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It's Official: O'Malley Endorses Clinton

He effusively praised her as a champion for working families and a leader on homeland security who could bring the country together. She praised him -- seemingly at greater length -- for his willingness to tackle tough challenges and give voice to those who feel invisible.

And with that, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley's endorsement of the presidential candidacy of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton became official today.

The two Democrats addressed a throng of media and other onlookers assembled on Annapolis's historic City Dock, with microphones positioned for television cameras to capture the State House dome in the background on an overcast morning.

"It is going to take a strong leader to reverse the catastrophic blunders of the Bush years," O'Malley said, with the senator from New York by his side and his 16-year-old daughter, Grace, hovering behind him. "She is ready today. She is ready to lead."

O'Malley said Clinton was a leader who cared about policy more than partisanship and would unite the country when she takes office in 2009. And, he said, "if George Bush won't end the war, she will bring our troops home safe."

Clinton spoke at length about O'Malley's tenure as mayor of Maryland's largest city, saying that "Martin instilled a sense of belief and possibility in the people of Baltimore" and relaying how the two worked together on homeland security following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Clinton also praised O'Malley's leadership on the recent passage of a "living wage" bill, which made Maryland the first state in the country to require government contractors to pay significantly better than the minimum wage.

"When he decides he's going to get behind a cause or an issue, it happens," Clinton said of O'Malley.

Left unmentioned was O'Malley's endorsement in the 2004 presidential election: of former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean (D). Republican operatives were more than willing to put a spotlight on that, however.

"Martin O'Malley's judgment when it comes to endorsements is an open question," said Dan Ronayne, a spokesman for the Republican National Committee.

By John Wagner  |  May 9, 2007; 11:15 AM ET
Categories:  John Wagner  
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Comments

What did you expect from O'Malley? A speach in favor of a Constitutional amendment to eliminate presidential term limits and a chant of "four more years"?

Note that he's not standing behind Obama (the even farther left wing candidate), then ask yourself why? Just like the Cardin/Steele race, O'Malley wants you to think that he's in tune with the black voters when he's never walked a step in their shoes and fails to support black candidates. Can you say "hoodwinked"? Don't let it happen again.

Posted by: BG from PG | May 9, 2007 12:59 PM | Report abuse

So, does that mean that everyone who, when given the choice between a black candidate and a white candidate, chooses the white candidate is racist? You mean it's impossible for someone to believe that one candidate is better than another and just so happens to be white?

You know, there are plenty of white people supporting Obama and plenty of black people supporting supporting Clinton? What does that say?

I hate it when people like you, BG, play racial politics with candidates. Is it impossible for you to imagine that someone may have very good reasons for supporting a candidate aside from the candidate's race?

Is it possible for you to imagine that Martin O'Malley, being of a more centrist persuasion, might want to support the more centrist candidate -- i.e. Hillary Clinton -- compared with the more liberal candidate -- i.e. Barack Obama?

Or are you too narrow-minded to imagine that?

Posted by: RL from PG | May 9, 2007 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Wanted: A New Truman, Newsweek Says

Newsweek examines the presidential courage, or lack thereof, among the 2008 candidates, including a new poll that indicates the contender most often credited with courage by voters is Republican Rudy Giuliani, cited by 48 percent (42 percent named GOP candidate John McCain, 43 percent cited Democrat Hillary Clinton).

http://onthehillblog.blogspot.com/2007/05/wanted-new-truman-newsweek-says.html

Posted by: Anonymous | May 9, 2007 1:52 PM | Report abuse

"So, does that mean that everyone who, when given the choice between a black candidate and a white candidate, chooses the white candidate is racist?"

Sorry RL, but that's what the loony Left has been telling people about the job application process for decades. Then they call it "Equal Opportunity" when certain groups are treated more equally than others. Yeah, it is really a shame when people actually begin to apply what Leftists tell them as no good can possibly come of it.

Posted by: Rufus | May 9, 2007 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Having worked on the O'Malley campaign as a volunteer, and seen Bill Clinton's rally for the Democrats in Prince George's near the eve of the election, I hope this endorsement is not an example of tit for tat favors in what was a narrow victory for O'Malley.

There is a great deal to recommend Hillary Clinton, but it is disappointing, first, that the Governor didn't wait a bit to decide and, second, in my humble opinion, that he didn't endorse Obama. I wish Senator Clinton did not come with the baggage she is forced to carry. It was not fair that she was saddled with it. But it is my belief that endorsing Hillary means a continuation of politics as usual and a retread of partisan viciousness. This turns off people from the process, and makes the broader Democratic job--of ultimately restoring trust in government and hope in our common enterprises--more difficult.

Indeed, the Democratic party will need to work much harder to carry off this election with Hillary at the top of the ticket than with Obama. That means resources for down ticket races will be scarcer, youth involvement will diminish, and the choice will likely again be reduced, in public perception, to the lesser of two evils. Ultimately, the country will be poorer for that.

