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Tigers' perfect* game: You can't change history... or wait, who says you can't?

Everyone who saw Detroit Tigers right-hander Armando Galarraga lose his perfect game in excruciating fashion will agree on three things:

*Umpire Jim Joyce blew the call.

*Galarraga deserved a perfect game.

*And something needs to be done.

The knee-jerk proposals for what should be done in the wake of Joyce's monumental blown call appear to be falling into two camps: those who would expand replay to include safe/out calls on the bases, and those who would enact tougher accountability standards for umpires -- whereby bad umpires can be replaced, just as bad players are released and bad managers are fired.

Both notions have their merits and deserve serious consideration. But I'd like to propose something that is both simpler and more radical at the same time: Go ahead and reverse the call, retroactively.

This is Bud Selig's big chance to do the right thing, the just thing -- and the popular thing: Invoke the best-interests-of-baseball clause. Change Jason Donald's infield single to a 3-1 out. Erase Trevor Crowe's groundout -- it never happened. Only a grinch (or a Cleveland Indians player) would protest such a thing. It would cement Selig's legacy. He would be the commissioner who reversed a grievous injustice.

We can never change history, not exactly. Galarraga will never get the moment he deserved -- the feeling of unbearable tension turning to overwhelming relief, the joyous hug with his catcher, the dogpile beside the mound. But at the very least, he deserves the satisfaction of seeing his name on the short (but strangely expanding) list of pitchers who have thrown perfect games, of being part of history.

The best argument against this idea, as best I can tell, would be: Well, you can't do that. And I'll be honest: I don't know the precise logistics of how this could be done, or if it could. I'm sure there is a point at which a game's outcome, and all of its statistics, become official, and I'm sure we are well beyond that point. It's in the books, so it's in the books.

But if Selig is powerful enough to have canceled a World Series, I'm guessing he is powerful enough to erase one measly infield single.

Just do it, Bud. We'll figure out the hows later.

By Dave Sheinin  |  June 2, 2010; 10:35 PM ET
Categories:  Indians , Tigers  
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Next: Statement from MLB on blown call in 'perfect' game

Comments

Can't the Tigers protest the game based on that call? If MLB rules the call was incorrect (and Joyce would surely attest to that) and uphold the protest, wouldn't that restore the perfect game using proceedures already in existence? Just a thought...

Posted by: jyjr16 | June 2, 2010 11:30 PM | Report abuse

jyjr16: You can't protest judgement calls, and even then, a protest only matters if it makes a difference in the result of a game, and the Tigers still *won* the game.

As far as I'm concerned, whether or not they change the call retroactively (which I think is about as likely as the Nats winning the World Series this year), he pitched a perfect game: He, as the pitcher, did his job perfectly, and the fielders behind him did their jobs perfectly. The one person on the field who failed to do his job perfectly was Jim Joyce.

And either way, it seems most baseball fans are willing to accept that he did pitch a perfect game.

Posted by: zaph | June 2, 2010 11:46 PM | Report abuse

Dave,
That is perfectly logical, fair, simple, just, and reasonable. That's 5 reasons why Uncle Bud would never do it.

Posted by: vtavgjoe | June 2, 2010 11:59 PM | Report abuse

This isn't an issue, because this call will almost certainly be reversed.

MLB does have the authority to overrule a call on the field. If MLB does not invoke this power considering the situation, then there is absolutely no reason for this power to exist because there is absolutely no less controversial a situation to overrule a blown call. It doesn't affect the outcome of the game. It doesn't affect the score of the game. And almost every party involved from the opposing team, right down to the umpire who made the bad call seem to agree that the runner didn't beat the throw.

This will be resolved by afternoon rush hour.

Posted by: jmorrisa | June 3, 2010 12:04 AM | Report abuse

My consolation idea was to have the official scorer call the play in question an error on Galarraga so that at least he'd get credit for a no-hitter, but they had the official scorer on MLB Network by phone and he said that he can't call it an error because there was no error on the play. (Except by the umpire.)

Posted by: jyjr16 | June 3, 2010 12:34 AM | Report abuse

As a life long Tiger fan I don't think I have ever been more disheartened by a Tiger game. But no matter how angry I am at the blown call, there were two people who acted with class: Galaragga and Joyce. Galaragga acted with humility and grace, and Joyce was man enough to admit his mistake and say so emphatically. I am very proud of the way the Tigers reacted after the game. It will take some time, if ever for Joyce to recover from the worst call of his career. I hope Selig will bail both of these guys out by reversing the call. It would save a lot of unnecssary pain for both the Tigers and Joyce who from all accounts in a highly respected and well liked umpire.

Posted by: nsemple2 | June 3, 2010 1:01 AM | Report abuse

What's happening in the universe that we could have three perfect games in a month?

Selig should definitely reverse the call on the throw to first and thus give Galarraga a perfect game. This was the simplest of all cases as the correct call would have ended the game right there - no arguing about the psychological effects, etc etc that would have followed had thus and so occurred or not occurred in the game afterward.

As this stands, it isn't fair to anybody, including the umpire, who will have to live with his egregious mistake forever if this call is not reversed.

The real issue is instant replay - and MLB needs to adopt it in some form.


Posted by: dcc1968 | June 3, 2010 1:46 AM | Report abuse

"Everyone who saw Detroit Tigers right-hander Armando Galarraga lose his perfect game in excruciating fashion will agree on three things:
*Umpire Jim Joyce blew the call.
*Galarraga deserved a perfect game.
*And something needs to be done."

Demonstrably not true. NOTHING NEEDS TO BE DONE. It's a freaking baseball game -- it's entertainment, get it?! What is entertaining about umpires huddling around a video replay screen for minutes on end?!?

I don't care that umps miss the occasional call. They're human, imperfect, no kidding, so what. Play the game and have fun, put on a show. Umps' calls and lucky bounces all even out in the long run anyway.

Do y'all really think NFL games are more entertaining since they started replay? I sure don't. And the net effect is the same anyway -- some calls are missed, some aren't, sometimes you get a break, sometimes you get hosed.

Just play the games and have fun.

Posted by: spunkydawg1 | June 3, 2010 2:12 AM | Report abuse

Oh, and Selig should not and absolutely will not reverse the call.

Posted by: spunkydawg1 | June 3, 2010 2:16 AM | Report abuse

Reverse the call. What else are commissioners for? Let him have the perfect game with an asterisk. What else are asterisks for?

