Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

First Click -- Maryland

Your Daily Download of the State's Top Political News and Analysis

Friday, August 28, 2009:


CANDIDATE: PUBLIC HAD TO WAIT TOO LONG TO LEARN GUARDS WOULDN'T BE PROSECUTED IN JAIL DEATH.
"Why You?" - A regular feature that introduces candidates for 2010 begins today on Maryland Politics. In his first profile of candidates in Prince George's, The Post's Jonathan Mummolo talks with Peggy Magee, candidate for State's Attorney.
Magee says she won't criticize State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey, but then says the public had to wait too long for an update after Ronnie L. White was found strangled in jail three days after he was arrested for running down county police officer Richard S. Findley.

"It would be very difficult to say what you would do differently," Magee said. "I think the only issue that the people are really looking at that probably is difficult for them is the time frame -- the fact that it took a year to come out with a statement and a decision."
Q: So you think a year was too long to decide whether to prosecute?
A: "Yes. ... People had to wait an entire year to find out what was going on."

No word yet from Ivey's office on a much rumored run for Prince George's County Executive.


CARDIN PAYS BALTIMORE POLICE $300 FOR WEDDING STUNT
Add $300 to the cost of that ring ... and add another controversy to state Del. Jon S. Cardin's (D-Baltimore County) "mock police raid cum marriage proposal," writes Julie Bykowicz in The Baltimore Sun.
Cardin, who had Baltimore Police use a helicopter and patrol boat to stage a mock police raid and add some excitement to his wedding proposal during a cruise on in the Inner Harbor, has reimbursed the city $300 for the time it took officers away from patrol.
The amount is stirring a new controversy for Cardin. Baltimore Councilman William H. Cole IV told The Sun the amount was "insulting to both city employees and to taxpayers." Police Commissioner Anthony Guglielmi says the reimbursement was fair-market rate for 15 minutes of marine police time, boat fuel and the minutes the city's Foxtrot helicopter spent hovering overhead.


STATE LAWMAKERS ASKED TO GIVE UP SOME PAY
After the state's Board of Public Works decided 70,000 state employees will be forced to take as many a 10 unpaid furlough days, Sen. President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr. (D-Calvert), and House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel), Maryland's Democratic legislative leaders, say they'll volunteer to do the same. Thursday afternoon, they urged every member of the General Assembly to follow suit.
It's unclear, however, if they will. Last year, 22 state senators and delegates did not return any pay despite a similar request made by legislative leaders.


MORE REVERBERATIONS ON BUDGET CUTS

Was Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett right to call them fair and equitable? That's what Adam Pagnucco at the blog Maryland Politics Watch asks after looking at the percentage hit Montgomery County and other counties are taking compared to Baltimore.

Examiner Columnist Marta Mossburg says Maryland's still flabby, considering its 200 layoffs amount to less than 1 percent of the state's payroll.

Worcester County Commissioner Linda Busick says Gov. Martin O'Malley's cuts to the Eastern Shore were far worse than local officials had expected.


QUESTION OF THE DAY

State lawmakers are being asked to give up 8 days of pay to mirror the cuts 70,000 state workers are being forced to accept through furloughs. Last year, several did not return any of their pay despite a similar request. Most state lawmakers make about $43,000 a year, less than many others, but they also hold full-time jobs outside Annapolis. Should all state lawmakers give up equal pay as state workers? Should voters care if lawmakers do not?
... write a comment, weigh in, and we'll let you know next week which lawmakers do not return pay.

By Aaron C. Davis  |  August 28, 2009; 8:30 AM ET
Categories:  Aaron C. Davis , First Click  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: "Why You?": What We Want to Know From 2010 Candidates in Prince George's
Next: Fruit Detente In Montgomery?

Comments

State lawmakers should suffer cuts commensurate with employees. It should be mandatory rather than voluntary. The money should simply be withheld rather than conditional on repayment. As noted, lawmakers have other sources of income. Name and shame.

Posted by: countbobulescu | August 28, 2009 11:40 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company