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Posted at 9:12 AM ET, 01/21/2011

New favorite saying

By Joel Achenbach

My new favorite saying is, "I'm landing this in the Hudson." As in, Sully landing the plane. It's what you say when you've got a big and complicated project or endeavor or obligation or duty (a wedding, for example) and you're out of good options, and out of even so-so options, and you're down to just one, bad option, incontrovertibly your only option. And you're going to make the best of it. No fussing, no tears. This is your plan.

And you might even pull it off.

An unfortunate fact of life is that few things go off as planned, and options get constrained, and you spend a lot of time doing triage. The ideal rarely materializes. We make dresses from drapes if we have to. There can be great artistry in reaching a level of mediocrity. There can be genius in mere survival.

Almost anything can be landed in the Hudson. My last batch of chili was Hudsoned. I didn't have all the ingredients that I needed (pheasant, rare Aztec peppers, hallucinogenic cactus) so I just landed it in the river with a heroic assist from the spice rack.

Dressing for "work" (hahahahaha) I pretty much always land it in the Hudson. You want your hair to look as disheveled as your clothes, so it looks like a package. Or wear a hat that grabs everyone's attention, and that way they won't notice that your blue blazer doesn't really go with the swim trunks.

None of this is to say that we shouldn't set high standards for ourselves. But we should have the courage to violate those standards when necessary, and we should have the panache to do so with what could be plausibly described as elegance given the situation.

By Joel Achenbach  | January 21, 2011; 9:12 AM ET
 
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Comments

First?

Posted by: gmbka | January 21, 2011 9:51 AM | Report abuse

good morning, joel. good morning, boodle.

Posted by: LALurker | January 21, 2011 9:54 AM | Report abuse

Okay, so before I go and back-boodle in the last kit, I present to my dear fellow boodlers my gift for the day:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthpicturegalleries/8273811/Wildlife-photographer-reveals-camouflaged-animals-hidden-in-their-habitat.html

Very cool pictures, indeed.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 21, 2011 10:02 AM | Report abuse

The French victory over the British fleet just before Yorktown allowed a Hudson-landing type victory over Lord Cornwallis, who went on to do great things in India. He's got the sort of fancy tomb that Washington declined.

Perhaps relevant to the Achenbach deadline situation, I'm in a chapter of Aron Ralston's "Between a Rock and a Hard Place" that's mostly about sleep deprivation. His description of a two-day no-sleep hike was scary.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 21, 2011 10:06 AM | Report abuse

Does that first graf have a subtle hint of major doings in the Boss's household???

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 21, 2011 10:09 AM | Report abuse

I'm landing this comment in the Hudson.

Posted by: cowhand214 | January 21, 2011 10:22 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all... especially to you, DOCTOR LALurker! Glad to see you here.

Thanks for the article about Queens, Slyness. It is a great school, just wasn't the right one for Son of G. But it did land him in your fine city and I'm glad for that. Just the right kind of place for a young man to sprout some wings: friendly, manageable and for the most part affordable. And CPCC is turning out to be a great find, as well.

Funny how the boodle can change lives... it was you and Jack who suggested Son of G check out Queens and he's been down there ever since.

Hope all of you have a great day. I'm off to DC to have lunch with an old work friend (my former "office spouse"), taking advantage of the lunch specials of Restaurant Week.

Oh... I think yello's in San Diego... how 'bout you?

Posted by: -TBG- | January 21, 2011 10:31 AM | Report abuse

Panache and plausible elegance under the circumstances: now there's a New Year's Resolution for you!

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 21, 2011 10:31 AM | Report abuse

We've been franticly working on the house in the face of a walk-through by the appraiser ahead of refinancing. The bank didn't tell us about the walk-through (as opposed to just a drive-by) until 3 days before we were supposed to settle. The on-going work we've been doing had the house in "less than presentable" condition. We pleaded for an extension, and "landed in the Hudson" just as the appraiser was walking through the door yesterday. Now we'll spend the next couple of weeks trying to relocate all the stuff that got shoved in closets or otherwise hidden from view.

Posted by: ebtnut | January 21, 2011 10:41 AM | Report abuse

My last house refinancing was done in the late stages of reconstructing the kitchen. The place was still a mess. Got the wonderful new mortgage anyway.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 21, 2011 10:50 AM | Report abuse

I'm landing it in the Anacostia. (It's only a few hundred yards away.)

I suppose John Boehner and the TPers might say, "We're landing health care repeal in the Potomac."

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 21, 2011 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Hey, LALurker's here. Good morning, Doctor.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 21, 2011 10:59 AM | Report abuse

I certainly can't speak for other appraisers, but when I was in the business there wasn't much in the way of cosmetics that I cared about. Anything that could be accomplished by a few people in exchange for beer & pizza wasn't likely to appreciably affect the sale price if the bank had to sell it as a foreclosure, which was essentially what I was hired to determine.

Posted by: bobsewell | January 21, 2011 11:00 AM | Report abuse

Ladies, take note-

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110118101515.htm

"Healthier or more experienced males may also be better partners in parenting, such that time takes less of a toll on mom."

Posted by: kguy1 | January 21, 2011 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, that reminds me of that horrific plane that went out of National Airport into the Potomac in a snow storm, killing an inordinate number of people (the same day the Metro had an accident (Red Line, maybe?), killing some people, as well).

Boehner and the other Rethuglicans are so transparent in their profound conflicts of interest and in their feeding from the trough, all the while acting like Captain Renaut in Casablanca (love Claude Rains in that film) pocketing his winnings from that simply disgraceful gambling opportunity.

Ah, well. It's not anything new and won't ever get old.

Do excuse me now, so that even I can make a buck (although I do that legally (in all senses)).

Posted by: ftb3 | January 21, 2011 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Where do I sign up???

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/20/AR2011012004349.html

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 21, 2011 11:35 AM | Report abuse


If I don't get this loan, it's curtains.

Posted by: edbyronadams | January 21, 2011 11:37 AM | Report abuse

g-g-g-good m-m-morning, y-y’all.

TWC’s high today will be about 9 dee-grees F.

Yanno the scene in “A Christmas Story” when the kid gets his tongue stuck on the frozen flagpole? If I go outside today, the metal parts of the chair will get like that. And there’s no way I’m gonna be able to get the road salt cleaned off all the wheel tread and spokes, so I'm staying in.

To wax philosophic-like for a moment, I’d say Mr. A shortchanged humanity a bit in his third graf. Life is wonderfully mysterious and few things are supposed to go as planned. What he calls “triage” can actually be an invitation to a new way of looking at or experiencing life that we’d otherwise never discover. And in those moments, there is genius.

Humankind has always had to survive. And, in the main, we’ve done it brilliantly. Our frail species has survived thousands of years when we just as easily could have been blown, washed, eaten, crushed, frozen, burned, or starved out of existence. There is freedom in our need to survive; freedom to choose how we take that task on, with reluctance and fear or with eagerness and excitement.

Warm muffins, assorted hot beverages and chilled OJ on the table.

Posted by: MsJS | January 21, 2011 11:39 AM | Report abuse

You left the OJ outside again, MsJS? :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 21, 2011 11:50 AM | Report abuse

If I'd done that, I'd have a pitcher-sized orange Popsicle, Scotty. But without a stick to hold on to.

Posted by: MsJS | January 21, 2011 11:58 AM | Report abuse

s'nuke-I'm with you. I'll even start ahead of time. Today works.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 21, 2011 12:07 PM | Report abuse

Great, frosti!

JA -- you in on Milbank's idea? I hope I hope??

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 21, 2011 12:20 PM | Report abuse

Milbank is a saint, a [redacted] saint. Now if he could just make Cilizza go on sabbatical.

ftb, that crash was Florida Palm 90. Remember Lenny Scutnik wading into the river to rescue that woman? Boy, I'll never forget that day. Every time I go over the 14th street bridge I always look at the spot it hit.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 21, 2011 12:44 PM | Report abuse

The right whale that made a live appearance on a Satellite Beach surf cam yesterday (and was photgraphed, too) has been identified. She's 7 years old and was spotted with her new calf on December 30. She's been heading south from St. Augustine.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 21, 2011 12:55 PM | Report abuse

heya tbg and mudge.

i find the funniest part of the millibank article the list of automatically generated recommended articles on sarah palin at the bottom.

Posted by: LALurker | January 21, 2011 12:59 PM | Report abuse

A disguised meta-kit, landed in the Hudson? Which my overdeveloped sense of irony appreciates - I will be smiling the rest of the day. X-D

Posted by: qgaliana | January 21, 2011 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Lacy, gently-wafting curtains, Ed?

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 21, 2011 1:29 PM | Report abuse

I'm with you, frosti & scotty. I hope other people take Milbank's challenge. Of course it is easy for me, since I have no public forum and seldom if ever discuss She Who Ate Wasilla by name, but I promise to do my part.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 21, 2011 1:57 PM | Report abuse

I guess our part is to boycott writers who break the embargo.

Posted by: bobsewell | January 21, 2011 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Greg Sargent's Plum Line leads to this tale of mandatory health insurance for sailors and government-run hospitals in the young American republic.
http://www.common-place.org/vol-09/no-01/rao/

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 21, 2011 2:23 PM | Report abuse

JA, I'm sure the book is great. You're not landing that plane in the Hudson, you're landing it smack dab in the middle of the runway. I think that feeling that it isn't going smoothly has to do with adjusting the flaps and applying the thrust reversers.

And yeah, Scarlet might have had some sun on her face and callouses on her hands, but not only did she look great in the dress, she got a matching hat.

Have a happy day all.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 21, 2011 2:26 PM | Report abuse

What a great kit! Yep. "Landed in the Hudson" seems like a great expression because it works on many different levels. I recall that many called Captain Sullivan a hero, and he doubtless was. However, I don't think he was a hero for landing in the Hudson - I mean, it's not like he had a lot of choice - he is a hero for becoming an airline pilot to begin with.

Because so much in life is just luck. As I've said before, people who endure hardships aren't necessarily more heroic than others, they are just more unfortunate. Heroism comes from making yourself vulnerable to hardships for a noble end.

So, to me, "Landing in the Hudson" refers to people who knowingly take on risks and challenges and end up with more than they bargained for. You know, like police, soldiers, parents, and, say, authors with an amorphous subject but a rigid deadline.

It indicates that in a life well lived you sometimes end up in situations where there is no choice but to buckle up, hope for the best, and wait for that really big splash.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | January 21, 2011 2:31 PM | Report abuse

LostInThought, your 2:26 reminded me of a joke I heard once.

[Plane has just landed]
Tower: Well, Captain, I see you were a little left of center on that one.

Aircraft: Yes, and my first officer was a bit to the right of center.

Posted by: cowhand214 | January 21, 2011 3:06 PM | Report abuse


Fondly remembering the Carol Burnett classic, Tim.

Posted by: edbyronadams | January 21, 2011 3:23 PM | Report abuse

"If I don't get this loan, it's curtains

Posted by: edbyronadams | January 21, 2011 11:37 AM

Or, more aptly, bedsheets stapled to the window frames.

Joel, if your Hudson analogy does indeed refer to your book project, I'd like to take it a step further. Yeah, Sully chose the only (bad) option remaining. But, because of his many years of experience, he knew *how* to attempt that option so that it had the best chance of succeeding.

Posted by: Raysmom | January 21, 2011 3:42 PM | Report abuse

RD, yes it's a good expression for skill and resourcefulness in averting major disaster.

I've landed a few things in the Hudson in my time.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 21, 2011 4:15 PM | Report abuse

Loving this kit and boodle.

"Dressing for "work" (hahahahaha) I pretty much always land it in the Hudson. ... wear a hat that grabs everyone's attention, and that way they won't notice ..."

In my case that's exactly what I do. Awhile ago I had to run out unexpectedly so I grabbed a wonderful old felt fedora that I hadn't worn in years, put on my silver earrings and a bit of lipgloss and hit the road. The reaction I got to the hat convinced me that even ratty jeans and a farm coat can be transformed into glamor with "panache and plausible elegance under the circumstances." (thanks, Imom and Joel)

Posted by: talitha1 | January 21, 2011 4:18 PM | Report abuse

I tip my (invisible) hat to ya, talitha, in admiration. I actually like hats, but haven't worn one in ages. Ear muffs (which my dear mom used to call "ear muffins") don't count.

There was a sign -- not unexpected, yet sad -- up in the mail room at the condo that a former resident had died on xmas day. She was in her 80s, very gregarious when she lived here and always welcoming to newcomers. She had stomach cancer, which cannot be pleasant no matter how old one may be. I cannot help but think it must be a relief to die under those circumstances. Too bad there are not other options, though.

Is it really almost the end of the day on a Friday? Holy FSM!

Posted by: ftb3 | January 21, 2011 4:31 PM | Report abuse

With Venn diagram
http://www.buzzfeed.com/expresident/why-people-write-first-in-comments

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 21, 2011 4:38 PM | Report abuse

If I landed in the Hudson, I'd consult a marine biologist so I'd know how it might all turn out.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 21, 2011 4:45 PM | Report abuse

" they won't notice that your blue blazer doesn't really go with the swim trunks"

Been there. Done that.

During an inter-departmental softball game, a spectacular long slide into second base while wearing shorts (doh!) resulted in road-rash from here to there. Wearing long pants was not an option for a couple days. Also, needed loose fitting clothing to cover the non-public parts.

Swim trunks worked. A bit informal for the office, so I attempted balance by adding a blue blazer and tie. Swim trunks were blue as well. I thought the ensemble worked OK.

Not many office-mates commented. Those that did were supportive. The meeting with the Admin VP and Director of Personnel could have gone better, 'tho.

Posted by: northbank | January 21, 2011 4:49 PM | Report abuse

I gather you didn't have the correct gender to make a skirt an option, northbank, nor the Sean-Conneryness to make kilts work?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 21, 2011 4:53 PM | Report abuse

I gather you didn't have the correct gender to make a skirt an option, northbank, nor the Sean-Conneryness to make kilts work?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 21, 2011 4:53 PM | Report abuse

WilbrodG -
Right, a skirt would have garnered LOTS of comments - not many would have been supportive.

Sean-Conneryness? A kilt? Dang!! Wish I'd thought of that.

Posted by: northbank | January 21, 2011 5:00 PM | Report abuse

The Boodle knows everything...

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/01/pentalobe-screw-apple-war.php

Posted by: -TBG- | January 21, 2011 5:04 PM | Report abuse

The key is the sporran. Nobody messes with you when you're wearing crotch bling.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 21, 2011 5:06 PM | Report abuse

I'd like to imagine that with sufficient Sean Conneryness, even a blue blazer with swim trunks can be successful office wear!

Posted by: northbank | January 21, 2011 5:15 PM | Report abuse

Northbank, pictures would be good. I'll bet you didn't think to take any, did you?

Sean Connery is sooo hawt!

Posted by: slyness | January 21, 2011 5:32 PM | Report abuse

Slyness - Nope, no pics. Probably for the best - all things considered.

Posted by: northbank | January 21, 2011 5:50 PM | Report abuse

I love men in kilts ... love 'um.
Of course I also love bagpipes and goats, so what do I know?

Posted by: talitha1 | January 21, 2011 6:05 PM | Report abuse

Dishdasha. That would be the thing.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 21, 2011 6:14 PM | Report abuse

Nice word, "sporran." This one jumped out at me. Figuratively.
http://giftshop.scottishtartans.org/msf-1015c.jpg

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 21, 2011 6:16 PM | Report abuse

Oooooo, Jumper ... that could make the fiddler play a jig!

ftb, meant to thank you for the link to the camouflaged animal life photographs. So many of them were from Madagascar, especially the frogs (my 'spirit' animal) that I'm fantasizing about a trip there. Maybe I could arrange a meeting with the weavable silk spiders while I'm there.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 21, 2011 6:34 PM | Report abuse

Work sure is boring so far tonight,I left my book at home,nothing to do except put food in my mouth.

I feel like Lloyd Bridges in Airplane
"I guess I picked the wrong week to quit smoking"

Posted by: greenwithenvy | January 21, 2011 7:53 PM | Report abuse

Hmmm. I have a long kilt, bought on High Street in Edinburgh in 1972. It's going to be cold this weekend, maybe I should wear it to church on Sunday...

Posted by: slyness | January 21, 2011 7:55 PM | Report abuse


Think o' the poor true Scotsman going through airport security. Think o' the poor enhanced pat down man. Ach! There's no landin' in the Hudson on that one.

Posted by: edbyronadams | January 21, 2011 7:56 PM | Report abuse

Bachmann giving a speech tonight in Iowa. Yikes. The GOP gets more interesting every week.

You have one half of the party (the part that typically controls things) that is deathly afraid to actually say what they are for. They have been focus-grouped into paralysis: what they are for (cutting popular benefits while spending more and more on the two or three industries that fund them like millionaires and defense and pharmaceutical companies) is wildly unpopular in unadulterated form. As a result, they end up running campaigns full of innuendo and misdirection.

People are very sick of that whole thing, so a rebellion has formed. The other half, made up of people who never seem to control anything, is made up of people that HATE focus groups and despise the other half of the party. They go out of their way to say exactly what honks off the people in focus groups. They do and say really stupid and controversial things because those things have been suppressed for so long.

It isn't going to end well.

Posted by: baldinho | January 21, 2011 8:09 PM | Report abuse

Antidote for Princess Sparkle Pony...
From the other end of MN, Lily the Bear has given birth to two new cubs!
http://www.bear.org/livecams/lily-hope-cam.html

Posted by: northbank | January 21, 2011 8:21 PM | Report abuse

greenwithenvy, you jumped into my thoughts this afternoon while I was out walking. Doing okay, I hoped ... not *too* bummed about the Ravens. Now I'm wondering what book you're reading that you forgot to bring to work. Minutes and hours (occasional days) of solitude and empathy come over me, so I extend my hand .....

Posted by: talitha1 | January 21, 2011 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Keith Olbermann is leaving MSNBC:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/21/keith-olbermann-countdown-over_n_812506.html
Bah - I hate when I come home just barely in time to catch him - he was thanking people so I knew something was up. I'll miss him. I know he was over the top at times, but I liked his sense of humor, and he has a heart of gold. Guess he won't be doing Palin stories, at least not on MSNBC.

Posted by: seasea1 | January 21, 2011 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Just got home from dance class and saw the news about Olbermann - wow. He was the top rated MSNBC show and had two years left on his contract, what the heck happened. I agree with seasea, he could be too much at times but I always enjoyed his sense of humor. There's got to be more to this story, I wonder what caused this.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 21, 2011 10:17 PM | Report abuse

northbank-thanks for posting the Lily link. This blog has been short on bears lately.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 21, 2011 10:59 PM | Report abuse

Well, the Comcast deal to take over NBC was finalized this week. So a conspiracy theorist might link Olbermann's departure to the Roberts family. (Except that they're very strongly Democratic, but ya know, why ruin a good conspiracy theory for that? :-)

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 21, 2011 11:16 PM | Report abuse

dearth of bear news means
hibernation is apace
snouts emerge in spring

Posted by: talitha1 | January 21, 2011 11:25 PM | Report abuse

Bears are fine, mostly
Unless they're in the yard.
Then be unwelcome here.

Posted by: Yoki | January 21, 2011 11:32 PM | Report abuse

Woke straight up with these two songs in my dream-mind's ear. Hope y'all don't mind the sharing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kT196UksWxc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sC0cWMo4TY


night owl
t.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 2:35 AM | Report abuse

It took me a day longer than I had hoped, but I finally got my umbrella drink:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/5377026499/

Posted by: yellojkt | January 22, 2011 4:57 AM | Report abuse

Naming a son Barack Hussein Obama was illegal under Hawaii Law in 1961.

Posted by: dancingrabbit | January 22, 2011 5:26 AM | Report abuse

Well done, yello. Is it wrong to say that actually looks good right now? I think a willing mind could turn that into a smoothie and therefore it would be acceptable for breakfast.

Posted by: cowhand214 | January 22, 2011 6:33 AM | Report abuse

What impresses me more than the drink is the short-sleeved shirt because here it is 8 degrees F. How I envy Yello.

Posted by: gmbka | January 22, 2011 6:36 AM | Report abuse

For the record, that photo was taken yesterday afternoon. However, I am about to leave for a distillery tour. It's five o'clock somewhere, just not here.

There is also a clue to my whereabouts in that picture. Let's just say there is a reason I am drinking that particular drink in that particular place.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 22, 2011 6:50 AM | Report abuse

ARRRRRRRRRRRGHHHHHHHHHH!!! Just lost a long comment... *recalculating*

It's not often you can find a great $16 cassoulet, right bc? :-)

Yes, those camo creature pics were great!

NatGeo, on the other hand, did NOT land these pics in the Hudson:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/01/pictures/110119-nuclear-waste-train-castor-antinuclear-protest-germany-power-energy-pictures

Context-free scaremongering, anyone? If someone (ahem) has a specific e-mail for a senior editor at NatGeo I can complain to, I'd appreciate it. *fuming*

The current WaPo home page headline about Princess Sparkle Pony should read "to give own State of the Onion rebuttal." I doubt the Onion could do anything to parody what she'll say (it's already written so she can practice, I'm sure). *RME*

And of course, everyone's heeding the call for a more civil discussion:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/22/business/media/22beck.html

*hanging my head*

But hey, at least the medium-range forecasts offer hope for a blizzard Tuesday/Wed.

*battling-a-balky-router-and-lining-up-the-usual-chores Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 22, 2011 6:56 AM | Report abuse

Good morning boodle!

What say we reserve March as Beck free month?

-20F here in Our Fair City, up from a low of -34 yesterday. Time to make some coffee and see if I have a bottle suitable for making Gluhwein later.

Not a big Olbermann fan, but I'm having trouble seeing the business angle that makes firing him a good move for MSNBC.

Later gators!

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 22, 2011 7:16 AM | Report abuse

In that case, file charges against his mom, pekkarhed.

Oh, wait. He wasn't born in Hawaii. No foul, no harm.

'Morning, Boodle. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. (You know what/whom I'm growling at.)

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 22, 2011 7:32 AM | Report abuse

I'd be fine with a Beck-free decade, frosti...

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 22, 2011 7:40 AM | Report abuse

Over at Obscured Clarity, Tim Molter has found and featured some of the finest DNA animation ever.
http://obscuredclarity.blogspot.com/

I found it wonderful.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 22, 2011 8:03 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. It's a refreshing -24C/-10F here Frosti. A nice winter morning with clear skies that keeps the birds hopping between the feeders and the trees. They need their calories them little birdies.
Beck is using hate mongering for venal goals. He is a truly despicable person.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 22, 2011 8:24 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. Perhaps Olbermann will be heading to CNN? They certainly need help over there. None of the folks over there have traction yet. We get so serious about politics, Olbermann gave us a break with humor. He could be serious, but I like the break.

The cold temps are back, need to wrap up to go outside. I may be staying in except to go to church.

Hey, Slyness, how's it going in the Queen city?

So whose playing the Super Bowl?

Have a super-duper weekend, folks, and love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 22, 2011 8:27 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, you all.

Miss Scarlet wearing her Mama's curtains, or the von Trap children wearing curtains in town to the embarrassment of their Papa. Yup, there is still plenty of wear in that material. It's all a matter of perspective.

In Carol Burnett's case, it's just a matter of hilarious.

Posted by: VintageLady | January 22, 2011 8:36 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all, hi Cassandra! My little weather station says it's 28 in the carport, so it's cold in the Queen City. Think I'll stay in awhile.

I slept late; Mr. T got up early to go to help at the firefighter entrance exam. Thank heavens bad weather didn't interrupt the schedule. I heard him leave but managed to go back to sleep. Hopefully it will be a nice, quiet day around here. Maybe I'll get my seed order together and send it. Spring will be here one of these days!

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 8:36 AM | Report abuse

That would be a Piña Colada in a spot named for its very birthplace, yes?

Posted by: Bob-S | January 22, 2011 9:57 AM | Report abuse

Or is yello in Puerto Rico? It's hard to keep up with him.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 22, 2011 10:00 AM | Report abuse

A little story...

I think most of you know that I live in a housing complex of seniors and disable folks famously known as public housing. When I first moved here, I went to the laundry room, the one I talk about so much, and I met one of my neighbors there. She was using the machines but didn't have the lights on. I asked if the lights were working and she said yes, but she didn't want them on. And she said this in a tone of voice that meant don't turn them on.

I took a seat and waited for her to finish with the machines. She then pulled a chair up and started talking to me. She said she had anger management issues, meaning she couldn't control her temper. Well, I'm thinking is this a good time to make an exit?

I said a little prayer, and joined in her conversation as to why she thought this was, her anger management issues. She's by no means a young person, much older than me. She answered, she didn't know. We gradually got to the subject of church, and the Bible. She read the Bible, but didn't understand it. I invited her to the Bible study, and we talked more about Scripture.

She smiled, and it was the most beautiful smile, so in contrast to what I saw when I first walked in. It just lit up her face.

To make a long story short, last year she cut off her cable and phone. She was using oxygen by then. She paid up her insurance for a year. She was in the hospital right before Xmas, and she told a friend of mine that God had told her she was coming in. The friend said, oh you'll be okay. She died that night.

I attended her funeral. When I walked up to the casket to view her, I nearly fell over. Most people in caskets look like what they are, dead. Not my neighbor, she looked like she was dressed for the greatest event in her life. It was like night and day. Everything matched, and she looked peaceful. Just beautiful.

In life, we seldom saw that in her. And I thought this morning, why didn't she look that way in her life? Why did she look better dead than alive? Was the release of life and the acceptance of death so much better than life? I miss her terribly.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 22, 2011 10:06 AM | Report abuse

Is it just me, or does Robin Givhan seem off her game in this review of the state dinner dress?
http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2011-01-19/michelle-obama-in-alexander-mcqueen-lady-in-red-at-white-house-state-dinner/

Too long by half, and full of sweeping generalizations without the usual wit.