Posted by: donnolo | June 3, 2010 4:24 AM | Report abuse

When the integrity of the game is impugned, as it was last night, MLB has to step in to rectify the situation.
They need to establish a system to correct obvious blunders for the sake of the game.

Posted by: pbshoe | June 3, 2010 5:03 AM | Report abuse

send ump to the minors.

Posted by: vwallen@bellatlantic.net | June 3, 2010 5:10 AM | Report abuse

I'm in total agreement with not changing outcomes. Fate is what it is, and that's part of the charm of the game. No matter how likely the eventual outcome was going to be following the bad call, SOMETHING might have been different, so you just can't screw around with it and pretend something else would've happened... er...except that's not true with 2 outs in the 9th. This game was OVER. If Selig changes this, nothing of consequence changes except the truth of what actually happened gets recorded properly. He absolutely should change the call - this is the one-in-a-million exceptional circumstance that cries out for the caretaker of the game to act to take care of the game.
This is going into baseball lore whether it's officially recorded as perfect or not, so that shouldn't be a factor in his decision. There's a difference between cold worship and love, so when Selig objects that "I can't break a century of precedent, and do something that's never been done before," someone should ask him "why not?".
For the pitcher, and his team, and the ump, Selig should make this right. The problem is that it would take a pair - a big pair - and my bet is that Selig only has peas.

Posted by: evilpettingzoo | June 3, 2010 6:39 AM | Report abuse

Armando Galarraga knows he threw a perfect game. That it's not noted in the baseball history books does not change that.

Posted by: jeadpt | June 3, 2010 6:47 AM | Report abuse

I'm generally against replay but this is an exceptional circumstance in that there is no disagreement about the call being blown, the game would have been over (so there is no concern about unwinding the rest of the game), and reversing the call wouldn't change who won.

This is indeed a one-in-a-million situation, there is no genuine concern about setting a precedent, and the best interests of baseball demand the call be reversed.

C'mon Bud, just for once, do the right thing.

Posted by: Meridian1 | June 3, 2010 6:48 AM | Report abuse

We were watching this game, and astounded along with everyone else at the ump's horrid call. If they can use instant replay for home runs, then for special circumstances like this, they should be able to use it as well. The ump admits his bad call, everyone saw that it was definitely an out - so Mr. Selig, step up and make this right!

Posted by: momE1 | June 3, 2010 6:52 AM | Report abuse

Obama says it's George Bush's fault!

Posted by: joeblotnik49 | June 3, 2010 7:17 AM | Report abuse

enough already with reversing calls & instant replay. do you think no other ball-strike calls were missed during the game. do you not think that they could have affecting the outcome. officiating in all sports is worse than ever and it is because of instant replay

Posted by: sjt1455 | June 3, 2010 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Why not adopt the NFL approach for the future? In pro football, a call is made, but it's not official until the Referee makes it so. It should be the same with the baseball, only with the home plate umpire serving in the role of the referee.

In this case, Selig needs to do the right thing. Imagine how great it would be if Cleveland management, and all the players went to the Commissioner and petitioned for the reversal. What a great day for the sport of baseball that would be.

Posted by: adrienne_najjar | June 3, 2010 7:52 AM | Report abuse

Another example of an outsized ego getting in the way. In 1,000 games many hitters never touch first - or are obviously late - and the umps ignore the miss. When a perfect game is on the line Joyce wants to be the center of attention and deliberately calls it wrong. OR was Joyce acting out of disdain for the Tigers? Or was he told not to a perfect game happen AGAIN! by the league? With all the corruption by officials in other sports, we do need to ask.

Posted by: therev1 | June 3, 2010 7:57 AM | Report abuse

Reverse the call. I wish it was Joe West who had blown it, then I'd say "fire the ump, too."

Posted by: jca-CrystalCity | June 3, 2010 7:57 AM | Report abuse

And after they reverse this call they can reverse Don Denkinger's call in the 1985 World Series and award the championship to the Cardinals. Then they can go review every single no-hitter that wasn't a perfect game and see if the umpires made the right balls/strike calls or whether a fielder really should have been given an error.

Give it a rest. A perfect game requires perfect pitching, perfect fielding and perfect umpiring. This obviously was not a perfect game.

Posted by: ShovelPlease | June 3, 2010 8:23 AM | Report abuse

@therev1- Can you read? The ump was in tears!

Posted by: semilost44 | June 3, 2010 8:26 AM | Report abuse


Posted by: jyjr16

"My consolation idea was to have the official scorer call the play in question an error on Galarraga so that at least he'd get credit for a no-hitter, but they had the official scorer on MLB Network by phone and he said that he can't call it an error because there was no error on the play."
_______________________________________

I thought of your same idea immediately and completely disagree with the official scorer. The scorer should wait of course to see how MLB reacts. But there is certainly room to call for an error, after all the runner should have been out and was not. The Umpires reasoning was that the pitcher missed the base so therefore it is E-1. Certainly better than a result of a 1 hitter.

Posted by: kieran2001 | June 3, 2010 8:28 AM | Report abuse

People express outrage at the idea of overturning the call because of other bad calls in the past that were not overturned. How about one call that was made according to the rules but was overturned? I'm thinking, of course, of the Pine Tar Game. I believe the AL President overturned the call in that game based on the "spirit of the rules." That's certainly a weaker reason to overturn a call than "the umpire was wrong," and it at least represents precedent for the concept that a call can be overturned in an unusual situation.

Whether a call, including this one, SHOULD be overturned is another question, but clearly the authority is there for it to be done.

The big thing I have to echo is the question about what's in the water at ballparks this year to cause this sudden outbreak of perfect games. This would be three in under a month and four in just over a year. There were 20+-year periods with no perfect games.

Posted by: 1995hoo | June 3, 2010 8:57 AM | Report abuse

In this time and era there is no question a supreme umpire, off-the field with instant replay capabilities, is needed to address questionable calls. Wake-up Bud,(this one is not for me), have the guts and go for it.

Posted by: kp4yw | June 3, 2010 9:08 AM | Report abuse

3 words for the baseball fans who have been claiming all morning long that baseball will not and should not step in and overrule the call on the field: PINE TAR INCIDENT.

In that game, the league overruled the judgment call on the field by the umpire and effectively changed the outcome of a game just as the Yankees(*spit*)were heading into a pennant race.

