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Juan Williams and the year of unairing your opinion

By Melissa Bell
Juan Williams
News analyst Juan Williams today on "Fox & Friends." (Richard Drew/AP)

It's been a rough year for journalists who air their opinions.

Juan Williams has been fired as an NPR correspondent after his appearance on Bill O'Reilly's talk show Tuesday night.

Rick Sanchez exited CNN after calling Jon Stewart a bigot and implying that Jews run the media.

Helen Thomas let loose on Israel and subsequently lost her job with Hearst News Service.

After Octavia Nasr tweeted her sorrow over the death of a Lebanese cleric considered an inspiration for the Hezbollah militant movement, she lost her job covering the Middle East for CNN.

As journalists try to navigate a news environment where every comment is meticulously recorded and tracked, the public's trust in the media continues to deteriorate. A 2009 study by the Pew Research Center found 74 percent of the Americans surveyed said news organizations favored one side or another in reporting on political and social issues, and the same percentage said the media were often influenced by powerful interests.

What is surprising is how quickly media organizations have responded to the missteps. Sanchez was out of a job within 24 hours. Williams did not last more than 14.

I spoke with Dave Weigel, a former Post reporter, who also left his job this year after a Web site published e-mails in which he made inflammatory comments about Rush Limbaugh and Matt Drudge, among others.

Weigel did not agree that his situation could be associated with the other journalists' because his comments were meant for a private audience. He said he left The Post because he was hired for a specific job that was clearly compromised.

However, he did note that media organizations were moving very quickly in response to outcries: "The tragedy of this isn't exactly all things considered."

He referenced the Shirley Sherrod affair as an example of the mistake an organization can make in moving too fast in response to criticism. In this case, the organization was the administration, which fired Sherrod after Fox aired because of fears Fox would air a misleading video of her.

Already a backlash is rising against NPR, with Mike Huckabee callling for the organization to lose its public funding.

"A lot of people are looking for stuff to attack," Weigel said. Media organizations need to decide "how much weight they're willing to give to people who complain."

Does the responsibility lie with the reporter to carefully guard against what he or she says? Does the media organization have a responsibility to defend its staff, or is firing the best response?

Update: Thanks to Andy Levy for pointing out a mistake in my post. Fox did not air the video excerpts before Sherrod was fired. As Howard Kurtz wrote, "But for all the chatter -- some of it from Sherrod herself -- that she was done in by Fox News, the network didn't touch the story until her forced resignation was made public Monday evening, with the exception of brief comments by O'Reilly."

By Melissa Bell  | October 21, 2010; 2:33 PM ET
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Comments

I have the same thoughts as Juan Williams when I see a Muslim on a plane I am riding. To go further, I get concerned if passengers look like they come from a country where Islam is the predominate religion. To fire him was a mistake. I have never forgiven them for firing Bob Edwards from Morning Edition. Steve Inskeep is a crybaby. He even started whining when interviewing Hillary Clinton about payroll taxes when he thought he may have to pay more.

Posted by: EFDTN | October 21, 2010 2:45 PM | Report abuse

I disagree with the firing of Juan Williams. So many people are losing their freedom of speech in this era of political correctness. He voiced his personal reaction to a situation, and was not endorsing bigotry against anyone in any way. Even though I definitely lean towards being a political conservative, I enjoy listening to Juan Williams when I see him on FOX. I may not always agree with his analysis or opinions, but he is always respectful and professional on air. I can't say the same for many other news commentators. I hope FOX picks him up and gives him a job.

Posted by: Deb0212 | October 21, 2010 2:46 PM | Report abuse


Juam Williams should of been fired the day he started working at Fox News.

Posted by: kenk3 | October 21, 2010 2:58 PM | Report abuse

is this freedom...

Posted by: DwightCollins | October 21, 2010 3:00 PM | Report abuse

The fact is, we all harbor certain prototypical fears shaped by our experiences.

Top 10 Ethnicities Feared by Juan Williams:
http://www.dailyscoff.com/?page_id=2895

...and you TOO...


-jjg
Gravelle.us

Posted by: jgravelle | October 21, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

What would have happened if Juan Williams had said he gets nervous whenever he sees people with Gadsden flags saying they want to 'take the country back?'

Yeah, he'd have gotten a promotion and lots more air time at NPR.

