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The Answer Sheet Archive: David Berliner

Poverty, student achievement, HCZ: Berliner

A new Brookings Institution report says there is "no compelling evidence that investments in parenting classes, health services, nutritional programs and community improvement in general have appreciable effects on student achievement in schools in the U.S." Is that really true?

By Valerie Strauss  | July 22, 2010; 6:30 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (7)
Categories:  David Berliner, Equity, Guest Bloggers, Learning  | Tags:  alexander russo, brookings institution report, brookings report and hcz, david berliner, effects of poverty on student achievement, factors in student achievement, harlem children's zone, jay mathews, student achievement, whitehurst report  
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New analysis of achievement gap: ½ x ½ = 1½

David Berliner, a prominent education researcher, writes about new data and analysis showing that when it comes to student achievement, family resources are important, school resources are important and the joint effect of the social and fiscal resources found in families and schools appears to be much greater than either alone.

By Valerie Strauss  | June 29, 2010; 6:30 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (9)
Categories:  David Berliner, Guest Bloggers, Learning, Research  | Tags:  arizona state university, coleman report, coleman report and 1960s, david berliner, educational research, effects on student achievement, how much does school affect student achievement?, parental influence and student achievement, standard deviations  
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Berliner: Why we are ‘smart’ about evaluating athletes and ‘dumb’ about assessing students, teachers and schools

By David C. Berliner Americans are smart about evaluating athletes and sports teams, and dumb about evaluating students, teachers and schools. Let me explain. Recently, two NFL teams were unbeaten after more than a dozen games into the 2009 season. Then both lost. Suppose that you were observing them on the day they lost, rather than on the 13 or 14 times they had previously won. Given the circumstances, we might all agree that the day you watch a team matters, and thus a single observation can lead to a big mistake in judgment about a teams’ proficiency. Suppose on the day you watch one of these teams the quarterback threw for 350 yards and three touchdowns. If that were all you were assessing that day, and reported the quarterbacks’ performance to others, it would sound impressive. But the team you watched actually lost their game because the quarterback threw two interceptions, fumbled once, and had minus rushing yards.

By Valerie Strauss  | January 5, 2010; 12:28 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (11)
Categories:  David Berliner, Standardized Tests  | Tags:  evaluating teachers, standardized tests  
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Berliner: Why Rising Test Scores May Not Mean Increased Learning

By David Berliner A rise in test scores leads most people to believe good things are happening in their schools. Not unreasonably, politicians and parents alike infer that students have learned more when test scores go up. But since the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law was passed that inference may be unwarranted. Sadly, there are numerous reasons why rising test scores may not be related to increases in student learning.

By Valerie Strauss  | October 1, 2009; 11:25 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (6)
Categories:  David Berliner, Guest Bloggers, Learning, Standardized Tests  | Tags:  David Berliner, No Child Left Behind, Standardized Tests, high-stakes standardized tests, school reform  
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