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Mike and Molly and Marie Claire: Do we need to ban the word 'fat' -- or just these writers?

mikemolly.JPG

"Should 'fatties' get a room?"

The writer Maura Kelly poised that question in a Monday column at Marie Claire, discussing whether or not people want to watch plus-sized actors being intimate with one another.

She was referring to the new television show "Mike and Molly," in which two jovial, overweight people fall in love with one another.

Kelly, who has admitted to suffering from anorexia, used the column to rant against the "fatties" of the world. She admitted her displeasure at seeing a "very, very fat" person do anything in real life, even walking across a room. She said obesity was something people "have a ton of control over." She offered tips on losing weight. She signed it off by asking, "Do you think I'm being an insensitive jerk?"

The answer, it seems, is yes. Commenters and blogs railed against her blithe treatment of the topic. "Lost yet another subscriber." "Thank you for helping me with my cost-cutting endeavors in this bleak economy. I can now save money by NOT purchasing your magazine." "As soon as I read the title my blood began to boil."

A Twitter hashtag started with #unfollowmarieclaire. Marie Claire's Editor-in-Chief Joanna Coles spoke to the Web site Fashionista, saying they had received around 28,000 e-mails in response to the piece.

"As a magazine that supposedly caters to women, Marie Claire would be better served by writers who don't use the magazine's Web site as a platform to publicly shame and berate women whose bodies are outside of one woman's ideal," a post read at Feministe blog.

In response to the public outcry, Kelly posted an apology beneath her column writing, "I never wanted anyone to feel bullied or ashamed after reading this, and I sorely regret that it upset people so much." Marie Claire has not pulled the post or apologized for it, but has posted the first of "a series of counterpoint posts" to Kelly's column.

Detractors of "Mike & Molly" have complained that its focus on weight inspires the wrong kind of attention for obesity. Lesley Kinzel, a blogger at Fatshionista and the author of the first counterpoint post, told CNN, "You can acknowledge that someone is different and you can acknowledge that someone is fat without making that the plot point everything revolves around. ... I'm not averse to having their weight brought up, but my problem is when that's all that is being talked about."

Up north, Stephen Marche, a Canadian writer, found himself in a similar situation after his column, "Rob Ford is not popular despite being fat. He's popular because of it," was pulled from the Globe and Mail.

The opinion piece credited a political candidate's popularity to his weight: "Mr. Ford offers voters fat. And we want fat. In fat, we see ourselves."

In a 792-word article, he uses the word "fat" 17 times. The piece appeared in the Saturday paper, but has been pulled from the Web site and Marche has been told he no longer works for the paper.

Has fat become a four-letter word? Do you think the media and television shows are too sensitive about the issue of weight or not sensitive enough?

Update:

Mark Roberts, the creator of "Mike & Molly," talked to the Hollywood Reporter about the Marie Claire controversy. Here's one comment:

Almost everybody I know struggles with something -- whether it's their weight or alcohol or temper. To stand in judgment of somebody -- especially when you're breaking it down to just the aesthetic. It just makes me sad ... wow that makes me sound much more upset than I really am. But I am un-friending that woman on Facebook.

By Melissa Bell  | October 27, 2010; 2:22 PM ET
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Comments

Wow, way to gloss over what Maura Kelly's article was really about. It wasn't about someone using the word "fat". It was about someone using dehumanizing, abusive, and bullying statements and language. Her "apology" then went on to say she was sorry people misunderstood (not that she was a bully) and that she only meant really, icky, super fat people. Like Melissa McCarthey. Has anyone called her for a statement?

Posted by: anonymiss1 | October 27, 2010 2:53 PM | Report abuse

We should ban "fat" and "ugly" and "clueless" and oh, by the way, everyone gets a trophy!

Posted by: socaloralpleazer | October 27, 2010 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Oh, puhleeze! All those ridiculous "self-esteem" classes have done a number on Americans, who have turned into total "teacups," shattering at the slightest criticism. It's not like anyone forced these people to become overweight: A good 95% of them are NOT "victims" but simply self-indulgent whiners who don't want to take responsiblity for their own actions. For crying out loud, it's not THAT bloody hard to exert some SELF-CONTROL and work at something consistently. But, no, it's much easier to pig out, experience instant self-gratification, wallow in front of a TV, and complain about being "bullied" by those who try harder.

Posted by: crunch99 | October 27, 2010 3:30 PM | Report abuse

The euphemism for "fat" nowadays is "heavy-set" or "big". What a crock. I use "morbo", a contraction for "morbidly obese".

Posted by: matt_s | October 27, 2010 3:35 PM | Report abuse

Oh, yeah, another thing: Really tired of hearing about "big and beautiful." If anyone *really* believed they were so beautiful, they wouldn't have to constantly remind everyone. Big is not beautiful! It's fat and unhealthy. It leads to diabetes, it's a poor example to young children, and it's unfair to the rest of the planet, who have to give these people one and half to two (and sometimes more!) times the space and resources of a normal person.

