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Posted at 8:00 AM ET, 05/ 2/2010

Heavily accented teachers removed from Arizona classrooms

By Valerie Strauss

School districts in Arizona are under orders from the state's Department of Education to remove from classrooms teachers who speak English with a very heavy accent or whose speech is ungrammatical.

Officials say they want students who don’t know much English to have teachers who can best model how to speak the language, but, according to The Wall Street Journal, some principals and administrators are concerned that the standards for removal are arbitrary.

The recent move by the department comes during the political firestorm over a new law in Arizona which requires police to question anyone who appears to be in the country illegally. It is the most restrictive immigration law in the country.

Arizona's education department has sent people into schools to audit teachers on comprehensible pronunciation, correct grammar and good writing. Teachers who fail may try to improve, but if they don’t, school districts can fire or reassign them.

The Journal’s report says that critics of the new teachers policy believe the education department was encouraged by the new law, and that targeting teachers with heavy accents is just part of the anti-immigration movement in Arizona.

School officials say that is nonsense, and that kids should have teachers who they understand.

About 150,000 of Arizona’s 1.2 million public school students are classified as English Language Learners, the Journal said.

Nobody can argue that kids don’t deserve teachers whom they can easily understand, and teachers who use proper grammar. I’ve been in classrooms where I couldn’t understand a teacher, and in classrooms where a teacher’s grammar made me wince.

The issue here is how to determine which teachers really should be in the classroom and which ones shouldn’t be. Speech that one child can’t understand could be completely comprehensible to most of the students.

How does one fairly draw the line on grammatical mistakes? Hardly anyone speaks English perfectly according to the rules of grammar. Quick: Give me an example of the pluperfect and the future subjunctive. Is it enough to toss out a teacher because he or she routinely misuses the verb "to be?"

Uncovering exactly how Arizona goes about this will be most interesting.

What do you think of Arizona’s new policy? What standards should there be for removing a teacher on the basis of a strong accent or poor pronunciation?

Update: Arizona strikes again, with legislation aimed at an ethnic studies program. Read about it here.

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By Valerie Strauss  | May 2, 2010; 8:00 AM ET
Categories:  Teachers  | Tags:  accented teachers being removed in arizona, arizona and immigrants, arizona and teachers, arizona immigration law, teachers  
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Comments

Well, one could claim that they screwed up hiring people who couldn't speak properly in the first place. However, what exactly is Standard English? a British accent? A Brooklyn accent? Midwestern? Southern? Western? Is there a specific accent they are looking for?

This sounds to me like more from the English Only people. They like to claim that immigrants don't want to learn English. Statistics prove them false.

Interesting that while everybody else in the country is looking for good math and science teachers these people are obsessing about English usage.

Posted by: celestun100 | April 30, 2010 3:05 PM | Report abuse

I had a biology teacher who spoke heavily accented English--he was a lousy teacher, but not because of that. We could understand him and his English was very good. (This is usually the case. Remember in "My Fair Lady" when they decided Eliza must be Hungarian because she spoke English too well to be British? And as a copy-editor, the easiest time I ever had with a manuscript was when the author was French and writing in English.)

On the other hand, my mother instituted an "ain't box" in her sixth-grade language arts classroom--anybody who made a mistake in grammar put his name and error in it and any students whose names weren't in it at the end of the grading period got an extra 100 added into their grades. She was rather embarassed when the principal took her class one day while she went to an appointment and she found his name in it several time. (This was a typical situation--the principal loved to teach history and was good at it, but to get a raise he had to be "promoted" right out of the classroom to an administrative position he hated.)

I also worked with an elementary teacher's aide who worked in our bookstore during the summer. She once commented, when I had been helping a mother find books for an insatiable reader, "I hate those kids who like to read--they always think they're smart." A few days later, she totally misunderstood a simple notice on the bulletin board, and we realized that she couldn't read well herself.

Let's quit worrying about accents and get rid of teachers who don't know basic grammar and reading. (At the very least, a teacher--or teacher's aide--should read at a college level.)

Posted by: sideswiththekids | April 30, 2010 4:44 PM | Report abuse

This is just another form of teacher- bashing, mainly because the poor economy has made it possible to hire Yale graduates to teach fourth grade in DC and other "challenging" school districts. Let's face it, the job of "inner-city" schoolteacher has not been highly coveted until lately.

