (rather than y'all)

Since I'm the one who stashed my Lincoln Logs in the bunker last night in the first place, how come you've been playing with them all day while worked?

LiT - did you include the orange Matchbox car tracks in the blizzard-day game? Ah, I thought not. Well . . . you see . . .

Too freakin' funny, friends! Wait till I bring my wooden marble track sets with the steel balls that you have to chase under the fainting couch. You'll be sorry.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 4:19 PM | Report abuse

scc: while "I" worked.

The ViewMasters, the Etch-a-Sketch and the Colorforms are in the cupboard behind the yarn box. Have a go . . . I'll be playing backgammon over by hearth with the first comer.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 4:26 PM | Report abuse

Shrieking, I caught mine in 30-foot water (a reef with 50 foot water surrounding it), a ways from shore in prime walleye fishing water.

The flesh doesn't smell fishy at all, so it should be good. My cousin is a retired fishing guide and he gave the thumbs up to eat it.

Your comment about heat and bacteria explains the comment I read elsewhere that "big pike caught in muddy waters may taste like mud."

I'll remember never to eat pike (or walleye) caught off a dock in shallow waters in the heat of summer, in case.


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 4:30 PM | Report abuse

Oh we have those Talitha. You might be surprised what my sweet darling little angel is into.

YJ, thanks. After reading your posts, I thought..good, she's not *that* odd. ;)

Headed toward the city for a badly needed night on the town (complete with a designated driver). Have a very happy night all.

Posted by: LostInThought | July 30, 2010 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Not a recipe. Wet work; pike.
http://www.lake-link.com/boards/forums/viewposts.cfm?Thread_ID=76601

They say maybe strong taste. I say, then use some onion. But let us know.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 30, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Good afternoon, everyone.

Barbie, Ken, Midge, and Skipper are in the closet on the top shelf. You have to have my permission to play with them and their clothes, as they are the original designs and Worth Something. I dunno what they're worth, but something.

If CqP shows up, I'll get them out and we womenly types will ooh and aah over them. They are lovely, especially when compared to the crap being manufactured and foisted on Barbie-mad girls today.

Posted by: slyness | July 30, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

Something, indeed Slyness.
http://www.dollreference.com/barbie1.html

I actually get the creeps from dolls--Stuffed animals were my dolls instead.

Barbies do score low-moderate on my creep scale as they're not anatomically accurate. It's the ones that look like too-pretty kids with huge glassy eyes that really freak me out. Also, Cabbage Patch Kids (tm), the bane of my childhood.

(Yes, I kind of liked the Chucky movies.)

I found another doll collector site which had Black label Barbies for adult collectors-- various ethnicities in black dresses. I rather liked the African-American one in a lawyer-like dress suit. I could see my niece loving that one.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 5:22 PM | Report abuse

Which remark was er, a beg to be excused from the ooh-aah fest despite having estrogen.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 5:25 PM | Report abuse

Hmm. I think LiT nailed it.

Legos and Tinkertoys and Erector sets and all of that great stuff were lots of fun in combination...

Matchbox cars were nicely accurate representations of real cars (for the most part), but Hot Wheels and even Johnny Lightning (remember them?) were faster on track. Corgis tended to not work so well, but they had a great line of scale European race cars, IIRC.

All those containers of Lincon Logs, Tinkertoys, Legos and whatonot were great, but I used to get a lot out of cardboard, wood dowels, popsickle sticks paper and glue.

Plastic models were for the rich kids, though I ended up being pretty good at that stuff when I had the chance (e.g. used to grind up pencil lead/graphite to use as simulated exhaust soot, and magic marker smears for scorch marks). Built a Lunar Module kit and wrapped the descent stage, legs and footpads with a gold anodized foil fried chicken wrapper to simulate the gold foil on the LEM.

Until I discovered, er, other things.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | July 30, 2010 5:45 PM | Report abuse

Boyhood is its own country with its own Constitution, and its rules of change follow their own timeline.