Posted by: AF from SS | May 9, 2007 2:25 PM | Report abuse

No doubt O'Malley will be on the outside looking in when Edwards or Obama knock off Hillary in the primary. I

Posted by: Anonymous | May 9, 2007 2:33 PM | Report abuse

AF says "I hope this endorsement is not an example of tit for tat favors in what was a narrow victory for O'Malley."

Well, I hope not either, but I'd also like to point out that a 53% to 46% victory isn't exactly "narrow". It's not a run-away, but it certainly wouldn't be defined by modern election results as close either.

Posted by: corbett | May 9, 2007 3:14 PM | Report abuse

This just confirms what we already know, Barak Obama is a true visionary, Martin O'Malley is not.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 9, 2007 3:20 PM | Report abuse

Could this possibly be a surprise to anyone in the state of Maryland? Martin O'Malley is probably the most liberal - closest to the left wing - politician we have seen leading the state in many years. Perhaps he is angling for the VP spot. Every politico needs to be forward looking these days.

Posted by: local voter | May 9, 2007 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Could this possibly be a surprise to anyone in the state of Maryland? Martin O'Malley is probably the most liberal - closest to the left wing - politician we have seen leading the state in many years. Perhaps he is angling for the VP spot. Every politico needs to be forward looking these days.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 9, 2007 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Uh-oh. I've really liked O'Malley's moves so far, but I too wish he'd have endorsed Obama instead...

Posted by: AS from MoCo | May 9, 2007 3:55 PM | Report abuse

I'm really excited that O'Malley came out early and strongly for Hillary. I think most importantly, she is presidential. She is strong, extremely intelligent, and is precisely what we need after George W. Bush's miserable presidency. And just to be perfectly blunt, Barack Obama is a phony--and is unfit to be president. As a liberal Democrat, I can safely say that I wouldn't feel safe with Obama as our Commander-in-Chief. Chris Dood said it best--after 8 years of George Bush, the absolute last thing we need is more on-the-job training. He'll make a good senator, and maybe good VP, but nothing more.

Posted by: Very Pleased YD | May 9, 2007 4:13 PM | Report abuse

"As a liberal Democrat, I can safely say that I wouldn't feel safe with Obama as our Commander-in-Chief. Chris Dood said it best--after 8 years of George Bush, the absolute last thing we need is more on-the-job training. He'll make a good senator, and maybe good VP, but nothing more."

You're dead wrong. Obama is a visionary, he's alrady outraised Hillary, he'll continue to do so, and he will win the nomination. Plus he'll leave O'Malley out in the cold where he belongs. I love it.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 9, 2007 4:34 PM | Report abuse

Obama sounds too much like 'Osama' to me. Just because media darling O'Malley backs Clinton doesn't mean every Marylander backs her, too. If she's elected I'm moving to Canada -- I claimed to be Canadian during her husband's administration.

And what's so wrong with W anyway? I just finished reading 'A Matter of Character' by Ron Kessler and he comes across as a really good person, which is more than I can say for Slick Willie. He held the country together after 9/11. He's kind to the Secret Service agents who protect him and his family. He has degrees from Yale and Harvard (MBA for what it's worth) so he can't be a complete idiot. He also claims he doesn't have time to read the Washington Compost, so he doesn't give a damn what's being written about him in this left wing liberal rag.

BTW, if Hilary is elected (God help us) what would Slick Willie's title be? First Stud? First Jerk Off? First Divorced ex-President? Has anybody seen them together in the same room since they left the White House?

Posted by: Southern Maryland Republican | May 9, 2007 4:36 PM | Report abuse

Ya'll keep talking. The only thing that Obama and Hillary are going to do is spend an awful lot of money on their campaigns. When America goes to the ballot box, they aren't going to elect either of these left-wingers. They make Ted Kennedy look centrist. You might think I'm some right-winger but I'm not, I voted for the first Clinton. But Hillary is not Bill. She thinks govt knows better, and that is a crock. McCain or Thompson in the White House. Get used to it, or get a more centrist Democrat to run for President.

Posted by: Falls Church, VA | May 9, 2007 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Hey, isn't the Lt. Gov black? Oh, yeah, he is.

Is that not support of black candidates, RL? Or doesn't that count?

Posted by: JC from PG | May 9, 2007 4:41 PM | Report abuse

All the existing Democratic power brokers and main street media will endorse Mrs clinton. Actually, she is their candidate. There is nothing new here and I do not think it is a news.

Posted by: Hira Biswas | May 9, 2007 5:12 PM | Report abuse

I've always wonder what real affect on the election does getting the support of another politician have? Personnally, I could care less who any politician endorses.