Posted by: JustJoe3 | October 21, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

A man who gets afraid when he sees a Muslim boarding his plane is no different than a man who gets afraid when he sees an African American. While he has the "freedom" to seek medical help, he has no business being on NPR. From the perspective of which religion commits the highest percentage of personal acts of violence, he should be more afraid off seeing a Christian than he should be of seeing a Muslim.

Posted by: dmuston | October 21, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

EFDTN:
"To go further, I get concerned if passengers look like they come from a country where Islam is the predominate religion."

Really? Do you also get concerned if they look like they come from, for example, Ireland?

Posted by: presto668 | October 21, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

NPR was abslouetly right to fire Willaims who claims-falsely-to be a civil rights advocate.

If he were he would not work for the World's hate and bigtory center-fox news.He is a hypocrite.

Posted by: asizk | October 21, 2010 4:13 PM | Report abuse

Bill O'Reilly, Newt Gingrich and the whole hate-Muslims wing of the GOP are the biggest threat to America's national security there is. Right now, we are at war with a few thousand radicalized young Muslim men. But the right wing American Taliban will not be content until all 1.5 billion Muslims in the world - who right now just want to raise their families and live in peace - feel so threatened, insulted and attacked by America's FauxNews Ignorants that they are won over to Osama bin Laden's cause.

Osama bin Laden has no more faithful cohort than Bill O'Reilly or Newt Gingrich. They might as well get the Al Qaida equivalent of the medal of honor for service to the Al Qaida recruitment cause.

I hope Homeland Security starts monitoring them half as closely as they have been following peace activists in this country. Because they are the bigger threat.

Posted by: B2O2 | October 21, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

Juam Williams should of been fired the day he started working at Fox News.

Posted by: kenk3

and/or

A man who gets afraid when he sees a Muslim boarding his plane is no different than a man who gets afraid when he sees an African American. While he has the "freedom" to seek medical help, he has no business being on NPR. From the perspective of which religion commits the highest percentage of personal acts of violence, he should be more afraid off seeing a Christian than he should be of seeing a Muslim.

Posted by: dmuston
______________________________________

so in media it is appropriate to fire someone when espousing opinions different from yours?

I don't think either one of you has ever watched Fox and listened to Juan Williams...he very rarely "agrees" with the hosts. His generally opposite opinion is why he is on Fox. Expressing the other sides views. Period.

But...hey libs like to use vindicatives and call conservatives unflattering names and its ok. Conservatives do the same we are hate mongers...PATHETIC!

Posted by: getagrip5 | October 21, 2010 4:29 PM | Report abuse

.
Juan Williams, voiced an honest and logical opinion. This opinion might not be agreeable to everyone, but is not hateful or threatening. It is a starting point for analysis and discussion.

Unfortunayely, the THOUGHT POLICE, have taken over. Our civil right to Free Speech must be censored. Mr. Williams is a victim here.

Who at NPR made this decision to fire Juan Williams ????????????

Is there no hearing or review ??????????

If Mr. Williams can be fired today for an honest thought, who's next??????????

//

Posted by: JAMadison4 | October 21, 2010 4:47 PM | Report abuse

TO JUAN WILLIAMS: Good-bye and good riddance; your departure from NPR, a news station, was long overdue. Now you can work full-time being unfair and unbalanced.

Posted by: gsross | October 21, 2010 5:01 PM | Report abuse

i already am reading some of the same post on this article that were posted on the WP editorial and other articles. The major point of these posts were that Juan Williams should have been fired for working for Fox News. These posts are from so-called liberal thinkers who must believe that every one has a right to say what they want as long as they do not disagree with your view of the world. This seems to be the current trend. Either agree with me or your are a bigot.

Posted by: sales7 | October 21, 2010 5:08 PM | Report abuse

This is a question of Journalistic integrity, which we don't see much of in broadcast media, save NPR.

Mr. Williams knows that if you are practicing Journalism, you park your First Amendment Rights at the studio door, and pick them back up on the way out. To do any less destroys any sense of impartiality, equanimity or balance. Which is fine if you're hired to blather opinion, but on NPR, Williams job was as a news analyst--a Journalist.

He may have been playing to his Fox "News" audience when he made his thoughtless statement, but in context of NPR, he destroyed himself (which he actually did when he accepted his first paycheck from Rupert Murdoch.)

NPR was well within its rights as a Journalistic organization to let Mr. Williams go. I hope Fox hires him full time to spew opinion and thump his chest as a "journalist". He'll fit right in.