Ken and GI Joe were invented in my boyhood, and my atavistic and fascistic young self, in my half-formed primitive way, rejected them thoroughly as unclean and detrimental to the zeitgeist.

Posted by: Jumper1 | July 30, 2010 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Or, as Michael Innes had it, "all small boys are insane."

Posted by: Yoki | July 30, 2010 6:24 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:51 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

My time killer were balsa wood airplane models. Had to cut all the ribs and fuselage bulkheads out with a razor blade, notch all the pieces for the 1/16 x 1/16th stringers, apply airplane glue and hold everything together with rubber bands. Resulted in creating a second skin on all finger tips that eventually got chewed off. Long before anybody knew about the hazard (pleasure) of sniffing. Then when all the major components were assembled the big task was to get the tissue paper cut and folded just right so it didn't wrinkle when water was applied to make it shrink. Found that if more than the recommended rubber bands were used to wind the propeller motor the result was fuselage compression failure.
Lincoln logs were used to explore future home design. I and two brothers got good a building mechanical erector set contraptions powered with an electric motor and improvised belt drives.
We were pre-match box cars and such.
Spent a lot of time over the laundry tub sink skinning black bass.

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

Surely, a record has been set!!

Posted by: rickoshea11 | July 30, 2010 6:57 PM | Report abuse

Just installed Google chrome and the comments just laid the in the box. Sorry

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 7:05 PM | Report abuse

Just installed Google Chrome. The comment just laid there in the box. Sorry

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 7:06 PM | Report abuse

There is something I don't understand

Posted by: bh72 | July 30, 2010 7:07 PM | Report abuse

'salright, bh. Perhaps the WaPo servers were confused by the shiny browser... :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 30, 2010 7:10 PM | Report abuse

gesundheit, bh72

*passing tissues*

Posted by: ftb3 | July 30, 2010 7:22 PM | Report abuse

All right, here's my sad childhood toy story.

I always wanted a train set, even just a round track with a locomotive, 2 cars and a caboose to get me started. When I was 6 years old I asked Santa for one for Christmas and I got a "life size" baby doll with handmade clothes and cradle instead. Fine.

Third grade (I'm 7 or 8) rolls around and I meet Bill Lumpkin. He not only has a train set (4 locomatives, 3 winding tracks) but it's set up in the basement on top of two pingpong tables. Has mountains and tunnels, lakes, towns, bridges, crossings where you can wreck trains if you coordinate speeds accurately.

I AM IN LOVE. I'd go home with him every afternoon and when I didn't show up by 4:30 by parents knew where to come looking.

I saw Bill at our 30th HS reunion and we still were talking model trains. He has the original stuff and more set up for his grandchildren. Why didn't I latch onto that boy in the first place?

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 7:42 PM | Report abuse

When I was nine I wanted, I craved, a dart gun. With a target and rubber suction cup darts. I found it in the Sears catalog and I showed my mother. It was all I wanted for Christmas.

Only when I later saw "A Christmas Story" did I see another person so obsessed.

But of course, on Christmas morning I got a really stupid Skee Ball type game with marbles. I whined about "the dart gun was in the Sears catalog" and was told they were "all out."

I might have been older than 30 before I realized my mother just didn't want me to put my eye out.

Posted by: nellie4 | July 30, 2010 7:56 PM | Report abuse

I see Snooki and John Boehner have more than one thing in common. They tan, and they are mad at Obama. I have never seen her show, but I have seen enough in the press to know that having Snooki against you is bound to be a net gain.

Posted by: baldinho | July 30, 2010 8:06 PM | Report abuse

Well, nellie, obviously we were deprived children. ;(

lol

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 8:07 PM | Report abuse

Oh! Oh! Backboodling I found yello's adventures with GI Joe and clothesless (!) Barbie. We had a series of headless Barbies but that's a story best left untold.