So, such an action would not be unprecedented. In fact, in my opinion, such an action is necessary for the integrity of the league. If Selig refuses to act on this quickly, he is going to be forced to institute an instant replay system to fix such cases, which he doesn't want to do. Additionally, refusal to act on this would add another ugly incident to Selig's legacy to rival the tied All-Star Game.

Posted by: brainpinky | June 3, 2010 9:11 AM | Report abuse

The umpires are really bad this year. Get rid of them and get some new young blood in there.
Yes protest the game. And Selig should reverse the call. Simple as that.

Posted by: joebstewart | June 3, 2010 9:20 AM | Report abuse

I still can not believe there are still people on here that would argue against instant replay. There is a tool that can correct a wrong and the thinking is nah..we rather preserve the charm of the game...mistakes happen. That is unbelievable.

Major sports in the US is not just a game. It is a multi billion dollar industry. An incorrect call at a crucial moment can cause a team/player/coach their season or even their jobs. Jobs and millions of dollars at stake.

What if something like this occured in a tied game 7 of a world series bottom of the 9th two outs. What if a missed call in that situation ended up causing a team the championship. Do we just say oh well?

Posted by: 6thsense79 | June 3, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

LOL...these purists are idiots. It's like saying to an innocent guy who just got released from jail after DNA proved he was innocent, "the flaws of the justice system are part of the CHARM." Accidents happen.

Who are you? Rand Paul?

Posted by: Please_Fix_VAs_Roads | June 3, 2010 9:28 AM | Report abuse

I don't think you can reverse this call. It sets a really bad precident. Also the calls to give the pitcher an error on the play to at least give him a no-hitter is an even worse solution. Unfortunately, the umpire blew the call, and what bothers me even more about the situation is that the umpire blew a similar call in the previous inning (bottom of the 8th) where a runner was ruled safe on a bang-bang play where replay showed the runner was probably out (not quite as bad as the play in questions), which eventually led to a run.

Jim Joyce and all umpires for that matter need to be put on notice that their performance on the field affects their employment. There's very little oversight of MLB umpires, and because of that, there are vast inconsistancies between them, and the obvious personality conflicts that occur with certain players and managers. I feel realy bad for Galaraga, but I don't think there's anything MLB can do about it. Everyone must remember that a perfect game winner and no-hitter is permanently enshrined in Cooperstown, and as this game was originally scored, it was not a perfect game, and not even a no-hitter.

Posted by: Russtinator | June 3, 2010 9:39 AM | Report abuse

Dave...come on. What if the Indians had loaded the bases after that and someone from Cleveland hit a grand slam to win the game 4-3. Would you erase all of those stats too because of the blown call? It is easier to argue it here because the next batter was a ground out. But what if it had not been. Where do you draw the line? The play ultimately had no effect on the outcome of the game, just on a very notable baseball achievement.

As for instant replay, I have no problem with it, just need to figure out a good system. There can often be 10-20 close plays at 1st, 2nd or home in a game and we sure as hell can't review all of them. Then we would have 5 hour baseball games and who would watch. Needs to be something like the NFL where each team gets two challenges per game. Of course, what do they lose if they get a chalenge wrong?

Posted by: happydad3 | June 3, 2010 9:44 AM | Report abuse

If official scorers get 24 hours to change "official" records, I am sure the commissioner could do the same. Remember the George Brett "pine tar incident" that was overturned and the game was resumed from that point.

Posted by: ronaldjeffcoat | June 3, 2010 9:46 AM | Report abuse

NOTHING NEEDS TO BE DONE. It's a freaking baseball game -- it's entertainment, get it?! What is entertaining about umpires huddling around a video replay screen for minutes on end?!?

I don't care that umps miss the occasional call. They're human, imperfect, no kidding, so what. Play the game and have fun, put on a show. Umps' calls and lucky bounces all even out in the long run anyway.Do y'all really think NFL games are more entertaining since they started replay? I sure don't. And the net effect is the same anyway -- some calls are missed, some aren't, sometimes you get a break, sometimes you get hosed.
Just play the games and have fun.
Posted by: spunkydawg1


well put! Tigers still WON

Posted by: mloaks | June 3, 2010 9:52 AM | Report abuse

Joyce ruled that the runner beat the throw, not that the pitcher failed to step on the bag. You can't give an error on that.
One idiotic idea down the drain.

Posted by: jeadpt | June 3, 2010 9:53 AM | Report abuse

Baseball is just a GAME.. so of course they can reverse the call, cancel out the last at bat and declare it a perfect game. Look if the Olympics can take away a medal long after the event is over and declare a new winner baseball can certainly do this... It's the RIGHT thing to do...

Posted by: sovine08 | June 3, 2010 9:53 AM | Report abuse

As a general rule, I think that umpire errors are a part of the game. Of course you want to minimize them as much as possible, but you can't go back after every game and look at the videotape and make corrections for every missed call.

HOWEVER, I think this is a unique situation in that it was with with 2 outs in the ninth and it was a clear mistake that the umpire admits and if it was made correctly the game would have ended right then and there. If the missed call had taken place in, say, the middle of the 3rd inning and the game continued with that being the only blemish on an otherwise perfect game I say it is a regrettable mistake that cannot be redressed since the proposed corrective (calling that batter out) cannot be imposed because it would require moving everyone elses outs to be moved one batter earlier. That would effectively change situational dynamics of every pitcher/batter matchup from that point on. BUT since this occurred on the last out it could and SHOULD be corrected by Bud Selig!

Posted by: CoachD1 | June 3, 2010 9:55 AM | Report abuse

Anyone watch Chicago vs Philly hockey last night. Several very close calls, and seems like the officials are on top of their replay game.

Posted by: 123cartoon | June 3, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

I suggest that Bud give the umpire an error on the call. This would allow the subsequent play to stand and leave the pitcher with a no-hit no-walk game, and no errors by players on the field. It would preserve the presence of a runner on base by an error and not by a hit, and preserve the subsequent ground-out.

Posted by: angusgoodson | June 3, 2010 10:00 AM | Report abuse

One consolation for Mr. Gallaragga. For the classy way he handled the ump's mistake, actually smiling good naturedly in disbelief before wholeheartedly and sincerely accepting the apology, he's going to be the most popular player in the league not to play on the home team. He should be in the record books with an asterisk. He'll be the only player in baseball history to pitch a perfect game denied to him by a less than perfect call. And didn't whine about it once.