The truth of the matter is that urban schools have traditionally been so desperate for teachers that they often hired people who could not speak or write standard English. When I was a young teacher in a large urban district, I remember how shocked I was when I began to suspect that some of my fellow teachers were illiterate. Yes, I suspected that they couldn't read or write. One teacher's spoken English was so poor that she was assigned the job of school librarian until she improved her speech. Go figure that one.

There was no hue and cry about this at the time. Administrators obviously saw nothing wrong with hiring these teachers until suddenly they realized they could be replaced and at a lower salary. This is what Arizona's sudden concern is really about.

What upsets me is the blame is being placed on these teachers. They were led to believe that they were qualified for the job when it should have been obvious that many were not. The shame of this belongs to the American people and perhaps to the administrators who hired them, but not to the teachers who accepted the jobs in good faith or the unions, which do not hire or fire.

The real solution to our teacher problems is to make the job attractive to well-educated men and women. The present teacher-bashing will only exacerbate the situation. If it continues, I suspect we'll have a much harder time hiring good teachers once this recession is over. And all those young women with limited job options will no longer be there.

Posted by: Linda/RetiredTeacher | April 30, 2010 4:47 PM | Report abuse

We need this especially in our colleges and universities. Check out the computer science classes. Most of the graduate students are from India. Their accents is sometimes so thick students do not understand a word that they are saying.

Posted by: alterego3 | April 30, 2010 8:12 PM | Report abuse


"Nobody can argue that kids don’t deserve teachers whom they can easily understand, and teachers who use proper grammar."

So why are you doing that?

If you had ever sat in a classroom in South-Central LA, like I have, you would not have the slightest doubt that something like this is warranted.

Accents? Yeah, it's unreasonable to expect a teacher to be able to do something that all the folks at Bangalore call centers somehow manage.

Posted by: WylieD | May 1, 2010 12:22 AM | Report abuse

If a student has to struggle to understand their teacher, then the student's performance is going to be diminished. On the other hand, if the teacher is excellent in other ways, a language deficiency might be offset. Still, there is a limit to how much of an accent is tolerable in a classroom. It's not unreasonable to require teachers to speak English clearly and correctly enough to ensure that learning is not impacted.

Posted by: postisarag | May 1, 2010 7:43 AM | Report abuse

alterego3: Just who have you been talking to at Bangalore call centers? The main complaint about tech support these days is that the people at the call centers can't be understood!

(While we're at it, let's start a movement to get all people to talk a bit more slowly.)

Posted by: sideswiththekids | May 1, 2010 8:36 AM | Report abuse

When I went to a NY State University, I had various math instructors who were, I am sure, brilliant but no one in the class could understand them because their accent. Years later, my son had a Spanish teacher in high school who was originally from France. Imagine trying to learn in that environment. I agree that teachers must be able to be understood if they are hired to transfer knowledge to our youth.

Posted by: sangacian | May 1, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

Students will suffer unless grammar, usage, and pronunciation are demonstrated consistently throughout the educational experience. Accent is not the primary problem. I have personally spoken to too many educators who cannot string together a coherent sentence.

Posted by: leuchars | May 1, 2010 12:37 PM | Report abuse

It's very simple - any accent a teacher has is OK as long as students can easily understand the teacher.

All teachers should speak and write standard English. This doesn't mean that they have to identify what "pluperfect" means on a test; it means they have to use it properly in speech and in writing.

I believe any college grad who doesn't regularly use standard English can learn it quickly. If they can't, after taking remedial classes, then they shouldn't be allowed to continue teaching.

We can't force teachers to raise students' scores, but we can expect them to speak and write like the educated people they are supposed to be.

For instance - "Him and I" is always wrong - you don't need to know why, just don't ever say it. Double negatives are wrong ("I don't have no book") and "irregardless" is not a word.

That's a start that would improve everyone's grammar - it's not just teachers who are guilty of these common errors.

Posted by: efavorite | May 1, 2010 12:49 PM | Report abuse

"It's not just teachers who are guilty of these common errors."

I agree completely--maybe after we get teachers who can speak coherently and correctly, we can go to work on the local television reporters who talk about "The burglar snuck in through the busted window." (Not to mention the ones who, even after six months in the area, can't master the local pronunciations of streets.)