Posted by: LindaOfLR | October 21, 2010 5:08 PM | Report abuse

What's NPR?

Posted by: braunt | October 21, 2010 5:12 PM | Report abuse

Love Juan Williams, haven't listened to NPR in years. Juan will find a better gig anyway.

Posted by: poutypout | October 21, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

i get concerned about seeing people...i hide in my house all day with my loaded guns and my dogs...this isn't a political statement knocking guns...i have guns and i'm a democrat..People get me nervous!!!...oh people doooo...i think what is happening is the usual fear mongering when a relatively new religious or ethnic group moves in...problem is that we've been at war with this particular group ,directly or indirectly for almost a thousand years...and they are from an eastern culture..turbans...veils..bhurkas...add to that the numerous terror attacks..the Cole,Munich 1972,the Achille Laure..and you have a somewhat justifiable state of paranoia...personally..i wouldn't get nervous about seeing muslims in their garb on a plane...but then..there is this body language thing that may get me uptight.

Posted by: kiler616 | October 21, 2010 5:33 PM | Report abuse

He is just an example of how Americans have become so irrationally xenophobic it isn't even funny.

EFTDN is another example.

You know what? I'm more afraid of riding on a plane with a bunch of hate-mongering Teabaggers!!!!!

Posted by: trambusto | October 21, 2010 5:51 PM | Report abuse

People, people, please, please! STOP thinking you are making some profound "civil rights" statement about "freedom of speech" in this context. Freedom of speech, in the constitutional context, which you are evidently referring to means the government cannot silence your political speech. A privite employer has every right to fire you for saying all sorts of things. If you don't think so, try walking into your bosses office tomorrow and telling him what you really think of him. See you at the unemployment office Monday!

Posted by: dirktazer | October 21, 2010 5:58 PM | Report abuse

People, people, please, please! STOP thinking you are making some profound "civil rights" statement about "freedom of speech" in this context. Freedom of speech, in the constitutional context, which you are evidently referring to means the government cannot silence your political speech. A privite employer has every right to fire you for saying all sorts of things. If you don't think so, try walking into your bosses office tomorrow and telling him what you really think of him. See you at the unemployment office Monday!

Posted by: dirktazer | October 21, 2010 5:59 PM | Report abuse

'get a grip' declares in response to my post that "so in media it is appropriate to fire someone when espousing opinions different from yours?"

There are all kinds of "media" outlets. NPR is what is calls itself - "National Public Radio". I have no problem with Williams expressing such views on Fox or most other places - just not on NPR.

"I don't think either one of you has ever watched Fox and listened to Juan Williams..."

Actually, I intentionally watch a variety of programs on the Fox network regularly and I have heard Williams. Being a "lib", I feel that it's important to hear all sides of a story.

"But...hey libs like to use vindicatives and call conservatives unflattering names and its ok. Conservatives do the same we are hate mongers...PATHETIC!"

If you actually had a "grip" you would have clearly seen that I did not call *anyone* names, flattering or otherwise. If a person has a permanent pass to ride the Fox train of hate and fear, let him speak - just not on NPR which, as the owners agreed, because that is just not an appropriate format for such opinions. And if some "lib" was talking that kind of trash on NPR about the "Let's be afraid, very, very afraid" Fox crowd, I'd like to see the owners get rid of him as well.

Posted by: dmuston | October 21, 2010 6:20 PM | Report abuse

Juan? Straight Black hair? Is he Mexican? Were his parents here legally? Let's see some birth certificates.

Posted by: Southsider | October 21, 2010 6:48 PM | Report abuse

I hope no one still believes that NPR is anything but a liberal institution. All opinions must be approved by the management.

Juan will be just fine. Conservative shows will tolerate opposing views and appeal to a much wider audience.

Posted by: kitchendragon50 | October 21, 2010 6:55 PM | Report abuse

Juan Williams is one of the most articulate reasoned voices for the Liberal cause to have come along in a long time. Every time I have seen him in a panel discussion, I knew there would be a broad set of strongly felt different views presented with out being disagreeable.

It is too bad that both NPR and LindaofLR do not understand the difference between Journalism, the reporting of facts without opinion, and News Analyst, one who looks at the facts and than expresses their expert opinion as to what the facts may mean.

But than again with the mass media true Journalism went extinct long ago.