Posted by: curtb | June 3, 2010 10:01 AM | Report abuse

If they dont correct this and make it a perfect game, I will never spend a single dollar on MLB again. They cannot allow their employees to do such wreckless things. There is no doubt the call was wrong, it wasn't close enough to question, it should have ended the game and frankly Selig should fix it. If he doesn't, I will boycott the sport with my dollars because I can't trust it any more.

Any chance Jim Joyce was upset with someone in Detroit?

Posted by: jaygatsby27 | June 3, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

I think Bud should overturn the call, but it probably doesn't matter. Either way it will still go into the record books with an asterisk, just like the not-quite-perfect games by Harvey Haddix and Ernie Shore.

Posted by: Cosmo06 | June 3, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Dave...come on. What if the Indians had loaded the bases after that and someone from Cleveland hit a grand slam to win the game 4-3. Would you erase all of those stats too because of the blown call? It is easier to argue it here because the next batter was a ground out. But what if it had not been. Where do you draw the line? The play ultimately had no effect on the outcome of the game, just on a very notable baseball achievement.
Posted by: happydad3
_____
That's the point it's easy to change this. Look we can play what if's all day and if the Indians ended up winning or even if the call happned in the 3rd inning and not the ninth you can't go back and change it. But this one is easy to do and everyone would be happy. No need to make a Federal case out of it.. Baseball is just a game so they can do whatever they want.. As far as the future cross that bridge when you get to it...


Posted by: sovine08 | June 3, 2010 10:03 AM | Report abuse

Umpires are part of the game. Their mistakes are part of the game too. Umps have a lot of responsibility and that adds to the sport.

Once you demand that every call needs to be perfect all of the time, you are asking to change the sport of baseball.

Posted by: ptltd1 | June 3, 2010 10:04 AM | Report abuse

Lifelong Tigers' fan here. I go back to 1961, when Norm Cash hit .361, Rocky hit 45 homers, and Frank Lary won 23. And never in my life have I seen a blown call like that. Fire him NOW.

Posted by: faygokid | June 3, 2010 10:10 AM | Report abuse

In 1972 Milt Pappas took a perfect game into the 9th inning vs. the Padres. With two outs, and the count 0-2, umpire Bruce Froemming called 4 straight balls when at least three of those pitches were clearly strikes. The next day Froemming told Pappas "show me a game where the ump didn't make an error". MLB has said for years they would do nothing because judgement calls, and the errors that come with them, are part of the game. If Selig overturns last night's call and awards Gallaraga a perfect game, he must do the same for Pappas.

Posted by: rjohnson5 | June 3, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Once you demand that every call needs to be perfect all of the time, you are asking to change the sport of baseball.
Posted by: ptltd1
_____
No one is asking that.. besides if that is the case why are their replays for homeruns? How might a hockey game change if there were no replays on goals??? Look no one is asking balls and strikes no one is saying every close play should be reviewed but a football type system giving a manager one or two changes to ask for a replay to get an IMPORTANT call correct seems very doable.. It's 2010 how does a pitcher lose a perfect game when it is so easy to get it right???

Posted by: sovine08 | June 3, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Sorry if I haven't read all comments, but the issue seems to me quite different from what's cited in those I have reviewed:

Of course the call can be reversed. Haven't errors been reversed post-game on review for ages? Reversing this call, however, will set quite a precedent. Would everyone be asking for this precedent if the call was made in the second inning? Would a pitcher to whom it happens in the fourth inning not have a precedent to invoke? Of course, an argument could be made that it's a great precedent, because in either of the above examples, the pitcher would be motivated to keep his "near-perfect" game going on the chance of getting a hit pardoned post-game.

Posted by: lawlorfrank | June 3, 2010 10:18 AM | Report abuse

Nothing beats instant replays. The accuity is better than 20x20, particularly if multiple HD cameras cover each spot on the playing field from all directions. So why not turn the entire stadium into "eyes" to monitor every play, nose pick, expletive, or expectoration?

Well, if fans don't like that option, and need a witness who does not side with one team or the other, then human umpires remain a necessity. And human vision and readiness incur occasional flaws. People watching the replays don't understand, of course, that the umpire does not have 360 degree perspective, slo-mo, or replay. Those who imagine otherwise will change their minds quickly after "umping" a few kid league games and endure manic parents' curses and spittle.

Posted by: jkoch2 | June 3, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

spunky,

You make the case exactly FOR reversing the call--if it's just a game, as you say (and of course it is), what harm is there in breaking with precedent and overturning the call?

sjt,

It's generally agreed upon that balls and strikes calls cannot be a part of any review system that's adopted if any are beyond the home-run review process currently in place. So in this case, we don't have to go back and check to make sure all balls and strikes were called correctly in order to preserve the integrity of the perfect game, because regardless of whether they were or not the fact remains that had the ump raised his arm instead of spreading them wide, the game would have gone in the books as a perfect game.

Posted by: markf40 | June 3, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

I am wondering why we have not heard one word from Selig yet.

I never thought I'd say this but I feel sorry for Joyce. I know he feels really bad. And in real time the foot on the bag was a fraction of a second late, of course easy to see in slow motion, unfortunately the umps are not equipped with slow-mo eyes.

Posted by: jtsw | June 3, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

People need to get over the idea that results need to be changed in the interest of 'justice.' Life is inherently unjust at times. Trying to concoct some sort of retroactive solution to make things the way we might want to be in some kind of fantasy world isn't the way things work, and it isn't the way that they should work. Should we also go back to 1985 and re-categorize Don Denkinger's missed call in the World Series? Of course not. The rules are the rules, and you can't recast them in some kind of effort to 'do justice.'

Posted by: xrtwrp453 | June 3, 2010 10:27 AM | Report abuse

This is like the 'let's give everybody a trophy' bs. There have been plenty of perfect games and no-hitters blown by bad calls. And, I'll bet there have been perfect games and no-hitters because of blown calls.

Because of tv, and slo-mo, and instant replay we can study and review and over-analyze every aspect of everyday life, but that doesn't make life any better. Would this guy really be happy being known as the 'Whoops, it really was a perfect game' pitcher? Does it get an asterisk like the Redskins Super Bowl win in the strike season?

Leave it alone.