Also, after taking a look at the dress as shown on the runway
http://www.style.com/slideshows/2010/fashionshows/2011RST/AMCQUEEN/RUNWAY/00290m.jpg
I prefer the asymmetrical neckline. Those sleeves scream prom dress. The question I'm surprised Givhan didn't ask is where that "bespoke tailoring" went amiss in fitting that neckline (or perhaps a little double sided tape could've helped).

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 22, 2011 10:21 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra-I'll be thinking about your story all day. Thank you.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 22, 2011 10:23 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra, what a sad story but it seems she was happy to be 'going home' so maybe this is really a happy story. Thank you for telling us this story.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 22, 2011 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

Warm muffins, assorted hot beverages and chilled OJ on the table.

An amazing lesson in your story, Cassandra. Thank you.

TWC has both cold and snow today. A rare combination.

Feeling quiet today so I'll just smile at you and wish you a great day.

Posted by: MsJS | January 22, 2011 10:46 AM | Report abuse

Back early from the morning errands -- just one more this afternoon, and then I'm definitely in for the duration. According to my aged automobile, the outside ambient temperature was 15F at the start and roared up to 17F at the finish. Hate to say it, but I think I've reached the point where I'm looking forward to complaining about summer. But first, I have to choke on daffodils and the pollen that follows.

Cassandra, that was a very moving moment you wrote about -- from start to finish. She was so lucky to have met you, and obviously you feel so lucky as to have been a part of her life. Thanks so much for sharing that.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra, the moral of that story is that you never know when the opportunity to minister to another one of God's children will present itself. I say that you were the conduit of God's love to your neighbor. A wonderful story, thank you for sharing.

I know what you mean about a person looking different when she dies. My mother's face was so peaceful. All the wrinkles fell away, she looked half her age. She too was ready and went home happily.

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Well. I've had my nose pressed against the glass all morning waiting for this new Sunday Style thing from the Washington Post. I can't decide if our delivery fellow is being tardy or if Suburban Fairfax is considered an "outlying area."

Posted by: RD_Padouk | January 22, 2011 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Breathless I say ... Breathless!

... after reading Scotty's 6:28 post and all that came thereafer. I'm a hapless Boodler.

My love to MsJs on the loss of her friend and to Cassandra as well. Seems like when I talk to my momhead all her news is about death and illnesses amongst our kith and kin ... yet I know that's not the case.

This blooming world is full of woes and always has been. S-fire! Ain't we all alive and wandering ... doing our bestest to muscle on, teach, revive and commune with one another?

OK then.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 11:20 AM | Report abuse

Got my grocery shopping done early and the pork roast is in the crockpot. Fresh flowers are arranged in the guest room for dbG, who is on her way here. This is the visit we were supposed to have for the Sanity Rally, when she ended up having to work.

I think The King's Speech is on the schedule for this evening. Dr G kept hearing it as The King's Peach and thinks that sounds delicious. I mean really... imagine how wonderful: a peach fit for a king!

Posted by: -TBG- | January 22, 2011 11:29 AM | Report abuse

*sigh* They. Just. Don't. Get. It.

The WaPo has a big photo of Palin in its rotating picture box, under the caption of a Palin-free month.

I mean, I recognize that we still have 8 days before it becomes february, but see, one theoretically shouldn't...oh, the hell with it. It's like trying to explain "good mental health" to pathorabbit.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 22, 2011 11:48 AM | Report abuse

Sending my fondest* thoughts to TBG and dbG this day ... rock-it!

*'fondest' because I can't conjure an adjective that best conveys my deepest care for two who've given me such kind support. Smile on, ladies!

That goes for CqP, dmd, Imom, slyness, sneaks, Cassandra, DNA_Girl, Wilbrod, Yoki, MsJS, LiT, MoftheM, nellie, Manon and VintageLady ... kindly forgive me, dear other sister-boodlers if I've not named you .....

Boodle men know I love and appreciate them ...
but I want pictures.
In kilts.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 11:53 AM | Report abuse

I would tend to say Boodlers, by and large, are quite peachy indeed, TBG. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 22, 2011 11:54 AM | Report abuse

pj, seasea, dr ...

... won't someone help a poor, well-intentioned, aging hippie old boodler-lady and publish an attendance roster?

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 12:02 PM | Report abuse

... and, um, what's her name again?

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 12:05 PM | Report abuse

I didn't get my Sunday edition either, RD. I'm in the outer wilds of Alexandria.

Posted by: -pj- | January 22, 2011 12:05 PM | Report abuse

talitha,

I'm quite honored to be included with your group, but I'm a guy.

Posted by: -pj- | January 22, 2011 12:07 PM | Report abuse

and frosti.

http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Pictures/bears_pg01.html

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 12:12 PM | Report abuse

ooooops, pj. Though I'm not 'picky' I can be mindless at times. Mea culpa. Do kindly help me and point out my boodle blindspots in the future. No kilt required ... ;)

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 12:19 PM | Report abuse

Cassandra, funny you should post that today. Something happened this morning that made me think DC's expectations have got to be mind-blowing.

So last week we had a death in the family. It was expected and a long time coming, and I thought I brought DC along nicely in the process. She's had a few questions that have dribbled out over the past few days. Normal stuff. Then this morning, we're in the car, and she's just being a kid babbling on when she says...

It's weird that we know where Hell is but nobody knows where Heaven is. We could go to Hell to visit people, but we don't know anyone who lives there. Hey. I couldn't find the Styx River, even when I zoomed in. Maybe it's really like a creek but they just call it a river. Oooh! I like this song. Turn it up!

So I'm looking in my rear view watching her rock out thinking What? so I turn Usher back down a notch and say "Honey. I don't understand. Where were you looking at a map of Hell?" She says the internet.

Now I'm thinking holy cannoli what the heck did she see on the internet and what on GGE was I thinking, I've gotta watch her more carefully, there's so much craziness out there and I'm sure I have this oh dear goodness I really am a poor excuse look on my face when she gives me an eye roll, a sigh, and a look that says oh you poor uneducated woman and says....

Mom. Chill out. Hell. It's in the Cayman Islands.

Have a happy day all.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 22, 2011 12:21 PM | Report abuse

Me in my kilt, talitha (scroll down to the bottom) http://bordersblog.com/trueromance/2011/01/14/guest-author-sue-ellen-welfonder-giveaway/

While combing the Intertubes for a picture of me in my kilt, I came across this site (http://www.men-in-kilts.com/) which featured a "Highland kilt package."

Due to the word "package," I was sore afraid to click on it.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 22, 2011 12:22 PM | Report abuse

ftb ...
ftb ...

earmuffins

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 12:22 PM | Report abuse

FSM, you people make me happy!

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 12:27 PM | Report abuse

Nice to see everyone lending a hand in space...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/22/AR2011012200398.html

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 22, 2011 12:28 PM | Report abuse

And Hell Bunker at St. Andrew's:

http://www.travelpod.com/travel-photo/dbarela/scotland2005/1122310200/sa-hell.jpg/tpod.html

Posted by: -pj- | January 22, 2011 12:30 PM | Report abuse

No sweat, talitha. I'd look dreadful in a kilt.

Posted by: -pj- | January 22, 2011 12:31 PM | Report abuse

LiT ... DC and you have once again revived my faith!
My fondest memories while I live and when I depart GGE are those when the wise child reveals the deepest and most hilarious truth.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 12:37 PM | Report abuse

The Catholic Church has just landed a whopper in de Nile, or make that de Nial.

The top story in the upper right of our local Metro page today is the headline, "Archdiocese settles suit for $946,000: Priest in case is accused of trying to hire hit man."

How did I miss that November part of the story--the contract hit put out by the no-longer-practicing priest? Sounds like a chapter ripped from the doings of La Cosa Nostra, or that it should be part of that story of the mob round-up that took place this last week in New York and two other states. And never in my life could I have imagined that I would find the words "Catholic Church" juxtaposed with the words "Texas Rangers" in the same body copy! Unfortunately the gunman the doofus priest thought he was hiring last November for the assassination attempt on the teen the priest allegedly raped on multiple occasions--and once allegedly at gunpoint--turned out to be an undercover Dallas cop.

Last night's local ABC affiliate, in a very brief story, named the out-of-court settlement paid out by the Catholic Church as $1 million. Close enough if you round up. Ace print reporter Abe Levy has the full details in today's paper, a very fine reporting job, if I do say so myself. So hold onto your saddles, since the trial for Father John Fiala is set for mid-August in Bexar County (San Antonio).

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/religion/article/Archdiocese-settles-suit-for-946-000-971214.php

To add to the riduculousness of it all, our local paer ran on page 3A today the story by AP's Nicole Winfield under the headline "Pope weighs in on sex scandal gripping Italy."

Apparently, the pontif is wagging his holier-than-thou hand at Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi--and, as reported, had an audience quite recently with Rome's police officers and police chief with a mention of rediscovering "moral and spiritual roots." No mention of travel to San Antonio to meet with local law enforcement.

The article also reports that Friday, a ranking cardinal, who leads the ongoing Italian bishop's conference, said Berlusconi's scandal would be discussed Monday at a meeting of the conference's main decision-making group.

Another classic example of bait-and-switch by the Catholic Church. Remember the pope's pronouncement last year, that the focus of the scandal should be on the victims?

To paraphrase my husband this morning, "Clean up the poo in your own yard before stepping in the doo in someone else's." He also said that the church's doctrine on this seems to be "Don't do as we do, do as we say."

Note: Since MLK, I have been battling severe allergies again, and in my January attempt to combat severe lung congestion and my efforts to make the house more breathable, I shall pop up here infrequently.

Posted by: laloomis | January 22, 2011 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Afternoon all
I have a rare saturday off,going to a friends 50th birthday party later.That will happen a lot this year including (yikes) me turning 50.

Talitha,to answer your question,right now I am reading 2 books,both boigraphies,one about Meriweather Lewis and the other about Rex Barney.Rex was a pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers and the long time PA announcer for the Baltimore Orioles.He was famous in Baltimore for his "give that fan a contract" and "Thank Youuuu" annoucements.

Posted by: greenwithenvy | January 22, 2011 12:52 PM | Report abuse

GreenWE, cool on Rex Barney. I lived in Balmer long enough to appreciate him and say Thank Youuuuuuuu back!

I just finished a Meriweather Lewis bio myself (same?) and dug through my shelves to retrieve Undaunted Courage (Stephen Ambrose, 2005) to reread. If my teachers and profs back in the day had sensed my voracious appetite for history they'd have made me a bookworm.

oh, wait ..... (as Scotty says)

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 1:09 PM | Report abuse

LiT, your DC sounds terrific! May she *never* lose her gift for imagination, no matter how manner feathers she may ruffle. BTW, you might want to have her study a map of Michigan (both peninsulae) to find Hell and Paradise. I've forgotten which one sits in which peninsula, but on the weather report with the great Sonny Eliot, he would always make it a point to say that "It's colder than Hell in Paradise!"

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 1:19 PM | Report abuse

SCC -- how "many" feathers, etc. ....

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 1:21 PM | Report abuse

Ummmm...

"RNC finances suffer from loss of major donors"

By T.W. Farnam
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, January 13, 2011

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/13/AR2011011305667.html

"Corporate contributions have surged for new Republican leaders in House"

By Dan Eggen and T.W. Farnam
Washington Post Staff Writers
Saturday, January 22, 2011

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/21/AR2011012103187.html?hpid=topnews

------------

So...which is it? Is fundraising up or down? Did they go from rags to riches in only 9 days?


Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 22, 2011 1:29 PM | Report abuse

I think the difference is where the donations are going. Donors abandoned the RNC under Michael Steele, but started giving directly to various individual campaigns. Not that I understand campaign financing laws, if there are any...

Posted by: seasea1 | January 22, 2011 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Ombudsman Andrew Alexander's final column: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/2009/02/25/LI2009022502075.html

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 22, 2011 1:36 PM | Report abuse

LiT


Just lovely, DC. LiT, that made my day, I laughed out loud.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 22, 2011 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, Monthly reports are due on the 20th, so this report shows the money given after the dust settled from the last election. On top of that, we're into a new election cycle so everyone's contribution meters click back to zero.


Posted by: LostInThought | January 22, 2011 1:42 PM | Report abuse

for ftb ...

I tried to link to "Sisters of Mercy" but the tech is beyond my capacity. So when Judy sings this I hope you'll understand some of my heart.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHP6vlO09ho&feature=related

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 1:48 PM | Report abuse

or the felt fedora, ratty jeans and farmcoat version ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZutD7E-toOI&feature=related

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for the laugh, ftb. The Cayman Islands. An actual LOL.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 22, 2011 2:20 PM | Report abuse

Has anyone here who actually subscribes to the dead tree edition of the WaPo received the new, whippy-skippy "Saturday" part of the Sunday paper? The time is working it's way to 3 pm, and not a paper in sight.

*muttering expletives*

Thanks, talitha!

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 2:49 PM | Report abuse

ftb-I'm sure it's frustrating not to have your WaPo Sunday on Saturday paper, but I'm glad it gave you the opportunity to say "whippy-skippy."

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 22, 2011 2:54 PM | Report abuse

I discovered the other day it's illegal to steal first base from second. Granted it's only in rare situations a runner might want to do this. But it's not allowed.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 22, 2011 3:03 PM | Report abuse

We do have a River Styx south of Gainesville, Florida. It empties into Orange Lake, east of Micanopy. Lovely little bald cypress waterway.

There's apparently Styxes all over, but this one's appropriately serene.

I finished reading Aron Ralston's "Between a Rock and a Hard Place", so am ready to see the movie version "127 Hours" on Friday. Ralston, at age 27, had done an enormous amount of traveling (largely to concerts, even one in Japan) and an astonishing amount of mountaineering. Admittedly, mountaineering can be cheaper than downhill skiing, but it's enormously demanding. Just hiking up mountains using easy non-technical paths is hard work. This guy's capacity for climbing projects is amazing. Some of it's just plain weird. A 48-hour nonstop hike?

The ecological physiologist in me is wondering about testing Ralston and some of his counterparts to see if they set some new standards for fitness.

Ralston's an excellent writer, I suppose a result of studying more than just mechanical engineering at Carnegie-Mellon.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 22, 2011 3:18 PM | Report abuse

ftb - I didn't get mine until well after noon, which is much later than the 10:00 promised. I'm assuming this is just a roll-out problem. And although the article by Hank Stuever is excellent, as is his custom, I'm a bit underwhelmed by the whole thing.

There isn't a whole lot here that is really new. It seems a bit of a throwback to a few years ago when we used to receive a big chunk of the Sunday Paper on Saturday anyway.

Still, it is nice to get the advertising flyers earlier. And if it helps the Washington Post pay its bills, that's cool with me.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | January 22, 2011 4:13 PM | Report abuse

RDP -- I may have to go out in the Arctic air tomorrow to get the Saturday half of the Sunday paper (and pay for it, of course) tomorrow. It is a pain in the veritables, I must say.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 4:25 PM | Report abuse

My brother sends me a new weather link. I keep up with such things. I see it's 79 F. in Puerto Rico right now. Hmmph. It's also a balmy 43 in Calgary. (Yes, Canuckistanis, it works for you all too.)
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/zoa/mwmap3.php?map=usa

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 22, 2011 4:58 PM | Report abuse

Nanosail-D is alive! Rockin' good news!
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1101/22nanosail/

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 22, 2011 5:04 PM | Report abuse

Yep, it works but we are heading for cold stuff. It's 5F/-16C on your site and the forecast calls for -25C/-14F early next morning. The VLP makes a nice feet warmer to watch hockey in total comfort, I'll make good use of that.
I'm making brunch food for dinner; sue me.
Rafts of asparagus on ham with poached eggs and Hollandaise. It should go down well with crusty bread and white wine.
I've heard there is football on the schedule tomorrow, for the penultimate time in a long while. How cold is it going to be in the games' statdiunms?

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 22, 2011 5:13 PM | Report abuse

SCC statdiunms? I'm besting myself on this one as the worst typist ever.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 22, 2011 5:15 PM | Report abuse

Yup, the Chinook blew in a few days ago (and I do mean blew, a positive gale) and forced us well into the +s. A relief from the -31C wind chills of the past few weeks. Last Sunday was plain arctic. I know the cold weather will return, so I'm enjoying the weather while it lasts.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 5:54 PM | Report abuse

We had the arctic all week-- yesterday was -31C (actual, before that it was wind chills.)

Blow some chinook down here, please.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 22, 2011 6:10 PM | Report abuse

I second Wilbrod's request. It looks like the Canuckistani chinook will not be here in time to create the longed for "January thaw."

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 22, 2011 6:17 PM | Report abuse

It's positively warm here, and sunny! The ground is saturated though. I've got some crocuses (croci?) up and out, and plenty of buds and new growth starting. Hope we don't a cold spell, or it'll be curtains for some stuff.

Saw The King's Peach - very good. Helena Bonham Carter wasn't scary at all. And I loved that they had Corgis (not sure why I was surprised).

Posted by: seasea1 | January 22, 2011 6:18 PM | Report abuse

I'm looking forward to The King's Peach, glad to read positive reviews here. I'm a sucker for English period pieces, as you all well know.

My little weather station says it's 37 here, but it feels much colder. We are anticipating a major storm mid-week, oh joy.

Supper here was London broil on the grill, asparagus with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, and a salad. Geekdottir made smoothies mid-afternoon, so I wasn't terribly hungry. But the meat was good.

You people get me into trouble. Someone, ftb I think, recommended Letters Between Six Sisters, from the Mitfords' correspondence. Got that for Christmas 2009. I have also read Hons and Rebels, Jessica Mitford's memoirs, and I got Wait for Me!, Deborah Mitford's memoirs, for Chirstmas 2010. Now I've bought a couple of Nancy Mitford's novels. This is getting to be an obsession.

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 6:47 PM | Report abuse

Geekdottir sent me this, which the physics-minded among us will enjoy?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GX4_3cV_3Mw

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 6:52 PM | Report abuse

I'm with you, Slyness. I got the Letters between Six Sisters AND Wait for Me for Christmas, and polished them both off in record time. The mystery, to me, is why that lot remains so fascinating to entirely non-upper-crust, non-Lost Generation North Americans. For me, I think it is their raw intelligence vs extreme politics, combined with their clear devotion to each other but not in a way that suggests that they *liked* each other; rather that the bond of 'family,' and 'sister,' was, in the end, unbreakable. I think I'm a bit that way myself.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 7:02 PM | Report abuse

Is whippy-skippy analogous to hippy dippy?

We frisbeetarians just want to make sure.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 7:13 PM | Report abuse

Yes, I think you're right, Yoki. It didn't hurt that they knew everybody who was anybody and lived interesting lives. And they had to use their intelligence to survive. Have you been to Chatsworth? It's on my short bucket list. That, and Windsor Castle.

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 7:16 PM | Report abuse

My pleasure, slyness. And I agree, Yoki -- I don't exactly know why they fascinate me so much. I suspect it is the times, when upper class women went uneducated formally, so that they could take their rightful places as mere trinkets for rich men who would have dalliances and die early from syphilis or other STDs of the day. Yoki, you are also perceptive (and when, my dear, are you not???) in regard to the bond of "family"such as it might be. The intertwinings of each of their respective needs and wants from their parents, neither of whom was equipped emotionally to provide, kept them, I suppose together. I found the letters from Jessica (the Commie) to be much more revealing of her underpinnings than I expected, even if (I suspect) she was unaware of it on a more granular level. Diana made me itch for obvious reasons, and I think Unity was off her nut for a long time before her rhapsody with Hitler. Nancy was duplicitous and I thought her letters and behavior showed a lot of insecurity (big *duh* there). Debo is the last one left, and perhaps I should take a gander at her memoirs. Reading them and about them is voyeurism at its very, very best, methinks.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 7:18 PM | Report abuse

Whippy-skippy is a term of art, used in our law firm on a regular basis, and even in context!

*snort*

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 7:20 PM | Report abuse

I have been to Chatsworth, only the public rooms of course. It is (probably even more now) perhaps the most beautiful of the old estate houses of all. Remember, too, that it was Mr. Darcy's house in the BBC Pride and Prejudice. What could be more scrumptious than Chatsworth in the background and Colin Firth emerging from the pond in Jones' garden in a wet shirt? Two beauties in one. I can think of one more beautiful scene, but one only.

And yes, ftb, I suspect Unity Mitford was seriously *amiss* in myriad ways as a child, long before she embraced the Fuhrer (we need umlauts *and* italics, given the number of German speakers in these parts).

You're absolutely right about the sibs fulfilling unmet child-needs. There are many currents among the sisters that I recognise from my relationship(s) with my brothers, again a function of parental absence/neglect (in our case, nearly benign [they were far more interested in each other than us, as it should perhaps be, and also in upholding a public-image of perfect upwardness -- which perhaps explains their individual bitterness when they eventually separated and divorced], in theirs, not so much).

Man, I love the Boodle. Imagine talking, really conversing, about the psycho-social circumstances of a literary family in any other internet forum!

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 7:53 PM | Report abuse

ftb, I think of C.S. Lewis, a little older than the Mitfords, who declared women were not worth knowing till they were 40. The implication, of course, is that women are uneducated (and uneducatable) and therefore cannot meet men as equals. In spite of the pervasive sexism, these six attempted and accomplished so much. Would a decent education have allowed Unity to comprehend the evil of National Socialism? Sir Oswald Mosely had an education and became a fascist in spite of it. But would Jessica have seen the inherent faults of communism? I wonder.

Of course, World War II had such an impact on their lives. The loss of their only brother, of Deborah's brother in law, who would have been the Duke of Devonshire, of other close friends, made for tough times that they met bravely and overcame. Diana in prison for three years, separated from her young children, that had to be hard.

Fascinating, all of them. Even Pam, who was the most reclusive and led a quiet life.

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 7:55 PM | Report abuse

I dunno about Windsor Castle. Much of it is George IV, restored by Elizabeth II.

London has some nice private castles. I've been to Kenwood House on Hampstead Heath and Osterly (both with Adams interiors). Chiswick House (Lord Burlington of the Boyle family, as in universal gas laws) is just sort of a tasteful rich guy's setting for parties. Eltham Palace is a weird combination of the remains of an Elizabethan palace (the hammerbeam-roofed great hall remains) and an Art Deco 1920s mansion that gets frequent use as a movie set.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 22, 2011 8:20 PM | Report abuse

For Jumper,

Inner life of a Cell:
http://aimediaserver4.com/studiodaily/videoplayer/?src=ai4/harvard/harvard.swf&width=640&height=520

With narration:
http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/anim_innerlife_hi.html

Mitochondria and ATP synthesis:
http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 22, 2011 8:26 PM | Report abuse

And the animation you linked to is part of a series by Drew Berry (awarded MacArthur fellowship in 2010)

http://www.wehi.edu.au/education/wehitv/

The Body Code is a compilation of all the DNA ones:

http://www.wehi.edu.au/education/wehitv/body_code_drew_berry_2003/

Narration provided by the DNA Learning Center
http://www.dnai.org/a/index.html

(go to "putting it together" in each section for the animations).

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 22, 2011 8:35 PM | Report abuse

I've not been to Windsor since the great fire of the annus horribilus, so don't know what it is now. I do have a funny story though.

I was visiting Windsor in the mid-sixties with my family; I would have been about 7 years old, my youngest brother about 3. He was suddenly seized with a need to relieve himself, and approached a precious urn of some Dynasty, clutching poor Willy desperately. A footman materialised from nowhere, picked up Gubbins and vanished with my baby; since I was the only one who noticed, I pursued them. We were led up a dark narrow staircase behind one of the linen-panels and deposited in a wee, primitive loo. Gub did his business (I think the fear caused by the purloining was the only thing that inhibited the footman's beautiful red-tailed uniform and brass buttons being ruined on the way), I wiped his bum and washed his hands.

When we emerged from the small dank cell, I found that same footman whispering into a (then) high-tech earphone/mic combo (in other words, *huge*), and we were further led by a different route through back-stairs until that fine specimen of British manhood opened, from the back, another panel and shoved us out to meet up with our tour group, as though nothing had happened.

The whole memory makes me happy, including that my Sovereign's staff is clearly accustomed to colonials bringing imperfectly toilet-trained babbies on long days of sightseeing in the Old Country.

My Mum later that evening told me that the other bros were quite distressed when they noticed that Gubbins was missing, until they realised that I was too. My mother's response? "So long as Yoki is with him, Gub will be fine."

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 8:43 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

A busy day and a busy evening - interesting how sometimes we get a lot done but wonder where our day went?

For those in the hunt for the Playoff Tiara, please don't forget to get your picks in - first game's at 3 PM EST tomorrow.

Lots of good Booling today, and LiT, that's a great story. I really don't want to know where Hell is, myself. I've been told to go there often enough, I think it's as likely to find me as much as I'm likely to find *it*. The Caymans sound nice, though.

Have a good night, all.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 22, 2011 8:57 PM | Report abuse

I can so relate to this kit: big, complicated project at my new job AND preparing for my son's wedding next month AND trying to sell my house 1700 miles away AND look for another one AND just finished my laundry in the basement of this temporary apartment building where I must reside one more week (it s_cks)AND flying to Florida tomorrow for work And.....

Thanks...I needed that. Promise to back-boodle soon. :-)

Posted by: Windy3 | January 22, 2011 9:00 PM | Report abuse

Great story, Yoki.

Posted by: Windy3 | January 22, 2011 9:07 PM | Report abuse

Looking forward to seeing The King's Speech .. Peach?

Also, go Steelers!