GI Joe came along when little brother was 7 or 8 and, being the only sonchild after three girls, Joe and his clones became the paramours of many a well-dressed Barbie. (I was a fledgling designer, after all.)

I've told you that my father flew Stearmans and Piper Cubs. Well, Joe became a paratrooper, often in tandem with Barbie, clad in proper jumpsuit. We fashioned parachutes from old silks, attached backpacks containing our home address, and launched them hither and yon from the planes. Most are lost to the ages but several came back in the mail with letters from the folks that found them. Great sport!

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 8:28 PM | Report abuse

I remember the Christmas I received (a very unwanted) Barbie.

This topic though, keeps me laughing. You all know the joke about Barbie, Ken and GI Joe? Can't tell it here bit it's like a joke cootie.

I have a 330 ayem downtime then am heading upstate for the night. I washed the dogs outside tonight. Aside from having to catch them, it was much easier than the tub. I could carry Cutter around like the little girl in Despicable Me, exclaiming, "it's so fluffy!"

night, all. Have a great weekend.

Posted by: -dbG- | July 30, 2010 8:44 PM | Report abuse

OK, I hoped for a pony (preferably a Connemara) for Christmas well into my teens. Sad, so sad.

Our stray kitty gave us a laugh today. Earlier, I came across her in the yard by the back fence, staring intently at something in the vegetation. Later, there was a dead mouse neatly deposited in her food bowl. Good kitty!

Posted by: seasea1 | July 30, 2010 8:47 PM | Report abuse

What dbG said about unwanted Barbies? The reason we had headless ones was because I thought Barbie was ridiculous so I turned them all into dressforms. Dressforms don't have heads.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 9:07 PM | Report abuse

Lots of lego blocks, Star Wars action figures when I was a kid. My brother is/was only 18 months my junior, so we could build battlegrounds out of legos, Star Wars action figures and army men and have rubber band wars.

The single best toy was my Evil Knievel stunt cycle. It was powered by the plastic zip strip, and could do pretty good jumps.

Posted by: baldinho | July 30, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

TBG and DrG are pretty much the best people I know.

Posted by: Yoki | July 30, 2010 9:32 PM | Report abuse

DbG, I read that joke, and I thought, "er.. Ken, not Barbie."


Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 9:33 PM | Report abuse

Wow, Seasea, that is really funny.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 9:36 PM | Report abuse

I always wanted a horse.

Posted by: Yoki | July 30, 2010 9:43 PM | Report abuse

For Yoki

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bu3I2DDuj8&feature=related

Posted by: talitha1 | July 30, 2010 10:06 PM | Report abuse

Me too, Yoki-- and a donkey. I now daydream about keeping miniature horses and donkeys I could drive little sulkies with.

Wilbrodog is horse-mad and would absolutely like making friends with a little horse.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 10:09 PM | Report abuse

Miniature donkeys pictures at:

http://www.grandfinaleminidonkeys.com/fun-around-grand-finale-farm.html

http://www.shortassets.com/photos.htm

Those foals are so cuddly.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 10:22 PM | Report abuse

boodle question
I have had problems with my home pc the last few days.I have a system restore feature on my pc,but instead of system restore.It went into system recovery and wiped out everything.My pc is like new when I bought it.Is there anyway to get any of that stuff back?

I was thinking about asking the geek squad,but opted for the all knowing,ever seeing boodle instead.Any suggestions or am I back to square 1?

Posted by: greenwithenvy | July 30, 2010 10:24 PM | Report abuse

A brief google found this:

http://www.recovermyfiles.com/

Can't vouch whether it works or not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_Restore

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | July 30, 2010 10:35 PM | Report abuse

Yikes.

I'm faced with moving the contents of my minimal Mac Mini to a less minimal one (a refurbished model that recently was replaced by a snazzier one). I suppose it won't be too much of a mess. I guess that, if nothing else, I could delete everything but the operating system and expect the Time Capsule to restore it all. That sounds too easy.