Posted by: Alan | May 9, 2007 5:29 PM | Report abuse

Jesus Christ there is so much negativity in these postings it's hard to sift through any real thoughts. The amount of superstition and gossip is on par with the National Enquirer. How about addressing real issues like the environment, health care, and civil rights? IMHO Obama needs another 8 years to really get ready for the presidency. Give Hillary the spotlight now. In the end, Obama will succomb to the same thing that happened to Edwards--his inexperience caught up with him.

Posted by: Eric | May 9, 2007 6:04 PM | Report abuse

ha ha you think Hillary is "left-wing." That's ridiculous. Hilary is a centrist, middle of the road, safe politician. Good piece about how influenced she is by union-busters et al:
http://www.thenation.com/doc/20070521/berman

Posted by: Tom | May 9, 2007 8:06 PM | Report abuse

Hillary is pretty centrist. Martin O'Malley's not too centrist. Though I think he'll make a great governor, I am disappointed he came out so early for Hillary. But I guess that's the way you get any credit for helping.

Posted by: Greg | May 10, 2007 1:10 AM | Report abuse

Why did O'Malley betray Obama after Obama campaigned for him, when Obama gets the nomination after Hillary implodes O'Malley will look like an absolute fool.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 10, 2007 11:10 AM | Report abuse

I woudldn't trust O'Malley to clean my toilet, much less take advise from him on presidential candidates.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 10, 2007 11:30 AM | Report abuse

woudldn't trust O'Malley to clean my toilet, much less take advice from him on presidential candidates.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 10, 2007 11:31 AM | Report abuse

I don't think who the Maryland Governor endorses in a Democratic Primary affects the people of Maryland very much because it is quite likely that the Democratic Primary contest for President will be decided before the Maryland Primary. What does affect the voters greatly is what tax increases the Governor will endorse.

Posted by: Robin Ficker | May 10, 2007 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Um, JC, you're preaching to the choir here. Maybe you meant to address BG from PG. He's the one who believed that O'Malley didn't support black candidates.

Posted by: RL from PG | May 10, 2007 2:08 PM | Report abuse

Why are you so surprised when a politician does ANYTHING? You expect a snake to crawl on its belly. You can expect a politician to do anything that will get votes. The last two Lt. Governors have been token blacks to get votes. The one before that was a woman. Don't you see a pattern here?

Posted by: Anonymous | May 10, 2007 2:56 PM | Report abuse

The Lt. Governor was used as a stepping stone to more important offices. So, the idea that they were token is a little too harsh. Townsend ran for governor but lost. Steele ran for Senator but lost.

So, if the trend keeps up, Brown will run for governor two terms for O'Malley, making a black governor a distinct possibility in 8 years.

Alternatively, as the county executive of Montgomery County is black and he may run for governor, we'll may have him as governor in 8 years. Perhaps the contest will pit two blacks running for the gubernatorial nomination of the Democratic Party. When that happens, should the white people of Maryland protest and say they've been left out of the process? Is it impossible for a black person to represent ALL people -- and not just black people? I should hope so.

And if a black person can be elected to lead a white-majority county (Montgomery), then doesn't this put the lie to your evil insinuation that white people are racist and won't elect blacks?

So, next question: If a black can represent ALL people, why can't a white person represent ALL people? Some of you are just evil racists.

Posted by: RL from PG | May 10, 2007 3:48 PM | Report abuse

Oh, by the way, I'm still waiting for a white mayor of D.C. Or should I just assume that white votes are taken for granted in D.C.? That a black person can't represent members of ALL races in D.C.?

Why does your argument that having a white governor means Marylanders (majority-white) are racist yet having a black mayor of D.C. (majority-black) doesn't make D.C. citizens racist?

Posted by: RL from PG | May 10, 2007 3:52 PM | Report abuse

When I lived in DC years ago, when we still voted by putting a slip of paper into a box like voting for prom queen, my vote was always separated from the others and put into a different box. I'd be willing to bet my vote was never counted. I was a registered Republican in DC with voter registration card. However, whenever I went to the polls they claimed they couldn't find my name on the election books. Therefore, my vote was probably never counted just like all the other Republican voters. Washington is 80% black and all those running, except for Carol Schwartz, are black. Therefore a black candidate will be elected as mayor of DC. Probably one with a drug habit, a criminal record, and a woman in every ward.

BTW, why is it whenever a white person criticizes a black person it's 'racism' but when a black criticizes a white person it's 'freedom of speech?' Answer that for me, will you?

Posted by: Anonymous | May 10, 2007 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Two terms for O'Malley! No Way, he will be only one term Governor. Montgomery County's Ike is more popular than O'Malley...Ike is all set to challenge the boyish Governor.


Posted by: Sam | May 12, 2007 1:06 PM | Report abuse

The rift between O'Malley and Leggett has been out there for awhile now, Leggett would appear to be angling for O'Malley's job in 2010, he may have a shot, especially if O'Malley's relationship with minorities continues to head south after he has vetoed the crime bill as a huge slap in the face to the African-American community in PG and Montgomery counties.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 14, 2007 6:22 PM | Report abuse

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