Posted by: Mikeb12 | October 21, 2010 7:12 PM | Report abuse

A clearly identified and cautiously presented expression of personal emotional response (as Williams' was) simply SHOULD NOT violate anyone's editorial standards for an "Analyst". By title, he is not a reporter, but an interpreter of the facts. Doing that job well REQUIRES acknowledgment of the analyst's personal feelings - and no NPR editorial brows were raised on the many occasions when he described his feelings from the civil rights era.

I am a (very) long-term contributor to NPR and notified them that if they persist in this blunder, my contributions to the three stations that I support will be reduced by 50% - my estimate of the extent of their credibility loss.

Posted by: fr3dmars | October 21, 2010 7:57 PM | Report abuse

Shame on NPR.

They don't fire other reporters/analysts who have expressed their opinions through the years. If he had expressed fears about right wingers he would have been applauded. FYI, I'm not a conservative.

It's certainly their perogative, but NPR has no business receiving taxpayer money in any amount or any through any vehicle. I will be on a writing campaign to put a stop to that.

Posted by: friendly2 | October 21, 2010 8:14 PM | Report abuse

Juan Williams should have been fired years ago. Firing him over this is ridiculous. It gives too many people too much fodder to go after NPR, the best news organization in the country. Williams was the worst of the best. NPR's real crime was keeping him -- a guy who couldn't keep his opinions to himself as a journalist should -- for so long.

Posted by: thepoorehouse | October 21, 2010 8:40 PM | Report abuse

It's a sad state of how much of a coddled misbehaving child Faux News has become in our country that people we are even focusing on Juan Williams. He spent 99% of that segment pushing BACK against the relentless no-apologies bigotry and provocation of the scum that goes by the name of Bill O'Reilly.

But Fox's hatemeisters all get a pass, because none of them are even fit to get in the door at a reputable news organization like NPR. I think NPR overreacted, but that doesn't get FOX off the hook for their reprehensible hatemongering toward the Muslim world - one that is a CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER to the security of our country, in that they are Osama's #1 recruiting tool.

Bill O'Reilly and Newt Gingrich belong in Leavenworth. Williams should be allowed to clarify his remarks. It is the scum O'Reilly who should be apologizing all over the place.

Posted by: B2O2 | October 21, 2010 8:43 PM | Report abuse

It's OK to have an opinion.

It's OK to give your opinion.

As long as it agrees with that of your boss.

Posted by: Benson | October 21, 2010 8:59 PM | Report abuse

I myself get really nervous when I see a black man on the street at night, coming towardd me. Know what I mean? KNOW WHAT I MEAN?

Posted by: dudh | October 21, 2010 9:01 PM | Report abuse

People should probably get nervous when they see Americans entering into voting booths. Every time they do, politicians get elected here who cavalierly kill people by the thousands and sometimes millions overseas.

Is there anyone more terrifying than an American voter? A million dead civilians in Iraq and three million dead southeast Asians during the 60s and 70s would likely say "no".

Americans are murderers. There is much more objective evidence of that than there is of O'Reilly's constant "innocent" innuendo that "Muslims are terrorists".

No one can deny the truth in this post, without going into deep denial about history.

Posted by: B2O2 | October 21, 2010 9:08 PM | Report abuse

I once visited Egypt. If one or two people in Islamic garb frighten you, don't go to Egypt. Stay out of the Middle Egypt.

A bunch of people from Saudi Arabia with checkered turbans / robes, presumably Saudi nobility (they go to Cairo and Istanbul to party, since it is illegal to have fun in Saudi Arabia) ) jumped to the front of the line at the airport. Was it irritating? Yes. But that's the way it is, in the other guy's home court. Were we personally threatened? No.

People in obvious Muslim garb are not going to be a problem. Ever. No one would be that obvious.

If you are the easily frightened, as Mr Williams seems to be, fear the young guys in casual Western garb. But 99.99 per cent of them are harmless, too.

Bottom line. You have more to fear from your daily commute than from Muslims.

Posted by: samsara15 | October 21, 2010 9:13 PM | Report abuse

Juan Williams should have been fired years ago. Firing him over this is ridiculous. It gives too many people too much fodder to go after NPR, the best news organization in the country. Williams was the worst of the best. NPR's real crime was keeping him -- a guy who couldn't keep his opinions to himself as a journalist should -- for so long.

Posted by: thepoorehouse | October 21, 2010 8:40 PM | Report abuse
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
I guess, then, that you would support NPR's firing of Nina Totenberg, who frequently gives her opinions on "Inside Washington". Mara Liasson does that as well, on Fox.