The "old" Mini will replace the Mom's hopelessly inadequate Black Friday notebook. I'm to blame for its still being in use.

We had a record high today. No particular relief in sight.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | July 31, 2010 12:35 AM | Report abuse

Babies are kinda freaky. They're like little people, but different. But that's not what I came to talk about.

I was browsing and, for various reasons, happened upon the Squaw Lake (MN) Wikipedia entry which contains the following tidbit:

"The median income for a household in the city was $11,875, and the median income for a family was $31,250. Males had a median income of $12,000 versus $20,000 for females."

Leaving aside the fact that "city" seems a rather grandiose appellation, it's clear to me where all the men are spending most their money. I know it ain't on the mayor's salary!

Posted by: Bob-S | July 31, 2010 12:48 AM | Report abuse

Yikes, indeed, DaveoftheC! Good luck.

Bob, I don't know about Squaw Lake but I'd be willing to bet that many womenfolk these days are floating household boats by whatever means they can. I hate to think that it's what you think, but . . . . .

Posted by: talitha1 | July 31, 2010 1:11 AM | Report abuse

And since I've started down this path, I feel compelled to share the following info from LakesnWoods.com, a guide to Minnesota communities (http://www.lakesnwoods.com/SquawLake.htm). This from the Squaw Lake entry:

Utilities:
Utility Type Utility Name Utility Phone
Electricity: n/a --
Natural Gas: n/a --
Wastewater: n/a --
Water: n/a --
Telephone: Paul Bunyan (218) 444-1234
Cable TV: n/a --

Lest you think the folks in Squaw Lake are pulling your leg, here's a bit of history behind what appears to be the only operating utility in Squaw Lake:

http://www.paulbunyan.net/cooperative/history.html

Posted by: Bob-S | July 31, 2010 1:19 AM | Report abuse

talaitha - You may safely assume that I hold nothing but admiration for these accomplished entrepreneurial northern plainswomen!

Posted by: Bob-S | July 31, 2010 1:23 AM | Report abuse

Hmmm... "talaitha" is the traditional Jamaican spelling, mon!

Posted by: Bob-S | July 31, 2010 1:26 AM | Report abuse

I was well over a thousand characters into a comment on Joel's Kit when I realized that I'm in some danger being a bit self-indulgent.

I really do ponder what we (the big, long-term "we") need to worry about.

Posted by: Bob-S | July 31, 2010 2:50 AM | Report abuse

I went way over the unknown limit of links in the hope of posting some nostalgic toy commercials. Got the dreaded white screen of Achenblog.

Here's one that really needs to be in the bunker.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5ScEl4ehsE

For troll control practice this is a must.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCrWk96DMHs

And . . . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-H5DZXddbA

Posted by: talitha1 | July 31, 2010 3:23 AM | Report abuse

Lest we forget our favorite romantic duo.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLL67CN2hnw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hhjjhYGQtY&feature=related

*blech*

Posted by: talitha1 | July 31, 2010 3:37 AM | Report abuse

And some fun classics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgIm1mJCyRU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVAJS58CdCY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICGrjmJouWA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLcjMzWNb-g&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZL6RGkPjws
_________________________

That was fun. Let's play again tomorrow.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 31, 2010 3:56 AM | Report abuse

gwe, I've been there, although due to a tech who didn't understand "CALL ME before you do something drastic!"

I'm sorry to say it's pretty likely your stuff has been at least partially overwritten by the system recovery. It'll take some data recovery specialists (big $$$, yes) to even have a shot at finding the files now. dbG, RD_P, would you concur?

*enjoying-the-first-low-humidity-morning-in-forever Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 31, 2010 4:33 AM | Report abuse

Morning Boodle! We're off to the airport to return to Canader. Had a simply marvelous time in DC/VA/MD. Hope to be back within the quarter.

Posted by: Yoki | July 31, 2010 6:05 AM | Report abuse

Good wings, Yoki and H.