Posted by: Windy3 | January 22, 2011 9:13 PM | Report abuse

Windy, may the ever-presents be at your back!

Yoki, I'm only halfway off the floor from laughing at your Gubbins at Windsor tale. Being an elder sister 'in charge and responsibly trusted' myself made it ever so more dear.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 9:14 PM | Report abuse

Love the story, Yoki! Yes, good to know the staff can handle tourists. Also good to know that there are loos at Windsor. I will have need of one, whenever I go. Did you notice the story about how Andrew and Debo installed seventeen bathrooms at Chatsworth when they moved in? And that rewiring the house took three years? Yikes. Makes me appreciate my 2400 square feel of ranch house.

Posted by: slyness | January 22, 2011 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Bob-S wins the drink and location naming quiz, although Wikipedia disputes Barrachina's claim by about a decade. After the pina colada we found the Don Q run tasting visitor station by the docks. That set us back two bottles of souvenirs.

Rum was also the theme of the morning as we visited the Bacardi plant. Lots of history and just a little rum. No need to purchase any since as the best selling spirit in the world (as the tour endlessly reminded us) the stuff is nearly ubiquitous.

To counter the rum we spent most of the rest of the day searching the center of the island in vain for coffee plantations.

Tonight I unwound with a mai tai and something called a Teach's torture which was 151 rum, Grand marnier, Amaretto and something else. Alas, neither drink came with an umbrella although both deserved on.

Only one more full day on la Isla Del Encanto. So much rum and so little time.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 22, 2011 9:43 PM | Report abuse

That is a funny story, and perhaps the best denouement is that I only years later realised that this footman was Security. Not a servant, but a Special Forces man, ready for anything, even a bab. Which explains his broad-of-shoulder-narrow-of-hip beauty, which impressed itself upon me even at the tender age of 7.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 9:46 PM | Report abuse

A public loo in plush Richmond had toilet paper that said "Council Property". I should have absconded with a sample.

The business of designing a fancy residence with back halls and back stairs apparently dates to the late 18th century. I think it was a sort-of palace for the young George IV that first allowed the servants to disappear. Unless you count Jefferson's dumbwaiter at Monticello.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 22, 2011 9:47 PM | Report abuse

Don't you just love the word 'dumb-waiter?' Especially if one hasn't encountered one naturally? I have, but still do. My brothers and I hauled each other up and down in one, in a derelict country-house in the cold and snow in Eastern Europe, when we were young. Probably too dangerous to be permitted to do so, now, but we had fun!

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 9:52 PM | Report abuse

The queen wanted me to tell you that the loo is through these gates and on the right.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/2555011904/in/set-72157605453101924/

If you can't find it, just ask this guy, he'll be glad to help you.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/2554197467/in/set-72157605453101924/

Posted by: yellojkt | January 22, 2011 10:03 PM | Report abuse

Why, why, dear yello, would you wish to usurp my mid-sixties, very funny true story? Must you always have the last word?

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 10:17 PM | Report abuse

Pamela! Of course! She was the one I forgot, but she pretty much faded into the background anyway.

The conceits of the upper classes have always intrigued me. There's the narcissism-entitlement fantasy along side the "What if this all goes away? What will happen to me then?" kind of mentality. On the surface, there's not much that interests me, but below the surface it's like lifting up a rock in the woods and you can see all the ugly, crawly life underneath. Interiors are much more interesting than exteriors, I think. But sometimes even that can be too creepy-crawly to witness. Sometimes, one must needs avert one's eye, out of embarrassment or out of disgust.

Yanno?

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 10:22 PM | Report abuse

I just don't accept that Pamela was somehow retiring. She was married for a long time to a physicist-soldier, and then lived openly with women On the Continent for even longer. She may not have written as many letters as did her sisters (which I put down to her disability, not inclination), but she flew here and there, drove everywhere, and lived a life of near adventure.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 10:26 PM | Report abuse

DaveotC, the dumbwaiter at Monticello is second only to the cupboard bed that opens into Jefferson's study. Also love the holes in the floor in the foyer that allow the clockweights to work properly. I 'heart' and admire Monticello.

There are two dumbwaiters at the old Maine house of my son's fathers family. It's a wonder any child survived the adventures there.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 10:28 PM | Report abuse

scc: missing apostrophe
... father's ... my son only had one!

Posted by: talitha1 | January 22, 2011 10:31 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, Boodle-friends. I feel passionately about Pamela, because she was interested in the same things I am; all things domestic. Cooking, clothing, pretty rooms. Oddly, though, she disliked children. I don't. I kinda like them.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 10:32 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I love those things too...and dogs, which you do also. Am trying to reconsider my fear of cats, and tis working...

So very tired that I must drive by and boodle lightly...in the AM, I will enjoy DNAGirl's treasure trove of sci-vis...science visualization -- the next big thing,of course.

Oh, Cassandra, the most poignant of stories...and you, dearest, are an ordinary angel....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 22, 2011 10:47 PM | Report abuse

Yoki, I guess Pamela escaped my attention -- even though I found her interesting when I was reading the letters -- because I was so wound up with the others. She sort of dropped off my attention span along the way. Nancy craved attention so much, as did Jessica; Diana did, too, indeed. Their personalities were more powerful, and distracting, in their own individual ways and in multiples. Unity was a nutcase, and she didn't last long. I don't know what to make of Debo, and I'll have to read her memoirs to attempt to delve into her role in all of it, as she was the oldest and is the only remaining of them all.

But you're right about Pamela. She did make a life for herself outside the norm -- both of the Mitford norm and the British (such as it was/is) upper class norm.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 22, 2011 10:50 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, dear CP. We've spoken before of 'keeping house.' Keeping, meaning loving, cherishing those within.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 10:52 PM | Report abuse

Backboodling.

Children and pretty rooms tend not to mix well for long, Yoki. At least not without footmen to guide errant youngsters to the loo.

LiT-- you have a darling imp on your hands. Cayman islands, indeed!

Cassandra, glad she went beautifully. Sometimes the undertakers do strange things. My grandma who died of Alzheimer's had extremely dark red lipstick on, it looked strange in the pictures. But youthful.

My uncle had his face pushed up in a smile, so unlike his usual cheek sag causing a near-frown his wife said she barely recognized him. I said I did when I looked straight down, but no question, it was very strange to see from the side, like an insipid angel.

In all, the body is the shell, but it is nice, I suppose, to leave a final impression. My grandma who died a couple years ago was dressed in her favorite pantsuit that she had worn to a few weddings and danced in-- and we had pictures up of her doing exactly that, in that outfit.

She wasn't worried of dying. Just another journey, and she always did believe in God.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 22, 2011 10:58 PM | Report abuse

No, Debo is the youngest (Nancy was eldest), talker of Boudleigh (no Honnish). I really think she disappeared herself, when she became the wife of a 'rich' man, and took a title. She suffered with Andrew Cavendish, but apparently the house was enough to make up for it. She is the only one who lived the life their parents thought they were destined for. Marry a title, be a lady, never concern oneself with things intellectual. She's incredibly intelligent, but completely uneducated, and not much interested in things cerebral; all about county and country pursuits; opening fetes, breeding Shetland horses, throwing large parties. A waste, to my mind, of a fine mind.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 11:04 PM | Report abuse

Disagree, Wilbrod. Pretty rooms and children do go together, so long as those rooms are designed for children and adults. And no primary-coloured plastic is admitted.

Posted by: Yoki | January 22, 2011 11:12 PM | Report abuse

If this is true, it both inspiring and alarming. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/world/23clarridge.html?hp

Posted by: Yoki | January 23, 2011 12:50 AM | Report abuse

laloomis was certainly correct about this: "Berlusconi's scandal [would] be discussed Monday."

cmyth4u - I wish we were all happier. We can only do what we can do, yes? Part of what we can do is not take each other for granted.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 3:15 AM | Report abuse

Yoki,
It was a lovely story. I enjoyed it greatly. I'm sorry if you thought my illustration was scribbling all over it.

Windsor Castle has been beautifully restored since the fire. I only hope to go back to England someday and see all the other wonderful castles my fellow boodlers have enjoyed. That sort of endorsement is the best form of travel guide. Please continue to regal me with your travels and will try to check my tendancies to be a 'topper.'

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 6:16 AM | Report abuse

I look forward to a time when we will need castles in the USA.

Posted by: russianthistle | January 23, 2011 6:27 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. Bob S, so very true, but so much of the time we do just that, take each other for granted.

I enjoyed your story, Yoki, although the world you speak of is so very far removed from me, as I suspect mine is from you.

I assume you're looking forward to the white stuff, Slyness, me, not so much. Perhaps it will bypass us.

Let's hear the outcomes of the games today. Where's the money going?

It's very cold here this morning. It is my intention to attend Sunday school this morning, and morning worship service. Hopefully, I can do that. Please join me.

Have a blessed day, folks, and love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 23, 2011 6:37 AM | Report abuse

And while it is no Windsor Castle, I bet a few boodlers can recognize this vista.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/5380763736/

I only hope the aliens landing behind me come in peace.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 7:11 AM | Report abuse

Cassandra!! *HUGSSSSSSSSSSSS* :-)

Why am I not surprised Yoki ended up with an even BETTER tour of the castle?? *L*

Olbermann's a diva? I'm shocked, shocked...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/22/AR2011012204023.html

And may I say that the Columbus DA would very likely frown upon whipping Skippy?

And this is depressing on so many levels, wouldn't you say, baldinho and cowhand?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/22/AR2011012203917.html

*drowning-my-sorrows-in-more-highly-creamered-caffeine-prior-to-a-few-more-pregame-chores Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 23, 2011 7:38 AM | Report abuse

Oh, and it seems we have some positive news in the civility front:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/us/politics/23seats.html

:-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 23, 2011 7:57 AM | Report abuse

WOW... Wizards actually won a game on the road -- in Boston, no less! :-O

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 23, 2011 8:05 AM | Report abuse

Debo *is* the youngest, of course, Yoki!

*shaking out the cobwebs in my increasingly aging brain*

The entire WaPo came today, as it usual has pre-newfangled Sat/Sun thingamabob.

Whatever ........

Posted by: ftb3 | January 23, 2011 8:36 AM | Report abuse

ftb - I guess this means you must be in an "outlying area." Either that or your delivery person just mucked things up yesterday.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | January 23, 2011 8:46 AM | Report abuse

Hi

slyness, you might like Julie Klassen's debut "Apothecary's Daughter"

Meanwhile for Mudge...check out my new favorite singer: Shaila Dúrcal

Just pick any song at random and I think you'll like.

Her full name is: Shaila de los Ángeles Morales de las Heras

Her mother was singing legend Rocio Dúrcal

Posted by: omni3 | January 23, 2011 8:49 AM | Report abuse

OMNI!!! *long-lost Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 23, 2011 9:02 AM | Report abuse

This song: 'Amor Eterno'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9m3HqR4D2I&feature=related

A Daughter and Mother duet recorded a year after Rocio passed away gives me goose bumps and brings tears to my eyes.

Posted by: omni3 | January 23, 2011 9:04 AM | Report abuse

Note to JA: just don't land it in the Neshaminy, or you'll have to do it all over again.

Posted by: omni3 | January 23, 2011 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Da Oms is in da house!!!! *doing happy Snoopy dance*

I will give her a listen in due course, omni. Glad yer back and giving us your musical recommendations.

It'll be interesting to see where Olbermann lands and when, especially if there's a non-compete clause in his exit agreement. And the problem with his being a diva and "difficult" to work with unfortunately casts the shadow that perhaps he was also on the wrong side of all those arguments. If it was stupid, personal stuff like demanding a certain brand of mayo on his lunch sandwich, or specifying that all the brown M&Ms be removed from his candy dish, well, sure. But given the corporate and political environment he worked in, dealing with NBC suits plus advertisers,and all the horses--- internal and external politics, he gets a pass from me. For all I know he was right and fighting the good fight against a bunch of soulless corporate robots who wanted him to tone down this or that.

And of course the WaPo has begun to deluge readers with a bunch of utterly meaningless political stories weeping over the plight of voters who do not yet know who the GOP nominee will be two years out, poor things. How the American public can be expected to function in the face of such ambiguity and uncertainty I'll never know.

Speaking of disspelling ambiguity and uncertainty, I have picked the Packers and the Steelers, which virtually guarantees wins for the Jets and the Bears. Given my track record this year, it's not outside the realm of possibility that the Buffalo Bills, say, or Edmonton could win an upset in one of these playoffs.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 9:44 AM | Report abuse

one more from Julietta Venagas, and I believe I mentioned this last year but couldn't the right link. Pay particular attention 1 minute and 45 seconds in

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTr9HMnAWNE&feature=channel

I love this singer cause she seems so joyfull

Posted by: omni3 | January 23, 2011 9:51 AM | Report abuse

still rootin for a green bowl here

Posted by: omni3 | January 23, 2011 9:56 AM | Report abuse

Wow, CBS reporter Barry Peterson's piece on the CBS Sunday Morning Show about his wife Jan's Alzheimer's is amazing (and unprecedented). He still loves her more than ever, even though she now has no idea who he is. But he interviews Jan in her assisted care facility, and she talks about how much she loves her husband and what a great guy he is without ever realizing in the slightest that he's sitting right there with tears running down his face. When he asks what her husband's name is, she clearly can't remember. And when that hasn't rocked you to your core, Peterson introduces his new girlfriend, Marynell, a widow who lives with him. They both go visit Jan, and Marynell has become friends with Jan (who has no idea...etc.). Amazing.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 9:58 AM | Report abuse

OMFSM, 'Mudge, I do believe I would have difficulty watching that.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 23, 2011 10:14 AM | Report abuse

I've been staying off the Sunday morning political, et al., shows for some time now (as I don't really want to disturb the digestion of my breakfast, silly me), but I now wish that I had seen that.

Alzheimers is known as "the never ending funeral" and my experience with it as inflicted on a parent -- along with all the other boodlers in similar circumstances -- know just how painful it is. I do not begrudge him his girlfriend -- not for a minute -- coping comes in all flavors.

Two loads of laundry done, plants watered, fluorescent bulb (of the long variety) changed over the 'puter, and instead of hunkering down inside the warmth today, I just may be compelled to go out and get some stuff (shoe laces, AA batteries, new fluorescent replacement so I don't get caught w/o one when the new one gets old, etc.). We'll see how long I debate this, before I decide (or not) to go out.

RDP, I'm not at all in an outlying area (within walking distance to Montgomery Mall). I suspect my carrier is lazy. As long as I got the entire paper (with inserts), that's all I care about. Doesn't really matter when it comes (although on the same day it should be delivered is preferable).

I've started the actual "Don Quixote" and I am enraptured after just a few pages. Such joy in discovering this writing from so long ago. To know that Cervantes and Shakespeare died on the same day (like Adams and Jefferson) is a bit magical, really -- at least to me.

Futbol today? Isn't it over yet???? I suspect there will be tiara-withdrawal once the über-bowl is done. Am I right, Mudge???

Posted by: ftb3 | January 23, 2011 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Laughing, ftb. No, I won't have much tiara withdrawal. I hardly ever wear it anymore, just on Saturday nights and special occasions. I stopped wearing it for everyday events back in June or July.

Yes, there is football today...and then one game left, in two weeks, most likely between the Bears and the Buffalo Bills. Then seven months of cold turkey. *sigh*

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 10:44 AM | Report abuse

Well, if it's gonna be cold turkey, you ought to wend your imagination over to hockey. There's nothing like the call after the singing of the national anthem like "Play Puck!" Right, Yoki? Although my Red Wings, beaten up as they are, and even though they're still right up in the top of the pack (albeit not #1 right now), are losing a few, they're still a team to watch. A number of the players are coming back from injuries in February and March, just in time to tune up for the playoffs.

Besides, baseball season starts in April, IIRC, and the Tigers might have something to offer this year in terms of excitement. And just to get back to futbol for a second, my Lions won six (6!!!!) games this season! Holy FSM!!!!!

Now, where was I going with this??? *scratching head*

Posted by: ftb3 | January 23, 2011 10:53 AM | Report abuse

And, here's sumpin to tickle yer funny bone: There's a wonderful New Yorker cartoon from a couple of years ago showing a buffalo standing up and talking on a cell phone. He says "I like the convenience, but the roaming charges are killing me!"

Very funny, especially to those of us who dabble in telecom law.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 23, 2011 10:56 AM | Report abuse

ftb, be careful saying "Play Puck" around here -- I-mom might think it's a casting call or something. :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 23, 2011 11:49 AM | Report abuse

You're absolutely right, Snuke. But you did make me laugh. I've gotta get into Shakespeare definitely, after I've slogged my way through 1000 pages of Cervantes.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 23, 2011 11:52 AM | Report abuse

Howdy! Yesterday had some fine Boodle stories. First was Cassandra's, with her very thought-provoking question. I'm still pondering it. Then LiT shared DC's wonderful observations. What a kid! Finally, we had Yoki and Gubbins Visit the Castle. Tremendous.

Alas, I felt too poorly to comment at the time. I am a trifle weary of being sick. I'm getting better but I want to be better faster. I think it was just a cold but it has been a long time since I've had a cold and I forgot how they can consume you. It has, however, proven to be an excellent spur to weight loss.

Hi omni!

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 23, 2011 11:54 AM | Report abuse

Olbermann is one of the few last broadcasters who know how to use their voices. He speaks crisply, enunciates, attempts to learn the right pronunciations, he doesn't say "pundint" or "nuclular," and has all but eliminated the "umm" or "err" from his delivery. Unlike, say, Larry King, or Tavis Smiley, for instance, both respectable speakers but who have never gotten rid of the verbal tics. Olbermann vies to deliver like the Masters - Cronkite, Huntley, Brinkley, etc.

Even worse than saying "uh" is the relatively new "ih, ih" habit, used I suppose to imply sincere uncertainty. Or something. Dobbs and Matthews are hooked on it.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 23, 2011 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Good afternoon, all.

Cassandra, I went to Sunday School (we had a great discussion about God's will, free will, and human suffering) and to church (the sermon was about Levi the tax collector, excellent commentary about how the young rabbi changed lives). I will go back in a little while, for a meeting of the pastoral search team. This is taking up lots of my time, but it's an important project and I'm honored to be a part of it.

Latest models say no snow for us, just rain. That suits me fine, I can do without snow. We are going to the mountain place Thursday evening, and there will be plenty of snow there. Probably a couple of feet.

I have to disagree about Debo not using her fine intelligence. She is obviously very good at relationships and used her EI to work with her husband to save Chatsworth. That is no small accomplishment. She managed to stay married to him for 63 years and did the right things to enable him to overcome his alcoholism. That's another huge accomplishment. I'd love to have afternoon tea with her.

Posted by: slyness | January 23, 2011 1:29 PM | Report abuse

Jumper-you speak of Olbermann as if he were dead. No doubt we'll hear from him again. But I agree about his delivery.

Seriously miscalculated the weather in Our Fair City. While waiting for the temp to climb above 0 to get some outdoor chores done, the wind picked up so we're back to wind chill of -15.

GWE, boss, all boodlers of a certain age, it's official- we're quintastic!
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/jan/23/turning-fifty-quintastics-50

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 23, 2011 1:37 PM | Report abuse

Hi Al!

Thought y'all might be amused by the phone call I got yesterday. A "poll" of conservative voters (no idea how my name got on *that* list!) commissioned by Boehner. After a recorded message by Himself, featuring terms such as "Obamacare" and "job killing" a young man came on the line. (Please note that normally I would have hung up before this, but I could see a leading question coming and felt like amusing myself.) His question was "Now that Congress has voted to repeal Obamacare, what action should they take next--cut taxes or reduce government spending?"

I replied that my preference would be to vote for something to replace the dear-departed Obamacare, as there remained a goodly number of Americans who don't have access to affordable health care. I added that, if I could only choose one of the two options he offered, I really couldn't answer the question. After a hesitation, the young man thanked me and hung up.

I can hardly wait until Mr. Speaker reports on the results of this "survey." He will probably say that x% of Americans want Congress to lower taxes/cut government spending. Without, of course, revealing the actual question said Americans were asked or that only certain types of Americans were targeted.

Posted by: Raysmom | January 23, 2011 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Scotty, the new speaker of the house in NH is right up the Tea Party's alley.

His/their latest is a bill to all but prevent college kids from voting in NH. They want to make it impossible for college kids to vote in any place other than the town and state from which they arrived.

This has been tried many times in many places and has been deemed unconstitutional. They don't care.

The statements from the speaker? "These kids did just what I did when I was young and stupid... they vote for liberals."

Posted by: baldinho | January 23, 2011 1:59 PM | Report abuse

To be on Kit for a moment, I always thought that having company to dinner either in the middle of a major redecoration or shortly after moving into a house was a great idea. Guests are impressed that you could put any kind of a meal together and don't mind the mismatched tableware.

Just got back from a trip to the beach near Plimoth Plantation. There are eagles nesting by the river there and we saw one from a distance. Very cool to know that they are in our area. Also saw lots of very cold sea gulls sitting on what's left of the sea wall or bobbing in the waves. Hearty birds for sure!

Posted by: badsneakers | January 23, 2011 2:14 PM | Report abuse

The Miami Herald has lavish coverage of the New World Symphony's new home, designed by Frank Gehry. I'll have to visit sometime. The facility looks as though it'll generate lots of envy. Maybe a replica could be built in some deserving cultural capital?

Pawlenty's proposed shutdown of the federal government would eclipse the Gingrich one.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 23, 2011 2:16 PM | Report abuse

Sadly, we are already contending with his little experiments up here in Minnesota.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 23, 2011 2:20 PM | Report abuse

Hey Baldi, what's wrong with absentee ballots, mailed and used ONCE? How would that make it more difficult? I'll personally loan any student a stamp to make sure it gets where they would be voting, when I was 21 I had no problem voting, and never did after that. Could there be entirely too much protestin' goin' on there? Like maybe putting an end to voting 'early and often', is in jeopardy? Hey, who cares you know, some may not live long enough, being young and stupid, so need to double up just to be fair, right?

Posted by: RichNomore | January 23, 2011 2:25 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, do you still have snow plows and police up there?

Florida will get Pawlentyized this year.

A day or two ago, an expressway crash near Port Canaveral set off a hot fire that pretty much ruined an overpass. Thanks to emergency reserve funds and advance planning, reconstruction might take only a bit more than a month. I suspect that next year, such repairs might have to be put off indefinitely.

But then again, new Gov. Scott now requires all contracts to be reviewed by his own instant bureaucracy. That could hold up emergency repairs. It'll be fun when we have a hurricane.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 23, 2011 2:29 PM | Report abuse

Richnomore: Children of divorce. Whose parents' home belongs to them? Also, legal voting age is 18, which means many students have never registered to vote.
Registration drives are easier to do at colleges for local districts rather than for all 50 states.

I would suggest actually asking somebody about the rationale for letting students register where they are spending most of their lives for the next year before you sling mud.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 23, 2011 2:32 PM | Report abuse

I was also disenfranchised in 2000 because the change of address "didn't go through" and I was told I had to drive to a district over a hour away at the last minute.

I have never forgotten that as I dourly said Bush was going to win Virginia anyway and that vote wouldn't make a difference. That was before the great Hanging Chad issue.

I don't see this or any effort to block voters' rights as good, and if you have any sense, you wouldn't want to see this country thrown into a constitutional crisis next election, either.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 23, 2011 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of Parties, both known and unknown,

Bipartisan Media Eulogy:

Keith Olbermann, the Don Quixote of a declining craft within a professional class of reporters. In the final analysis the wind he sowed, spun the windmill that he tilted at one too many times, that toppled him from his horse of many colors.

Not so much for the beliefs (or lack thereof) that he espoused, expounded upon, but for the anti-repudiational doctrine he followed, which spoke more to the falling away from any doctrine, resembling the first brilliance of the Founding Principles of the Nation, than to any core values he held.

Perhaps his ample parachute, lined with the fleece, the skins of a mythical people, called sheople, he imagined to reside within OUR Great Land, who in his diminished intellect, he saw laying in wait to ambush him personally, along with his ardent, but shrinking group of followers, will land him in a quiet place of reflection where he might begin to understand why his audience, so vulgarly loyal, ubiquitous, ephemeral on the one hand, yet bound by a common disdain for those who would fight to guard, shield, defend, protect, no matter what storms, brinks, man-made disasters, and threats against Liberty these horrible people have led US into, continue to mount assaults against a reverence for the Founders, the Patriots, and the Statesmen (Persons) who delivered a Democratic Republic to US, at great price: their own Lives, Fortunes, Sacred Honor, BOTH the TOO WEALTHY, and the not nearly WEALTHY ENOUGH.

So let his legacy be, he fought a good fight, in that he stayed true to his determination to avoid any semblance of worship of an order of truth higher than himself, and therefore used his position on the watchtower to daily relegate his flock to the lowest nether regions of reality, from which they must now hoist themselves up off the petard he has left them on, before the infamous coalition, held together by subtle and not so subtle invective, collapses, and find another Dagon of platitudinal presentiment, to feed their insatiable hollowness, born of a mental disorder, easily cloaked in an appearance of reasonable, logical, civil discourse.

In closing, thanks Keith, for keeping this one truth before US, which we will never forget you for, all people in America are to one degree or another people in America, but unfortunately for all, some choose not to join the effort to preserve the Democratic Republic, so hard won, by keeping it from becoming overly Democratic. That sweet enough for y'all?

Posted by: RichNomore | January 23, 2011 2:40 PM | Report abuse

"...all people in America are to one degree or another people in America..."

Getting all weepy here.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 3:12 PM | Report abuse

Tautology -- ain't it fun, Mudge?

Just came in from my eventual forays out and about. Jeeeeeeezzzzzzzzz, it's cold out! And when the wind blows, brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

Think *choke* Spring!

