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Pr. Geo.'s taxi drivers press council for reform

More than 100 Prince George's County taxi drivers turned out today at a County Council meeting to show their continued support for reform of the county's taxi licensing system, which they say creates unfair working conditions.

Drivers say a handful of companies hold the vast bulk of county-issued operating certificates, and overcharge drivers for use of the certificates. County officials have also raised concerns about drivers and companies who do not follow regulations. A task force was formed by the council last year to study the issue, and it was expected to introduce taxi legislation today.

Abay Gedey, president of the Prince George's County Taxi Workers Alliance, who sat on the task force, said he and his colleagues were present to show that many of them live and vote in the county (though Gedey does not), and that they want to see reform achieved. He said he had not read a draft of the bill yet, so could not say whether he supported it, and no copies were available to the public when drivers flooded into the council meeting room around 1:30 p.m.

"We support a change overall," Gedey said. "We have to see the final version" of the bill.

Gedey added that he was pleased to have the chance to sit on the task force and have his group's concerns heard. Discontent among drivers over the operating certificates issue caused some to strike last year.

[Note: Maryland Politics will link to the new taxi legislation once the county posts it online.]

By Jonathan Mummolo  |  May 11, 2010; 2:16 PM ET
Categories:  Jonathan Mummolo , Prince George's County  | Tags: Maryland, Prince George's County Maryland, Taxicab  
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