Posted by: 21stCenturyCaveman | June 3, 2010 10:27 AM | Report abuse

I'm pretty much alone here it appears, because I think it would be a travesty for them to overturn the call on the field. This is not to say that I don't think a perfect game was thrown, but that circumstances don't always let that performance result in a perfect game happening. A ball will drop out of an outstretched glove. A double clutch will result in a runner just beating a throw. An umpire will botch a call. This is all part of the game! It's also why there have been only 21 perfect games in the history of the sport. The stars must align perfectly.

There are only 2 reasons that this is getting press. One is that it was a blown call for out #27. That's certainly 'tragic', but no different than if it had been on out #1! Would the fans be screaming for a call reversal if the umpire botched that first play and then the pitcher retired the next 27 batters? Probably not....

The second reason is that WE all want to remember our 'part' (ie watching) of a season where 2 perfect games were thrown in a month's time. There's an element of 'we were there' that everyone feels they were robbed of. That's understandable, but misplaced. I think Gallaragga's 'stolen game' is going to go down in history as one of the iconic moments of the sport. We were there for THAT.

One other thing. There's no doubt that a bad call cost this pitcher his perfect game. However, there have certainly been no shortage of bad calls that have HELPED others to no-hitters and perfect games. Did we overturn those? Umpires are of the game's palate, just like the arena/field, weather, lights, etc.. Sometimes they get in the way of the game. So what?

Nothing that's happened takes away from this kid what is a lifetime achievement for him. Plus he handled the disappointment with a grace that says more of him than his pitching. Congrats.

Posted by: cometboy | June 3, 2010 10:28 AM | Report abuse

Reverse the call, then reverse the call in the 8th that lead to 2 Tigers runs, and just keep going back and reversing all the bad calls in the past. And then let's reverse bad calls in football, basketball, hockey, boxing, tennis, the Olympics. They are part of sports. Get a better ump, he seems pretty bad, but there is always a human element and mistakes are going to be made. By pitchers, fielders, batters, runners, umpires, coaches, managers, GMs, owners, and fans.

Posted by: RussellCox | June 3, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Baseball is baseball, the umpire is part of the game, same as the players there will be bad calls, errors are made they happen all the time, same as bad pitches, get over it....

Posted by: theidahokid | June 3, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Obama says it's George Bush's fault!

Posted by: joeblotnik49 | June 3, 2010 7:17 AM | Report abuse

__________

yeah it is not like BUSH ever tried to REWTIRE HISTORY EITHER

Posted by: racerdoc | June 3, 2010 10:38 AM | Report abuse

Why not just record the perfect game with 28 outs with an * explaining the situation?

Posted by: herbinthebronx | June 3, 2010 10:39 AM | Report abuse

If there was any justice in MLB the next story would cover former umpire Jim Joyce. The runner was just to obviously OUT!

Posted by: whocares666 | June 3, 2010 10:41 AM | Report abuse

Remember Fred Merkle, famous for the play that gave him his nickname "Bonehead"; Jim Joyce deserves the same lasting infamy: "Blind Jimmy" Joyce.

Besides that, he should be fired--no excuses. Everyone who was watching could see that the ball got to Galarraga and that he tagged the base before the runner hit it.

As to the call, "thems the breaks."

Posted by: mini2 | June 3, 2010 10:41 AM | Report abuse

Shovel,

The umpire wasn't perfect so it's not a perfect game? A perfect game applies to the pitcher and the players behind him, NOT the umpire. Umpires are *never* perfect, nor should they be expected to be. Recognizing that, by your criteria there never has been a perfect game, since upon further review there must surely have been some balls-and-strikes calls in every perfect game that could have gone the other way and ultimately changed the course of the game in some little way that might have prevented the game from being perfect.

Russtinator,

What does being enshrined in Cooperstown have to do with it? Why shouldn't he be enshrined along with the 20-odd other pitchers who've done it, since everyone knows that that's what he accomplished?

curtb,

I can't imagine any player handling this with more class and dignity than did Gallaraga. Perhaps that was the silver lining for him in all of this if the call is never reversed--he got a chance to indelibly stamp in the public's mind his character.

Posted by: markf40 | June 3, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

Overturn calls retroactively after a game has concluded? Should we also reverse scores? There have been blown calls for decades. What's the limit on what should be reversable and what shouldn't be? This could open a Pandora's box.

Posted by: Sutter | June 3, 2010 10:47 AM | Report abuse

Shenin, of course, was little Davey Do-over as a boy, so expunging the record is easy for him. Not for sensible baseball fans.

Still there is one thing the scorer could do: charge Galarraga with an error on the play, taking away the hit, and giving him a no-hitter if not a perfecto. Since the throw beat the runner, his foot must have been off the bag, hence, an error.

Of course the umpire didn't signal that he missed the bag, but so what? We saw what we saw. No-hitter; No perfect game.

Posted by: Jessel1 | June 3, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Theres no crying in baseball, no redos and no replay. Keep it that way.

Posted by: bob29 | June 3, 2010 10:50 AM | Report abuse

Galaraga has proven himself a class act for how he has comported himself through this affair. Where others would have thrown down their hats and gotten in the ump's face, Galaraga took it in stride. He deserves to be proud of his (almost) perfect game.

Posted by: herrbrahms | June 3, 2010 10:50 AM | Report abuse

@vtavgjoe: You hit the nail right on the head.

Bud Selig has never had the stones to make the correct decisions when confronted with monumental situations. He didn't have the stones to confront the Players Union regarding steroids until Congress threatened to take matters into their own hands, and even then Selig only did the bare minimum necessary to avoid congressional action. I predict that Selig will react to this situation in the exact same way he always does: he'll hem and haw for a ridiculous amount of time, then hide behind some silly, half-baked excuse for maintaining the status quo.

Posted by: dfl1 | June 3, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Can we have our Nationals' win over Houston back on Tuesday night after the umps blew the swinging strike that would have ended the game one pitch before two runs scored to lose it for us?

I'm all for that guy getting the perfect game he pitched, and I am also all for us getting the game that we won in the win column where it belongs.

Posted by: FergusonFoont | June 3, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Of course Selig should change the call. But first he should restore the greatest game ever pitched -- Harvey Haddix's 12 perfect innings in 1959, a game Haddix lost in the 13th -- to 'perfect game' status.

Removing that game from the 'perfect game' status was a greater injustice than this judgment error, and that obscenity was perpetrated by a misguided committee years after the fact.