Posted by: crunch99 | October 27, 2010 3:36 PM | Report abuse

Please, no! I use the word "fat" to motivate myself to get back on the bicycle again tomorrow morning. We don't need more euphemisms. If you're not ashamed of being fat, don't be ashamed when someone calls you "fat."

Posted by: dricks | October 27, 2010 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Fat is not a four-letter word. It's more to the point that saying heavyset or overweight. Having written the book, HOW TO NEVER LOOK FAT AGAIN, I found that younger people are comfortable using the word fat and older people would prefer "heavyset." Either way, Mike & Molly is a rather groundbreaking comedy that should help show that all people, no matter what size dress they wear, have similar concerns and issues with confidence and dating. Marie Claire should be embracing ALL women. This was the magazine that started out being different by featuring articles about GLOBAL concerns for women and women's rights! What happened?

Posted by: charlakrupp | October 27, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

Bravo!!! bravissimo to Maura Kelly in a turned upside down PC world some one finally had the cahunas to say what they really felt.Morbidly obese fatties need not to be celebrated.The only time i consider them funny if I happen to see them fall down & like a turtle can't get up.They need to put down that bowl of ice cream & slab of cheese cake & get some type of exercise already.They are a segment of the population that is suffering from major health issues.the truth is I DO NOT want to see 2 obese disgusting slug-like slobs frolicking around in a sexual situation. How revolting & a complete turn off can u get.Fat people need to be taken to the desert 90 miles outside of Vegas givin adequate water & told to make it back to Vegas they'd be a hell of alot slimmer when they did.

Posted by: hynzerelli | October 27, 2010 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Bravo!!! bravissimo to Maura Kelly in a turned upside down PC world some one finally had the cahunas to say what they really felt.Morbidly obese fatties need not to be celebrated.The only time i consider them funny if I happen to see them fall down & like a turtle can't get up.They need to put down that bowl of ice cream & slab of cheese cake & get some type of exercise already.They are a segment of the population that is suffering from major health issues.the truth is I DO NOT want to see 2 obese disgusting slug-like slobs frolicking around in a sexual situation. How revolting & a complete turn off can u get.Fat people need to be taken to the desert 90 miles outside of Vegas givin adequate water & told to make it back to Vegas they'd be a hell of alot slimmer when they did.

Posted by: hynzerelli | October 27, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Media and society have become too sensitive on this issue. This is precisely because obesity has become so commonplace that large numbers of people are offended when derogatory comments are made about a legitimate health problem. This is one area where I area I hope the U.S. doesn't get hyper PC. I also hope that being overweight never becomes a protected legal class. People with actual medical problems are covered under current disability discrimination laws. Excessively overweight people should not be able to claim that their weight is beyond their control or that it is unfair for society to view it negatively. Most countries do not have obesity to the degree that the U.S. does and that is evidence that we have a cultural problem with excess.

Posted by: michele79 | October 27, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

Maura Kelly's despicable blog post has nothing to do with the political correctness of the word FAT. Fat is fine; it's the vapid and vitriol tone of her blog that is the problem! The fact that Marie Claire is having "counter point" articles instead of just pulling the blog and apologizing for bad taste really shows what a publishing stunt this really was.

Fat is fine; ignorance is the problem

Posted by: Pam_P | October 27, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Oh yeah, & I also agree w/ everything crunch 99 said.Have some SELF-CONTROL U GLUTTON MUTTONS cry-babies!!!

Posted by: hynzerelli | October 27, 2010 4:13 PM | Report abuse

A little respect, please, people.

About three years ago, I weighed 40 pounds more than I do today. But until I was 40, I was constantly the subject of speculation that I was anorexic - and I definitely wasn't. I had a really fast metabolism, and I could eat and eat and eat until I was bloated, miserable, and disgusted with myself, but I didn't gain weight.

I wish I'd realized that my metabolism changed after 40, and before I was 48 and nearing 170 pounds. But when I finally caught on that I couldn't ignore my my consumption and my eating habits, I spent the next two years really working at getting my body back into a healthy condition and back down to a reasonable weight.

I've been at 130 pounds for the last year, and it's not easy, but it's easier maintaining than it was getting to a healthy weight.

So, unless the critics have been heavy/large/fat (whatever!) and have successfully brought their weight under control, they simply don't "get" it. It's hard - for some (like my skinny, pre-40's self) it's not possible to completely control one's size and weight.

If you haven't been there, just shut the f--- up, because you don't know what you are talking about.

Posted by: SueMc | October 27, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

Melissa, I sympathize with you. Having to watch trashy TV must be the world's worst job. And then you have to write about it!

