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Posted at 5:23 PM ET, 02/ 2/2011

Smithsonian has bonanza year in fundraising

By Jacqueline Trescott
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Smithsonian Secretary G. Wayne Clough. (AP)

Secretary G. Wayne Clough did have one thing to smile about this week. He reported that the Smithsonian, on the fund-raising front, had had its best December ever, bringing in $50 million.

And the rest of the year wasn't bad either. For the fiscal year 2010, which ended September 30, they raised $158 million. The previous year the tally was $126.6 million.

Helping the Smithsonian recover from the hit its private fund-raising and endowment took during the recent recession were several large gifts. Betty and Whitney MacMillan donated $18 million, of which $10 million is going to a project on endangered languages at the National Museum of Natural History and other projects. Another portion of the gift, $8 million benefits an education center and education endowment at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Whitney MacMillan is the former chairman of Cargill, the international producer and marketer of food and agricultural products and a philanthropist, and Betty MacMillan has been active with Smithsonian boards.

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Robert and Arlene Kogod.

Robert Kogod, the president of Charles E. Smith Management and a Smithsonian regent, and his wife, Arlene, donated $10 million for the renovation of the Arts & Industries Building. Clough reported that work was starting on the structural repairs.

A number of gifts went to the National Museum of African American Culture and History, which is scheduled to open on the National Mall in 2015. The Lily Endowment donated $10 million; WalMart gave $5 million; United Health Care Group gave $5 million; Target gave $5 million and Time Warner donated $2 million. "The museum has to raise $250 million and they are making tremendous progress," said Clough.

By Jacqueline Trescott  | February 2, 2011; 5:23 PM ET
Categories:  Jacqueline Trescott, Smithsonian  | Tags:  Fund-raising at the Smithsonian, G. Wayne Clough, Smithsonian Institution  
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Comments

Money always speaks over
incompetency.

Posted by: lenjanr | February 6, 2011 9:50 AM | Report abuse

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