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DNA dance: Amazing science lesson of the day

10153521H13774901.JPGA late, late lunch break...

Today, we're going to learn about the "Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment."

Don't worry, I was as confused as you likely are. Thankfully, PhD thesis student Maureen McKeague won't try to explain her study in words. Instead, she's dancing it out.

In a stylish routine fueled by Queen, the Supremes and Lady Gaga, the members of the DeRosa Lab at Carleton University shimmy and shake their way through the the scientific process of finding a DNA aptamer to attach to the molecule homocysteine.

McKeague writes that the process could quickly diagnosis heart disease, Alzheimer's disease and birth defects. The video is her submission to the third annual Dance Your PhD competition put on by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Watch the video for your science lesson. You'll be cheering when the target homocysteine finally finds her bind.

Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using SELEX from Maureen McKeague on Vimeo.

I'm still not sure I totally understand her thesis, but I haven't been this excited about DNA since scientists announced there could be more chocolate for everyone thanks to DNA studies.

(Thanks BoingBoing!)

By Melissa Bell  | September 17, 2010; 1:31 PM ET
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Comments

This is brilliant. Next up: Macrophage destruction of viral antigens as envisioned by Mimes.

Posted by: RD_Padouk | September 17, 2010 3:04 PM | Report abuse

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