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Posted at 10:00 AM ET, 02/ 6/2011

Where Super Bowl players went to school

By Valerie Strauss

Which school is most represented on the Super Bowl teams? Which conference?

Mike Huguenin, the college football editor for Rivals.com, allowed me to reproduce his findings from his blog. Here's the run-down for the Green Bay Packers and the Pittsburgh Steelers:

*The Southeastern Conference will be the most-represented conference in Sunday’s Super Bowl.

Eighteen SEC alums were listed on the active rosters of the Super Bowl participants as of noon Eastern time Friday. Ten of the league’s 12 schools have players in the big game, led by four from LSU and Tennessee.

*The Big Ten is second with 15 players, while the Atlantic Coast Conference and the Mid-American Conference are tied for third with 13 alums apiece.

*Four players are the most from any school, and four schools are in that category: LSU, Tennessee, Central Michigan and Ohio State.

Some other items of interest:

*Green Bay has three players each from Ohio State, Central Michigan and LSU. Pittsburgh has three players from Texas.

*Tennessee is the only school with multiple players on each team. There are two ex-Vols on each roster.

*There are five Western Athletic Conference alums in the Super Bowl, all on the Packers’ roster.

*Ten of the Atlantic Coast Conference’s 13 alums play for Pittsburgh.

*Eastern Michigan has two alums in the game.

*There are two players from Miami (Ohio) and one from Miami (Fla.).

*There are no players from Oklahoma.

*There are four players from the Big East, the same number as from the Sun Belt and one more than are from NCAA Division II schools.

Here’s a league-by-league look at the number of players who’ll perform Sunday.

SEC: 18
Schools represented: Alabama (2), Arkansas (1), Auburn (1), Florida (1), Georgia (2), Kentucky (1), LSU (4), Ole Miss (1), Mississippi State (1), Tennessee (4).

BIG TEN: 15
Schools represented: Illinois (1), Indiana (1), Iowa (1), Michigan (3), Michigan State (1), Minnesota (1), Northwestern (1), Ohio State (4), Penn State (2).

ACC: 13
Schools represented: Boston College (2), Clemson (2), Florida State (2), Georgia Tech (2), Miami (1), North Carolina (1), Virginia (2), Virginia Tech (1).

MID-AMERICAN: 13
Schools represented: Bowling Green (2), Buffalo (1), Central Michigan (4), Eastern Michigan (2), Kent State (1), Miami (2), Western Michigan (1).

BIG 12: 8
Schools represented: Colorado (1), Kansas State (1), Missouri (1), Nebraska (1), Texas (3), Texas Tech (1).

CONFERENCE USA: 7
Schools represented: East Carolina (1), Marshall (2), SMU (1), Tulane (1), UCF (2).

PAC-10: 6
Schools represented: Arizona State (1), California (2), Oregon State (1), USC (2).

MOUNTAIN WEST: 5
Schools represented: BYU (2), San Diego State (1), Utah (2)

WESTERN ATHLETIC: 5
Schools represented: Boise State (2), Louisiana Tech (1), San Jose State (1), Utah State (1)

BIG EAST: 4
Schools represented: Cincinnati (1), Louisville (2), West Virginia (1)

SUN BELT: 4
Schools represented: Arkansas State (1), Louisiana-Lafayette (1), Middle Tennessee (1), Troy (1)

Football Championship Subdivision PROGRAMS: 4
Schools represented: Alcorn State, from Southwestern Athletic Conference (1), Bethune-Cookman, from Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (1), Idaho State, from Big Sky (1), Northern Colorado, from Big Sky (1)

DIVISION II PROGRAMS: 3
Schools represented: Bowie State (Md.), Grand Valley State (Mich.), Shippensburg (Pa.)

INDEPENDENTS: 1
Schools represented: Notre Dame

(NOTE: Schools listed under their current conference affiliation, not necessarily the league the team was in when the player attended the school.)

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By Valerie Strauss  | February 6, 2011; 10:00 AM ET
Categories:  Sports  | Tags:  big 10, colleges and super bowl, green bay packers, pitt, pittsburgh steelers, sec, super bowl, super bowl players, super bowl time  
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Comments

Great article but I must point out one minor mistake. Mark Tauscher #65 an OT for Green Bay went to Wisconsin. You make no mention of anyone in the Super Bowl playing for U of W. Im just saying.

Posted by: ddmorton04 | February 6, 2011 1:21 PM | Report abuse

and did any players majored in the sciences?? social sciences?? hard sciences???

Posted by: Rockvillers | February 6, 2011 1:38 PM | Report abuse

Apparently it makes little difference where a football player went to school. It appears a majority of them were standing around looking bored while the Star Spangled Banner was being played. While the crowed cheered a video of Marines at Camp Leatherneck standing at attention, Brett Keisel stood with his fingers hooked on the neck of his jersey. Looked as if he would fall asleep if the crowd hadn't been so loud.

This after all the faux-patriotic pre-game hype. Shameful.

Posted by: arancia12 | February 6, 2011 6:59 PM | Report abuse

They went to school there, but did they actually go to class and do any of the work? Every few years there is another scandal about college athletes getting their work done for them or having their transcripts altered to keep them eligible--and in no cases do the students at the college express shock, because they have known all along.

Posted by: sideswiththekids | February 8, 2011 9:01 AM | Report abuse

Scoffers:
Read Valerie's careful choice of verbs. She reprints the schools "most represented," not "school attended." Even the jock press refers to the university "he played for." Yes, that's about right. Too bad most of the programs don't get hived off as the for-profit programs they are, and the players paid for services rendered.

Posted by: incredulous | February 8, 2011 3:01 PM | Report abuse

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