Posted by: sideswiththekids | May 2, 2010 9:30 AM | Report abuse

At the elementary school level, I agree with this policy, but not perhaps for high schoolers. In my son's Northern VA supposedly "world-class" school, his kindergarten teacher constantly mispronounces children as "childrens" and gets other plural words wrong. His teacher has a doctorate degree. It drives me crazy that my child is not exposed to proper english at this early age. By the time kids are older and can distinguish proper grammar I would be more accepting. But not at age five. I want my kids to have people who can speak PROPER english. Honestly, this is a common sense issue - not racial or immigration - COMMON SENSE - something we seem to be severely lacking in this country these days!!

Posted by: abcxyz2 | May 2, 2010 10:21 AM | Report abuse

At the elementary school level, I agree with this policy, but not perhaps for high schoolers. In my son's Northern VA supposedly "world-class" school, his kindergarten teacher consistenly mispronounces the plural "children" as "childrens" (not in a possesive term) and gets other plural words consistently wrong. His teacher has a doctorate degree. It drives me crazy that my child is not exposed to proper english at this early age. By the time kids are older and can distinguish proper grammar I would be more accepting. But not at age five. I want my kids to have people who can speak PROPER english. Honestly, this is a common sense issue - not racial or immigrant bashing- simply COMMON SENSE - something we seem to be severely lacking in this country these days!!

Posted by: abcxyz2 | May 2, 2010 10:23 AM | Report abuse

I HAD CONCLUDED that obama was a master liar and manipulator... since then I have concluded he's just incompetent.... pluperfect.

Obama SHALL LOSE his congressional majority in november... future subjective.

Yes, if you cannot do that in 10 seconds... you should NOT BE TEACHING US STUDENTS.

Posted by: docwhocuts | May 2, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

When taken into consideration the fact that FAIR, was responsible for writing the “show me your papers” law, an organization whose roots and current Board members are directly linked to a white supremacy organization, it is not much of a stretch to understand that the next target would be to rid the schools of anything non-white or diverse in culture.

Where is the media in reporting the truth about FAIR? This organization plays such an important role with the AZ legislature that its despicable roots and membership should have been exposed years ago and brought to the surface certainly in light of their participation in writing the law.

Congratulations to Arizona. It has won the contest, beating out Texas, as the worst state in the union. Now they have to continue to work to keep the title as there are several other southern states working hard to surpass their dubious title.

Boycott Arizona? You betcha by golly!

Posted by: utahmink | May 2, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

When taken into consideration the fact that FAIR, was responsible for writing the “show me your papers” law, an organization whose roots and current Board members are directly linked to a white supremacy organization, it is not much of a stretch to understand that the next target would be to rid the schools of anything non-white or diverse in culture.

Where is the media in reporting the truth about FAIR? This organization plays such an important role with the AZ legislature that its despicable roots and membership should have been exposed years ago and brought to the surface certainly in light of their participation in writing the law.

Congratulations to Arizona. It has won the contest, beating out Texas, as the worst state in the union. Now they have to continue to work to keep the title as there are several other southern states working hard to surpass their dubious title.

Boycott Arizona? You betcha by golly!

Posted by: utahmink | May 2, 2010 11:40 AM | Report abuse

The hidden problem is in the numbers -- you have a state where one eighth (12.5%) of the students are still learning to read and write English. That big (and probably growing) block of learners are struggling to understand the lessons taught by native English-speakers.

What's the state Department of Ed doing about that? Not much. You could provide teacher training in basic Spanish, or scholarships for teachers to study other languages. But that wouldn't get you many white votes in an election year.

You know how they say the Southwest is where we'll eventually see a Hispanic majority? That's what this whole movement is about.

Posted by: Samson151 | May 2, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

"I HAD CONCLUDED that obama was a master liar and manipulator... since then I have concluded he's just incompetent.... pluperfect.Obama SHALL LOSE his congressional majority in november... future subjective.Yes, if you cannot do that in 10 seconds... you should NOT BE TEACHING US STUDENTS.Posted by: docwhocuts"

Assignment: the student is to re-read the above and correct the numerous grammatical errors.

Sincerely,
The Teacher

Posted by: Samson151 | May 2, 2010 11:50 AM | Report abuse

utahmink - your comment is typically a lying, liberal one. FAIR has no roots in white supremacy - you want to state that it does because you are making a lying, racist comment. If you follow our law, then you have applied for citizenship and are here legally. If not, then you have refused to follow our law and must be held accountable.