Posted by: dcc1968 | October 27, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

wow i am completely discussed at this article how dare some one write and article like this and she even made it personal..i think The writer Maura Kelly should be not only ashamed for what she has written but FIRED FROM HER JOB!

Posted by: myhondaisfaster | October 27, 2010 4:40 PM | Report abuse

For all of you criticizing the overweight, I hope you gain 10lbs this weekend. Okay, just 5lbs. Point being, weigh loss/gain is a daily trial.
Not everyone wants to starve themselves into a slimmer form. I'm thin and to maintain that, I am hungry most of the time and I have to exercise. Plus, no matter how much weight I lose, I will never be satisfied with my body or the size of my rear.
How refreshing to not be so obsessive.

Posted by: hebe1 | October 27, 2010 4:48 PM | Report abuse

First and foremost, fat people are just that, PEOPLE WHO HAPPEN TO BE FAT. Big hairy deal, Hollywood. Big hairy deal Maura. Why is is still ok in this hyper P. C. world, for people to freely express extreme predjudice in this area? Fat is just a discriptive word, like tall short, or thin, and should not be given so much power.
Second, though I'm really glad to see Melissa Mcarthy on tv again, couldn't someone write something about fat folks just living their lives? Why do they meet at O.A.? Do we need some "forgiveable" excuse for these two to get together like trying to overcome the horrible and obsessive need for food. In Hollywood this is religion , but in the rest of the world, not all fat people eat too much, most of us met our mates just like skinny people do, at work, at a party, at a bar, on vacation..where ever. We ARE just people and our lives do not revolve around our size. BELIEVE IT OR NOT.
So, Miss Maura, please pull your head out of the 3rd grade, and learn to deal with real life.
As for the word fat,go ahead use it, the more you do, the less of a stigma it becomes.
The less of a stigma WE become.
Angie M. Seattle WA.

Posted by: dasmunki | October 27, 2010 4:48 PM | Report abuse

This title is almost as offensive as the Marie Clair article. It's not about the word. It's about people feeling that they have a right to bully..and yes I say bully another person. Had she used the F word for gay instead of Fatty...people would be far more outraged than this. For some reason some people think they are better than someone else because of their size. My mother raised me to be a more thoughtful person than that. It would never dawn on me to like or dislike someone..and definitely not bash them publicly, based on their size, color, gender etc. Even more if I did take issue with them on something I would not be derogatory or mean towards them. Is that really so rare a thing in this world?

Posted by: Berriffic | October 27, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

I think calling people "fatties" is different from describing a person as fat (and the former is objectionable, the latter not).

And calling them "overweight" hardly is better, because it obviously points out that their weight is "over" an accepted standard for their height.

Posted by: hitpoints | October 27, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

This post is a shamefully incomplete representation of the conversation surrounding Maura Kelly's piece - not that "fat" has become a four-letter word, as you suggest, but that fat-bashing & fat-shaming & fat-bullying have become societally acceptable, all in the name of caring about one another's health. Kelly's piece was cruel & crude, & her apology that claims it was hastily written is no apology at all - if anything, it indicates that the words she wrote are indicative of her true, uncensored feelings. Had the piece focused on any other kind of people, as others have suggested - lesbians or Asians or Jews - it wouldn't have passed editorial scrutiny (if Marie Claire has any), & Kelly would've been fired on the spot for being racist or homophobic or just generally hateful. Hell, what if it had been a piece about anorexia, telling them to chill out & eat a sandwich? That likely wouldn't have flown, either. But because fat people have the power to "fix" themselves of their problem - why, Maura Kelly was kind enough to condescendingly provide us a few creative, never-before-heard-or-tried weight loss suggestions! - this piece is a conversation point, & Kelly keeps her job. The real subject is this: Do fat people deserve to be happy, despite their fat? Kelly's piece & too many of the responses in support of it would indicate that no, they don't. That fat people's very existence is shameful, disgusting & offensive to the rest of the world.

I wish I could tell Maura Kelly the same thing.

Posted by: SaraKateB | October 27, 2010 5:23 PM | Report abuse

I suggest using the term "land whale."

Posted by: CubsFan | October 27, 2010 5:24 PM | Report abuse

To all those angry, angry skinny posters...have a doughnut and chill out. What a bunch of haters.

Are you equally as offended by someone who smokes, drinks heavily or drives while talking on a cell phone? You should consider where this reaction is actually coming from.

Being over weight is not about self-control, it's about biology and psychology and about how our culture is geared to make us hate ourselves rather than accept ourselves and rock what we've got.

Regular exercise and eating healthy feels good, but if all fat people get from skinny people is ridicule, how likely are they to take action to effect healthful change in themselves? Not likely at all.

