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Posted at 11:08 AM ET, 10/ 6/2010

Paper applications for tech schools: a harbinger?

By Valerie Strauss

Patrick J. O’Connor, director of college counseling at the Roeper School, a private day school in the Detroit suburb of Birmingham, Mich., sent this amusing e-mail to colleagues on a listserv Wednesday, and he gave me permission to reprint it:

Colleagues, I offer a brief glimpse at my appointment calendar for your bemusement:

Wednesday, 8 AM: Send off supporting material for 180 electronic applications to a host of liberal arts colleges.

Wednesday, 11:30 AM: Send supporting materials for 6 paper applications, 5 of which are going to — wait for it — technological universities.

So ... do they know something we don’t?

Yours in cyberspace,

Patrick

Patrick J. O’Connor, Ph.D.
Director of College Counseling
Roeper School

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By Valerie Strauss  | October 6, 2010; 11:08 AM ET
Categories:  College Admissions, Technology  | Tags:  college admissions, college applications, college counselors  
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Comments

HURRAY! My unemployed friends and I secretly harbor a feeling that the unemployment rate could be cut drastically if we could apply on paper (or at least by email) instead of filling out online applications screened by job search engines. Not only does this take longer (especially with a slow connection), but in a lot of cases the applications force choices that the applicant doesn't quite fit into. (My favorite is the application for an office position at a large retail chain. The specific store must be designated, even though it is not clear in the job listing, the department must be designated, even though the office is not one of the choices, and most of the questionnaire asks about attitudes toward job safety. Makes you wonder how many computers fall on their secretaries.)

Posted by: sideswiththekids | October 7, 2010 10:27 AM | Report abuse

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