As for hiring people who speak correct English to teach English - duh. But it has been hard to do when large districts hire non-certified, non-qualified people because they want to cut costs. At some point, it will create a backlash and you pay the piper.

Posted by: joesmithdefend | May 2, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

If a teacher, in the classroom and it is not part of the education curricula speaks:

1. Ghet-to
2. Spanglish
3. Gaelic
4. French
5. Jive
6. Can't communicate or get their words out in a way that is understandable and can communicate in the "King's English."

You're fired!!!!

In the past year, I have seen and heard the UCLA protestors and when interviewed on TV, they sounded like a cross between Jive, Ghet-to and Spanglish, in trying to communicate in an interview.

I was embarrassed, considering that not only is UCLA my Alma Mater, by they have admitted people who will fail, as professionals, unless they go into some liberal arts-type work, become professional students or mayy some rich person, where they don't have to work.

Posted by: Computer_Forensics_Expert_Computer_Expert_Witness | May 2, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

"Obama SHALL LOSE his congressional majority in november... future subjective."

Though I would agree your statement is extremely subjective, I think you meant to say subjunctive.

Maybe consistently maintaining accuracy while writing and speaking quickly is not so easy after all?

Posted by: dcgradstudent | May 2, 2010 12:09 PM | Report abuse

You omitted the most galling part of the story: several years ago, Arizona hired many native Spanish-speaking teachers to implement a very progressive Spanish immersion language program.

Then the administration changed, the Spanish immersion program was summarily killed, and the recently hired native Spanish-speaking teachers -- many of which were specially recruited from overseas -- were given the new mission of teaching their classes in English, with predictable frustration experienced by all concerned.

Just another example of how the xenophobic wingnuttery in Arizona is hurting innocent people.

Posted by: 12008N1 | May 2, 2010 12:14 PM | Report abuse

"School districts in Arizona are under orders from the state's Department of Education to remove from classrooms teachers who speak English with a very heavy accent or whose speech is ungrammatical."

guess no bush family member will ever teach in Arizona

Posted by: newagent99 | May 2, 2010 12:20 PM | Report abuse

samson the teacher, are you changing the assignment AFTER THE TEST? how fair is that? cheapo shots.

my examples of the two tenses are perfectly adequate and demonstrate that SIMPLE PRINCIPLES of grammer (grammar) can be demostrated on a whim by a man 30 years removed from any formal "english" education.

Posted by: docwhocuts | May 2, 2010 12:22 PM | Report abuse

@docwhocuts - No TEABAGGING RACISTS allowed on this "real" newspaper! Go to FAUX!

Posted by: cholly85241 | May 2, 2010 12:36 PM | Report abuse

I can relate with Arizona's current move from a student's perspective. I had a class taught by a very intelligent Pakistani Ph.D. Only problem was that her commnication skills, specifically her accent, were so strong, it was impossible to understand her 80% of the time. We tried to work with her and she gave us reams of typewritten notes in order for us to understand her. Students deserve effective communicators as teachers.

Posted by: R2And | May 2, 2010 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Welcome to the Banana Republic of Arizona where high schools kick out future “Jaime Escalantes”.

Posted by: motherseton | May 2, 2010 12:48 PM | Report abuse

Welcome to the Banana Republic of Arizona where high schools kick out future “Jaime Escalantes”.

Posted by: motherseton | May 2, 2010 12:50 PM | Report abuse

I can remember moving to the South from the North in High school and believe you me.... I'd take a Hispanic bi-lingual any day.

Posted by: Geopolitics101 | May 2, 2010 12:53 PM | Report abuse

If YOU don't live in Arizona, with Kids in School, it's NONE of YOUR business !!!

When the grass looks greener on the other side of the fence, maybe you need to be spending more time taking care of your own yard !!!

Posted by: thgirbla | May 2, 2010 1:23 PM | Report abuse

During the seven years of fat harvests just anybody could get a job teaching.

Then, during the seven years of lean harvests all the malcontent, incompetent and fraudulent teachers, with or without legitimate credentials, were fired.

This is a fact of life.

Posted by: muawiyah | May 2, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

I agree with this idea. Kids should have maximum opportunity to learn English so they can get good jobs or get into the best possible college.

