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Amy Winehouse was wrong about rehab (Music)

In 2006, the song "Rehab" thrust the 1950s beehive and Amy Winehouse's sultry, smoky singing onto the international stage. Unfortunately, it also predicted her future: She has spent the subsequent years battling addiction. There is good news on the horizon: The singer, who turns 27 today, will be releasing a new song on Quincy Jones's collaborative album. The Associated Press reports she recorded "It's My Party" with producer Mark Ronson for the album "Q: Soul Bossa Nostra." This is great news to me. This girl can sing something fierce:

By Melissa Bell  | September 14, 2010; 8:23 AM ET
Categories:  Picture Shows  
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Next: U.S. hiker released from Iran; President Obama, world reacts to news

Comments

$113 billion is spent on marijuana every year in the U.S., and because of the federal prohibition *every* dollar of it goes straight into the hands of criminals. Far from preventing people from using marijuana, the prohibition instead creates zero legal supply amid massive and unrelenting demand. The scale of the harm this causes far exceeds any benefit obtained from keeping marijuana illegal.

According to the ONDCP, at least sixty percent of Mexican drug cartel money comes from selling marijuana in the U.S., they protect this revenue by brutally torturing, murdering and dismembering countless innocent people.

If we can STOP people using marijuana then we need to do so NOW, but if we can't then we must legalize the production and sale of marijuana to adults with after-tax prices set too low for the cartels to match. One way or the other, we have to force the cartels out of the marijuana market and eliminate their highly lucrative marijuana incomes - no business can withstand the loss of sixty percent of its revenue!

To date, the cartels have amassed more than 100,000 "foot soldiers" and operate in 230 U.S. cities, and it's now believed that the cartels are "morphing into, or making common cause with, what would be considered an insurgency" (Secretary of State Clinton, 09/09/2010). The longer the cartels are allowed to exploit the prohibition the more powerful they'll get and the more our own personal security will be put in jeopardy.

Posted by: jway86 | September 14, 2010 1:34 PM | Report abuse

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