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Posted at 11:00 AM ET, 12/31/2010

Lunch Room Chatter: Food-for-dope program

By Tim Carman

The latest in food news, ideas and philosophy, just in time for your lunch break.

  • More robots! A Japanese sushi chain avoids the country's restaurant death spiral through sheer automation. (New York Times)

  • The French would never eat at Minibar: "Unlike Americans, French people don’t make long-term dining reservations. The feeling is “How do I know where I want to eat two months from now?” And I tend to agree." (David Lebovitz)

  • Trust me, you don't want to know their methods. (Twitter)

  • "Hey, man, we heard, like, if you bring in four cans of pork and beans, you get a free spliff." (NPR)

  • GMO vs. organic: Can't we all just get along? (Food Safety News)

  • Know your cuts of meat, USDA-style. (USA Today)

  • Street food advice for the utterly clueless. (Midtown Lunch)

  • Prediction for 2011 that may actually come true: "Food writer’s right ring finger falls off after typing 'local' one time too many." (Eater)

  • 2010: The year we cared about the health of what we ate. (SlashFood)

  • Thomas Keller's latest creation: a magazine. (Inside Scoop SF)


By Tim Carman  | December 31, 2010; 11:00 AM ET
Categories:  Chefs, Food Politics, Media  | Tags:  Lunch Room Chatter, Tim Carman  
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Next: Future trends: Central Kitchen wants more street food

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