Posted by: GRILLADES | October 21, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

'get a grip' declares in response to my post that "so in media it is appropriate to fire someone when espousing opinions different from yours?"

There are all kinds of "media" outlets. NPR is what is calls itself - "National Public Radio". I have no problem with Williams expressing such views on Fox or most other places - just not on NPR.


Posted by: dmuston | October 21, 2010 6:20 PM | Report abuse

=====

You should read the facts before rushing to propagate your opinion. He didn't make this statement on NPR, he did so on Fox, and what's more as a guest, not as a journalist or commentator.

Posted by: robert17 | October 21, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

Bye bye Juan. You hung around the pig sty that is Faux News and the stench got all over you. There is a vast difference between NPR and Faux News amigo. You seem to want things both ways --- use NPR as your journalistic bonafide --- and then make big bucks by hanging around with the right wing fanatics at Faux. Don't know how you survived at a real news organization as long as you did anyway considering you've been frittering away your credibility at Faux for years now. Good bye and good riddance. Enjoy your role as the token at Faux.

Posted by: army164 | October 21, 2010 9:32 PM | Report abuse

It appears NPR has something to hide relating to this firing. I hear many NPR news analysts and talk show hosts voicing not only their feelings but also engaging in debate by the subtle use of questioning and sometimes even more direct. I think there is more to this story then has been disclosed by NPR.

Posted by: novamark | October 21, 2010 9:46 PM | Report abuse

I think there is more to this story. I have heard other NPR analysts and talk show hosts expresss their feelings and even engage in debate, either subtly by questioning or directly. I think NPR has not disclosed the entire rationale for this action--they may even be hiding something.

Posted by: novamark | October 21, 2010 9:49 PM | Report abuse

The same phonies that fired Juan Williams are the first to call the police when they see a black man walking on their street.

Posted by: MKadyman | October 21, 2010 10:06 PM | Report abuse

Why is it when Mr. Williams was representing a liberal viewpoint on Fox, and everyone on this post has agreed he is a liberal, NPR did not consider firing him? Can someone please explain this to me?

Posted by: kramer52 | October 21, 2010 10:21 PM | Report abuse

Can anyone give a believable explanation why the US government needs a domestic radio broadcast propaganda network?

If NPR is popular enough to be a viable entity, it can support itself without taxpayer money. If not, then let it go the way of Radio America, which was the same kind of Progressive programming.

Congress, do not fund NPR.

Posted by: NocheGarcia | October 21, 2010 11:10 PM | Report abuse

I get nervous when I see people with a large tattoo of a cross or a huge crucifix dangling from their obese necks anywhere.

I am thankful that I do not work at NPR, because they'd fire me for saying that.

Posted by: HumanSimpleton | October 21, 2010 11:16 PM | Report abuse

Why is it when Mr. Williams was representing a liberal viewpoint on Fox, and everyone on this post has agreed he is a liberal, NPR did not consider firing him? Can someone please explain this to me?

Posted by: kramer52
==
Yes, can you be specific and cite the remark of the said liberal viewpoint so that those of us who think for ourselves and can evaluate the content of his viewpoint make a informed comment?

Posted by: HumanSimpleton | October 21, 2010 11:19 PM | Report abuse

NPR IS CORRUPT.

NPR's CEO attacked Mr. Williams demanding that he speak with his "Psychiatrist!"

Now THAT is NOT a CEO (Shiller) or an organization to whom American taxpayers want their funds to go.

The NPR has outlived its usefulness; and has become nothing more than a "silk stocking" politically correct propaganda machine using American' taxpayers' subsidies.

Defund NPR for its CEO's corruption of the 1st Amendment.

America is better than that!

Posted by: gglenc | October 21, 2010 11:37 PM | Report abuse

These MSM liberals would have made very competent Thought Police in German in the 1930's and 1940's.

Posted by: 1911a1 | October 22, 2010 6:42 AM | Report abuse

Juan Williams is helping keep the debate about the assimilation--or their non-assimilation--in the headlines. When the President of Germany has said Muslims have not and never will become part of the West then such ideas have become mainstream and deserve to be debated in all possible forums without censorship. Besides if we wants new without opinion why not let machines rather than people read the news. That would be more interesting that the soft murmur of Bill Moyers and Sivlia Poggioli.

