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George Steinbrenner dies

New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner has died after suffering a massive heart attack. The news was first reported by the New York Daily News. Here is The Post's obituary.

Emergency crews responded to Steinbrenner's home Monday night and he was taken to a Tampa hospital in critical condition.

Steinbrenner's 80th birthday was July 4.

He had a heart attack, was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital in Tampa, Fla., and died at about 6:30 a.m, a person close to the owner told the Associated Press.

From CNN: "It is with profound sadness that the family of George M. Steinbrenner III announces his passing," a statement from his family said. ""He was an incredible and charitable man. First and foremost he was devoted to his entire family - his beloved wife, Joan; his sisters, Susan Norpell and Judy Kamm, his children, Hank, Jennifer, Jessica and Hal; and all of his grandchildren. He was a visionary and a giant in the world of sports. He took a great but struggling franchise and turned it into a champion again."

In a column written from the 2008 All Star Game in New York, Washington Post columnist Thomas Boswell wrote:

The All-Star Game here Tuesday was supposed to commemorate the last season of Yankee Stadium. Instead, it was transformed into a far more topical and touching evening -- a farewell to the third-of-a-century Yankee dynasty of George Steinbrenner III, the man whose wallet and will revived the most important franchise in the game.
When Steinbrenner, who seldom appears in public and never speaks when he does, rode a golf cart from the Yankees bullpen to the pitcher's mound on this evening, the symbolism pulled the whole night together. He brought with him four baseballs, one each for Yankees Hall of Famers Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Goose Gossage and Reggie Jackson, who threw out simultaneous first pitches. Only four? The ranks are thinning fast.
For months, this town has prepared an enormous baseball celebration for this day. Yet ironically, no one here seemed to understand the true focus of the night until it arrived. The Steinbrenner Era probably has run its course in the last seven seasons of incredibly expensive and disappointing postseason defeats. So the time was right, disguised as a Goodbye Ballpark affair, to pay respects to a man who spent decades being mocked across America while being grudgingly appreciated or amusingly endured here.

From the site of tonight's All-Star Game, Boswell says Steinbrenner would have enjoyed grabbing the spotlight once again.

This is exactly the ideal over-the-top farewell for a man who loved nothing better than to upstage his entire sport and steal every iota of attention for himself and his team.

In a 2009 column, Boswell said Redskins owner Daniel Snyder could learn a few things from Steinbrenner:

The Boss never stopped maintaining the appearance of control, bordering on interference. It was central to his self-image and his personality. But after a miserable eon without a World Series win from 1978 to '96 -- a period during which he went from a national caricature of the tyrannical but successful employer to a standing joke as an inept buffoon -- Steinbrenner evolved.

-- Dave Sheinin reports these quotes from Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig at the site of the All-Star Game in Anaheim, Calif. Selig said he was awakened this morning by a phone call "about George."

"I know he was controversial. I know all the arguments [against him]. He was clearly a giant of the sport. After all, when he took over the Yankees, the Yankees were struggling for the first time, and he did absolutely remarkable. I will say this: No one loved his team more than he did. ... I'm sorry this day happened"

-- Statement from the Washington Nationals:

"The Washington Nationals and the Lerner Family are deeply saddened by the loss of George Steinbrenner - a monumental figure of the baseball world for more than 35 years. He will be remembered as a driven competitor and champion, but also a man who gave much to the people and communities he loved. George was a one of a kind owner, sports figure, and man. He will be missed. Our condolences go out to the Steinbrenner family, the Yankees organization and Yankees fans everywhere."

-- Statement from Redskins owner Daniel Snyder (via Redskins Insider):

"I am sorry to hear of the passing of George Steinbrenner. I have a tremendous amount of respect for what he was able to accomplish, both in business and professional sports. He was very warm and gracious to me, personally writing numerous encouraging letters supporting my ownership of the Washington Redskins. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family."

-- Batimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos released the following statement:

"The Orioles are saddened to learn of the passing of George Steinbrenner. As an active participant in the organizational direction and operations of the New York Yankees, his name is as synonymous with that franchise as any of the legendary athletes who have played in pinstripes. On behalf of the Orioles organization, I extend my deepest condolences to his wife, Joan, and the members of his family."

-- Yankee great Yogi Berra: "George was The Boss, make no mistake. He built the Yankees into champions and that's something nobody can ever deny."

-- On his D.C. Sports Bog, Dan Steinberg looked back on Steinbrenner's thoughts on baseball in Washington and chimes in on comparisons between Steinbrenner and Daniel Snyder.

For more on Steinbrenner, here are a photo gallery and comments about him on Twitter.

By from staff reports  |  July 13, 2010; 9:43 AM ET
Categories:  Yankees  
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Next: George Steinbrenner comments on Twitter

Comments

Good timing, George, since he died this year there is no inheritance tax on the Yankees. His sons will save a billion dollars.

Posted by: RationalPolicy | July 13, 2010 9:59 AM | Report abuse

I'm so sorry to hear this. My condolences to his family and to the Yankees organization. Though I'm a hardcore Sox fan, Steinbrenner was certainly a legend of the modern game.

Posted by: jeffwacker | July 13, 2010 9:59 AM | Report abuse

Good timing, George. Since he died this year there is no inheritance tax on the Yankees. His sons will save a billion dollars.

Posted by: RationalPolicy | July 13, 2010 10:00 AM | Report abuse

THANKS FOR ALL THE RINGS!!!

Posted by: mcgrupp10799 | July 13, 2010 10:04 AM | Report abuse

First Bob Sheppard; now Steinbrenner... Yogi better watch out

Posted by: mcgrupp10799 | July 13, 2010 10:05 AM | Report abuse

Wow...kinda like Darth Vader passing on

Well GeorgieBoy, you left the 'Evil Empire' in more than capable hands; Hank is a chip off the old block and will wear the 'Black Helmet' with pride and arrogance.

I can just see George asking GOD 'Why are you sitting in MY chair?'

RIP Champ

Posted by: kahlua87 | July 13, 2010 10:13 AM | Report abuse

I guess Steinbrenner wanted to be with Bob Sheppard, ya know?

Posted by: bs2004 | July 13, 2010 10:18 AM | Report abuse

I like the Darth Vader comment.

Yuck the Fankees. Go Nats!

Posted by: ericroks | July 13, 2010 10:38 AM | Report abuse

How can you die of a heart attack when you have no heart?

Posted by: dl49 | July 13, 2010 10:42 AM | Report abuse

I don't think we need to worry about Yogi just yet. Better to worry about the next legend who rides onto his home field in a golf cart for the All-Star Game: Ted Williams lasted only three more years after his ride and rally at Fenway in 1999, Phineas T. Bluster two years after his appearance at Ye Olde Yankee Stadium. Maybe the next such honoree should walk out ...

Speaking of honorees, now that he's gone, does Steinbrenner make Cooperstown, or are some of his more nefarious deeds grounds for exclusion? Commissioner Selig?

Posted by: dacorriveau | July 13, 2010 2:16 PM | Report abuse

I don't think we need to worry about Yogi just yet. Better to worry about the next legend who rides onto his home field in a golf cart for the All-Star Game: Ted Williams lasted only three more years after his ride and rally at Fenway in 1999, Phineas T. Bluster two years after his appearance at Ye Olde Yankee Stadium. Maybe the next such honoree should walk out ...

Speaking of honorees, now that he's gone, does Steinbrenner make Cooperstown, or are some of his more nefarious deeds grounds for exclusion? Commissioner Selig?

Posted by: dacorriveau | July 13, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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