I'mom -- I do hope you'll be feeling much better soon. I guess the chicken soup I faxed over didn't help, eh? I'll look in my cupboard for something else that might help.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 23, 2011 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Dagnabbitrabbit, have you met RichNomore? RichNomore, this is dagnabbitrabbit. I'm sure you two crazy kids have a lot to talk about. But remember -- be home by 10:30. Tomorrow's a school day.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 4:03 PM | Report abuse

'gday all. The Pack, my Replacement Team, is doing well so I'm happy.
I tried to walk the VLP this afternoon but it was just too cold. The wind coming off the river was sharp, dry and cold. The poor dog's rear paws and ears were freezing. The forecast is for -32C/-24F for tomorrow morning so the early outing will also be a short one.
Cold days call for hot food. I've made chili (with pinto beans, not a Texan chili, I know) this morning and a lamb braisé is up for dinner tonight. Lamb, leeks, onions, carrots, Savoy cabbage and potatoes stewed together can beat winter blah.
Anybody else in Haute Maine tired of CTV's fake football palyer wearing a bike helmet?

The Prancing Logomorph and RNM should hold a private nonsense party. They deserve each other.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 23, 2011 4:21 PM | Report abuse

The wife tells a great story of how it went when she registered to vote in Keene, NH in 2004. She had recently moved to Keene as a newspaper reporter. It was a runup to an election, and there were people there actively trying to prevent supposed college kids from registering.

One guy peppered her with about 10 questions: "where are you from? Do you live here? Where are you going to live in six months? You know, if you are a college student, it is illegal to vote here... you should vote back where you really live!"

She was not a college student, and it was perfectly okay to register if she was. She watched him do the same thing to about 3 other people that looked like college kids over the next 10 minutes.

She waitd for an opportunity and then calmly told him: "Those are interesting issues... can I interview you for more details about what organization sent you here? I work for the Sentinel, and would love to write an article on your concerns."

He apparently let forth with a stream of expletives and stomped off.

Disenfranchisement indeed.

I wonder what the GOP folks who wish to prevent college kids from voting in college towns think all the NH students who go to school out of state would do? I suspect they don't care.

There is no rule about where you can vote as long as you have a legitimate residence where you register and you only register and vote once.

I love the GOP paranoids that are convinced that the Dems use voter fraud to win elections. There is never any proof, but that does not matter.

Posted by: baldinho | January 23, 2011 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Love the building DotC, I went to the AGO recently, the newest expansion was done by Gehry and is magnificent, many similar touches in the buildings.

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2011/01/24/arts/design/20110124-gehry-9.html

Posted by: dmd3 | January 23, 2011 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for the talk of voter registration! It reminded me to send our address change to the proper authorities, so we get to vote in the right precinct next time. Wouldn't want to be voting in the wrong alderman's race. I still say that they should be able to get address change notification from the dmv, like they do in civilized places, but I shouldn't have unrealistic expectations.

Posted by: -bia- | January 23, 2011 4:57 PM | Report abuse

dmd, I somehow missed the NY Times photos. The Art Gallery of Ontario looks neat--and boxy.

In Miami, those curving pergolas for the bougainvilleas remind me that I've seen only one such pergola (an ordinary wood one), and for some reason, it was demolished. There must be fear of overhead spiny plants. That park next to the New World Symphony was contentious--Gehry was to have designed it, but the city government became worried about cost, so the project went to a respected park design firm.

Florida is full of former architects. The end of the building boom pretty much wiped out the profession.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 23, 2011 5:09 PM | Report abuse

How about the GOP accept a compromise? College students must vote in the district that they lived in before they left for school, and everyone in nursing homes must vote in the district they lived in before they were admitted.

Done and done.

Posted by: baldinho | January 23, 2011 5:16 PM | Report abuse

I noted the bougainvilla and imagined how great that will look when they fill in. Yes the AGO is abit boxy but it does work quite well, and it makes entering the large gallery on the street side so impactful, you go from small intimate rooms into a large, bright soaring space.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 23, 2011 5:38 PM | Report abuse

I've never had much use for Olberman, but I wish him well.

I tend to think of a dumbwaiter as something like the one in my great-grandparents' house: A small car with a counterweight, moved manually by operating a rope, handle, or wheel. But we do have a little-bitty electric elevator at work (about 1 metre cubed) that's generally called a dumbwaiter. The safety features make it approximately impossible to send yourself on trips in it (no way to get it going once you're inside), but eventually I'm gonna get a couple of my co-workers to cooperate on saving me trips up the stairs.

I'm landing my dinner in the Hudson. I seldom make meatloaf, but that's where I ended up. I just started throwing stuff in a bowl. About a pound and a half of mixed ground meat, chopped onion & garlic (on the general theory that everything except [and occasionally including] ice cream can use some onion & garlic), an egg, couple dashes of Worcestershire & some pepper. Since I'm told that some filler is traditional, I crumbled up a couple of Giant (the grocery store) brand "Low-fat White Cheddar Flavored Corn Cakes". I have no idea what this product is, how long it's been in my house, or how it arrived here. Looks & feels like Styrofoam. But, like cockroaches and Twinkies, it seems sufficiently robust to survive the Apocalypse, so I guess it will do. I also threw in a handful of Wheaties. Do I need anything else?


Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 6:22 PM | Report abuse

What's wrong with the biblical precedent? If you want to be counted, shag your butt back to the town of your birth.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 6:26 PM | Report abuse

I'm also not entirely sure how long I should cook the meatloaf. About an hour, I guess? The oven's at about 360 F. I made a topping from some barbecue sauce, mustard & pepper sauce that I'm spooning onto it every ten-to-fifteen minutes (or so). It smells good.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 6:55 PM | Report abuse

90 minutes, Bob

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 7:00 PM | Report abuse

Depends on how big it is, Bob. To an internal temp of 155F

Posted by: Yoki | January 23, 2011 7:08 PM | Report abuse

I usually cook a one-pound meat loaf for about 45 minutes, Bob.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 23, 2011 7:09 PM | Report abuse

Bob S

And you're going to eat that, right?

Ivansmom, hope you get to feeling better soon. I'm still trying to throw pneumonia and bronchitis, both want to hang around. And I'm sick of both!

Slyness, believe it or not, I'm just getting home from church, been there all day! We had an installation service for the new pastor, plus lunch was served before that. It was pretty long, with everybody giving small speeches and the speakers got long-winded. Just really tired and ready to hug my bed. I hope we get rain too. No one asked me, but I've had my fill of the white stuff.

Have a good evening, folks.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 23, 2011 7:10 PM | Report abuse

Comment monster got me.

Have a good evening, folks.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 23, 2011 7:12 PM | Report abuse

Well, evidently it was hanging in space, waiting for another comment.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 23, 2011 7:15 PM | Report abuse

It's a pound and a half, and he keeps opening the door every 15 minutes to baste it. It's gonna take longer.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 7:15 PM | Report abuse

360°. I like that. Seriously. People should realize more often the oven can go anywhere between 350° and 375° they wish.

I can easily separate my admiration for Olbermann's commitment to professionalism, such as it is, from his politics. While we often agree, I'm capable of criticism. While not a purveyor of out-and-out stone cold crazy, like rich or rabbit here, he has dipped into hyperbole a bit much.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 23, 2011 7:18 PM | Report abuse

Ooops, might have slightly over done it. The thermometer was up to around 185-190 F with several readings. Glad I checked. Thanks!

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 7:20 PM | Report abuse

Bob, Dorito crumbs (T1 prefers cool ranch) adds a little something.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 23, 2011 7:28 PM | Report abuse

LIT, I'll give that a try next time. I actually had some on hand. Slightly stale OK?

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 7:35 PM | Report abuse

Back in my day, students were allowed and even encouraged to use their campus mailing address for voter registration. I voted right on campus and never had a problem even though my physical residence changed a few times. And this was deep in the Reagan Era.

I proudly tell people that John Lewis was my congressmen back when he first won office. The whole voter registration blocking tactic strikes me as something he has spent his whole career fighting.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 7:39 PM | Report abuse

I don't see why not, but how'd Doritos last long enough to become stale?

Posted by: LostInThought | January 23, 2011 7:42 PM | Report abuse

It's pretty tasty! It was closer to 1.25 pounds, and I'd flattened the loaf a bit, so that shortened the cooking time. I had it in for just over an hour, and it's juicy but definitely done. Now I need a side dish, or I'm going to nibble my way through far more flesh than is healthful.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 7:43 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of well-cooked meat, in Anthony Bourdain's latest book 'Medium Raw', he devotes a chapter to the practice of sterilizing ground beef with ammonia. Much of the information he got for that chapter was from a NYT article about Cargill, a major meat packing plant which uses ammonia-treated beef.

In his trademarked hyperbole-filled vitriolic style, he villified the Cargill policies which allow this practice. Hannah Hayes, a writer and daughter of a high-ranking Cargill executive took umbrage:

"I think you could understand why I was taken aback to read in your latest novel Medium Raw that you would like to see my father’s nuts wired to a car battery while he’s fed the sweepings from the bottom of a monkey cage. I’m just quoting here."

http://www.voxmagazine.com/stories/2010/11/11/essay-open-letter-anthony-bourdain-chef-who-hates-/

She then goes on to paint her family as the very picture of upper-middle class respectability, perhaps nauseatingly so, and invites Bourdain over to enjoy some backyard barbecue featuring barely cooked Cargill ribeyes.

Anthony responds in a way many might seem uncharacteristic for him, with grace and humility, but firmly sticking to his guns:

"I applaud and respect your loyalty to your Dad–and your impassioned and articulate defense. {long snip} I’m not even suggesting that Cargill’s ground meat products are necessarily “bad” for you. I’m saying I do not like the whole idea that anyone would use what I believe to be a cleaning product in making hamburger. I believe that a good quality hamburger–suitable for sale to children and adults–should require neither ammonia nor well done cooking to make it considered “safe.” I suspect, judging from your piece, and your stated personal choices for food sourcing, that you feel the same way."

http://blog.travelchannel.com/anthony-bourdain/read/dear-hannah/

Bourdain is just such an amazing writer. He completely deflates Ms. Hayes while coming off as informed and reasonable.

I guess the moral is that a little graciousness always goes a long ways.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 7:57 PM | Report abuse

LIT, all of the relatively whole Doritos are long gone. I've got a bag of bits & crumbs.

I was (of course) jesting about voter registration. I have some sympathy for concerns about new and/or relatively temporary residents swinging elections, but if people reside (and spend most of their money) somewhere, they should probably be eligible to vote there.

The opposite case (absentees who continue to vote in a locality after years of absence) is also interesting. I'm not convinced that there are any simple policies that are fair.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 7:58 PM | Report abuse

Steamed broccoli, Bob. Go for it. Actually Mexican squash was on sale at the Fresh Market yesterday, I bought some.

Ivansmom and Cassandra, you two need to get well ASAP. I know, I know, the weather is no help at all. Please work on it.

I'm certainly okay with not have snow this week, or any future week, Cassandra. The falling and playing is okay, but I object to being homebound more than, say, 24 straight hours. Mr. T goes to work regardless, but he has four wheel drive and appropriate tires.

Good question, LiT. My guess is that Bob doesn't have small people around to eat them all up at one sitting.

Posted by: slyness | January 23, 2011 8:01 PM | Report abuse

I think Hannah Hayes is a SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) girl. Gotta watch them, they're always up to sumthin'.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 8:11 PM | Report abuse

Doritos are supposed to last more than one sitting?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 8:13 PM | Report abuse

Here is Hannah Hayes's recipe for Cargill Meatloaf (and her rebuttal to Bourdain):

http://kitchenoddity.tumblr.com/post/2878355942/lets-make-a-cargill-meatloaf

She never mentions when to add the ammonia.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 8:19 PM | Report abuse

That sounds like a tasty meatloaf, Bob.

I have that new Bourdain book, yellojkt, but am impatiently waiting to read it until February, when I take a break from novels.

I am very suspicious of store-bought ground beef - not so much for the ammonia, as for the absolute random and miscellaneous nature of the processing. A single package can contain meat from cows from several different states and countries. The processors are not uniformly inspected, either. Now, I buy ground meat only from a local butcher who knows his meat sources.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 23, 2011 8:21 PM | Report abuse

Almost forgot:
http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/01/20/steampunk-palin-comic/

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 23, 2011 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Jumper-have bookmarked your link for reading in March.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 23, 2011 8:49 PM | Report abuse

For ground meat I buy a piece of meat and ask the butcher in my local grocery store to grind it for me. This is not fool-proof, but after having seen a documentary about ground-meat-production I have given up on buying the pre-packaged stuff.

Off to see Downton Abbey.

Posted by: gmbka | January 23, 2011 8:58 PM | Report abuse

Ammonia-treated beef. Isn't that pink slime?

Architect Frank Gehry's new home for the New World Symphony has a glowing review at the NY Times and a happy one at the LA Times.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 23, 2011 9:01 PM | Report abuse

gmbka, good idea. I usually buy beef and chop it myself in the Cuisinart.

Had a fun weekend down at TBG's house!

Should students be able to vote where they attend college? Sure, but I was still angry when I lived in Ohio and a local professor sponsored a registration drive for the express purpose of having his students vote to raise property taxes. Easy for them, they didn't have a dog in the fight and at the time I could ill-afford the extra few several hundred dollars a year.

Posted by: -dbG- | January 23, 2011 9:21 PM | Report abuse

few several. Right. Sorry!

Posted by: -dbG- | January 23, 2011 9:23 PM | Report abuse

I haven't bought ground beef in years; I would only delibrately shop it for sphagetti, otherwise I was watching for good prices, which never materalized often enough.

Fortunately I learned about chicken cacciatore, ciouppicini, and pork sphagetti, so I am no longer stuck on the beef paradigm.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 23, 2011 9:28 PM | Report abuse

Well, I don't think there's anything magical about beef that makes it especially dangerous in ground form. It just happens to be the most popular ground meat. If ground chicken or pork or horse or panda were prepped, packaged, and sold in similarly large quantities with similarly (ahem) 'imprecise' quality controls, we'd be hearing the same complaints, I'd guess.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 9:39 PM | Report abuse

E coli - the reason why you should always make sure ground beef is cooked thoroughly. It's ok to eat rare steaks, but with ground beef, bacteria can be anywhere. The Jack in the Box incident was fairly traumatizing for me!

"the E. coli epidemic of 1993: Four children died and hundreds of others became sick in the Seattle area as well as California, Idaho and Nevada, after eating undercooked and contaminated meat from Jack in the Box. It was the largest and deadliest E. coli outbreak in American history up to that time."
(Wikipedia)

Posted by: seasea1 | January 23, 2011 9:50 PM | Report abuse

dang

Posted by: omni3 | January 23, 2011 9:54 PM | Report abuse

When I went to college voting wasn't a problem. The king wouldn't let us. Sometimes the knights could put their two cents worth in, if they did it carefully and groveled a lot. Us cerfs and squires and tradespeople? Fuggeddaboudid.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 9:58 PM | Report abuse

SCC: serfs. I had Bennett on the brain.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 9:59 PM | Report abuse

Bennett Surf?

Posted by: -dbG- | January 23, 2011 10:00 PM | Report abuse

The point is that it should be the job of the meatpacker to make sure the meat he sells me is free of e. coli, not my job to kill it once I've bought it. And I would rather not have my meat treated with ammonia to do that. It sure would make sense to keep the meatpacking plant clean enough to avoid the contamination.

My packaged cookie dough has big warnings not to eat it raw, like I like, because they can't assure me that the materials used to make it aren't free of deadly contaminants.

I really have a hard time seeing how keeping the food supply safe is so hard.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 10:04 PM | Report abuse

Stephen Vincent Benet Surf, who wrote John Brown's Body Surfs the Waters of Babylon.

Posted by: -pj- | January 23, 2011 10:08 PM | Report abuse

Say g'nite mudge.

Posted by: RichNomore | January 23, 2011 10:12 PM | Report abuse

Or was it John Brown Body Surfs the Waters of Babylon?

Posted by: -pj- | January 23, 2011 10:12 PM | Report abuse

No.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 23, 2011 10:13 PM | Report abuse

Keeping the food supply pretty clean for you and me, and even our immediate families, is probably pretty easy. But (obviously, anecdotally) as the scale of the operations gets ramped up to mega-industrial scales, certain niceties are being left by the wayside. Understandable, perhaps, but not entirely acceptable. Nothing that an order-of-magnitude increase in food prices couldn't take care of, I suppose.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 23, 2011 10:15 PM | Report abuse

Charlie Don't Surf

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1nUkSHRb80

Don't know about Bennett.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 23, 2011 10:21 PM | Report abuse

The Stillers won, although Mudge bet on them. Life is full of surprises.

The problem with ground meat is that the meat of hundreds of cows is processed together, which increases the risk. In addition, these processing methods make it very hard to find the source of the contamination.

Meat you can cook thoroughly and avoid illness, but when a few years ago green onions were contaminated with e-coli, I stopped buying them altogether. I am not sure what I am going to do when for instance lettuce turns out to be contaminated, not eat salad any more? That would be a real problem.

Posted by: gmbka | January 23, 2011 10:57 PM | Report abuse

Hello to all! You know, you all are making me pretty happy that I seldom buy meat. Both the dotts are vegetarian, and I often find myself feeling deprived, and occasionally buy these thin little "breakfast steak" things to fry up and eat. But missing the ground beef - not so much after all I've read here.

I used to buy ham pretty often for myself, but after thinking about it, I'm off pork entirely. Beef and chicken are all I'm willing to eat. Funny how the aesthetics of those you live with influence you.

We're in the lull between the flurry of applications to colleges and the trickle of acceptances. This is my first time doing this, and it has been interesting. I am eternally grateful that my h.s. senior feels comfortable with an essay she wrote 1/2 an hour before the deadline. I read them - she's right, they're good. So, what, me worry?

Posted by: Wheezy11 | January 23, 2011 10:57 PM | Report abuse

Congratulations to the trickles, Wheezy.

Posted by: gmbka | January 23, 2011 11:01 PM | Report abuse

gmbka, a friend of mine from India is not accustomed to eating salad - if it can't be cooked, it is not eaten in her culture. And she was definitely raised upper middle class. It's just not in her repertoire. She will take chopped peppers and other chopped veggies and bathe them in oil and vinegar, but not greens which can't be washed convincingly.

Posted by: Wheezy11 | January 23, 2011 11:02 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

Had a very nice weekend, all in all. Work, fun, relaxation, and the last multi-game Football Sunday until next season (congrats, Pack and Stillers fans).

Was thinking about favorite sayings, and while I haven't latched onto the landing in the Hudson thing, I do have all kinds of sayings and quotes that my family and friends are sick of hearing me say.

I suppose as a middle-aged man and Dad, I'm entitled to be a case-study of "$#!+ My Father Says."

Funny how that whole circle of life thing works, isn't it?

G'night, all.

And 'nukes, thanks for sharing the stollen during the Jets/Steelers game. Yummy.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 23, 2011 11:17 PM | Report abuse

When I traveled in India decades ago, salad was not on my menu either, nor in any other country where the water cannot be trusted (I got sick anyway). If it is not cooked or cannot be peeled, don't eat it is the rule here. But it would be really hard for me to change life-long eating habits permanently.

Also, if more of the food supply cannot be trusted, what are we going to do? Bob S mentioned the cost of food, which is lower here than in other developed countries, for sure. But don't we pay in human suffering, loss of life and medical care?

Posted by: gmbka | January 23, 2011 11:20 PM | Report abuse

Great post, Joel. I love that phrase, now, too.

Posted by: reillycapps | January 24, 2011 12:39 AM | Report abuse

Bob S, you had me laughing with your meatloaf. You had all the basis covered and the cooking time advisors were dead on, so I shut my pie. Meatloaf is life , do whatever with it that is moderatly safe to do.

The lamb stew was great. I just love winter vegetables (onions, celery, carrots, leeks and Savoy/Milano cabbage).

It is -30C/-24F right now in the other capital, so I offer this moment to the cool people: dr, engelmann, yoki, frosti and wilbrod (and her sidekick wilbrodog of course).

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 24, 2011 12:48 AM | Report abuse

How to tire a dog ("A tired dog is a good dog") in such weather? When we can't walk them far lest their poor paws and bums freeze? Me, I like to set up an agility course from whatever is to hand, and teach and encourage them.

I was so sad, this morning, to read Cassandra's message to me. A brief moment of affluence for my parents when I was 7-years old and not in the least responsible for that nor its flight, followed by many hard times doesn't, to my mind, make us far apart. Closer, rather.

Posted by: Yoki | January 24, 2011 1:19 AM | Report abuse

Since there was a Hawaii law from 1860 to 1967 forbidding any non Christian names of children born in Hawaii.

How is it possible to have the name Barack Hussein Obama?

Posted by: dancingrabbit | January 24, 2011 4:40 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. Yoki, that's what talking too much, and not really knowing the circumstances will get you. No foul.

Bob S, the meatloaf, after cooking, I'm sure was good. Ground beef is mystery meat on any day, and I thought I read that you added something stale? Haven't had meatloaf in awhile, but usually add breadcrumbs along with the veggies. With prices here for the mystery meat, it would be a luxury!

I had an uncle that used to buy the packaged hamburger for his dog. He said he worked in a meat packing plant, and hamburger packaged for the grocery store was not fit for human consumption. He ordered a piece of meat and had it ground if he wanted to eat ground beef. Of course, this same uncle washed grits too. He worked there too.

If we got a chance to see how the foods we eat are prepared and done before hitting the grocery stores, I suspect many of us might change our ways. Didn't help me much, as you know, I worked at a chicken processing plant, but still eat chicken.

Got babysitting detail this morning. And it would have to be a cold morning. Boy, I did not want to get up. Not that warm in here. Need coffee.

Slyness, it's slow going. I'm doing breathing treatments at home, and it does help some. Be careful if you're doing the walk this morning. I found ice yesterday morning.

Have a beautiful Monday, folks, and love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 24, 2011 5:00 AM | Report abuse

SD, thank you for the tidings of great chill. I'd take my -30 over your -30 any day. Its a dry cold. Except Sunday was a really splendid day + 3!


Dear dancingrabbit, ever drive faster than the speed limit? Everybody breaks some sort of law now and then and there are all sorts of laws on the books in every jurisdiction that have not been enforced for years.

Posted by: --dr-- | January 24, 2011 5:54 AM | Report abuse

I am sure there are laws or rules everywhere that forbid handing out high school diplomas or the like to people that obviously lack the fundamentals necessary to show they deserve one, but I bet dancingrabbit has one.

As other have said, not all rules (assuming this isn't simply another fabrication from the world of dancingrabbit) are strictly enforced.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 6:06 AM | Report abuse

I ran a quick search on the dancingrabbit claim. The wording is only that a name must be a Christian name. That is vague enough to allow Barack.

It made me giggle that after the wikipedia link about the rule, the next two links that showed up were freerepublic message boards.

Ha ha ha.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 6:10 AM | Report abuse

Do you think dancingrabbit KNOWS that the law he grasps at was established to stop traditional naming practices of the Hawaiian islanders? It was established to convert them from heathen lands to good Christian lands.

By 1967 it had no real meaning any more. Even if it did, it would have allowed Barack Hussein Obama because it is a Chrisian name, complete with family surname and different "first" name related to the sex of the baby.

Dolt.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 6:40 AM | Report abuse

Could the boodle be compared to the reality show "Survivor", perhaps without the camera lens?


I hope President Obama remembers the poor in his State of the Union address, and give them the same break he gave the rich with those tax cuts. I sometimes think when Republicans holler for leaner government and budget cuts that always mean cutting off aid to the less fortunate, if they really do live in the land of make believe. I just wonder if their cars ever travel through those neighborhoods, do they see this stuff up close, first hand. Do they just live uptown and never see the shanties?

And if by some chance they do visit such areas, do they really believe doing nothing is the answer? And I can at some point understand the arguement that nothing has worked so far, but wouldn't we rather have something in place than nothing?

Some of that stuff they talk about looks good on paper, but in reality, not so good. I don't know the answers, and not pretending to know. Just see us all living together with this time bomb. Unless there's a new place to live, we need to try and work together on solutions.

And the emergency rooms at local hospitals have become the doctor's office for those of us without insurance. That can't be a good thing. So how is the healthcare plan a bad thing? Emergency room care is the most expensive care in the world.Hospitals are having to eat that cost. It seems re-routing that might be cheaper?

Hope I don't get run off the island for the comment.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 24, 2011 6:49 AM | Report abuse

And the governor of South Carolina is cutting her budget for staff and what not. My question, how is that helping the state of South Carolina when some of her citizens are putting coins in a slot to use the bathroom and to take a shower?

Will they be donating the money saved to making a difference for the folks putting the money in slots.

Just asking.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 24, 2011 6:55 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, you all.

Dulles temperature was +7 degrees at 6 am this morning. Granted, that may be early springtime to some of our hale and hardy boodlers, but it is frightfully cold to me....our birds are all puffed up for their dawn patrol hulled sunflower seeds.

Cassandra, I agree with your point regarding hoping that President Obama remembers the poor in his State of the Union address, and gives them the same break he gave the rich with those tax cuts.

What is that saying, something like a country/nation should be identified by how it cares for it's most vunerable, it's most fragile?

It has become a *new favorite saying* of mine.

Posted by: VintageLady | January 24, 2011 7:29 AM | Report abuse

OF at my house this morning but it we venture too far from our house temps in the surrounding area are -8 to -6F, it is definitely the coldest morning of the year so far, by quite a bit. Hope everyone in an area that has these cold temps are staying warm.