I have met kids from Los Angeles schools who can't speak good English. One told me she was in all Spanish classes. She said her teacher could not speak English!

This was a very bright little girl who it seemed could easlily get into a college some day. But she was being handicapped by a system that did not allow her to learn proper English.

That is discrimination and should stop now. One country with a primary language will help all of us. These is nothing "racist" about this.

Posted by: oflibertysons | May 2, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Grammar is so not important. It is not even on my list of things to worry about.
On the other hand, you cannot learn from a teacher that you cannot understand. Don't teachers have to have an education themselves? Don't they have to pass a test to be accredited as a teacher?
We need to have standards as to who can or cannot be hired as a teacher, and stick to them.

Posted by: leslieswearingen | May 2, 2010 1:54 PM | Report abuse

esl rules.what BS

Posted by: pofinpa | May 2, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

So what's worse? Learning from a teacher who speaks correct English with a Spanish/Asian/French/German accent? Or from one who speaks the most common dialect in English (found in the western part of the country and most resembles that heard on network news. Walter Cronkite used to be considered the gold standard for Standard American English), but who uses ungrammatical constructions like "he don't," "I seen," and "should have went."

Ideally, of course, all teachers would speak in a clear, fairly unaccented voice, using the conventions of Standard American English.

But this law clearly is aimed at those who "sound foreign." As an English teacher (yes, I know I used sentence fragments above!), I sometimes shuddered to realize the teachers in my own department were guilty of egregious grammatical errors and couldn't spell properly at all. No one in "grammar schools," secondary schools, or colleges seems very concerned about usage and grammar. I care a lot more about these issues than regional accents or those which are evidence that English is a second language.

Posted by: mwestorca | May 2, 2010 2:09 PM | Report abuse

There is absolutely no evidence from First or Second Language Acquisition research that shows kids pick up on the accents or errors that their teachers make. It's way more complicated than mimicry and habit formation, which are behaviorist notions discredited long ago. Think about it, how many parents try to correct their little kids to no avail, and how many people with 'standard' accents had parents or teachers with foreign accents? If it were about understanding the content, then these teachers would teach in Spanish, but that's illegal in racist-run Arizona. So the so-called 'experts' invented 'Structured English Immersion', the so-called 'theory' used to justify this policy, based on discredited science, to justify their right-wing, nativist political agenda. You will find no respected First or Second Language Acquisition, TESOL, or applied linguistics expert that supports this policy.

Posted by: JRinAZ | May 3, 2010 1:49 AM | Report abuse

Wait; they are removing teachers they previously hired? Didn't they speak during the interview? What will become of them when they are removed from the classroom? Why now; while in the throws of the controversial immigration reform law? I smell a rat--I hope someone has a trap.

Posted by: eaglechik | May 3, 2010 7:58 AM | Report abuse

Perhaps the WP should seek a new applicant for writing this blog - somebody with better reading comprehension, perhaps?

Go and read the **actual WSJ news article** it refers to and see what it **actually says**:

"... must be removed from classes for students **still learning English**"

- it does NOT says that ANY teachers are losing their jobs over this

- it does NOT say that overly-accented teachers are being removed from classes IN GENERAL

- it ONLY applies to CLASSES for ENGLISH LEARNERS, _not_ classes for those who are ALREADY FLUENT in English

Posted by: counterpoint1 | May 3, 2010 5:52 PM | Report abuse

I am, sad to say these days, from Arizona. This Arizona Department of Education edict is purely political. The woman who is backing this latest "news" is running for Superintendent of the DOE. She hopes to garner the votes of all the unread, ignoramuses who support the immigration bill SB 1070 and who are trying to preserve a white, monolingual majority in Arizona. I speak four languages...it tends to make me more open and accepting of cultural and linguistic differences with accents. Speaking English without an accent does not make you a person who can critically think or intelligently see the unintended (or intended ) consequences of some of the craziness that is going on in Arizona. This latest stupidity is like the rest...politically motivated and pressing the buttons of fear and hatred, the basest of human emotions.

Posted by: GR8DAMA | May 4, 2010 11:42 AM | Report abuse

Arizona's law was written by immigration attorneys.

Arizona's law is the EXACT same thing as the federal law---except Arizona is actually going to enforce the laws, not ignore them.

Based on the population/demographics of Arizona---if 70% of AZ citizens support the new law---this means that it does include Hispanic citizens as well.