Posted by: bertilack | June 3, 2010 10:57 AM | Report abuse

I am thinking that one of the reasons that Joyce missed the call is because they rely on sound as much as sight at 1st base and he would not have heard the sound of the ball go into the glove because the ball was caught on the web, so he would have heard the foot hit the bag and not the ball hit the glove. Tough call any way you look at it.

Posted by: jtsw | June 3, 2010 10:58 AM | Report abuse

Of course the call can be reversed. Haven't errors been reversed post-game on review for ages? Reversing this call, however, will set quite a precedent. Would everyone be asking for this precedent if the call was made in the second inning? Would a pitcher to whom it happens in the fourth inning not have a precedent to invoke?
Posted by: lawlorfrank
_______
Why worry about precedent? This would be a one time reversal. For the future install instant replay that a manager can invoke once or twice a game. If there are more bad calls than that in a game then baseball really does have big problems. And no if this had happened in the 3rd inning NO one would be asking for the call to be overturned.. that early in a game it changes who bats in what inning and changes the pitcher's whole mindset for the game... What I don't understand is all the hand wringing over this.. Everyone knows this pitcher should have gotten a perfect game. So let him have it. Baseball is a GAME!!! They can put in any rule they want at any time. Changing that ruling to be fair and make everyone happy seems to me to be a no brainer..

Posted by: sovine08 | June 3, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

As unjust and unfair as this blown call was, the fact is baseball has so resisted any move to instant replay they have refused to incorporate how technology might improve the calling of a game. Simply put, the rules in place as of this date do not allow for any reversal of a call no matter how wrong it was.

But, if there is any clear thinking person in charge of baseball (and given their history that is doubtful) they will immediately allow for instant replay by officials on disputed calls (not balls and strikes) with a reasonable degree of appeals by both sides and call this new measure the Gallaraga Rule. THis young man may have had baseball immortality stolen from him but his name could live on forever by doing so.

Posted by: bobfbell | June 3, 2010 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Theres no crying in baseball, no redos and no replay. Keep it that way.
Posted by: bob29
____
No replay EXCEPT for home runs you mean. Baseball changes rules all the time from adding a DH to taking the * away from Maris 61 HR's. Sports correct themselves.. this is one time it should do it again...

Posted by: sovine08 | June 3, 2010 11:05 AM | Report abuse

Deetroit, the Tigers, and the whole state of Michigan can't seem to get a lucky break these days.

How refreshing to see Galarraga act like a gentleman, even with the missed call.

Galarraga sure has class.

He deserved the perfect game. Watching and listening to the players and announcers after the play was dramatic in a way I don't think I have seen ever in baseball.

The Tigers should concentrate on winning the division. Catch and stay ahead of Minnesota now so we don't have to go through another tie-breaker.

Go Tigers!

Posted by: celestun100 | June 3, 2010 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Jessel,

So it's OK for an official scorer to retroactively *incorrectly* reverse a call and give the pitcher a lesser accomplishment, but not OK for the commissioner to retroactively *correctly* reverse a call and give the pitcher the greater accomplishment that he actually achieved?

Posted by: markf40 | June 3, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

@faygokid

Here is a link for you to listen to:
http://bethepower.com/music/gogetemtigers.mp3

It's that Tiger song from 1968.

Even if he didn't get the perfect game, you have to be happy that he looked so good. With Verlander doing so well and Galarraga looking good, maybe the Tigers will get going. Cabrera is doing great, it looks like we have a chance.

Posted by: celestun100 | June 3, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

I'm an Indians fan. Hate to admit that, but I am. I don't think you'd find a Cleveland player that would not want that call reversed. Even though they are on the wrong side of history they respect the game and KNOW that they were perfected. Selig doesn't have the stones to correct this blunder.

Posted by: BrownPants | June 3, 2010 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Sez rjohnson5: "If Selig overturns last night's call and awards Gallaraga a perfect game, he must do the same for Pappas." Seems to me it's a different situation. In the Pappas game, after the first blown pitch, there were subsequent pitches that affected the play of the game. Would Pappas have pitched differently if that first ball had been called a strike? You don't know. So, that bell can't be unrung. In yesterday's game, the at-bat after the blown call was inconsequential. Also, I think Joyce's immediate admission that he erred on the call is significant. Did the ump in the Pappas game admit to screwing up on all the disputed strike/ball decisions? (I don't know the answer....but I suspect not.)

Posted by: mvm2 | June 3, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

Some wrongs are difficult to make right. This one isn't. It won't affect the outcome of the gsme or the standings to reverse this one call. The circumstances are exceptional and the unpire has admitted his mistake. It costs no one anything to fix it. The other "remedy" -- instant replay -- fixes nothing; it does not correct the error. But it would cost the game and its fans. Even limited expanded replay would do two things I wouldnb't like: (1) lengthen what is already an almost intolerable playing time for an average game, and (2) provide yet another distraction for TV commentators and the press, who no longer seem able to tell us what's happening on the field because the do have instant replay. When the action is slow, we don't get play-by-play anymore, we get sideline commentators interviewing players' grandmothers about the wool socks they used to knit for them and similarly uninteresting junk. If replay is adopted, it should be like the NFL -- two challenges a game for strictly limited types of calls. And it should be accompanied by a structly-enforced time limit between pitches. And networks should immediately fire all of their sideline commentators then seriously consider whether they really need more than one person in the broadcast booth. They're killing the game with all of their "expert" nonsense.

Posted by: qball43 | June 3, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

No one has brought up the fact that there were 4 umpires working that game. Were the other 3 asleep? They all seemed to rush in to help the umpire when he is swarmed by the players. Why did not one of them talk to Joyce and say are you sure he was safe because the rest of the world did not think he was. What happened to the umpire conference in an effort to get it right. Shame on all 4 of the umpires.

Posted by: fitzmauricejack | June 3, 2010 11:21 AM | Report abuse

With virtually THREE "perfect games" already this season, after just 19 in MLB since 1876, we're undoubtedly seeing the results of TOO MANY many so-called big league teams [30] and the concomitant dearth of of genuine big-league players comprising those teams.

Do you enjoy paying all that money to watch what used to be Double- and Triple-A-level baseball?

Maybe steroids were [are] beneficial in giving a lot of minor leaguers needed boosts.

By the way, is this Galarraga related to Andres, the guy whose BL career was unquestionably saved by performance enhancing chemicals?