I have my annual physical this otherwise I would be venturing outside as little as possible, driving kids to and from school. Eldest has her last two exams today, crossing my fingers for the math exam, science was last Friday, she thought she did OK but said it was tough, 100 multiple choice, fill in the blanks, diagrams, short and long answer questions - glad I am not back in high school. This afternoon she will begin a nice break before second semester starts next week.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 24, 2011 7:52 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all, hi Cassandra! You folks are making me feel warn at 30 degrees. It's still chilly! No rain yet. Mr. T has a cold, so we didn't walk this morning.

This will be an interesting SOTU speech. I also hope the President will address the issues facing the poor in this country. Yes, Cassandra, health care reform should take the burden off emergency rooms and that will make care cheaper.

Why are we responding to trolls?

Posted by: slyness | January 24, 2011 7:54 AM | Report abuse

Yea, Omni is back!!!!!

Posted by: VintageLady | January 24, 2011 8:03 AM | Report abuse

Good morning boodle! 12 above this morning and, be still my heart, a forecast of 32 for Thurs. I'll be on my way to FL by then, but at least those I leave behind will be treated to the traditionally expected "January thaw."

There's some kind of lesson for the Vikings in the Packers going to the Super Bowl.

RIP Jack Lallane.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 24, 2011 8:06 AM | Report abuse

*trying-to-make-up-for-Dawn-Patrol-and-Metro-delays-but-I'll-backBoodle-soon Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 24, 2011 8:12 AM | Report abuse

Glad to see a blue collar Super Bowl this year, but sorry I didn't get the All Greens that omni (and I) would have liked to see.

I'm just mainly glad there's no home team advantage this year for the Big Game (sorry Ivansdad).

Had a wonderful weekend with dbG. Just a nice, relaxing couple of days with a good friend--even running errands and chauffeuring Daughter around together. We did see The King's Peach and loved it, although Dr G uncharacteristically said he liked True Grit better.

I guess for me it was almost a toss-up, but a lot of that is the experience of our dumpy, but lovable, independently owned "art" theater. I always leave happy, seeing so many (mostly old) people patronizing such a place. There are so few left anymore, at least around here. It's nice that the same guy owns the cheap ($3-$4, depending on the night) theater, too, so many of the best films make it over there eventually.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 8:17 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all. Freaking cold here this morning. A whopping 5 degrees.

Wilbrod, children of divorce use the address of the parent who had primary custody of them. It comes up for things other than voting (college apps, student loans and the like) and in my experience, they never bat an eyelash...they know what 'home address' means.

Bob, glad the meatloaf worked out for you. Definitely a clean-out-the-fridge dish.

Cassandra, I think you've touched on something there. Seems to me a whole lot of people think hospitals really do just eat those charges, that they just vanish into thin air.

Have a happy day all. Stay warm.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 24, 2011 8:27 AM | Report abuse

I'm going to make my prediction for next season in two weeks.

stayed tuned...

Posted by: omni3 | January 24, 2011 8:29 AM | Report abuse

Ah, it's up to -2 degrees here. And they said it would be chilly this morning. Ha! I just hope I can get my car started . . .

I hope everyone had a lovely weekend. I drove down to New Haven to see an old friend who's at the Divinity School there. I good trip. Lot's of laughs, beer, met some nice folks, and was awful at pool. All in all, a success.

Off to work and our first day at the new office. I'll be working against muscle memory here for awhile and I predict at least two instances of ending up at the old office in the first 4 weeks.

Posted by: cowhand214 | January 24, 2011 8:52 AM | Report abuse

7 degrees Fahrenheit might not seem cold to some of you Northerners, but it sure did to me. Or at least to my car. Despite speaking very kindly to it, my Ion initially refused to start. It just whined plaintively.

"No problem!" said I. This is one of the reasons we bought a car for my son. It's an emergency back up. Except, of course, that the doors to the emergency back up were frozen shut. It seemed to unlock, but wouldn't open - and none of the nifty tricks on the internet worked.

I was about ready to call into work and tell them I would be late when I decided to try the Ion one more time. This time it started for me. I guess it was just being coy. Or maybe it just felt sorry for me. This was a pity start. But I'll take it.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | January 24, 2011 8:54 AM | Report abuse

It's 0.5 here but we're south of cowhand, so of course it would be 'much' warmer. Busy weekend with dancing and some family drama that I think is resolved, but who knows for sure. Very glad the Jets lost as now I can watch the big game without caring a lot who wins and just concentrate on the commercials.

I'm with Slyness, why engage the trolls?

R.I.P. Jack LaLanne, he led a long and healthy life.

Posted by: badsneakers | January 24, 2011 8:58 AM | Report abuse

'Morning, Boodle. Uh, guys, I'm still not sure some of you quite get it. See, the thing about Wackywabbit's claim is that even if he is dead solid correct -- OBAMA DIDN'T NAME HIMSELF. If someone "broke the law" it wasn't Obama, it was whoever named him. Eevn if there was a "crime" here (which is completely wack-job insanse), it wasn't O who committed it. So what's the point?

Yes, wackwabbit, I did indeed vote for a guy whose momma broke a most excellent Hawaiian law, OK? We now on thje same page? And yes, I think she should be punished. Perhaps a good flogging, I dunno. 20 years at hard labor. You happy now? And I hope the re-instate that law, because heaven knows, we need all the uber-racist laws from 1860 we can get out back into place. Hey, why not even go for the three-fifths of a person rule? You up for it?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 8:59 AM | Report abuse

P.S. Let's don't let the fact that she's dead stop us from prosecuting and harrassing her. Maybe we can desecrate her grave or something.

You really need to get some psychiatric help.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 9:02 AM | Report abuse

Meanwhile, this just in from today's Borowitz Report:

JANUARY 24, 2011

Republicans Rehearsing Grouchy Facial Expressions for State of the Union

Boehner Leads Weeklong Seminar

WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report) – Preparing for what most political insiders agree is their most important performance of the year, congressional Republicans have spent the past week rehearsing their grouchiest facial expressions for Tuesday’s State of the Union Address.

For seven grueling days, GOP congressmen have been behind closed doors, refining their best winces, grimaces, and other sourpuss mannerisms under the tutelage of Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio).

“Looking like you’ve just sucked on a lemon is harder than it seems,” said Mr. Boehner. “It doesn’t come naturally for everyone like it does for Mitch McConnell.”

Mr. Boehner has been employing a “method acting” approach with his House colleagues, urging them to imagine “the most unpleasant thing they can think of – like Keith Olbermann being back on TV.”

But given the new vogue for “civility” that has swept Washington in recent weeks, Mr. Boehner is instructing House Republicans to restrain themselves from outbursts like that of Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC), who famously shouted “You lie!” during President Obama’s congressional address in 2009.

“If you feel an outburst coming on,” Mr. Boehner told his colleagues, “I ask that you instead limit yourself to a simple, tasteful jerking-off hand gesture.”

Mr. Boehner said that while he wants his Republican members to look as grumpy a possible throughout Mr. Obama’s speech, “I want them to show him the same respect we would show to any other foreign visitor to our shores.”

Immediately following the President’s speech, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis) will give the official Republican response, followed by Michele Bachmann (R-Minn), who will give the official moron response.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 9:06 AM | Report abuse

I think Obama would be thrilled to have the chance to throw his momma in jail. I was listening to Paul Simon's "Love Me Like a Rock" recently and this verse really tugged at my heart...

And if I was president
The minute congress call my name
I'd say "who do,
Who do you think you're fooling?
I've got the presidential seal
I'm up on the presidential podium
My mama loves me
She loves me
She get down on her knees and hug me
Like she loves me like a rock
She rocks me like the rock of ages
And loves me.

Whether you like him or don't, you've got to admit that Obama's mother died way too young and it's a shame she didn't get a chance to see the man he became. (His grandmother didn't even make to see him elected, although I'm sure she knew in her heart he would be.)

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 9:13 AM | Report abuse

Howdy y'all. All this Weather talk has me grateful for our 19F this morning. In retrospect it was positively mild.

I am back at work today. I brought in a lot of Kleenex but feel well enough to sit and think about working.

Cassandra asked some good questions. Here the Republicans, who now control our government, have a hole to fill which might reach 600 million. They refuse to raise revenue but talk about "rightsizing" government. Mostly they are vague as to what this means. A few outliers, not elected officials, are blunt enough to say that they think government just shouldn't be in a lot of its current arenas, like health and education or most human services. More moderate elected folks seem to want to contract out services currently provided by the state. Fine, but nobody has explained coherently how this will save the state money. If the state pays the contractor it is still state money, and hereabouts state work is way cheaper than private. The contractors may not pay their employees as much or offer benefits, but they don't pass those savings on to the state; they keep the difference.

I'm with slyness on this troll. It is a one-note wonder, a single-topic obsessor, and I think it likes the attention. Going off topic is one thing, but doing it to constantly bring up the same thing, and so gracelessly, is another. We've refused to countenance such bad manners before.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 24, 2011 9:27 AM | Report abuse

25 minutes.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, Barack Hussein Obama is a Christian name. It has to do with structure, not origin of name.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 9:36 AM | Report abuse

Technically, a Christian name is what's given at a baptism, so they should be looking for his baptismal certificate for this one, not his birth certificate.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 24, 2011 9:48 AM | Report abuse

Barack Hussein Obama has a first name based on gender, a middle name and a surname based on his father's last name. That is a Christian name.

Kamehameha or Liliukalani (one name only) is not. That is what the law wanted to stop.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 9:55 AM | Report abuse

TBG, it is with immense love and respect that I thank you -- really, really, really, really thank you -- for inserting that tune cootie in my head from Paul Simon. Can't git it out, nope, it's combined with my auditory nerve endings and is looping constantly, yes indeed it is, and so I really, really, really, really want to thank you.

*sigh* (good song, though, just not constantly)

As for Christian names, I guess that leaves me out (among others). But I was born in Michigan, which brings with it a bunch of other exclusionary laws from previous centuries, I'll bet.

Whatever....

Posted by: ftb3 | January 24, 2011 10:04 AM | Report abuse

It's taken bouncingbunny several days to get a rise out of usso he is nothing if not persistent. I like that he exemplifies the intellectual bankruptcy of the Birther movement as they grasp for thinner and thinner straws.

The "Christian name" rule doesn't seem to hold much water. The logic seems to be that if non-Christian names were illegal that somehow 'proves' that his birth certificate is a forgery and he must have been born somewhere else. Presumably some place where Hussein is a common middle name. Like Kenya.

At least he has widened the Overton Window for some of our less incoherent trolls.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 10:06 AM | Report abuse

Once Obama has completed his two terms in office, I will vote for Hillary Rodham Clinton, if she will have us. I have done a turn around in my opinion of her and how she is ably serving our Country. We will have many Bugs Bunny lookalikes hopping around the front of the bunker, looking for a carrot to chew on.

Posted by: VintageLady | January 24, 2011 10:15 AM | Report abuse

I think all baby boys should either be named Dave,or an alternative proposed in the following:

Did I ever tell you that Mrs. McCave
Had twenty-three sons, and she named them all Dave?

Well, she did. And that wasn't a smart thing to do.
You see, when she wants one, and calls out "Yoo-Hoo!
Come into the house, Dave!" she doesn't get one.
All twenty-three Daves of hers come on the run!

This makes things quite difficult at the McCaves'
As you can imagine, with so many Daves.
And often she wishes that, when they were born,
She had named one of them Bodkin Van Horn.
And one of them Hoos-Foos. And one of them Snimm.
And one of them Hot-Shot. And one Sunny Jim.
Another one Putt-Putt. Another one Moon Face.
Another one Marvin O'Gravel Balloon Face.
And one of them Shadrack. And one of them Blinkey.
And one of them Stuffy. And one of them Stinkey.
Another one Putt-Putt. Another one Moon Face.
Another one Marvin O'Gravel Balloon Face.
And one of them Ziggy. And one Soggy Muff.
One Buffalo Bill. And one Biffalo Buff.
And one of them Sneepy. And one Weepy Weed.
And one Paris Garters. And one Harris Tweed.
And one of them Sir Michael Carmichael Zutt.
And one of them Oliver Boliver Butt.
And one of them Zanzibar Buck-Buck McFate...
But she didn't do it. And now it's too late. (Dr. Seuss)

Though it never appears to be too late to beat a dead horse.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 24, 2011 10:18 AM | Report abuse

It's not just the state of Hawaii that doesn't like non-Christian names. The Pope is none too fond of them either.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/religion/the-pope/8251791/Pope-rails-against-rise-of-un-Christian-names.html

Which raises an interesting question. If you are supposed to name your kid after a saint, how do we ever get any new saint names? I am hopeful that someday we will have a Saint Moon Unit or a Saint Apple.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 10:22 AM | Report abuse

Yello, while you're "encouraged" to name your child after a saint, it's not a requirement. So I suspect new saints' names will come from those who say 'thank you, no' to the "encouragement." (Not to mention that, as the article explained, some people use a saint's name as the middle name).

This is where I'd normally insert the joke about my favorite Saint name being "Drew Brees" because he went to the same college as me, but heck, it's Monday morning so I'll let that one go.

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 10:32 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

Warm muffins, hot coffee and chilled OJ on the table.

Names are pretty fluid things in my family. Two of my uncles were known throughout their lives by nicknames having nothing to do with the names on any official document. One of my aunts was named Roger, but was known by a family term of endearment (don't ask). I dumped my birth name when I reached adulthood. For us, what's on the birth certificate is basically a placeholder until one is old enough to make up one's own mind.

Posted by: MsJS | January 24, 2011 10:40 AM | Report abuse

It was interesting (if not a bit gorge-rise worthy) to hear Sen. McConnell voice the view (and I paraphrase) that the general public isn't interested in seeing elected officials acting like adults during the SOTU. *eye roll*

And count me totally satisfied with the results of yesterday's pentultimate playoff games.

*back-to-a-particularly-busy-Monday Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 24, 2011 10:44 AM | Report abuse

Baldinho, your 9:55 makes no sense to me whatsoever. First, I have no clue what the wabbit is babbling about, or what actually constitutes a "Christian" name. But I am even further clueless how "Barack Hussein" is okay but Liliukalani is not.

Or "William," for that matter. Or Louise. Beowulf. Christopher. Sade (pronounced Shar-day). Irving. Moshe. Xavier. Paddy.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 10:48 AM | Report abuse

There are a LOT of saints. Lots of names to pick from. If you're baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church, you've got to have one, but there are so many to choose from and you can make any non-saint name based on a saint's name.

For example, an uncle of mine was baptized Haralambos, but while that name was on his baptismal certificate, his birth certificate said Robert. (Actually, I have several uncles named Haralambos and they all go by different names, most likely Harry)

http://tinyurl.com/49a6sov

These are just the Greek saints. If you bring in all of the Christian religions you've got a pretty long list. There's even a Saint Brioc, which could easily be claimed for the name Barack.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Saints

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 11:00 AM | Report abuse

I name all of my children for satellites of the gas giants. If I ever run out of them, I'll start working on the asteroids.

Posted by: bobsewell | January 24, 2011 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Saint Brioc? The patron saint of buttery, eggy, French bread?

Posted by: MsJS | January 24, 2011 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Hello, all!

We had a lovely trip to southern Florida, I only wish I could've brought some of the warmth back with me. (I also was wondering what those structures were in Miami, now I need to go back and see them when the bougainvillea grows in. Amazing what you learn on the boodle.)

talitha, I purchased a black fedora just this past week. I've already worn it with jeans and an athletic shirt into a restaurant during the long car ride down. I'm glad to see this is the proper usage.

Also, if anyone, anyone in the area is looking to go to Florida and not have to fly, consider the AutoTrain. We drove down to visit friends on the way and took the train back. It was worth every single penny, and wasn't much more money when you factor in food and wear and tear on humans and car alike.

Posted by: MoftheMountain | January 24, 2011 11:27 AM | Report abuse

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned it, but front page says 13 dead in terrorist bombing in Moscow Airport. Also, Billy Graham says he's sorry he allowed politics into his evangelestic career. I didn't mind that he ministered to our presidents, as long as he didn't get puffed up about it, and I don't know that he did.

Posted by: VintageLady | January 24, 2011 11:40 AM | Report abuse

Hawaiian names versus Christian names: a history.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaiian_name

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 11:41 AM | Report abuse

I've been reading about the awful explosion in Moscow, VL. I just hope our airport "security" doesn't change because of this.

According to the article, the blast took place "...where friends and relatives wait to greet passengers, and, as at most airports, it is outside the secure zone."

I mean, really... the entire world is outside the secure zone, isn't it?

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 11:59 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, I hate to dignify this "Christian name" thing with discussion, but, as baldinho says, the issue is Native versus mainstream culture. Hawaiians here are the Native culture. Names were part of the assimilation/extermination battleground for Native Americans. They tended to have one name (like Hawaiians) or a name which made no sense to their federal or state government overlords. One way to supress Native culture was change naming practices. Decent citizens had a first name, middle name, and last name based on a paternal line. That's a "Christian name". The troll is, not surprisingly, disregarding reality for obsessive fantasy.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 24, 2011 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Total change in subject: does anyone here use Blue Agave sweetener? What can you tell me? I picked up a two-pack at Costco yesterday.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 12:09 PM | Report abuse

Sadly, TBG, you're right. Most of the world is outside the secure zone. I think it is better for us to accept that, and find ways to deal with insecurity, than to slowly expand the boundaries of the secure zone.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 24, 2011 12:11 PM | Report abuse

Italians had a tradition to name the first son after the paternal grandfather, the first daughter after the paternal grandmother, the second son and daughter after the maternal grandparents and only for the 5th child the parents were somewhat free to pick a name, although naming after the parents or relatives was still preferred. When I meet Mr A.'s extended family, I still get sometimes confused, and it does not help at all that both cousins named Corrado americanized their first names to Roddy.

Posted by: gmbka | January 24, 2011 12:11 PM | Report abuse

Interesting to contemplate the false-compromise theories, yello. AKA Argument to moderation, Okrent's Law, False Balance, etc.

What kills me is the naming of financial businesses after made-up names. Edw@rd Jones. R@ymond James. Wonder how Edward James and Raymond Jones would do on the scale?

Anderson Maher? Bill Cooper?


Posted by: Jumper1 | January 24, 2011 12:12 PM | Report abuse

I guess Donovan was persona non grata in Hawaii. He's probably pagan anyway.

Nice link to Hawaiian names. I am reminded Keanu means "the coolness" and I didn't know Malia (I know one) was a Hawaiian name.

I guess I ought to listen to Iz more often.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWkKAQxe2mc

"Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers,
for by doing that,
some have entertained angels unawares."

I'm trying, Iz. I'm trying REAL HARD.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 24, 2011 12:25 PM | Report abuse

Jumper1 - not sure I understand what you're saying. "Edward Jones" was named after its founder, Edward D. Jones (NOT the Edward Jones that co-founded Dow Jones & Co., though). Raymond James is a partnership name, created when Raymond and Associates merged with Robert A. James Investments. They're not "made up names."

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 12:29 PM | Report abuse

I'm so embarrassed... Boy, was I wrong. I thought it was all marketing. Must have been a rumor. One shouldn't accept stupid rumors.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 24, 2011 12:34 PM | Report abuse

I love the way some old names make funny URLs. For example, A.G. Edwards looks like Aged Wards Dot Com.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Back from the doctor and all is well, except for a rather high cholesterol level, time to make some lifestyle improvements.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 24, 2011 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Glad you hear your checkup went well, for the most part, dmd.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Thanks, Ivansmom. Yes, I get that part of it. I'm just a bit beleaugured that anyone even *cares* about anybody's name. To me, even the phrase "Chrsitian name" is, prima facie, offensive, and why anyone even continues to use such a term anymore bugs me. That's the first thing people ought to be stripping out of the lexicon. I mean, the very notion that "Hussein" is a "Christian" name is patently absurd right there. You might as well be saying that Xin Liu Peng is a Christian name. Or Buddha X Tao. It's jabberwocky, but people seem to be perfectly willing to play along like it all makes sense.

Also, the notion that names necessarily have gender basis should have slipped away by now. There's a sizeable handful that are "traditionally" cross-gender (Lee, Pat, Lyn, etc.) and a whole bunch more that have slipped well beyond it (naming a girl Madison or Meredith or Bailey [one of my granddaughters is named Bailey]). Hawaiian names are genderless, as are many other naming systems in non-European cultures.

There's even dual and triple naming systems, whereby people have both a "public name" and a "private" (often secret) name. (This is mainly true of Native Americans.) Some religions give you an entirely different name apart from your given/"public" name, and others incorporate them.

By and large it has all the significance of Dungeons & Dragons, and why a troll like you-know-who is fixated on it is a mystery to me.

/signed/

Ming Wyoming (my stripper name)

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 12:46 PM | Report abuse

Ming... you're right. That's why the Hawaiian law was taken off the books in 1967. No one cares.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 12:58 PM | Report abuse

Dude! That's my dog's name! You two have so much in common, except for, you know, species and gender, number of legs used for walking, hair color, and so forth. But you have the same soulfulness around the eyes.

Barack, by the way, clearly comes from the same Semitic language root as Baruch, which means "blessed" or blessing" in Hebrew and which is a modern name used commonly among the Tribe. Since the Torah has no vowels, and modern transliterations of consonants are somewhat fluid, I suspect that no one could actually tell you whether Baruch or Barack is the actual Moses-approved conveyance of the word (or neither), and so they are both equally Biblical. Is the Terpsichorean lagomorph now going to start questioning whether names derived from the Torah can be Christian? Bring it on, bunny-brain, bring it on!

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 24, 2011 12:58 PM | Report abuse

"What's in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet."

Shakespeare

Posted by: gmbka | January 24, 2011 1:07 PM | Report abuse

Thank you, gmbka! Perfect.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 1:10 PM | Report abuse

Gee, in our family, we hand out baby names like candy, but don't actually call the baby by that name. Think Maria Theresa Bernadette or John Paul Aloysuis. For your first name. Never enough room on credit cards or driver's licenses. Gender-specific names don't work well for us either, as both Patsy and Connie are men's names.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 24, 2011 1:30 PM | Report abuse

Actually, now that I think of it, I think all you folks should change "Christian name" to "Jewish name." Reason: David, Sam(uel), Sarah, Abner, Rachel, Adam, Hannah, Ben(jamin), Ethan, Hazel, Jesse, Joel (ahem), Jonathan, Judith, Miriam (derivative: Mary), Matthew, Michael, Naomi, Nathan/Nathaniel, Joshua, Rebecca, Ruth, Sharon, Susannah. There's probably a few more.

It's about the copyright, see? We have lawyers.

So, you wanna name your boy David, be my guest (I have one, too). But no, it's not exactly a Christian name. (I noticed nobody jumped on "Goliath." I don't know why; he was the big, strong one. You all went for the skinny little punk couldn't keep his zipper zipped. Go figure.)

Ichabod and Uriah are ours too, but we'll let you have them, gratis.

I was unable to find an Old Testament source for "Bieber," but I'm pretty sure we aren't gonna contest that one. He's all yours if you want him.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 1:32 PM | Report abuse

gmbka - fine, but the name of concern there was "Montague" vice "Romeo".

Mudge - it's a weird situation. As someone else said up above, strictly speaking a "Christian name" is the name taken at baptism, to differentiate among members of the same family; it does NOT include the surname. (See http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Christian+name) To remove it from the religious context, its rough synonym, "Given name" is the name given to an individual to distinguish him or her among the various family members, who all have the same family name.

So technically it's not correct to say that "Barack Hussein Obama" is a Christian name, nor is "John Sidney McCain III" a Christian name. The "Christian names" are "Barack" and "John". You could also call those "given names."


Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 1:46 PM | Report abuse

# Barak

Israelite commander who fought against the Canaanite general Sisera.

* Appears in Judges

http://www.babynamer.com/category/677

Posted by: gmbka | January 24, 2011 1:47 PM | Report abuse

Survived first day of teaching. Coldest bike ride for me on record. Brrrrr and still chilled.

DNA girl, I used the links to open the class with the wonder of science.....thank you.

Time for an on-kit comment: 'panache' is a great word and fits nicely with the fedora string in the boodle.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, ArmyBrat, I don't quite get what you are saying about Romeo Montague.

Earlier in the discussion somebody pointed out that the Hawaiian law referred to name structure, not given names.

Posted by: gmbka | January 24, 2011 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Dear Mr. Curmudgeon6,

I have seen the lovely Ming Wyoming, and you, sir, are no Ming Wyoming!!!

Posted by: Don_from_I-270 | January 24, 2011 2:05 PM | Report abuse

Ugh. Headline says...

"Supreme Court says fiancee of complaining worker protected from retaliation"

Except the complaining worker is female and her intended is male, who is then a fiance. Not a fiancee.

Jeesh. Who the heck is writing the headlines at the Post these days? In the story, he is referred to correctly as a fiance. Didn't the headline writer even read the story?

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 2:06 PM | Report abuse

Oh, TBG asked about Blue Agave. Uncle Sam's Navy uses it to disolve rust off of decks and bulkheads. Navy coffee works, as well.

Posted by: Don_from_I-270 | January 24, 2011 2:15 PM | Report abuse

Puttering around the house I found myself working up quite a sweat... much more so than a day like today would warrant. Then I noticed that the nice young man who was here this morning tinkering with the furnace left the thermostat up at around 85°F.

I think Daughter will be quite pleased when she comes in from the bus stop in a few minutes.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 2:20 PM | Report abuse

"Reading the story" costs extra, TBG.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Healthcare professions "going the extra mile" for their patients.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/the-hot-button/dentist-shows-cleavage-to-distract-patients-from-pain/article1880815/?cmpid=rss1&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheGlobeAndMail-Front+%28The+Globe+and+Mail+-+Latest+News%29&utm_content=Google+International

Posted by: dmd3 | January 24, 2011 2:23 PM | Report abuse

A better link, dmd. If ya know what I mean.

http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/853476-dentist-uses-sexy-dresses-to-distract-patients

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 2:28 PM | Report abuse

and in other news, Rahm Emanuel is now ineligible to run for TWC Mayor - see http://voices.washingtonpost.com/thefix/white-house/rahm-emanuel-ruled-ineligible.html?hpid=topnews

further appeal expected later today

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 2:41 PM | Report abuse

Naming the name positions....Catholics, traditionally, patterned names this way:

given or first name followed by baptismal name (saint required) and then last name. At confirmation, an additional saint's name is taken.