Based on 3 national polls---Rasmussen, Gallup and CBS---the MAJORITY in the country support Arizona's new law.

Now--states such as Ohio, Colorado, Utah, Georgia and Texas---have already talked about passing the same laws.

And, yes, teachers should be able to speak English well---before they are able to teach students.

Posted by: Brendasue4824 | May 4, 2010 12:07 PM | Report abuse

utahmink wrote:"When taken into consideration the fact that FAIR, was responsible for writing the “show me your papers” law, an organization whose roots and current Board members are directly linked to a white supremacy organization, it is not much of a stretch to understand that the next target would be to rid the schools of anything non-white or diverse in culture."
----------
Since the Arizona law mirrors federal law, I'm sure you'll find some way to claim that the framers of federal law were members of FAIR as well. And just why should you assume that immigrants or even illegal aliens are "non white"? And if the latter are, well, it doesn't say much about them that they have so little respect for OUR laws and OUR culture.

Posted by: Ali4 | May 4, 2010 2:03 PM | Report abuse

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE bring this to California! I sat in my son’s kindergarten class and felt like an outsider. There are 2 teachers every day and instruction is given in both English and Spanish. The problem is the teachers forget to say instructions in both languages. So occasionally the non-english kids don’ get instruction or the English only kids don’t get instruction. My son who is very bright had trouble keeping up because he doesn't speak Spanish.

Posted by: inoc | May 4, 2010 3:08 PM | Report abuse

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE bring this to California! I sat in my son’s kindergarten class and felt like an outsider. There are 2 teachers every day and instruction is given in both English and Spanish. The problem is the teachers forget to say instructions in both languages. So occasionally the non-english kids don’t get instruction or the English only kids don’t get instruction. My son who is very bright had trouble keeping up because he doesn't speak Spanish.

Posted by: inoc | May 4, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

?Just why should you assume that immigrants or even illegal aliens are "non white?" Because those are the only ones many people in the country are concerned about. Craig Ferguson wrote an autobiography admitting to having been an illegal immigrant in the past--is there any demand that his American citizenship should be revoked? After Latinos, the largest group of illegal immigrant in the nation, I think I read, are Irish, although the improving economy in Ireland is encouraging many of them to go back. Are the police in Arizona going to stop a redhead with an Irish accent for "suspicious activity"? Or are they only going to check up on Mexicans? And what will happen when they stop a tourist or a diplomat, as will undoubtedly happen sooner or later?

Posted by: sideswiththekids | May 4, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

The new AZ law only comes into effect after the police have legally stopped a person for an infraction of law. At this point ANYONE who is not a legal citizen, Mexican, Irish, Chinese, Etc. will be detained and possibly deported. Next time read the law before you make assumptions. By the way if you “side with the kids” you may want to support this law since it will curb human smuggling for sex trade, sexual abuse of minors, drug smuggling, and murders. In my city alone we’ve had 1 murder, 33 sex crimes, and 125 robbery/burglary/theft/drugs from illegal immigrants this past year.

Posted by: inoc | May 4, 2010 4:12 PM | Report abuse

From what I understand this law only pertaines to teachers of English as a second language or ESL. You would want someone who speaks English clearly in order to teach English to others. makes sense.

Posted by: kwaite1 | May 4, 2010 5:50 PM | Report abuse

Who needs an education? Just ask a rags-to-riches multi-million dollars lotto winner.
In today's USA, apparently most of the population identify themselves with a non-english background, and even don't care much about the language(s) they speak (not to mention writing).
The obvious question is: Does pronunciation matter any more these days? Look around and open your ears.
Who pays attention to his/her language - English in question?
Does anyone care about the decency - the civilized values - today?
What good is a costly education, if the bad students and crooks become wealthy and influential and the best students struggle to pay their bills?
Out of curiosity, how many teachers are the ideal role models, to begin with? Someone has to stand up and deliver the good fruits.

Posted by: MustaqurRahman | May 4, 2010 9:07 PM | Report abuse

Hmmm, guess they would have fired Albert Einstein when he was a teacher, he had a heavy accent also.

But then again, he did say that the only thing that interfered with his learning was his education...perhaps that is not working out so well for today's students?

Posted by: NativeEarthling | May 11, 2010 4:18 AM | Report abuse

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