Posted by: talitha1 | July 31, 2010 6:15 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. Another wonderfully cool morning, 10C/50F as I type, but there is a faint skunk smell in the air. Nothing's perfect. It was cool enough that the Very Large Puppy slept on the couch...

GWE, there are no easy solutions. Specialist can recover stuff that wasn't overwritten but that's not easy nor cheap.

Off to a busy pre-vacation day. Mow, water, weedwhack, shop, bank, launder, vacuum, etc.

Hey dr, could you use your influence on the Eskimos to make them stink less? I got tickets for Sep 19 thinking the Als/Esk rivalry would get on again this year. The Esks win against BC last night wasn't impressive. They are both at 1-4 now. Geez.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | July 31, 2010 7:05 AM | Report abuse

You missed this, talitha, and it is more appropriate for these partisan times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xV7cx4cQOuU

Posted by: baldinho | July 31, 2010 7:10 AM | Report abuse

Here is the toy stash theme song. Warning: there is a chance this will run through your heads for a long time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EDAjoLGQyQ&feature=related

Posted by: baldinho | July 31, 2010 7:58 AM | Report abuse

Happy Saturday!

The weather is blissfully cool this morning. It's nice to feel as if you can breathe.

I am hearing that young Miss Clinton is getting married today to some fellow whose name I can't seem to remember. I assume my invitation was lost in the mail.

I loved the discussion of toys. My wonderful mother once bought us this huge box of random Legos, (I mean Lego-brand bricks) through some mail-order service decades ago. Many happy Sundays were spent creating enormous cities with these bricks.

My own kids played with Legos as well, but nowadays the emphasis is more on model kits complete with highly-detailed instructions. Still fun though. And when key pieces of the kits were inevitably lost, we dumped the remaining pieces together into a big bin where free-form play once again ruled.

Now, I need to tend the garden and figure out just what a "Snookie" is.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | July 31, 2010 8:27 AM | Report abuse

Nice morning here as well, cool and sunny will warm up to a lovely warm but not hot day, will try to get a lot of work done outside before the heat returns.

Went to take my dog to the vet for some test yesterday and was pleased with myself at the ease with which I placed a muzzle on him. Being the morning I was still a little low on caffeine, didn't realize at first I had the muzzle on upside down, if fell off as we got to the vet and there was no way he was letting me put it back on. So the vet game me some sedation for him for his next visit. I had to test the dose last night, all is well this morning, he was dopey and sleepy last night but well, but will have to up the dose as he was still more alert than they would like for the procedure.

Eldest has left for a few days at a friends cottage and will return for one night before heading out west with her sister, where they will visit with relatives and explore the mountains - going to be quiet around here.

And eldest completed her upgrade summer school class, passed - very proud of her.

I do not know what a Snooke is though but I did have eldest describe "Jersey Shore" - she gave it a rather scathing review - something along the lines of you watch because they are so st*pid.

Posted by: dmd3 | July 31, 2010 8:42 AM | Report abuse

May I just state for the record there is absolutely no connection between "S'nuke" and that "Jersey Shore" alleged lifeform.

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | July 31, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, all.

Cool enough to go outside and do a little work, pulling weeds and trimming roses and rhododendron. I also cut back the oregano, which goes wild this time of the year. That, and the spearmint, whose roots I pulled earlier in the week. The joys of summer!

I have to stop, though, and cool off so I can get ready to go to the retirement party for my friend the IRS audit agent. She was out as of July 2 after 37 years with the agency. That has to be a record.

Cassandra, I hope you are resting well in this nice weather. Don't overdo, please!

Posted by: slyness | July 31, 2010 10:06 AM | Report abuse

Last Saturday I took a meandering ride along the Jersey Shore including a stop in Asbury Park. In tribute to Brooce, I walked the boardwalk and took some pictures of Madame Marie's stand. Asbury Park looked like it has been recovering from some hard times.