Here are a few scrambles from sibs and cousins, with fake last names but not that fake......scrambled to protect privacy....

Mary Bridget Scholastica O'Malley

Bernard Joseph Raphael Sinnot

Priscilla Catherine-of-Sienna Anne Flynn

Frederick Peter Paul Rafferty

Never once did we call first names or name patterns "Christian" names...an elderly relative, in dementia would sometimes ask:

"What is your front name?"
"Oh,that is nice, dear. Now, what is your back name?"

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 2:46 PM | Report abuse

Happy to hear that MoftheMountain survived southern Florida.

It was perhaps a good idea to visit before the state government begins its descent into madness.

Thinking of madness, despite federal loosening of travel to Florida, state universities are still strictly forbidden to have anything to do with so much as handling outside grant money for such travel. Not so bright when you realize that an open Cuba would have a huge impact on Florida agriculture. Or maybe not. Cubans might not want to supply America's insatiable demand for tomatoes, celery, avocados, pineapples, whatever.

A huge problem with Cuba seems to be that the regime has instilled a deep culture of corruption. It's probably a lot easier to do agriculture for export in an honest country like Chile.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 24, 2011 2:52 PM | Report abuse

I don't believe either of my names, are actual saints names, but are variations of saints names and actually variations of the same name. What should have been my saint name definitely is not one - wonder if my parents realized that, this amuses me.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 24, 2011 2:55 PM | Report abuse

Rahm probably didn't have a proper birth certificate.

Posted by: bobsewell | January 24, 2011 2:56 PM | Report abuse

DMD -- in Irisher-land, including our diaspora -- lots of ways to do "Mary: theme and variations" that can be acceptable a saint names. Until the 30s and 40s, many parishes registered the names in Latin:

Mary = Maria
James = Jacob
William = Guilliame...etc.

For Mary: Marie, Maria, Mariah, Marian and Marion, Maura, Moira, Moyna, Maureen, etc. were often acceptable, especially as first names or Baptismal...not so for confirmation names. And, then add the family pet names of Mimi, Molly, Polly, or the spelling of Maire...

Gerald and Gerard and Jerome were sometimes conflated into one "saintie" name...

John, Sean, Owen, and less so Evan and Ewen and even Ian -- all John-names.


Donal -- Donald but no saint, so sometimes turned into David...

Margaret -- Mairead

Catherine -- Cathleen, Catriona, and the K-versions.... Caitlin and Kaitlin are really phonetic spellings of Cathleen/Kathleen. The th-sound is elided and not pronounced thickly.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 3:13 PM | Report abuse

One would have wished the same standard applied to Dick Cheney re. residency. Technically unconstitutional.

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 24, 2011 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Well that explains it, I believe my other name is a spanish variation of Mary. I am a loop hole child :-)

Love Guilliame - not a name you hear very often.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 24, 2011 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Lots of fellows name Guillermo around here. A couple of them I know go by Bill, like my cousins who are named Basil.

Any Greek Jimmy or Jim you know is likely named Dimitri.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Loop hole child -- love it but not a googlenope....darn.

Guilliame is nice and I would expect some in the Northern Lands, with the French influence.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 3:29 PM | Report abuse

Middle child has a friend Dimitri. I also think there needs to be more Gwendolyns.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 24, 2011 3:51 PM | Report abuse

More Emilys. I like Emily. Don't know a single one.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 3:58 PM | Report abuse

The Naming of Cats
by T. S. Eliot

The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter,
It isn't just one of your holiday games;
You may think at first I'm as mad as a hatter
When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES.
First of all, there's the name that the family use daily,
Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo or James,
Such as Victor or Jonathan, George or Bill Bailey--
All of them sensible everyday names.
There are fancier names if you think they sound sweeter,
Some for the gentlemen, some for the dames:
Such as Plato, Admetus, Electra, Demeter--
But all of them sensible everyday names.
But I tell you, a cat needs a name that's particular,
A name that's peculiar, and more dignified,
Else how can he keep up his tail perpendicular,
Or spread out his whiskers, or cherish his pride?
Of names of this kind, I can give you a quorum,
Such as Munkustrap, Quaxo, or Coricopat,
Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellylorum-
Names that never belong to more than one cat.
But above and beyond there's still one name left over,
And that is the name that you never will guess;
The name that no human research can discover--
But THE CAT HIMSELF KNOWS, and will never confess.
When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplation
Of the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name:
His ineffable effable
Effanineffable
Deep and inscrutable singular Name.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 4:02 PM | Report abuse

Glancing through resumes, I see some really interesting names for children born in the Aughts. So cyclical, baby names. I hope they won't hate them when they grow up. Gwyneth, really?

Don, ROTFLMAO!

Posted by: slyness | January 24, 2011 4:12 PM | Report abuse

In a bit of karmic justice, while we were gone our furnace pilot light had gone out as it wont to do. The thermostat was reading 45 as we walked in.

We also carefully unpacked our souvenirs only find that one of the dozen mini-bottles of rum had shattered in transit, giving all our dirty laundry a slight tropical odor.

The prize possessions, two bottles of Don Q rum, one limon and one anejo, made it intact. I ame going to have to keep more Coke around for mixers.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 4:13 PM | Report abuse

You don't know a single Emily, Mudge? Wow, how old ARE you? :-)

Seriously - check out http://www.ssa.gov/cgi-bin/babyname.cgi

Emily was the single most popular girls' name for babies born in the US every year from at least 1999 through 2007. It was 3rd in 2008 and 6th in 2009 (but Emma, a variant, was 2nd in 2009).

This jibes with my anecdotal evidence - each of my three daughters has at least 4 friends named Emily.

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 4:17 PM | Report abuse

I used to play a game with my wife's class lists where as she was making their file folders I would try to guess the gender of each student based solely on their name. There were always quite a few international students in addition to all the contemporary unisex names. I could usually do about 80%.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 4:22 PM | Report abuse

I used to play a game with my wife's class lists where as she was making their file folders I would try to guess the gender of each student based solely on their name. There were always quite a few international students in addition to all the contemporary unisex names. I could usually do about 80%.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 4:23 PM | Report abuse

Ooops. Sorry.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 4:25 PM | Report abuse

I would like to thank ArmyBrat for correct usage of the word "jibes" instead of the so-often misused "jives". It warms my little heart, which may or may not have cockles, but which is surely 2 sizes too small.

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 24, 2011 4:30 PM | Report abuse

Greek Peters can be Panayotis, too. Of course that puts their name day with some Marys/Marias.

LOL, you too, yello? Our hot water heater is hooked into our oil burner for efficiency and one of the sensors is buggy. When it registers too low it seizes the whole system and won't allow the burner or circulator to work, and I didn't think to turn the system off before we left. We returned to a 35F house (in the middle), very, very cold radiators on the outside walls, and an extremely unhappy almost-cat-sicle.

Posted by: MoftheMountain | January 24, 2011 4:32 PM | Report abuse

I started a program at the kids' elementary school and after the first year of forming teams I had to add "Gender" to the registration form to make sure they were balanced.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 4:33 PM | Report abuse

SciTim, at that rate that I send you *hearts* for your posts, you damn well *better* have cockles laying around. Ya hear???

Up against a deadline, so I just have to shoot (in only the most loving way) and run.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 24, 2011 4:37 PM | Report abuse

ArmyBrat,

Do they wear Emily The Strange?

http://www.emilystrange.com/blog/index.cfm/2009/9/9/Who-is-Emily-the-Strange

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 4:37 PM | Report abuse

My favorite was always Saint Spreservus.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 4:42 PM | Report abuse

TBG, you asked about Blue Agave. Haven't tried it, but I'm using stevia on the advice of the alternative doctor. I like it, but it's more expensive than the older sweetners. I buy Trader Joe's version but saw it at Costco for the first time a couple of weeks ago.

Posted by: slyness | January 24, 2011 4:44 PM | Report abuse

Here's something about names... middle names... I mean middle initials...

http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/80200

Posted by: -TBG- | January 24, 2011 4:50 PM | Report abuse

yellojkt - no, they don't. That's one of the great conundrums of teenage life - at one point is a "counterculture" symbol so popular that it becomes the "culture" against which it rebels? In some circles, Emily has hit that point and is now experiencing pushback.

aka - it's hard to "be the man" and "stick it to the man" at the same time. :-)

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 4:51 PM | Report abuse

There are tons of overlooked saints' names anyway.

Some are apocryphal, such as St. Ovide, who apparently was Ovid the poet in er,christianized fertility worship form. Or something.

Among the more canon: St. Genesius is the patron saint of actors, for instance.

Emily could be seen as a form of St. Amelia (many in history, the most famous refused King Charlemagne as a suitor.)

Many saints didn't necessarily grow up in christian homes anyway.

I think Venerdi originates from "Venus-day." (Latin: dies veneri) Yeah, that's a bad choice for a boy's name.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 24, 2011 5:14 PM | Report abuse

Proof that I have a great job: play mp3 files here of great game theme songs from the UMD Gamers Symphony Orchestra

http://umd.gamersymphony.org/?page_id=16

Am enjoying a couple of Mario themes now.

Came to courtesy of a new student.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 5:29 PM | Report abuse

Proof that I have a great job: play mp3 files here of great game theme songs from the UMD Gamers Symphony Orchestra

http://umd.gamersymphony.org/?page_id=16

Am enjoying a couple of Mario themes now.

Came to me courtesy of a new student.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 5:30 PM | Report abuse

CqP - I like the GSO. Oldest daughter's boyfriend was a member until he graduated last Spring. Middle daughter is currently a Freshman at EnorMouse State, but she's more into a capella than instrumental musice.

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 5:36 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod, I can't figure out your point about not being raised in a Christian home. Help?

Posted by: LostInThought | January 24, 2011 5:39 PM | Report abuse

Wilbrod - yep, that's the origin of the word. The origins of the names of the days of the week are more obvious in languages like French or Latin (hmm - Lundi; Mardi; Mercredi; Jeudi; Vendredi; Samedi; Dimanche. - Yep, looks like Moon Day; Mars Day; Mecury Day; Jove Day/Jupiter Day; Venus Day; Saturn Day; okay, "Sun Day" is more obvious in English :-)

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 5:41 PM | Report abuse

My old cat, Bruce Catton, gave away his secret name when he was a tiny, tiny kitten. It was "Steve."

tbg and I in Costco. Dangerous, and not just because of the new cutlery.

Posted by: -dbG- | January 24, 2011 5:42 PM | Report abuse

gmbka, regarding your 1:58 - sorry, that was an obtuse reference to the fact that Juliet wasn't concerned about Romeo's "Christian name" or first name; it was his last name/family name that was the problem. Changing his name to "Niccolo Montague" wouldn't have helped; it would have had to be something like "Romeo Di Medici".

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 5:45 PM | Report abuse

I'm glad there are only 7 days in the week, cuz the next plant after Saturn (Saturday) is Uranus.

*tittering quietly*

Posted by: MsJS | January 24, 2011 5:56 PM | Report abuse

Self castigation clearly, on the double post. Thought I hit preview.

WB -- tones of saints whose named do not come forward. A few I know about:

St. Benignus, a Roman soldier, whose remains are at the Franciscan Monastery in Brookland, DC.

St. Drogo, the patron of unattractive people.

St. Dymphna, mentally ill.

St. Thekla or Thecla, companion of St. Paul.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 6:07 PM | Report abuse

Is St. Thekla (or Thecia) a suburb of Minneapolis?

(A Monday Moment)

Posted by: ftb3 | January 24, 2011 6:10 PM | Report abuse

LostinThought-- St. Patrick was a runaway slave who converted to christianity, etc. A lot of the early saints weren't raised with "christian names."

This was in reference to Yello's gripe how new saint's names were supposed to happen if every Christian had a saint's name.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 24, 2011 6:21 PM | Report abuse

People my age usually have names from the Bible, simple names like, John, James, Mary, etc., but as the years moved on the names became more complicated and now, it's almost impossible to pronounce them or spell them for that matter.

My name is Greek, I think. My mother said my dad got it out of a book.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 24, 2011 6:21 PM | Report abuse

Yes, "Cassandra"-- disbelieved by men. The prophet Cassandra in the Iliad.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 24, 2011 6:30 PM | Report abuse

The winner of the Ice Fishing Extravaganza in Brainerd,MN was just interviewed by the local PBS station. "Having a baby, that was pretty exciting, but this is right up there." (he won $150,000 for a fish he caught just 15 minutes after the all day contest started) At first I thought he was wearing one of those Canuckistani "beardo" contraptions, but it turned out his real beard was just kind of frosted up.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 24, 2011 7:03 PM | Report abuse

Science Tim, since you are usually so knowledgeable, I hate to correct you but you are wrong about the Torah. It does have vowels but they are just not letters. They are dots and lines or a combination of both usually placed under the letters but not always. Hebrew writing with these dots, called Nikud, makes Hebrew a very phonetic language because the words can only be pronounced one way. The Torah, that is the Hebrew Bible, is written with these marks, as is poetry and children's books. It is only later, when children have learned to read, that the dots and lines are no longer used in ordinary reading material. You are right that Baruch means blessing in Hebrew but there is another name, Barak, which means lightning. The Israeli Defense Minister is called Ehud Barak but Barak can also be a first name.

Posted by: orawh | January 24, 2011 7:17 PM | Report abuse

I'm assuming that this is the "Beardo" you mean.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Beardo_promo2.jpg

That's cute!

Posted by: Bob-S | January 24, 2011 7:18 PM | Report abuse

Scc--I think this is what you use to correct a mistake. The Torah is only part of the Hebrew Bible.

Posted by: orawh | January 24, 2011 7:20 PM | Report abuse

Interesting, orawh. My father actually taught Hebrew (yet, not to his children). I'm fascinated by tonal languages (like Chinese and related languages), where if the tonal pronunciation is not right, the potential insult coefficient could go through the roof. Fun.

Barak as lightning, eh? Cool.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 24, 2011 7:24 PM | Report abuse

In case somebody actually wanted one, this link would probably be more helpful.

http://beardo.bigcartel.com/

Posted by: Bob-S | January 24, 2011 7:24 PM | Report abuse

Another Scc. Baruch means blessed. Blessing is Bracha. Sorry.

Posted by: orawh | January 24, 2011 7:24 PM | Report abuse

SCC = "Self Castigation Club"

Works for us.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 24, 2011 7:25 PM | Report abuse

mudge way back at 10:48 a.m. had a major point. Most names are just nonsense syllables. How is Kal-El any different from Mi-Kal or Kev-In? Even if the baby name books give a meaning, it's usually some archaic term that nobody ever uses.

And then when someone names their kid after a real word like River or Homebrew or Placenta, they are considered nutty hippies. Unless the word you use are an old-fashioned virtue like Chastity or Prudence or Temperance, in which case you are a zealot.

I've always wanted to have a boy and girl pair of twins so I could name them Hunter and Gatherer.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 7:27 PM | Report abuse

orawh - Yup, that's it. It's the Self-Castigation Club.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 24, 2011 7:27 PM | Report abuse

Ftb, it's not a matter of tonal pronunciation. However, when Hebrew is written without the dots, the same set of consonants can be read differently, and mean completely different things. For example, the Hebrew letters that would be the equivalent of spr could be read as book, told, was told, and also cut, barber and many that don't come to mind at the moment. The only way to know is from the context. I read Hebrew fairly fluently but I still sometimes stumble over these things.

Posted by: orawh | January 24, 2011 7:32 PM | Report abuse

Orawh!

I work with a (drama queen) person who often expounds on her daughter's beautiful name. She desperately wants one of us to agree, but it hasn't happened yet. Both names are pretty alone, but the combination makes us laugh silently. Poor little Savannah Rain.

Posted by: -dbG- | January 24, 2011 7:41 PM | Report abuse

CqP, I too love to start class with whiz-bang sci videos.

Some of my colleagues worry about the strong and likely wrong (in detail) impressions the videos create in young students' minds about "how things must work" (way more effective than static picts in texts), and wonder if they simply make passive learning more easy/attractive.

I do love the sense of wonder, though I must follow up with discussions of what's real/not real/totally wrong/not known etc. and hope the students remain inspired enough to explore the mol bio world for themselves.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 24, 2011 7:52 PM | Report abuse

yellojkt - not sure I agree about "most" names being just nonsense syllables. I'm sure there are some names like that, but most have some meaning, even if it's "archaic".

And the best set of twin names I've personally seen were two women named Margaret and Suzanne. They went by their nicknames, Peggy and Sue. Yes, their brother's nickname was Buddy.

Posted by: ArmyBrat1 | January 24, 2011 7:54 PM | Report abuse

I just had another thought. Maybe Science Tim is not wrong, after all. It may be that the Torah scroll, which men read from on the Sabbath and on holidays, has no vowels. Notice I said men. Since I am a woman, I have never read from the Torah scroll and don't know. (The Reform and Conservative movements, where women can also read from the Torah scroll, have little impact here but at any rate I am not a religious person.)
However, the Bible in book form definitely has vowels.

Posted by: orawh | January 24, 2011 7:59 PM | Report abuse

Sure, ArmyBrat, but that's just arbitrary convention, enforced by long tradition. They're still nonsense sounds with no connection to anything.

"Ding-dong", though, MEANS something, by golly!

Posted by: Bob-S | January 24, 2011 8:01 PM | Report abuse

DNAGirl, among all the pipetting and reagent prep and PCR trials the undergraduate junior and seniors do -- I want to remind them of the wonder, yeah that!, of their work. Then, we move on to science and technical writing.

So, not burdened if the microtubules really unzip that way....glad you are at the helm.

And, do you know this charming sci-animation?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=we0vBoQfSjQ

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 24, 2011 8:19 PM | Report abuse

'K let's stop pussyfooting around and just play the porn star name game already!
http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=1555

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 24, 2011 8:23 PM | Report abuse

Here are the Top 10 girls and boys names from 2009.

Girls: Isabella, Emma, Olivia, Sophia, Ava
Boys: Jacob, Ethan, Michael, Alexander, William
http://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/top5names.html

They are all just gibberish. Take this pop quiz:

1. Use any of them in a sentence as anything other than a proper noun. Feel free to use the original language.

OR

2. Give the original meaning of any three of these names and the location where this would still be a word.

Kevin Smith named his daughter Harley Quinn. Now there is a name that works on a bunch of levels.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 8:27 PM | Report abuse

Ha! CqP you caught a pet peeve. Not mine, but a Harvard prof went on a rant about it last sem (over good wine)--Microtubules DO NOT zip that way! Or maybe they do kinda sorta maybe nononono no one knows...not yet.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 24, 2011 8:29 PM | Report abuse

Homebrew Placenta is a pretty sweet name. I dunno if the wife would approve, though.

Posted by: baldinho | January 24, 2011 8:30 PM | Report abuse

Princess Harborview. Fitting enough.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 24, 2011 8:41 PM | Report abuse

Good evening, all.

Wilbrod - LiT knows her saints and Catholic history far better than I. CPq, too. Still, I don't think how one is raised would have much - if anything - to do with one's becoming a saint.

None of the Apostles were raised in Christian homes (to the best of my knowledge). And saints, all - except for the guy with the 29 silver pieces (he lost one to me when he took the Bears and the points).

These days, people take a new name when they take their vows into the Orders. Watch for Pio to make it into the top ten baby names in 2012 (right before the End of the World).

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 24, 2011 9:02 PM | Report abuse

Some years ago, a wildlife biologist re-surnamed herself Cerulean, as in warbler.

I have a ridiculously common surname to go with an even more ridiculously common given name.

Locally, the cheese shop is still holding out in the face of competition from nearby Fresh Market, which doesn't have tilsit or plain Wensleydale, nor Dutch cheese with caraway seeds. Local tomatoes are becoming available.

In the back yard, the annual rye grass is making the lawn neon, and 'Fairy Tale' amaryllises, planted in December, are putting on a show.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 24, 2011 9:14 PM | Report abuse

orawh, your disagreement with SciTim is partly about semantics, but partly not. Overall, he is more correct than you. He is quite correct that biblical Hebrew did not and does not have vowels of any kind, not even the diacritical marks called nikud that you cite. And he is also correct that many torah scrolls do not have those nikud in them. Now, I admit I don't know about ALL torah scrolls, nor do I know what torah scrolls in Israel these days might look like. If you say they now contain said nikud, fine. But in America in many synagogues, the torah scrolls men read from usually (I can't say always) do NOT have nikud. This is one of the things that makes studying for one's bar/bas mitzvah so difficult; the student has to basically memorize the text pronunciation through rehersal, because there are no diacritical marks to guide him/her.

Ancient Hebrew and what might be called classical Hebrew of the Talmudic period of the Talmud, Mishnah, Gemarra, etc. were all written pre-nikud. The nikud were "invented over a couple of centuries starting about 200 CE and adapted into what became known as "Tiberian" Hebrew, one of several post-Talmudic versions of Hebrew.

The nikud were "invented" by the scribes, called "masoretes," who were not only scribes but also (ahem) the sort of copy editors of their day. The "standard" and "recognized" translation of the Old Testament Jews use today is called "the Masoretic Text," meaning that it is the version "authorized" and passed down by these masoretes.

So when you cite some forms of Hebrew, say, the Aleppo Codex, circa the 10th century CE around the time of Maimonides, yes, these all have nikud in them. The "semantic" part of the argument has to do with whether you or Tim regard nikud and diacritical marks as "vowels," per se (I suspect he'd say no), or simply punctuation guides, which are a slightly different thing. (We used to use diacritical marks in dictionaries to show when a vowel was pronounced long or short. But now we have some system put in place after I went to school, and I'm basically lost with the new stuff. But my point is that in English, at least, no one would claim that a straight line diacritical mark over oo in the word "boo" meant it was a vowel; it isn't; it's a diacritical mark. So Tim's much more correct, based upon his understanding of English.) Now, whether you consider nikud to be "vowels" in Israel I cannot say. Here we do not and would not. It has always been my understanding, as it is Tim's, that Hebrew has no vowels as he and I understand the term.

I cannot speak to modern Israeli practice.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 9:25 PM | Report abuse

In a way, there is a "proof" that Tim is right and that Hebrew has no vowels, a proof which many Christians would probably recognize. It has to do with the name of God, which even many non-Jews would recognize as YHWH, also called the Tetragrammaton (which is fancy-shmancy Greek for "word with four letters"). The name of God is famously unpronounceable, but has wandered aimlessly around language until it became Jehovah (in English, anyway).

According to legend, the reason *why* it is unpronounceable is because only the high priests knew what the vowel sounds were supposed to be (there being no vowels there to help you). When the temple was destroyed in 70CE (and the priests with it), the knowledge of how to pronounce those four consonants was lost. (Quibble: the "W" may be a vowel placeholder consonant. Don't ask. For further reference consult "mater lectionis," which deals with consonants that are placeholders for vowels. Bring aspirin.)

At any rate, the point and the "proof" that Hebrew has no vowels is seen in the story/legend about why YHWH can't be pronounced.

(The alternate story, which some people including me think is a gloss added later, is that it is simply disrespectful to pronounce the name.)

In any event, *because* the name could only be pronounced by the high priests, the Jew-in-the-street began to use titles such as "Adonai" instead, similar to "Lord," which is not a name but a title, and "Elohanu." Of course, such terms were long in use anyway very long *before* the temple was destroyed.

The other alternative to using either YHWH (6,800 mentions in the OT, but totally missing in Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs and Esther, BTW) is to simply refer to it as "The Name."

Which is why Tim was basically correct.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 10:10 PM | Report abuse

No vowels, ya say? Well, that's just ridiculous. How am I to know whether I'm about to be confronted with a bore, a boor, a boar, a bear (all of which I'd normally just as soon avoid) or a beer (which I'd generally rather not miss)?

Posted by: Bob-S | January 24, 2011 10:12 PM | Report abuse

What's that sound? It Isabella ringing.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 24, 2011 10:21 PM | Report abuse

Amen to what the Hebrews said.

Hope Joel has kittin's tomorrow, this one is getting really long to backboodle.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 24, 2011 10:27 PM | Report abuse

You can be guided by its appearance, Bob. What does it look like, a glass of yellow liquid with a foamy top, a really ugly pig with tusks, a very large furry creature (possibly wearing a forest ranger hat), or RichNoMore or dagnabbitrabbit?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 24, 2011 10:28 PM | Report abuse

Anne Applebaum's account of "The Way Back" (new movie featuring the Soviet Gulag) left me in tears.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 24, 2011 11:00 PM | Report abuse

So Hebrew is some kind of Serbian then. My friend Mrkch, whose family initially came fron a place near Krk, no joke, would approve.

Back in the bad old days the local convention was, for all good Catholics, to start male name with Joseph and female name with Marie. As the priest were generally interjecting the days's saint in the name before the given name there were lots of Joseph Théophraste/Théodule/Onésime/etc Maurice Tremblay and Marie Bernadette/Thérèse/Madeleine/etc Georgette Tremblay. The Joseph and Marie thing faded in the fifties, maybe because of the double Joseph and Marie. Marie Madeleine Marie Tremblay is just weird.

