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Ex-Big Leaguer Werber Passes Away at 100

Bill Werber, the College Park native and McKinley Tech alum who was the oldest living ex-major leaguer, died peacefully today in Charlotte, N.C. at the age of 100, according to his son.

Werber was the last remaining ex-teammate of Babe Ruth. He played 11 seasons in the majors, including parts of two seasons with Ruth's Yankees, and also played alongside Hall of Famers Jimmy Foxx, Ted Williams and Lefty Grove.

His 100th birthday last June drew national publicity, including this feature in The Washington Post, and he was a legendary storyteller who wrote a book, Memories of a Ballplayer: Bill Werber and Baseball in the 1930s, that related his best stories.

If we get any further details about funeral arrangements, I'll post an update here.

By Dave Sheinin  |  January 22, 2009; 4:20 PM ET
 
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Comments

Just saw this item in the print edition. May he rest in peace.

Posted by: natsfan1a1 | January 23, 2009 8:09 AM | Report abuse

Dave - you may have seen come across this, but while going to one of my favorite sites, I came across an Eric Seidman tape of his interview with Werber. You can compare notes.
http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/index.php/goodbye-bill

Posted by: jca-CrystalCity | January 23, 2009 9:18 AM | Report abuse

Dave,

The article on Yahoo says that public arrangements will be in Charlotte The weekend of Jan 31 - Feb 1.

http://ca.sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news;_ylt=Ag2eGSgELW3oaNJVqLGKeompu7YF?slug=ap-obit-werber&prov=ap&type=lgns

Pass on my condolences if you go.

Posted by: CALSGR8 | January 23, 2009 7:10 PM | Report abuse

Werber's book is well worth reading, and can probably be found at Amazon used for only a few $$$. It's well written and gives a good sense of what life was like for ball players in the 1930s...

Posted by: baseballindc1 | January 26, 2009 1:59 PM | Report abuse

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