Posted by: perryneheum | June 3, 2010 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Keep instant replay out of baseball. Baseball is a game of imperfections and yesterday's blown perfect game is a great example of the beauty of the sport and the game will be talked about for a very long time.

Heck, if you are going to have instant replay, do away with umpires all together. Use those pitch trackers we see everynight on ESPN for balls and strikes and the video for outs.

Posted by: clydet42 | June 3, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

The play will forever stand as one of the most notorious blown calls in baseball history. However, in the grand scheme of things, this injustice is relatively mild. (I'm sure the Tigers' management will view the game as "perfect" when it is time to negotiate Mr. Galaragga's next megabucks contract.) Now, if you want to talk about a higher order of injustice, let's, for example, talk about the folks living inside the Gaza. That's injustice with a capital "I."

Posted by: zephyr99 | June 3, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

"No one has brought up the fact that there were 4 umpires working that game. Were the other 3 asleep?"

Umpires do not normally confer on these sorts of calls. Don Denkinger was on SportsCenter this morning talking about it and he said that a call on a tag at a base is the sort of call on which they never confer because the other umpires are so much further away. I'm not entirely certain I buy the argument--after all, it's routine to go to the first- or third-base umpire on a check-swing call--but I have to concede that I don't ever recall seeing the umpires confer on a play of this sort.

Posted by: 1995hoo | June 3, 2010 11:28 AM | Report abuse

1995hoo asked "What's in the water" to cause 3 perfect games this year (it WAS a perfect game; Selig only has to correct the actual boxscore). But to answer the question, it's more like what's NOT in the water? Notice how pitching is becoming more prominent as we get away from the steroids era? Suddenly those middle infielders poking balls over the fence are dying short of the warning track. And the best are succumbing to the rigors of the long season. Indeed, "Baseball" in the truest sense, is back.

Posted by: chris-gso | June 3, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

I think it is worse if your team loses as a result of a bad call. Since the Tigers won, it is still a shut out, they should tell people to lay off the ump.

It would have been better if it didn't count as a hit, then he could have at least had a no hitter.

It is bizarre, but the ump called it like he saw it at the moment and that is what the umpires have to do.

Posted by: celestun100 | June 3, 2010 11:32 AM | Report abuse

Anyone who brings up the arguement that steroids are gone that the reason for all these perfect games stop . Im starting to hear this through out. Can anyone take into account that pitching has gotten alot better the last 3 years and and even 10 years when the steroid era started. i take into account that slumps are happening , young players have been called up are struggling but they will eventually figure it out andu know some of the best hitters we know and love are getting older and cant expect those same players put up numbers like they have. people can say steroids are gone thats why there are these perfect games but lets give credit to these pitchers. u Can steroids is the reason but teams still are putting up big numbers

Posted by: cjdwolfpack | June 3, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

"You can't change history..."

-------------------------------------------

Tha's not changing history. It's setting it straight.

Posted by: waterfrontproperty | June 3, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Let's say the runner was clearly safe but the umpire called him out. Would we demand that the commissioner order the game resumed with two outs and a runner on first? The game is played by humans and umpired by humans. Bill Buckner having a ground ball roll through his legs, Johnny Pesky holding the ball while Enos Slaughter scored, Jim Joyce missing the call, are all part of the human aspect. You can't, and shouldn't, mess with that unless the games are to be umpired and played by computer.

Posted by: SilverSpring8 | June 3, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

"How refreshing to see Galarraga act like a gentleman, even with the missed call." Seconded. (Thirded? Fourteenthed?) Both principals -- Joyce and Galarraga -- have provided rare and stellar examples of maturity, responsibility and sportsmanship. Imagine if the principals had been Bill Hohn (the clown who ejected Oswalt over nothing) and Curt Schilling.

Posted by: mvm2 | June 3, 2010 11:40 AM | Report abuse

what about the home plate umpire in the Halladay perfect game? While Halladay struck out the next to last batter of the game (the last batter grounded out), not one of the pitches was in the strike zone. Should something happen in this game?

Posted by: GaryRosenthal | June 3, 2010 11:41 AM | Report abuse

http://www.freep.com/article/20100603/SPORTS02/100603024/1321/

Jim Leyland is calling for Tiger fans to cheer Joyce today, not boo. Another class act.

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Posted by: goedefrence | June 3, 2010 11:43 AM | Report abuse

The author is 100% right - too easy. I figured this out at 3am when I had to get up and feed my infant son, turned on Sportscenter and said while not even 1/4 awake 'Selig should just overrule this - too easy'.

Come on Bud, you can do it, come on big guy, you can do it, it's OK, it's alright, you can do it.

Posted by: johnfickel | June 3, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

There is an old story about a runner sliding into home,the catcher tags him,and then they both turn to the umpire.Since he hasn't made any sign,one of them says,"Well,is it safe or is it out?"The umpire replies,"It ain't nothing 'til I call it."That might seem more subjective than we would like,but that's how the game works.

Posted by: seanmg | June 3, 2010 11:50 AM | Report abuse

Its a darn shame, but it is baseball. I remember the homerun that wasn't at Yankee stadium in the AL championship game against the Orioles when that kid stole the ball from play. Should baseball go back and retroactively change that call? Of course not. What makes baseball great, and fun to debate, are the human decisions made during games. Stop looking for retribution and just enjoy the arguement.

Posted by: dougw3 | June 3, 2010 11:55 AM | Report abuse

It's terrible indeed. But to go back and "make it didn't happen" would be worse. Do you take the hit away? Or make it the only perfect game ever with a hit in it? Let it go. BTW, WTF is it with all these perfect games and almosts all of a sudden?

Posted by: Nemo24601 | June 3, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Everyone is so up in arms about this - fans, commentators, etc. And for what - an individual accomplishment? Is this what baseball is about?

Where was the outrage the night before when a blown call on a check swing 3rd strike to Lance Berkman should have ended the game with the Nationals winning (instead, the Astros won the game on the next pitch)? Other than from Nats fans, there was none - no calls for an expansion of instant replay, nothing.

If we want Selig to reverse a call just to get someone's name in the record books but not one that changed the outcome of a game, then there's something very, very wrong with us. Something seriously wrong with us.

Posted by: NickHammer | June 3, 2010 12:06 PM | Report abuse

Sorry but if Bud Selig invokes the "Best Interest of Baseball" Clause here, he, like Fay Vincent who used it with relative abandon, will be abusing his power as Commissioner.