Even though the latin/French naming practice of putting the commonly used name last in the string of 3 to maybe 5 given names has been stable for 400 years most forms from companies and the federal and provincial gunmints, until fairly recently, still asked for the given-middle-family names in the anglo-american fashion. Grrr.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 24, 2011 11:19 PM | Report abuse

something from lemmings. since it *is* cold.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKwsgOSG_H8&feature=related

Posted by: -jack- | January 24, 2011 11:26 PM | Report abuse

In the NYT: "The median Democratic Congressional district now has a population 11 times as large as the median Republican Congressional district, according to an analysis by Transportation Weekly..."

What utter nonsense. How can they publish such stuff? Do they consider states to be congressional districts because they have senators?

LTL-CA

Posted by: Jim19 | January 25, 2011 12:44 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. Up early and busy. I have much on the dance card today. Still quite cold here, but yesterday turned out real nice. Lots of sunshine, but still a tad chilly.

I do hope your day is everything you want it to be, and so much more. Love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 25, 2011 4:25 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, if you read my last post, you will see that I corrected myself when I realized that the Torah scrolls might not have vowels. But in modern Hebrew the Nikud are considered vowels. Thank you for your comprehensive explanation.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 6:43 AM | Report abuse

No discussion of names is complete without name checking Freakonomics and its study of how names move from more affluent census tracts to less affluent ones.

The full chapter isn't online (since they still sell plenty of those books), but Baby Names is one of the common tags on the Freakonomics blog:

http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/tag/baby-names/

And there is a blog tracking the prognostication powers of Levitt and Dubner.

http://www.babynamesgarden.com/freakonomicswatch.aspx

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 6:57 AM | Report abuse

Mudge, a comment on the use of God's name. In Israel, if the word God is written in English letters, the religious people write it as G-d because even in English it is considered too sacred to write in full. In speaking to people in Israel, you can determine how religious they are not only by their clothing but also by the circumlocutions they use when referring to God. I use the word "Elohim" but people who are a bit more religious will say "Elokim" . The expression "The Name", as you mentioned, is very commonly used but there are many more like "The Place" and others that don't come to mind at the moment. The expression Thank God is expressed as "Baruch HaShem" which means blessed be The Name. It is simply considered sacrilegious to utter or to write God's name.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 7:12 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all, hi Cassandra! I'll look forward to checking your links later, Yello. Mr. T and I have a funeral to attend this morning, for the mother of a friend. It's at 9 ayem in a town 45 minutes from here, so we're starting early.

Have a good day, everyone!

Posted by: slyness | January 25, 2011 7:15 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

Signing in cold
Literally, brrrrrrrrr
and without any backboodling since Sunday evening ... dealing with dead but now alive 'coach and six' yesterday.

Good to see omni ... many thanks for the glorious music.
_____________

So her highness princess-sparkle-pony is opining on behalf of the tea thinkers this evening? The right must be *so* proud.

Does the Boodle do after State of the Union post-commentary? If so I'd like to participate.

Stay warm today!

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 7:18 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

Signing in cold
Literally, brrrrrrrrr
and without any backboodling since Sunday evening ... dealing with dead but now alive 'coach and six' yesterday.

Good to see omni ... many thanks for the glorious music.
_____________

So her highness princess-sparkle-pony is opining on behalf of the tea thinkers this evening? The right must be *so* proud.

Does the Boodle do after State of the Union post-commentary? If so I'd like to participate.

Stay warm today!

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 7:18 AM | Report abuse

Good one, fb.

My turn:

Olivia smell of napalm in the morning. It smells like victory.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 7:19 AM | Report abuse

I really have nothing to add to any discussion of names, Hebrew, vowels, or Hawaiian laws. So I'll just note that it's still cold, now snowing, and work beckons.

Have a good day everyone and stay warm!

Posted by: cowhand214 | January 25, 2011 7:22 AM | Report abuse

CqP, thanks for reminding me of that CHON video. Sent the link off to Liz Lerman as a good morning gift.
Much appreciated.

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 25, 2011 7:23 AM | Report abuse

scc: after = post
*talitha wanders off for more tea*

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 7:24 AM | Report abuse

I really DO need to wake up fully.
When I wander off for 'more tea' I mean my preferred caffeine-infusion substance (Earl Grey), not the political version.

Pass it over, my friend .....

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 7:34 AM | Report abuse

Justice Thomas was confused by the Supreme Court's COI disclosure procedures?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/25/us/politics/25thomas.html

Ooooooooooooooooooooooooooookay...

*generally-enervated-and-fighting-a-headache Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 7:52 AM | Report abuse

Good morning all.

Wilbrod, bc, thanks. My background in that goes well beyond childhood. Despite my own best efforts to rebel, I ended up spending quite a bit of tuition money getting the full snap. And the list of those beatified but not yet canonized has got some cool names on it. Caius might be a good name for either a football player or a ballet dancer, but any kid named Odoric is probably going to be handing over his lunch money pretty regularly.

Stay warm and dry, and have a happy day all.


Posted by: LostInThought | January 25, 2011 8:28 AM | Report abuse

'morning all. It was -30C yesterday morning and -20C this morning. Things are moving in the right direction. There was even a good hint of a sunrise coming in to work.
That cold weather has a big silver lining; the frikking Japanese beetles larvae are supposed to start to die off when the soil goes below -20/-25C. Die Japanese beetles, die.

Posted by: shrieking_denizen | January 25, 2011 8:32 AM | Report abuse

Morning all... bc... Wilbrod's mention of the non-Christian upbringing of many saints was in answer to yello's question that if all Christians must be named for a saint, how will there ever be any new saint's names?

And she has a point. I think many were sainted because of their behavior after conversion.

But enough of that. Here's a very fun page on the Baby Name Wizard...

http://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager#

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 8:37 AM | Report abuse

Thanks, bc and TBG about the detail of non Xtian saints becoming saints. And, now, boys and girls, this is where we remind ourselves that, ahem,

Jesus was not Christian. Not raised one, nor did he convert. Nice Jewish boy who happened to look rather Italian in that attractive Mediterranean, dark and strong-nose way...nothing like the insipid and wan blonde youth depicted in many holy cards...the best of which, with the tiny deckled, gilt edge, come from, ta dah, ITALY.

Stunning to some, actually.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 8:45 AM | Report abuse

CqP no like bishounen Jesus?
http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=3765

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 25, 2011 9:03 AM | Report abuse

DNAGirl--so funny and am sending to three buddies now.

And, Liz Lerman is local. Did you live here and I miss knowing you IRL? Meaning, we could have gone to her dance performances? And, Tiffin or Udupi Palace afterwards?

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:22 AM | Report abuse

CqP, my travels have taken me into the back rooms and the residences within the Vatican (there's a bowling alley and a movie theater in there...who knew?). Seems to me most of the paintings (with exceptions like Botticelli) show both him and his mother as pretty southern Italian looking. Dark hair/skin/eyes. I think it's fairly common for artists to depict them as looking like the artist. (There's also cool stuff where artists got mad at each other and used each other's faces for Satan.)

Posted by: LostInThought | January 25, 2011 9:29 AM | Report abuse

'Morning, Boodle.

No problem, orawh. I think I post my reply before refreshing to read your reply. That happens around here sometimes. Yes, here many religious Jews also use the G-d convention.

Are you familiar with what is called (I'm not quite sure why) "high[er] criticism"? It concerns all that discussion of OT sourcing, the stuff about the J, E, P, D, DH (not "designated hitter"), Dtr1, Dtr2, etc., authors, much of the basis of which has to do with how they use the various names and titles.

talitha, I'm sure there will be SotU live boodling as well as post-SotU boodling. However, I expect many of us will be held in rapt attention as Princess Sparkle Pony delivers what is sure to be a wondrous rebuttal (depending on whether she's taken her lithium).

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 9:31 AM | Report abuse

I've just always assumed that I look like Jesus. I mean, my wife often looks at me and mutters his name.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | January 25, 2011 9:40 AM | Report abuse

LiT -- very cool to know about Vatican recreation. THEN, the blondie saint series of holy cards are a strategic marketing variation to sell!

Know your market: they want that Jesus, and not, perhaps, the real one.

And,geezy peezy lemon squeezy, so many miss his message of radical love. Like: share the money, care for each other, do not judge, give more/take less, be still often, love the enemy, turn the cheek, heal each other, visit prisoners, comfort the grieving, bind up wounds,

So non-tea party it makes my heart sing and my teeth squeak with irritation and rage....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:42 AM | Report abuse

Good morning boodle! Having trouble blasting myself out of the morning coffee chair and into the day's activities. Following all the interesting links...

A math story that I think will interest all boodlers. Partition numbers conquered.
http://esciencecommons.blogspot.com/2011/01/new-theories-reveal-nature-of-numbers.html

Later gators. Prepping for a drive to Florida with 2 of the frostcats later this week. Come Sat. the Gang of Four will be reunited and hilarity will ensue (a euphemism for fur flying I'm sure).

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Good morning, y'all.

Warm muffins, assorted beverages and chilled OJ on the table.

TWC awaits the Ill-In-Oy Supremes decision on Rahm's residency status. Absentee balloting starts early next week, so we hope for a decision by Friday.

Got friends coming for lunch. Curried chicken salad on a bed of spinach, banananana bread, fresh pineapple and blackberries and ginger cookies. Choice of hot beverage. Kindly BYOC(hair).

Posted by: MsJS | January 25, 2011 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Funny, Padouk.

Nice graphic, TBG. I see I have gone from 59th to 406th since my birth. This may not bode well. Oh well, my gf likes it. The whole thing, not the nickname. So now I go by that.
- Jumperian

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 25, 2011 10:15 AM | Report abuse

The discussion of Jesus' probably appearance leads perfectly to this protest sign my cousin recently pointed out on FB...

"Obama is NOT a brown-skinned anti-war socialist who gives away free healthcare. You're thinking of Jesus."

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 10:30 AM | Report abuse

Yo, just popping back in. Some good Torah scholarship last night.

As a groupie to a Jewish person (the ScienceSpouse), I do not read Torah, or Hebrew (neither Biblical nor modern), either. I am nevertheless going to speak from the bima ('stage') this Friday evening during Shabbat services.

Despite my non-Hebrew, non-Jewish disabilities, I paid attention while discussing Torah with my wife in preparation for her adult Bat Mitzvah and with the two ScienceKids in preparation for their B'nai Mitzvot. I didn't know the word "nikud", but I was aware that modern-ish Hebrew uses diacritical marks to indicate vowel sounds. I am willing to accept these as actual vowels. The lack of these modern conveniences in the actual Torah scroll is well-known to every poor schlub who is preparing to read Torah. Not to mention the cantilation marks, which would also be nice to have. For the benefit of the non-Jews here: not only does the aspiring individual who seeks recognition as an adult member of the community have to read a section of the Torah aloud to the congregation, from the scroll, which has no vowels; it must be chanted to one of a modest number of specific 'tunes'. 'Cantilation marks', IIRC, are used in annotated versions of the Torah to keep this information preserved. The annotated version is not, however, what you read from at the bima. At the bima, you read from the real deal, a scroll that has been carefully copied from a prior Torah scroll (albeit in a new hand, possibly a new font), right down to the misspellings. The known misspellings are grist for the mills of those who want hidden messages from God, guides to resolve ambiguity.

I put 'tunes' in quotes because tune is probably too light a word for the gravity of the occasion, and probably too favorable a word for the musical character of the rendition. Think Rex Harrison. There are different traditions, which have different tunes, but you have to pick one at a given time, and there are certain commonalities -- for example, the ScienceSpouse's Torah portion had one of exactly three occurrences in the Torah of a particular long sustained warbling syllable that was not easy to get right.

orawh, you may note I have repeatedly mentioned my female wife reading Torah. If you are feeling slighted by being barred from reading Torah yourself, you might consider changing your affiliation to a less orthodox congregation. Here in the US, there is yet another branch of Judaism, Reconstructionism. Reconstructionist Judaism embraces the devotion to Tikkun Olam ('healing the world') that undergirds Reform Judaism, while maintaining an affinity for tradition as a guide to the continued development of a vibrant and non-stagnant Jewish culture. You can find the Jewish Reconstructionist Federation here: http://jrf.org/

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 25, 2011 10:33 AM | Report abuse

LTL-CA - The NY Times was quickly apprised of their error:

"Correction: January 25, 2011 -
Earlier versions of this article misstated a demographic comparison of Congressional districts held by each party; an analysis by Transportation Weekly found an 11-fold disparity in population density, not in population."
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/25/us/politics/25build.html?_r=1&hpw

[As a matter of fact, the population of the Congressional districts ranges from just over 500,000 in Louisiana's 2nd District to just over 1,000,000 in Nevada's 3rd District. Population density is of course an entirely different matter. -- BS]

I'm not extremely fond of the re-written passage in the NY Times article: "The median Republican Congressional district now has a population density 11 times smaller than the median Democratic district, according to an analysis by Transportation Weekly..."

I guess it gets the point across, but it's pretty ugly mathematically ("11 times smaller"!?) and linguistically.

Posted by: bobsewell | January 25, 2011 11:02 AM | Report abuse

Yello: I loved the Freakanomic take on baby names. My favorite name was the one that was pronounced Shah-teed.

Posted by: baldinho | January 25, 2011 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Interesting:

"Bush officials broke electioneering law, federal agency reports

By R. Jeffrey Smith
Washington Post Staff Writer

Monday, January 24, 2011; 10:00 PM

"At least seven Cabinet secretaries to President George W. Bush took politically motivated trips at taxpayer expense while aides falsely claimed they were traveling on official business, the independent Office of Special Counsel said Monday night in concluding a three-year probe.

In a report on allegations that first surfaced before Bush left office, the agency condemned what it depicted as widespread violations of a law restricting political activities by federal workers and illegal use of federal funds to engage in electioneering.

The abuses mostly occurred in 2005 and 2006, when Bush's advisers were anxious about the looming midterm electoral losses that would hand control of the House of Representatives to the Democrats.

According to the report, the White House improperly orchestrated the use of assets throughout the government to help key congressional allies as the voting drew near, including arranging more than a hundred ostensibly official appearances by top appointees in battleground states such as Pennsylvania, New Mexico, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and Connecticut.

-----Okay, here comes the key graf: -----

"This federally funded travel was organized, approved and closely tracked by Bush's political office, the Office of Special Counsel found, describing the activity as leading to the illegal diversion of federal funds and workers' time."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/24/AR2011012406592_pf.html

The story goes on for nearly 400 more words in 9 grafs. It never once mentions the name of the guy who ran that political office. Jeez, what was his name? It's on the tip of my tongue. Bald guy. Glasses. Gee, what was his name again?

Could it be...

Satan?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 11:31 AM | Report abuse

You thinking of the guy in the Six Flags commercials, 'Mudge? :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 11:44 AM | Report abuse

That's him, Scotty! Nice catch.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 11:52 AM | Report abuse

Claude Rains and I are *shocked!* *shocked!* that this happened.

Started reading that story, but backed away from the ledge.

*sigh*

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 12:07 PM | Report abuse

Joel and a Miami Herald Tropic magazine cover are mentioned in the intro of the Weingarten chat today.

Posted by: -pj- | January 25, 2011 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Mudge-- you mean You-Know-Who?

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 25, 2011 1:08 PM | Report abuse

That Guy, yep.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 1:20 PM | Report abuse

Latest from the Capitol Weather Gang sez the computer models are all lining up to suggest significant snow tomorrow evening into Thursday... :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Rahm Emanuel is back on the ballot while the Illinois supreme court considers the case.

http://www.suntimes.com/3483600-417/emanuel-court-illinois-appellate-ballot.html

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 1:49 PM | Report abuse

The Florida Senate has more committees than Democrats to serve on them.

Dressy western boots are suddenly a fashion item in political Tallahassee.

And Gov. "Scott is the anti-Crist". Unlike the former governor, he doesn't need for people to love him. Good thing. I suspect he's not going to be popular at all.

http://www.floridatoday.com/article/20110123/COLUMNISTS0207/101230327/1086/Matt+Reed++10+things+to+know+about+Tallahassee

In the yard, Easter lilies are anywhere from 6" to 2' tall. We're supposed to get a nasty, wet cold front this evening, presumably precursor to a storm going up the Atlantic coast.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 25, 2011 2:08 PM | Report abuse

Has anyone else been noticing this ad on the top of the page? Is this Justice Scalia? He looks good in a hairnet, don't you think?

http://bit.ly/g2BjfZ

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 2:11 PM | Report abuse

Looks like the Egyptian government needs to shut down Facebook, which was a big coordinating tool for ousting the Tunisian government. I suppose they could also fly in some advisors from Iran, whose government survived unrest.

NY Times and BBC are reporting big demonstrations in Cairo.

Posted by: DaveoftheCoonties | January 25, 2011 2:16 PM | Report abuse

Jeez. Scalia makes my byetta injection needles. No wonder I feel quesy after a shot.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 2:29 PM | Report abuse

Science Tim, I hope you read my correction to my previous post when I realized that Torah scrolls might not have vowels. Mudge gave me a whole lecture on the subject but he seemed to ignore the fact that I had already posted these second thoughts.

I do know about Reconstructionism as as well as all the other streams of Judaism as I lived in the States for 22 years before moving to Israel. I do not feel in the least slighted at not having read from the Torah scroll. I only mentioned it to explain why I was not sure about whether it contained vowels or not. What does upset me is the--to me--misogynistic attitude of some of the ultra-orthodox men. I could give you examples that you would find hard to believe exist in the 21st century but I don't want to get into that here or now. Too many lurking trolls might misuse this. As for changing my affiliation, the beauty of living in Israel is that I don't have to be affiliated to any synagogue in order to share in the Jewish culture and tradition. As I have mentioned earlier, I am not a religious person so this suits me just fine.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 2:32 PM | Report abuse

In the opening to the Weingarten chat, he makes reference to the Tropic cover of the article Dave Barry wrote 'welcoming' Orlando to the NBA back in 1989. I was living in Tampa at the time and it was one of the funniest things I have ever read.

Gene linked to a copy of the cover photo (which I will reproduce here in its mildly unsafe for small kids glory: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/interactivity/barry.jpg), but when asked for a link to the article he sent rookie ChatSparky on a wild goose chase. Between 'Orlando' 'Magic' and 'Dave Barry', that article would be completely buried in GoogleNoise.

There is only one place I know where one could easily find a link to a 20+ year old Tropic article. I hope that person reads this comment.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 2:36 PM | Report abuse

It's not only the ultra-orthodox Jewish men who are misogynous, orawh. It's everywhere in the culture (and in other cultures, alas). I'm not at all religious, either, but I do resent the idea that I would be stoned (in a manner of speaking, but both figuratively and literally) if I were to attempt to pray at the Wailing Wall.

*unbelievable*

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 2:54 PM | Report abuse

Ftb, you would not be stoned if you prayed in the women's section, which is partitioned off and much smaller than the men's section. You would, however, find yourself in trouble if you were seen carrying a Torah scroll anywhere in the vicinity. By the way, in Israel it is called the Western Wall.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Ftb, you and I seem to think along similar lines. I would really like to have an exchange of ideas with you. I don't know the protocol for this but if you are at all interested, you can contact me at
win37ok@yahoo.com. But please don't feel obligated by this. I realize you are a busy person so I will not be upset if you aren't interested.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 3:13 PM | Report abuse

Just sent you an email, orawh.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Ftb, received your e-mail and will be answering from my real e-mail address.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Well, that Western Wall is OK, I guess.

But this one's much older, and has room for everybody to pray at once:

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_2jAtcezr53I/SXsmEByfAZI/AAAAAAAAVrw/HTGhbiXrQy8/058-Western+wall+of+The+Great+Gorge.JPG

Posted by: bobsewell | January 25, 2011 3:47 PM | Report abuse

I wasn't born Jewish, but I *was* born nikud. Nobody prefers to see me that way these days, however. Sigh....

Posted by: Don_from_I-270 | January 25, 2011 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Another shot, looking down the glacier instead of up:

http://photos.alaska.org//photos2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=10674&g2_serialNumber=2&g2_GALLERYSID=ade803bdfa4182bc4f5e7b8c0e5a6036

Posted by: bobsewell | January 25, 2011 3:51 PM | Report abuse

*Snort*

Posted by: Yoki | January 25, 2011 4:24 PM | Report abuse

Hey Mudge --

Google Noomi Rapace and click on the Charlie Rose Show -- terrific interview with her from last October (I think). Very smart woman.

It may be time for me to get the movies, as my contact in Stockholm hasn't yet gotten me the television versions of the books (much longer than each of the movies).

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 4:27 PM | Report abuse

Just a quick note to say that I'm getting above water again. Appraisal was fine - came in well over what the minimum needed to be. Now just have to survive closing, which hopefully will happen by Thursday. And of course, in the midst of all the penury resulting from the house work, the Miata got sick. Haven't gotten the tab yet, but I'm just hoping it doesn't go past $500.

Posted by: ebtnut | January 25, 2011 4:29 PM | Report abuse

Ftb, just sent long e-mail reply.

Posted by: orawh | January 25, 2011 4:36 PM | Report abuse

Copy Editor Emergency Alert:

http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/fashion/2011/01/25/2011-01-25_wet_seal_hawking_grammatically_incorrect_your_single_tshirts_error_appears_to_be.html

Tee shirt badly in need of editing.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 4:43 PM | Report abuse

***
There is only one place I know where one could easily find a link to a 20+ year old Tropic article. I hope that person reads this comment.
Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 2:36 PM | Report abuse

***

Hi, Yellojkt and pj and everybody! I have the link to the deficit article--at least it is an article about the deficit that was published in 1989; presumably this is the one...

http://tropicfan.com/Scandal_by_Joel_Achenbach.html

The Orlando article is more difficult to get. Dave's articles aren't electronically archived. Since the date is visible on the cover Gene posted, I can look it up on microfilm and link to it as a pdf, but I have to go to the downtown library. I'll do it tomorrow. I love having an excuse to go to the Tropic microfilm.

= = =

Chatological Humor reminds me that I was recently watching the first season of "Dave's World" and it made much of the hijinks at the Tropic offices. It is implied that Dave was encouraged to work from home because when he was in the office no work was done by anyone.

Posted by: kbertocci | January 25, 2011 5:19 PM | Report abuse

Uh...the joke in that copy editor emergency is not only that the slogan has "your" in it when it is supposed to be "you're" -- but the newspaper headline mocking the error is wrong. It has "t-shirt" when it is T-shirt."

So I suppose it is a meta-copy-editor joke.

There is NO, repeat, NO discretion on whether it is capitalized or not. The shirt is so named because it looks like a T. It doesn't look like a t. So it must always be T-shirt. You can quibble all you want about other letter-words, but not that one.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 5:32 PM | Report abuse

So behind in backboodling (scanning is dangerous*) that I'm seriously afraid to show up here, yet alone place my fingers on the keyboard.

Yet here I y'am. It's an evening of political superbowl ... and the Boodle is the only safe haven.
______

*Jesus was a Jew? Holysmothersbrothers!
Will someone inform Moronicus and Idiocrates downhome? Noah's white dove never found the olive branch as far as they're concerned.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 5:38 PM | Report abuse

Interesting, isn't it, talitha -- when I hear the phrase "What would Jesus do?" I always want to respond: "He wouldn't eat your pork roast."

Which brings me back to a lovely tune cootie (and one of my absolute favorite Simon and Garfunkel songs): "The Boxer" wherein the phrase: "A man hears what he wants to hear, and disregards the rest." na na na doo doo doo doo.....

So, who shall win the tiara for the amount of snow we're gonna get here? The Capital Weather Gang is predicting a fair amount. I have a lunch meeting on Thursday, which might very well be postponed on the basis of the wuss-coefficient.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 5:44 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, I learned that it was a tee-shirt, no exception, as it was named after the letter t because it looks like it and that's how you spell that letter.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 25, 2011 6:15 PM | Report abuse

Old salty bugs
http://www.pr.uni-freiburg.de/pm/2011/pm.2011-01-21.19-en

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 25, 2011 6:26 PM | Report abuse

Old salty bugs
http://www.pr.uni-freiburg.de/pm/2011/pm.2011-01-21.19-en

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 25, 2011 6:55 PM | Report abuse

Hi orawh! Sorry, I didn't mean to be telling you stuff that you already know. That's the pesky problem with asynchronous communication. Some of my words were intended solely to explain details for the benefit of my fellow-goyim.

Your report on the experience of Israeli Jewish life vs. synagogue affiliation is very interesting. We had a synagogue retreat in which the relationship between American Jews and Israel was the topic. Many members mentioned that they had never felt less consciously observant, yet more vibrantly Jewish, than when they were visiting or living in Israel. Rabbi Kaplan, founder of Reconstructionism, wrote about exactly that idea as the motivation for a modern Jewish state. Summarizing in more modern parlance, he suggested that Jewish culture had been frozen in resistance to assimilation and the only way to revive as a living culture would be in a society in which Jews do not define themselves in distinction from a larger culture. I recognize that this philosophy has problems with respect to the non-Jewish people who also happen to live in that part of the world. I am not sure whether Kaplan gave that issue any thought.

Posted by: ScienceTim | January 25, 2011 7:03 PM | Report abuse

Neglectful housekeeper that I am, I never found any bugs in my salt.
Pass me that microscope, Janseen.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 7:03 PM | Report abuse

T-shirt, with a capital T.
... a smallcase t-shirt is goonie (says her judgemental self). Make it black for the slimming effect, dark olive with treemen logos if you're (like me) green. I won't comment on pastels but white with tasteful slogans must be treated with care by the laundryspouse ... or there will be h*ll to pay. Thus spake T-shirthustra.

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 7:28 PM | Report abuse

Talitha, I'm more than willing to believe I learned incorrectly, especially since I have owned so few. But I do have an Error in '08 shirt.

Posted by: LostInThought | January 25, 2011 7:41 PM | Report abuse

That is interesting, SciTim "Summarizing in more modern parlance, he suggested that Jewish culture had been frozen in resistance to assimilation and the only way to revive as a living culture would be in a society in which Jews do not define themselves in distinction from a larger culture."