Then we went down the rest of the shore which was very toney with lots of huge houses flying Italian flags. We were wondering where this MTV version of Jersey Shore was. Then we hit Seaside Heights. The place was wall-to-wall bars, tattoo parlors and souvenir stands. It made Ocean City look like the French Riviera. My wife refused to get out of the car.

The episodes of Jersey Shore currently airing were filmed in Miami, presumably for some fish-out-of-water schadenfreude. Snooki was just arrested while filming new episodes in Joisey after negotiating a raise to $20k an episode. Not bad work for being drunk and disorderly, if you can get it.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 31, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Glad to know that you guys down south are also having more reasonable weather for a change. I've been in the yard and will go back out but waiting for the granddaughters to arrive. SIL will be helping "S" cart off to the dump an old 27" TV that died. We have a little 19" out there now but will eventually move the living room set out there and buy a flat screen. Will think about that later.

(Rant ahead) I've been trying to file for extended benefits here in MA. Earlier in the week they said they'd be sending a letter. Yesterday morning I got a recorded phone call telling me to call a specific number to apply. Yesterday afternoon I got the letter, which basically told me the same thing. I've been calling on and off since yesterday. First the recording says to wait for the letter (duh), then, after 30 seconds of 'info' it tells you to punch in your SSN. Once you've done that it warns you what info you will need when you talk to an agent. Then the phone rings to a recording that tells you there's too long a wait and to call later. So it takes them three minutes to get to the 'we're too busy'. Would it be too much trouble to just say that right away!!! I'm glad I'm not starving because I wouldn't have the strength to keep calling. (rant over)

Posted by: badsneakers | July 31, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

talitha,
Great commercials, and congrats on breaking the three link barrier.

My GI Joes were a little more, well, hirsute:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjkQMM_Ledg

I know that tiger and talking commander well. The 'life-like hair' didn't fair too well after too many underwater demolitions missions in the bathtub. And the scuba outfits were a devil to get off once they were on. I'm sure Barbie never had those problems with her lycra roller disco outfits.

But nothing was cooler than kung fu grip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quEfi5IVD1Q&NR=1

Posted by: yellojkt | July 31, 2010 10:20 AM | Report abuse

Rescuing people was one of the major story themes of GI Joe in the post-Vietnam era, so our Barbie extradition missions weren't so far out of line from the commercials we were watching:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSyfMsqlOV0&feature=related

And I did have that helicopter. My brother and I fought over who got to use it for hours. Determining whose GI Joe stuff was whose caused some bitter sibling antipathy that still hasn't been totally resolved.

Posted by: yellojkt | July 31, 2010 10:30 AM | Report abuse

New kit!

Posted by: yellojkt | July 31, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

Illegal aliens, like Burmese pythons in Florida, Norway rats hitting Pacific Islands, Asia carp and snakehead fish in US waterways and Mexican Border-jumpers all tend not to be good for the natives.

Posted by: ChrisFord1 | July 31, 2010 5:09 PM | Report abuse


There's a movement afoot which refers to the people creating "the Anthrppocene" as "the Terraformers".

Basically, imagine that an alien civilization would really like to live here. The gravity is right, the solar influx is right, the planet has a magnetosphere and is tectonically active (actually this is all good) but sadly the dominant epicycle of life is oxygen based in a saturated nitrogen environment. Something's got to be done about that. Furthermore, there's a technical civilization there that's on the edge of discovering fusion and potentially the nearly-as-fast-as-light intertialess drive and thus is on the edge of discovering ana-causality drives and in between the closed time-like loops and the schrodinger cat fuzzbox effects, next thing you know, you're imminentizing the Eschaton and who the heck knows what could happen. So it's open season on those Terrestrial Hominids. Fortunately they are dim and deluded in the aggregate, so you give them every last technology needed to destroy the world they can live on, and manufacture a world useful for the Terraformer species.