And why? Well, Bud will certainly be righting a wrong but what about the next clearly blown call? Stay off the slippery slope.

Posted by: CapsNut | June 3, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

Theres no crying in baseball, no redos and no replay. Keep it that way.
Posted by: bob29
____
No replay EXCEPT for home runs you mean. Baseball changes rules all the time from adding a DH to taking the * away from Maris 61 HR's. Sports correct themselves.. this is one time it should do it again...


Posted by: sovine08 | June 3, 2010 11:05 AM | Report abuse

_________________________________________

Right now we have replay on HRs. I'm still not in favor of changing this call. Here's why: theres a certain perfection to the game from the distance between the bases and to home plate that makes these plays close. The umpires are part of that. Gallaraga got a bad break. But now he is known as the guy who a.)pitched a perfect game AND b.) was such an excellent sport he didn't complain when it was taken unfairly. That IS justice and perfection -he is larger still than just a perfect game pitcher. Please don't take that away.

Posted by: bob29 | June 3, 2010 12:14 PM | Report abuse

What would have happened if the reverse had happened? What if Galarraga Had his perfect game going into the ninth and on the second out of the inning there is a close play and the Joyce calls the runner out at third. Then he gets the next batter out and he has his perfect game. What if the replay shows that the second out was a bad call. The runner was safe and the replay is clear. Do we take away his perfect game? Do we go back and replay the game from that point? Changing calls like this after the fact is ludicrous. Human error is a part of baseball. Always will be and always should be.

Posted by: happydad3 | June 3, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

There's no disputing that Galarraga PITCHED a perfect game. In fact, he pitched a perfect game plus one, 28 consecutive outs. But it's not recorded as a perfect game for one reason and one reason only: E-Umpire, with 2 outs in the bottom of the 9th. Even the umpire admits it (for which I give him credit). In this unique circumstance it would be easy enough for Bud Selig to order that baseball's official records reflect that on June 2, 2010, Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga PITCHED a perfect game, with an asterisk to reflect the uncontested error by the umpire. If the Commissioner has the power to order that Roger Maris' 61-homer season be recorded with an asterisk, he surely has power to order that Armando Galarraga'a remarkable pitching performance be memorialized in baseball's record books with an asterisk. It doesn't change what happened on the field, and doesn't set a precedent for retroactively changing outcomes of games. It merely acknowledges the reality of what happened on the field. The simple fact is, the kid pitched a perfect game and then some, and that fact should be recorded in baseball's official records if those records are to faithfully and accurately reflect what happened on the field of play.

Posted by: bradk1 | June 3, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse

No replay EXCEPT for home runs you mean. Baseball changes rules all the time from adding a DH to taking the * away from Maris 61 HR's. Sports correct themselves.. this is one time it should do it again...


Posted by: sovine08

----------------------------

Maybe...but you8 don't do it retroactively, you do it going forward. You want to add replay to every out call, fine, but you don't go back and change a call after the fact. I can't imagine baseball with replay on out calls. Games will take forever. Think of all the shoestring catches, near tags turning double plays, bang-bang plays at first. We will end up with 5 hour games that no one will want to watch!

Posted by: happydad3 | June 3, 2010 12:24 PM | Report abuse

There's no disputing that Galarraga PITCHED a perfect game. In fact, he pitched a perfect game plus one, 28 consecutive outs. But it's not recorded as a perfect game for one reason and one reason only: E-Umpire, with 2 outs in the bottom of the 9th. Even the umpire admits it (for which I give him credit). In this unique circumstance it would be easy enough for Bud Selig to order that baseball's official records reflect that on June 2, 2010, Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga PITCHED a perfect game, with an asterisk to reflect the uncontested error by the umpire. If the Commissioner has the power to order that Roger Maris' 61-homer season be recorded with an asterisk, he surely has power to order that Armando Galarraga'a remarkable pitching performance be memorialized in baseball's record books with an asterisk. It doesn't change what happened on the field, and doesn't set a precedent for retroactively changing outcomes of games. It merely acknowledges the reality of what happened on the field. The simple fact is, the kid pitched a perfect game and then some, and that fact should be recorded in baseball's official records if those records are to faithfully and accurately reflect what happened on the field of play.

Posted by: bradk1 | June 3, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse
----------

GREAT idea. I completely agree. And that could put an end to this!

Posted by: happydad3 | June 3, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

Even if the commish overturned, well, there'd be an asterisk. What a game. Let's not forget Austin Jackson's no-see-um catch in deep center. Jackson giveth, Joyce taketh away. That's baseball. Galarraga's good humor through it all will be the legend that comes out of this.

Posted by: jujy54 | June 3, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

"Erase Trevor Crowe's groundout -- it never happened. Only a grinch (or a Cleveland Indians player) would protest such a thing."

----------------

Actually Dave, the Indians radio guys said they were "sickened" by the call during and after the 9th inning. Today they are reporting that the Indians players don't feel right about what happened, including Jason Donald who commented that he was trying his best to beat the throw but only wanted a legitimate hit.

Posted by: remember1007 | June 3, 2010 1:46 PM | Report abuse

By the way, Joyce also blew a call earlier in the game, from which the Tigers scored 2 runs.

Posted by: remember1007 | June 3, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

if you over turn this one call, it opens the books to have teams asking all the time for calls to be changed. The first one that comes to mind is the hose job on the nats the other night when Berkman should have been called out on a third strike. The ump blew the call - game should have been over - Nats win. Instead he gets a hit and the Nats lose.

If you change for the Tigers, you gotta change for the nats.

I dont actually believe this, but hopefully you get my point.

Posted by: capsfansince74 | June 3, 2010 1:57 PM | Report abuse

GM gave Galarraga a red Corvette.

Posted by: celestun100 | June 3, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Oh. And another thing, would Seelig intervening be a little too much like a note from your mom? Galarraga is way too beg for that. Leave it alone. It's in the books. The hilarious thing is that baseball is a game of both abundant stats and abundant subjectivity. That's what makes it wonderful and enduring.

Posted by: jujy54 | June 3, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Oh. And another thing, would Seelig intervening be a little too much like a note from your mom? Galarraga is way too big for that. Leave it alone. It's in the books. The hilarious thing is that baseball is a game of both abundant stats and abundant subjectivity. That's what makes it wonderful and enduring.

Posted by: jujy54 | June 3, 2010 2:39 PM | Report abuse

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