Somehow I don't think Jewish culture has been totally frozen since the dispora. It simply hasn't been celebrated so openly. That makes a huge difference.

I enjoyed hearing my coworkers and acquaintances talk about Israel, covering both the good and the bad.

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 25, 2011 7:58 PM | Report abuse

So Rahm Emmanuelle can't be mayor of Chicago. I don't think he is hurting too bad. He must be rich from all those movies he made back in the 70's and 80's.

Posted by: baldinho | January 25, 2011 8:16 PM | Report abuse

LiT, I own exactly three T-shirts.
Hate the things and was writting with tongue planted firmly.

But I've sure laundered and folded my fair share of sonchild's and mates' ... so I figure that gives me some say-so.
And then there's the patchwork sonchild and I made of his childhood Ts. Mercy!

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 8:34 PM | Report abuse

scc: writing ... one 't'

Posted by: talitha1 | January 25, 2011 8:35 PM | Report abuse

T-shirts,tshirts,tee-shirts,tea shirts,the english language is sure screwed up.And I have plenty of them,plenty to give away LiT,if you ever want one.Although I am sure it would look more like a dress or a night shirt on you.

I have the remnants of a tee-shirt from the first Blue Oyster Cult show I ever went to in 1975,there isn't much of it left,but enough to show it off every show I go to.

I am wondering about the ammount of snow from this upcoming storm.I have 4 days off starting Friday and wanted to go to west by god,but if it snows too much,I may have to change plans.

I was just watching the weather channel,since when did they start playing PF's "shine on you crazy diamond" during the local on the eights?Come to think of it,I think I have a couple of Pink Floyd tee-shirts somewhere too.

Posted by: greenwithenvy | January 25, 2011 8:45 PM | Report abuse

Just in time for her post-SotU speech:

"Anderson Cooper rips GOP Rep. Michele Bachmann over comments on slavery, diversity in the U.S.

BY Aliyah Shahid
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Tuesday, January 25th 2011, 3:02 PM

Anderson Cooper is giving Michele Bachmann an F in U.S. history.

The CNN host slammed the Minnesota Republican congresswoman's recent remarks about diversity in America, including claims that the Founding Fathers "worked tirelessly until slavery was no more" and skin color "didn't matter" in the early days of democracy.

During his "Keeping Them Honest" segment on Monday night, Cooper said Bachmann simply "airbrushed herself some new history," adding the U.S. representative's remarks are "either a deliberate rewriting of our history or signs that she has a shaky grasp" on what really happened.

Bachmann, a rising Tea Party star who is rumored to be considering a presidential run in 2012, delivered the controversial remarks to a group called Iowans for Tax Relief on Jan. 21.

"It didn't matter the color of their skin. It didn't matter their language. It didn't matter their economic status," Bachmann told the audience while describing the experience of early settlers in America.

"It didn't matter whether they descended from known royalty or are of a higher class or a lower class. It made no difference. Once you got here, we were all the same. Isn't that remarkable? It is absolutely remarkable."

Her spokesman did not immediately return requests for comment.

Cooper quickly pointed out the difficulties a number of ethnic groups have faced, including Irish immigrants, Japanese-Americans who were placed in internment camps and enslaved Africans who were brought to the U.S. against their will.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 8:50 PM | Report abuse

An airbrushed Tea Party view of history? How is this possible? *eye roll*

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:04 PM | Report abuse

Mudge: Oh yeah? Well, if those Japanese Americans were so patriotic, how come they refused to integrate and instead lived in settlements by themselves, away from the rest of America, huh?

Posted by: baldinho | January 25, 2011 9:04 PM | Report abuse

For those who want to follow along with the bouncing teleprompter - the prepared text of the SotU speech:

http://www.documentcloud.org/documents/29615-state-of-the-union-speech-2011.html

Enjoy. Might try to invent a game to play while I'm watching so's I can finish off this bottle of cab sav.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 25, 2011 9:05 PM | Report abuse

OK.. I just tuned in. Is there some reason so many women are wearing red suits?

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 9:11 PM | Report abuse

Mr. F and I toured Dachau last week. Remarkably unflinching look in the museum. It's bad enough the Bachmann's of our world would never allow the same level of examination at an American site, but to completely fictionalize the past...words fail.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 9:13 PM | Report abuse

An excellent opening, invoking Tuscon without reference to political party.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:14 PM | Report abuse

I had to switch from CBS to ABC because the CBS commentator kept quoting from the advance text. Since when was that allowed?

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 9:18 PM | Report abuse

TBG -- the ladies decided that David B. could rock the lavender tie without them.

And, the eternal return of the same red power suit.

Hilary looks nice in midnight blue, which is lighter than navy but not by much.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:19 PM | Report abuse

First drinking word: together.

I won't imbibe; I lost five pounds with the flu. Obama has already said "together" enough to add a pound.

Nice speech so far; honest and pointed.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 9:20 PM | Report abuse

I am so tired of the red power suit.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 9:21 PM | Report abuse

Since the television in this house only receives ESPN, I'm depending on you folks for play-by-play commentary. I know you'll come through!

Posted by: slyness | January 25, 2011 9:22 PM | Report abuse

I see two green suits and will try to follow through on who sports them.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:22 PM | Report abuse

ABC's random, not-always-captioned crowd shots aren't all that helpful.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:23 PM | Report abuse

Word, FB, word.

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:24 PM | Report abuse

NBC is keeping quiet and letting the man speak. Fun audience cut-aways, though, with little labels. It is very cool that the CEO of Xerox is a black woman.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 9:25 PM | Report abuse

SciTIM -- space mention.

Go energy reform/re-jiggering! Time is almost long past

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:25 PM | Report abuse

I think after Sputnik, he's going to talk about the Fuller Brush Man.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 9:26 PM | Report abuse

That was an interesting comment about Oak Ridge and our nation's nuclear facilities...

'Jes sayin.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:27 PM | Report abuse

biofuels but no species mention....

....oil companies should not suck so much at our collective teets...

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:27 PM | Report abuse

Is it my TV, or does John Boehner's face clash with his tie?

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 25, 2011 9:28 PM | Report abuse

YAYYYYYYYYYYYYY to Science Fair winners!!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:30 PM | Report abuse

Edu-fam partnership...

Superbowl: you better bow down before science fair! WORD. Sorry Tiara-Chasers...love you....

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:30 PM | Report abuse

I think perhaps Bachmann was referencing some of the Founding Fathers who don't normally get as much recognition as MSM history gluttons, great but obscure Founding Fathers like Buffalo Bill Cody, Erma Bombeck, John Cabot, Warren Sapp, Anton Dominique "Fats" Domino, Ally McBeal, and other signers of the Declaration like that guy who signed his name so large so the Queen of France could read, John Prudential of Omaha.

And let us not forget those great men and women of the Original Tea Party, who dressed up in warpaint and went aboard three ships in Charlestown Harbor, the Nina, the Pinto and the Santo Flamingo near Fort Dumpster where the first shot was fired that we heard round the world, and dumped tea into gunny sacks and carried them ashore, men and women such as Flowthrough Tetly, Earl Grey, Lady Earlene Grey, William of Orange and his life partner Harvey Pekoe, Sir Basil Lipton and his stepson, Sir Leroy Lipton Brisk, Lionel Nestea, Emilio and Raphael Salada, Josephus Twinings, and of course that great native American Tea Bagger, Chief Tazo of the Mazawattee.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 9:30 PM | Report abuse

Yes, it is, bc... and I think it's funny that Boehner's face is darker than Obama's.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 9:31 PM | Report abuse

Whoo. A cheerful upbeat Obama says, in the same tone, that we're going to work together, we are innovative, we will reinvent ourselves, and we'll take back our money from the oil companies. F*** you, conoco and shell! Boehner forgot to clap.

Nice exhortation to parents and citizens leading up to education.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 9:31 PM | Report abuse

REplace NChildLeftBehind...FB, we can hope for real reform and flexibility about teacher certification...

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:32 PM | Report abuse

100,000 new STEMers indeed!!! :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:33 PM | Report abuse

fb,

I hope you don't mind me indulging my photo habit, but I also found Dachau amazingly blunt and honest. By giving clear unvarnished accounts of the rise of Hitler and the practices at Dachau and other camps. Images like this poster, scare me because the same tactics could work here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yellojkt/4896067350/in/set-72157624608736065/

Parallels are often frightening.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 9:34 PM | Report abuse

Go Science, Math, Engineering!

And, be a teacher! (CpBoy plans to be a sci-teach, even before this speech.)

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:34 PM | Report abuse

Do right by children of immigrants!

Posted by: CollegeQuaParkian1 | January 25, 2011 9:37 PM | Report abuse

yello-appreciate the photo. You're right, and I am frightened.

Brave head on mention of immigration.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 9:38 PM | Report abuse

*SIGH* I can hear the "anchor babies" criticism starting already...

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:38 PM | Report abuse

In response to the call to give teachers more respect, my wife says "Show me the money."

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 9:38 PM | Report abuse

Awesome. Immigrants, introduced through innocent kids raised as Americans. Stop expelling - Boehner clapped.

Infrastructure!! Be still my heart.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 9:38 PM | Report abuse

ABC just transposed the caption for Sens. Wyden & Grassley... *SIGHHHHHHHH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:41 PM | Report abuse

Sen. Wyden is still wearing his Christmas tine and vest combo.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 9:41 PM | Report abuse

Lobbyists? Lobbyists have rigged the tax code?

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 9:42 PM | Report abuse

Pitting corporation against corporation. Devious.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 9:42 PM | Report abuse

So that is Grassley in the Burl Ives wear.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 9:47 PM | Report abuse

I think that Boehner's tie was an attempt at bi-partisanship (note: blue really *is* the new red - look at all the blue suits and ties out there tonight), but it comes off as odd.

"Now, I've heard rumors that a few of you have some concerns about the new health care law."

OK, that was snortworthy.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 25, 2011 9:47 PM | Report abuse

I see Nancy Pelosi is sitting next to Rep. Roscoe Bartlett (R-Pear Tree).

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 9:47 PM | Report abuse

I am so glad that Obama came out in favor of those controversial child labor laws.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 9:49 PM | Report abuse

Lukewarm applause, bipartisan heart failure at the thought of lost defense contracts.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 9:50 PM | Report abuse

Smoked salmon gets the best laugh of the night... Who knew?

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:55 PM | Report abuse

Oh, I love this guy...sooooo devious, devious, devious. Give them medical malpractice, an utterly irrelevant issue of no consequence except to the obsessed.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 9:55 PM | Report abuse

Ok, everyone's going to give up earmarks.

Any bets on the new name they'll call them?

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 9:57 PM | Report abuse

Consolidating departments and agencies, now THAT's a radical idea.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 9:57 PM | Report abuse

Very nice. Spending freeze, restructuring gummint, reforming the tax code, reforming education. . . In one year. With a divided Congress. This may sound like a mainstream, feel-good speech, but he's saying a lot of big stuff.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 10:00 PM | Report abuse

Toothmarks. Beauty marks. Hearing-Related Fiscal Deleveraging Insignia.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:03 PM | Report abuse

Hillary's hair -- say what???

NukeSpouse just noted Biden's doing his best imitation of Jeff Dunham's "Walter" character...

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 10:03 PM | Report abuse

Looks like Boehner is drifting off. How embarrassing would that be?

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 10:04 PM | Report abuse

Indeed I-mom. A kind of double dog dare if you will.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 10:04 PM | Report abuse

Any moment I expect Finn and Rachel to lead the Glee crew down the aisle in the JK wedding dance.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:07 PM | Report abuse

Much will be made of the Joint Chiefs remaining silent over repealing DADT, but they're ALWAYS impartial and stoic during these events...

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 10:08 PM | Report abuse

End don't ask don't tell and open the campuses to ROTC. Nice. That was, after all, the excuse.

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 10:08 PM | Report abuse

Boehner's trying not to cry -- shocking, I know.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 10:10 PM | Report abuse

'xactly S'nuke.

I-mom-another clever move that, pairing DADT with opening campuses.

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 10:12 PM | Report abuse

VERY nice, tying the Chilean miner rescue into U.S. competitiveness.

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 25, 2011 10:12 PM | Report abuse

Targeted And Tightly Assigned Stimulus, or TATAS for short.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 10:14 PM | Report abuse

"We do big things." now there's a slogan.

Sure did enjoy the bipartisan seating. There's not a lot Tom Coburn and I agree on, but he can be personally gracious and I'm glad he stepped up.

I can't listen to the nattering nabobs. Off to see the rabbit!

Posted by: Ivansmom | January 25, 2011 10:16 PM | Report abuse

He's signing autographs!!! Way cool!

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:16 PM | Report abuse

yello-excellent!

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 10:18 PM | Report abuse

Why do the Republicans get to present a "rebuttal" to the speech? Obama didn't give the speech because he's a Democrat. He gave the speech because he's the President. If the Reps get a rebuttal so should the Congressional Dems.

LTL-CA

Posted by: Jim19 | January 25, 2011 10:19 PM | Report abuse

I am sooo looking forward to Sparkle Pony.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:19 PM | Report abuse

I hate the idea of an Opposition Party response. Whether the Dems or the Republicans do it. I mean, it was OUR PRESIDENT speaking... not the party leader.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 10:22 PM | Report abuse

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest is available streaming on netflix, as of today. So, later gators!

Posted by: frostbitten1 | January 25, 2011 10:22 PM | Report abuse

Phony math from Ryan already.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 10:28 PM | Report abuse

Amazon shipped my copy this morning, frosti.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:29 PM | Report abuse

Watched it on PBS, which also had Mark Shields (I luv him) and Gerson (I don't) on as pontificators.

Liked the speech a lot -- dang! our prez is good at what he does! It was very inspirational, all the while a subtle "eff-u" kinda speech.

Hope it all has traction. At least Obama's approval numbers are climbing, and this speech might have jacked them up even more. Goodie!

Thought Hillary looked very tired. Can't blame her. Thought Boehner looked like he really didn't want to be there. Wish I could have accommodated him. Like, forever.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 10:29 PM | Report abuse

I may not know all your issues that well, but I can see the wholes in the Republican rebuttal - did they just make some of that up, it is close to fiction.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 25, 2011 10:30 PM | Report abuse

I can't tell you all how glad I am to be free to admire your adult, articulate, informed, intelligent and gentle President, without it coming off as partisan.

Posted by: Yoki | January 25, 2011 10:32 PM | Report abuse

Whew! Defoliating a victory garden certainly works up an appetite!

Posted by: Jumper1 | January 25, 2011 10:36 PM | Report abuse

Go to CNN. Princess Sparkle Pony exclusively in four minutes.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 10:37 PM | Report abuse

I liked that he kept "the state of our union is strong" till the end (I was afraid he'd missed it at the beginning). Did everyone know that because the speech was leaked? I thought he built nicely to it. I don't remember seeing people with copies of the speech before - seems like the last few years, everyone was tweeting, which I didn't see much of tonight.

Gary Locke gots lots of screen time, as did Patty Murray (next to Jon Kyl). Did Alito deign to come?

Posted by: seasea1 | January 25, 2011 10:37 PM | Report abuse

Mudge, the man is a rock star politician.

I'm glad to note that he did not sign McCain's bare chest.

Overall, I'm giving the speech a C+, good on big ideas and rhetoric but didn't get deep into the tough stuff. Rather inspirational and aspirational, and I think a kickoff of sorts for the 2012 campaign. This is exactly what I expected he would be doing and certainly understandable.

Amused at the notion of a Government re-org - in the private industry, I seem to get one every year. When an organization can't change their external influences easily, they rearrange the resources they can (rather than the factors they *can't*) change to see if they can make the organization more effective. Sometimes it works.

Didn't hear a word of Paul Ryan's Repub response; I couldn't pay attention to anything but the man's hair. Remarkable.

Now, even a Tea Party response from Michele Bachmann on CNN? Really? Oy.

Curious move in terms of demostrating conservative cohesiveness. Or, perhaps, a blow struck in the name of tri-partisanship.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 25, 2011 10:43 PM | Report abuse

As for the Tea Party getting a separate rebuttal speech, my wife just asserted that the Venn diagram of the Tea Party is entirely within the Republican Party.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 10:44 PM | Report abuse

Alito, along with Thomas and Scalia did not deign to come, alas. The rest of them did, though, including all three wimmin.

I refuse to watch the Rethug rebuttal and I will go out of my way to avoid Princess Sparkle Pony. I rely, therefore, on my dear fellow boodlers to elucidate, as appropriate (or not, if it's really funny).

There's a chat going on with Robt. Kaiser now. I don't know if he'll take my comment, but he had postulated that lobbyists don't enact legislation -- that's the job of Congress. Whereupon, I suggested that lobbyists, at least in certain past administrations have indeed been known to draft legislation and then pass it on to the recipients in Congress of their largess, to introduce and vote on. Like good little boys and girls.

And, now, Don Quixote awaits my attention.

Posted by: ftb3 | January 25, 2011 10:45 PM | Report abuse

I don't think that's a Venn diagram. It looks more like a carpet stain.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:46 PM | Report abuse

SOTU Word Cloud:

http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/3039450/President_Obama%27s_2011_State_Of_The_Union

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 10:48 PM | Report abuse

I thought that the entire Supreme Court never attended the SOTU. Neither does the entire Cabinet. Someone's gotta be left to govern if the Capitol goes kablooey.

Wait! Princess Sparkle Pony is MAKING THESE NUMBERS UP!

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 10:51 PM | Report abuse

I was also hoping for the audience to break into the Chile chant when Obama mentioned the guy who came up with Plan B.

CHI CHI CHI!
LE LE LE!

Posted by: seasea1 | January 25, 2011 10:52 PM | Report abuse

I'm amused that Princess Sparkle Pony had to remind us that the Tea Party is a force for good, or something.

Then she goes to a chart.

I wish she'd look me in the eyes, rather at the prompter just off-camera to my left.
Unnerves me, and does not inspire my trust.

Hey, Michelle - I'm over here! [bc, waving at the TV]

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 25, 2011 10:54 PM | Report abuse

Oh sweet Jaysus. Bachman is using the raising of the flag on Iwo Jima against what she calls the Japanese "incursion."

Uh...don't ask. I have no clue what that was all about.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 10:57 PM | Report abuse

Looks like someone pulled the charcoal-on-the-binoculars trick on Bachman.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 10:59 PM | Report abuse

Yes, we were in the hands of Ken Salazar (and his hat) tonight. The 3 most right-wing Supremes did not attend of their own (bitter) accord, I believe.

There is an "enhanced" SOTU here - a panel (moderated by Kalpen Modi) is taking questions:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/state-of-the-union-2011
Some of my political/knitter friends turned me on to this.

Posted by: seasea1 | January 25, 2011 10:59 PM | Report abuse

I want to capture that performance and post a link anytime a troll mentions Obama reading off a teleprompter.

Bachmann's speech came off as a very low budget QVC segment selling Tea Party Snake Oil.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 11:00 PM | Report abuse

I agree with you, LTL-CA, but that would make Obama look really unpopular. INstead they tend to have the Dems rebutt the Republicans.

My favorite soundbite from that speech transcript:

"Cutting the deficit by gutting our investments in innovation and education is like lightening an overloaded airplane by removing its engine. It may feel like you're flying high at first, but it won't take long before you'll feel the impact."

-- President Barack Obama, State of the Union, January 25, 2011

(Gov. Pawlenty, take note. The impact won't be good for you.)

Posted by: Wilbrod_Gnome | January 25, 2011 11:02 PM | Report abuse

Bachmann made me nostalgic for the lucidity of Sarah Palin.

Alito et. al. probably stayed away mad because they didn't vote this guy in.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 11:03 PM | Report abuse

Bachman, in suggesting that this nation's birth was miraculous, goes further to suggest that another miracle is possible.

Also, everything that's wrong with the country went off-tracks in the past two years? Really?

Have no idea where she was going with the Iwo Jima thing, either.

bc

Posted by: -bc- | January 25, 2011 11:04 PM | Report abuse

Someone on Twitter (via Witstream.com) just said, "Bachmann's video proves a surprising fact: No one in the Tea Party was ever in the A/V Club."

Actually... not surprising at all. The A/V Club was usually made up of the smart nerds.

Wait... "was"? Daughter is in the 2011 version of the A/V club and yes, she is a smart nerd.

Posted by: -TBG- | January 25, 2011 11:04 PM | Report abuse

I love the boodle's analysis of the SOTU. This is the best interpretation ever.

Baldinho posted earlier, "Mudge: Oh yeah? Well, if those Japanese Americans were so patriotic, how come they refused to integrate and instead lived in settlements by themselves, away from the rest of America, huh?"

I'd like to respond to that. The Japanese Americans didn't choose not to integrate. They lived in their Japantowns or Little Tokyos because, way back when, there were neighborhoods in which they weren't allowed to live. Before WWII, Japanese immigrants were not allowed to own property and they were excluded from all kinds of neighborhoods where the residents didn't want "their kind" to be living next door to them. So, you see, it wasn't that Japanese Americans didn't want to integrate, they weren't allowed to do so.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | January 25, 2011 11:04 PM | Report abuse

At least Michelle's eyes weren't as bloodshot as Ryan's. He needs to stay away from bong right before a national speech.

Posted by: yellojkt | January 25, 2011 11:09 PM | Report abuse

MotP, one day I'll tell you about the third-most-senior-partner in the law firm I first worked for. A distinguished Japanese-Canadian jurist who spent some of his childhood in an internment camp in the interior of the Canadian Rockies.

That was a terrible crime that I could and can do nothing about, since I wasn't at the time extant. Still, I am ashamed and sorry.

Posted by: Yoki | January 25, 2011 11:15 PM | Report abuse

MotP, Baldinho knows that. He was making a joke, reversing the idea about how they were rounded up and basically sent into concentration camps. He knows they didn't "refuse to integrate." And I'm sure he knows about the Nisei battalions, too. I would have never let that go if I didn't know he was being sardonic.

Posted by: curmudgeon6 | January 25, 2011 11:15 PM | Report abuse

Oohhhhh!!! Sorry Baldinho. I'm a bit slow sometimes. That one flew over my head. :)

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | January 25, 2011 11:18 PM | Report abuse

Yoki - the Japanese Canadian story is a tragic one. They had it really bad. I'd love to hear the story about your colleague sometime.

Mudge - I shoulda known better.

Posted by: MiddleofthePacific | January 25, 2011 11:21 PM | Report abuse

evening all. i see that the state of the boodle is good. thanks for the rundown on the sotu, as well as the princess sparkle pony show.

Posted by: LALurker | January 25, 2011 11:38 PM | Report abuse

Say what you will... I won't feel that I really know the State of the Onion until hippityhopper has chimed in.

Posted by: Bob-S | January 26, 2011 3:25 AM | Report abuse

Good to know I made the right decision in skipping the rebuttal and the party political broadcast from the Loony Party. It probably would have helped if she'd fallen through the Earth's crust, hm? She's certainly dense enough. :-)

My other decision skills are in doubt, however -- Medical appointment today, when the storm FINALLY arrives. *L*

*enjoying-an-extra-cuppa-cawfee-and-raptly-watching-da-radar Grover waves* :-)

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 26, 2011 5:46 AM | Report abuse

No problem, MOP.

yello, could earmarks be

Focused Investments in Building Supermajorities

Posted by: baldinho | January 26, 2011 5:58 AM | Report abuse

And back in the Land of Harsh Realities, if you prevent people from asking difficult questions, you don't have to worry about any decisions, it seems:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/26/us/26guns.html

:-((((((((((((

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 26, 2011 6:02 AM | Report abuse

A George Costanza rebuttal to the boodle rebuttal to the Bachmann rebuttal:

It is not a lie if you believe it to be true.


For that reason I can't get mad at Bachmann.

Posted by: baldinho | January 26, 2011 6:34 AM | Report abuse

It's the voters that somehow find Bachmann acceptable that earn my ire, baldinho... *SIGH*

Posted by: Scottynuke | January 26, 2011 6:49 AM | Report abuse

Good morning everyone thank you for watching Bachmann so I did not have to.

Yoki, I would love to hear your story of your friend. An essay question on eldest final history exam was about racism in Canada, they were to recite three examples to support their arguments. Eldest was described by her friends as being over the top excited by being able to answer that question, she chose as one of her examples Japanese internment and told me she might have gone a little over the top in adding some drama to her answer, would love to share your story with her.

Posted by: dmd3 | January 26, 2011 7:11 AM | Report abuse

Morning all, 'tis a rainy day in the Carolinas. Cassandra, I hope you're staying dry! You need to, to get over the illnesses.

Thanks to all for the illuminating commentary. Now I know all I need to, about the SOTU speech. Ugly of the Republican Supremes not to show, but typical.

Onward into the day...

Posted by: slyness | January 26, 2011 7:52 AM | Report abuse

God loves us so much more than we can imagine through Him that died for all, Jesus Christ.

Good morning, friends. I tried to stay awake for the SOTU speech, but alas, I failed. Thanks boodle for the updates. And who is Princess Sparkly Pony? Is this the person that claims the founding fathers had all in mind, including the children of slavery?

Sorry to hear there's more snow on the way for some. We have rain this morning. Just hope it stays that way.

It is Wednesday, and not so busy, but have the afternoon Bible study here, and one later at the church being taught by our new pastor. If he can get in a word.

Slyness, is it wet in your neck of the woods or do you have the frozen stuff?

Have a beautiful day, folks, in spite of the weather, and love to all.

Posted by: cmyth4u | January 26, 2011 8:00 AM | Report abuse

New kit!

Posted by: DNA_Girl | January 26, 2011 8:37 AM | Report abuse

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