As if the original Holocene Mass Extinction weren't enough -- and there's plenty of that, try to Google for the term -- let's orchestrate a bottom-up destruction. Dust Bowl? Almost worked, but they adapted their agriculture. Let's try Urban Pollution. Ooops, they got wise. Chesapeake Bay ecological catastrophe? Darn, they saved their bacon on that one. Maybe force an industrial accident in the Gulf of Mexico? Sorry, couldn't get enough methane clathrates into the Gulf Stream to shut down the global thermohaline circulation system and precipitate a new Ice Age in a time of global hydrocarbon fuel depletion. Dang it all, we've got bad luck or those sorry Terrestrial primates have some Major Powers looking out for them.

But seriously, folks: We need to reduce our numbers. The Chinese have the right approach, one which has been VOLUNTARILY adopted by most of Europe and the US-born American popuation at large. About 1.3 kids per parent halves the population in each generation but allows for replacement of accident victims. In three generations we can reach a Sustainable Population Base that doesn't devour the natural world. SAVE THE PLANET. HAVE LESS CHILDREN. QUALITY NOT QUANTITY.

Or you're just making an ecologically dead terraformed colony environment for nasty aliens that breathe sulphur dioxide in a nitrogen oxides base with a metabolism based on an isomer of CHITIN... that uses botulinim metabolites as the energy transfer system rather than ATP.

If you're going to have too many kids, why not just go burn some forests, strangle some penguins, nuke a baby whale for Jebus, and pray to alien g_ds promising global destruction.

Posted by: thardman | August 1, 2010 12:16 AM | Report abuse

There's a movement afoot which refers to the people creating "the Anthrppocene" as "the Terraformers".

Basically, imagine that an alien civilization would really like to live here. The gravity is right, the solar influx is right, the planet has a magnetosphere and is tectonically active (actually this is all good) but sadly the dominant epicycle of life is oxygen based in a saturated nitrogen environment. Something's got to be done about that. Furthermore, there's a technical civilization there that's on the edge of discovering fusion and potentially the nearly-as-fast-as-light intertialess drive and thus is on the edge of discovering ana-causality drives and in between the closed time-like loops and the schrodinger cat fuzzbox effects, next thing you know, you're imminentizing the Eschaton and who the heck knows what could happen. So it's open season on those Terrestrial Hominids. Fortunately they are dim and deluded in the aggregate, so you give them every last technology needed to destroy the world they can live on, and manufacture a world useful for the Terraformer species.

As if the original Holocene Mass Extinction weren't enough -- and there's plenty of that, try to Google for the term -- let's orchestrate a bottom-up destruction. Dust Bowl? Almost worked, but they adapted their agriculture. Let's try Urban Pollution. Ooops, they got wise. Chesapeake Bay ecological catastrophe? Darn, they saved their bacon on that one. Maybe force an industrial accident in the Gulf of Mexico? Sorry, couldn't get enough methane clathrates into the Gulf Stream to shut down the global thermohaline circulation system and precipitate a new Ice Age in a time of global hydrocarbon fuel depletion. Dang it all, we've got bad luck or those sorry Terrestrial primates have some Major Powers looking out for them.

But seriously, folks: We need to reduce our numbers. The Chinese have the right approach, one which has been VOLUNTARILY adopted by most of Europe and the US-born American popuation at large. About 1.3 kids per parent halves the population in each generation but allows for replacement of accident victims. In three generations we can reach a Sustainable Population Base that doesn't devour the natural world. SAVE THE PLANET. HAVE LESS CHILDREN. QUALITY NOT QUANTITY.

Or you're just making an ecologically dead terraformed colony environment for nasty aliens that breathe sulphur dioxide in a nitrogen oxides base with a metabolism based on an isomer of CHITIN... that uses botulinim metabolites as the energy transfer system rather than ATP.

If you're going to have too many kids, why not just go burn some forests, strangle some penguins, nuke a baby whale for Jebus, and pray to alien g_ds promising global destruction.

Posted by: thardman | August 1, 2010 12:37 AM | Report abuse

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