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Ehrlich identifies $3 million fundraising goal

John Wagner

Former governor Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R) has identified a $3 million goal for money raised during the fundraising period that closes Tuesday.

Given the expectations games that candidates play, it seems likely that Ehrlich's take will exceed that amount, which is mentioned prominently in an email solicitation sent out early Monday morning.

Even so, Ehrlich is all but certain to have significantly less cash on hand than Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) heading into the final months of the election.

In January -- the last time candidates were required to report fundraising totals -- O'Malley had $5.7 million in the bank. He has been actively raising money since the legislative session ended in April but has also started spending significantly on television ads in the Baltimore market.

Ehrlich, who announced his plans in April to get his old job back, had only $151,529 in the bank back as of January. Though he has not aired TV ads yet, Ehrlich's campaign does appear to be spending a fair amount of money on staff, office space and social media outreach.

Reports are due to the State Board of Elections on Aug. 17, a week after the fundraising period closes.

The complete text of Ehrlich's solicitation is below:

Dear Friend,

Tomorrow's crucial fundraising deadline is upon us.

We are on the cusp of sending a strong message to the incumbents in Annapolis, but I need your help to cross the finish line.

We have one goal for tomorrow's deadline: report $3 million in contributions since March. Governor O'Malley has had four years to amass a sizeable pile of campaign cash. We believe he will have raised $5 million since March for a total of $10 million, including significant corporate and out-of-state contributions.

We are running a very different campaign. We are fueled by Maryland families and small businesses who want new ideas and proven leadership. They want a clean break from the stagnant economy, record tax increases, and billion dollar budget deficits of the past four years. Your donation today will help me win in November so we can finally get Maryland working again. My vision for Maryland is simple: more jobs, lower taxes, and less spending.

Thank you for your donation and your outstanding support.


Sincerely,
Bob

By John Wagner  |  August 9, 2010; 7:45 AM ET
Categories:  2010 Elections , John Wagner  
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Comments

Bob,

You should be asking: "would you like fries with that?"

get a real job bob, you got tossed out for being a political "shim" -- you just take up space.

get real, why in the world would anyone making less than $100,000/year vote for you?

you only cause middle class salaries/wages to go down in value....

you make those households earning less than $100,000 subsidize small businesses and corporations...

you support public subsidies for business and make those who earn less than $100,000 per year pay for them.

WTF Bob? raise taxes on those making more than $250,000, $500,000, $1,000,000, $10,000,000 or more... make their rates exceed 6.5% or 6.7% they can afford it... they don't need to be subsidized by those earning less than $50,000, $70,000, or $100,000 per year... make those McMansion and waterfront properties pay higher property taxes... after all they are the ones responsible for polluting the bay, rivers, and estuaries in Maryland with all their lawn service fertilizers. Do away with all the public tax subsidies for public golf courses, and boating facilities... come on the average joe-bag-of-donuts can't afford a pot to pee in and doesn't even play golf... or wealthy enough to even go boating.

Posted by: FranknErnest | August 9, 2010 9:50 PM | Report abuse

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