Posted by: werowe1 | October 22, 2010 8:02 AM | Report abuse

replacing juan will be the black panther who wielded a club intimidating voters in philadelphia...
the right negro as far as npr is concerned...

Posted by: DwightCollins | October 22, 2010 8:51 AM | Report abuse

If NPR is,as it suggests, a public enterprise, then ANY opinions should be welcomed, not just the station's position.

Posted by: alicef99 | October 22, 2010 8:56 AM | Report abuse

Journalists should be allowed to voice their opinions simply because it makes them more believable and exposes their biases (which they ALL have)and exposing their biases is a GOOD thing. We all know certain "journalists" have certain biases and by expressing them it allows us to evaluate their reporting. Honesty is the ONLY politically correct policy.

Posted by: faulkner1 | October 22, 2010 9:16 AM | Report abuse

Fact: Chris Matthews feels a tingle up his leg everytime he hears Obama speak.

Fact: Juan Williams feels uncomfortable around Muslims on planes.

And only one was fired for their statement....

Posted by: detroit50 | October 22, 2010 10:05 AM | Report abuse

First, although we do not need to relitigate the Sherrod story, your colleague Howie Kurtz and Andy Levy are splitting hairs: Fox called not just Sherrod looking for a comment, but also people at the Ag Dept, they PRE-recorded shows designed to run "live-on-tape" (aired as if the segment was happening now), posted video on two Fox websites before the firing was fait accompli. Suggesting that Fox was somehow innocent of jumping the gun-totin' shark is simply wrong.

Journalists do carry a special burden with respect to their personal opinions. Gene Robinson -- who moonlights on MSNBC -- tried to make another hairsplitting distinction that boggles the mind. He suggested today that the distinction between "analyst" and "contributor" is moot. Very wrongheaded. Analysts are expected (at least by this viewer) to look at facts and deliver a factual assessment of the topic at hand. Contributors' roles are somewhat ambiguous; contribute to a discussion which on most "news" shows these days means get into something just short of a fist fight to entertain the audience.

But Williams made a choice to sacrifice his prestigious association with NPR for the gutter-dwelling news porn of Fox. I don't know anyone in the news biz who can complete a multi-million dollar contract in 14 hours. It doesn't happen. Clearly there is much more to this story than we know, and by the time it comes out, NPR will not have acted in haste, but reacted to an employee who was damaging the company brand, negotiating a separate deal and demanding bigger bucks.

To Juan Williams, kiss you career and credibility goodbye, and don't let the doorknob hit you on the way out.

Posted by: jade_7243 | October 22, 2010 10:14 AM | Report abuse

>Posted by: JAMadison4:

>Juan Williams, voiced an honest and >logical opinion.

Really? A logical opinion? Based on what circumstance? The 9/11 terrorists, Faisal Shahzad and Nidal Hassan did not wear "Muslim garb." When I see people on a plane in head scarves or other Muslim apparel, I feel sorry for them because I know they're going to be hassled every step of their trip.

>Posted by: JAMadison4:

>Who at NPR made this decision to fire Juan >Williams ????????????

>Is there no hearing or review ??????????

>If Mr. Williams can be fired today for an >honest thought, who's next??????????

Are you under the impression that NPR is obligated to even explain, let alone get outside approval for its hiring/firing decisions? Have you never heard of "at will employment" ? People are fired every day for ridiculous reasons, or no reason at all, and corporate America's biggest supporters wouldn't have it any other way.

Unless someone they like loses his job. (I don't remember Newt Gingrich being concerned when Dave Weigel lost his.)

And "defund NPR" ?! Really?! NPR telling Juan William to find another outlet is censorship, but trying to take NPR off the air is not?

Hypocrites.

Posted by: SilSpr | October 22, 2010 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Juan is certainly right to express his views, fears and concerns about anyone and anything in this country. But, I am an African-American male like Juan Williams, and my question to him is: how will he feel if someone said he will feel nervous if he spots a black person on a bus or airplane, simply because that person has seen or heard blacks being portrayed by the media as being violent?

Posted by: uia97 | October 22, 2010 2:58 PM | Report abuse

Hey , he got a job on Fox "news" channel. Obviously he is no newsman. NPR should have let him go a long time ago. It will be interesting to see how much Librul stuff he says there. Being hired by Fox puts a label on you. Palin , Orielly, Huck, and on and on. Its a right wing propaganda machine, plain and simple.

Posted by: jimbobkalina1 | October 24, 2010 3:25 AM | Report abuse

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