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Tim McCarver, Lyricist Extraordinaire

If you're a fan of FOX Saturday Baseball announcer Tim McCarver, we're about to add a must-buy item to your cart the next time you're tooling around amazon.com. And if you don't like Tim McCarver, well, brace yourself for more ammunition behind your irrational hatred.

You see, Tim McCarver fancies himself a crooner. The longtime baseball player turned television color man and self-appointed sports talking head professes to have a powerful vocal talent, and he decided to prove it by recording an album in which he attempts to sing the best of "the American songbook."

That's right, Tim McCarver landed a recording deal, which is something that took David Gray a good decade to do. According to Dan Levy of The Sporting News, McCarver actually has a pretty strong voice and can carry a tune, two declarations which both seem stunning to Baseball Insider. But a recent FOX broadcast of a Mets game compared a McCarver Sinatra cover to the real deal by leading back into game action with a shot of the Philly Phanatic dancing in front of a Sinatra classic without announcing the performing artist was actually McCarver ... until the track had already ended. Evidently it was a close enough fascimile to convince listeners that it could double as the real deal.

Then again, Levy may have been pumping up McCarver to for Levy's own sanity. No fan of the "idiosyncrasies" that have become emblamatic of McCarver's broadcast performances (none more glaring that calling Bronson Arroyo "Brandon Arroyo" throughout the entire 2004 MLB playoffs), Levy may have coined the line of the week in exhorting McCarver to find a muse and pursue his hidden talent.

"This is not a Barry Zito situation by any means. So Tim, I speak for all baseball fans when I say this: quit your day job. Please."

By Cameron Smith  |  September 18, 2009; 1:25 PM ET
 | Tags: Tim McCarver, media, music  
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Comments

my hatred of Tim McCarver is very rational.

Posted by: olsonchr | September 18, 2009 2:19 PM | Report abuse

According to the post, McCarver "attempts to sing the best of 'the American songbook.'" I take that to mean he didn't write the songs. Since a lyricist is the person who writes the lyrics of a song, I take that to mean he's not a lyricist, he's a singer, and the headline on this post is incorrect.

Posted by: greggwiggins | September 18, 2009 4:45 PM | Report abuse

in my case, it's not hatred: it's disdain, contempt, dismissal and a tiny bit of pity... there is not enough there to hate, and what there is is below standard. when empty cliche follows the stunningly obvious in monotonous succession, you have tim mccarver (who, in honor of his misnamings of players, i prefer to call tug mcgraw.) that reedy baritone of his will prove far too rough and unreliable for him to actually sustain singing. he can look like it, no doubt, but not sing. just as he looks like a broadcaster, but by failing to add any actual information fails to fulfill the function of one.

Posted by: natty-bumppo | September 19, 2009 12:46 AM | Report abuse

Tim McCarver sucks. He is especially hated in Philly. His outright favoritism for the Rays and contempt for the Phils in last year's World Series is well known. He was never liked in Philly and although he was part of the 1980 Championship squad, he is never invited back to Philly to participate in special events along with Schmidt, Carlton, and other beloved Phillies. So, whenever he gets the chance, old Tim likes to talk trash on the Phillies.
If I never hear him and Joe Buck call a game again, it will be too soon. Go away, Tim and take your lackey with you.

Posted by: PhilliesPhan | September 21, 2009 4:08 PM | Report abuse

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