Posted by: InterestedParty7 | October 27, 2010 5:46 PM | Report abuse

"Detractors of 'Mike & Molly' have complained that its focus on weight inspires the wrong kind of attention for obesity. Lesley Kinzel, a blogger at Fatshionista and the author of the first counterpoint post, told CNN, 'You can acknowledge that someone is different and you can acknowledge that someone is fat without making that the plot point everything revolves around. ... I'm not averse to having their weight brought up, but my problem is when that's all that is being talked about.'"

I have not seen the TV show in question, but this comment makes me think about other pathbreaking shows featuring particular minorities.

The early sitcoms involving African Americans as main characters -- mostly in the '70s -- did a great deal of stereotyping. Black people often came across as two-dimensional "types": the matriarch, the angry guy, the long-suffering wife, the goofy one, the minister, the minister's wife, etc.

Similarly, when sitcoms began featuring gay main characters, these folks were often portrayed with the same kind of boxed-into-a-type approach that we saw with African American shows. Characters were often overtly "swishy," and their mannerisms were exaggerated and sometimes "high-camp." Predictably, they had artistic or dramatic careers and a best friend who was straight.

These were often painful, awkward exercises, and I'm sure that many Americans wince just thinking about some of those shows. Eventually, though, once the self-conscious novelty of television based on minority characters wore off, better shows with better writers came along, and those stereotypes got fleshed out into real people with real lives and real thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

If the storylines in this new TV show about fat people seem contrived and single-themed, it may simply be that TV producers and writers haven't yet become familiar and comfortable with their subject matter.

If TV's past is an accurate predictor of future developments, perhaps a few years down the line, there will be shows featuring fat people as real, fully described human beings with lives that revolve around careers, school, love, heartbreak, kids, no kids, bad hair days, and crazy in-laws. Let us hope so.

Posted by: haveaheart | October 27, 2010 6:11 PM | Report abuse

"Detractors of 'Mike & Molly' have complained that its focus on weight inspires the wrong kind of attention for obesity. Lesley Kinzel, a blogger at Fatshionista and the author of the first counterpoint post, told CNN, 'You can acknowledge that someone is different and you can acknowledge that someone is fat without making that the plot point everything revolves around. ... I'm not averse to having their weight brought up, but my problem is when that's all that is being talked about.'"

I have not seen the TV show in question, but this comment makes me think about other pathbreaking shows featuring particular minorities.

The early sitcoms involving African Americans as main characters -- mostly in the '70s -- did a great deal of stereotyping. Black people often came across as two-dimensional "types": the matriarch, the angry guy, the long-suffering wife, the goofy one, the minister, the minister's wife, etc.

Similarly, when sitcoms began featuring gay main characters, these folks were often portrayed with the same kind of boxed-into-a-type approach that we saw with African American shows. Characters were often overtly "swishy," and their mannerisms were exaggerated and sometimes "high-camp." Predictably, they had artistic or dramatic careers and a best friend who was straight.

These were often painful, awkward exercises, and I'm sure that many Americans wince just thinking about some of those shows. Eventually, though, once the self-conscious novelty of television based on minority characters wore off, better shows with better writers came along, and those stereotypes got fleshed out into real people with real lives and real thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

If the storylines in this new TV show about fat people seem contrived and single-themed, it may simply be that TV producers and writers haven't yet become familiar and comfortable with their subject matter.

If TV's past is an accurate predictor of future developments, perhaps a few years down the line, there will be shows featuring fat people as real, fully described human beings with lives that revolve around careers, school, love, heartbreak, kids, no kids, bad hair days, and crazy in-laws. Let us hope so.

Posted by: haveaheart | October 27, 2010 6:13 PM | Report abuse

"Big is not beautiful! It's fat and unhealthy. It leads to diabetes, it's a poor example to young children, and it's unfair to the rest of the planet, who have to give these people one and half to two (and sometimes more!) times the space and resources of a normal person.
Posted by: crunch99"

Crunch,

While you're ranting about people who take disproportionate shares of other people's resources, tell me this: Are you a meat-eater?

I'm just curious. You see...

If you are a meat-eater, you are at significant risk for heart disease, stroke, and a variety of cancers.

If you are a meat-eater, you are wasting 16 pounds of life-giving grain every time you eat a pound of steak. Entire developing countries could thrive on the quantity of grain that goes to feeding livestock in the U.S.

If you are a meat-eater, you're setting a wretched example for the children who are going to inherit your environmentally trashed world one day.

So, while I know it's tempting to stand on your soapbox, given what an upright member of society you are, you might want to think about that glass-house thing and whether you're really in a position to throw stones.

Posted by: haveaheart | October 27, 2010 6:33 PM | Report abuse

The cause of obesity is eating more calories than you burn.

The ONLY way to lose weight is to burn more calories than you eat. There is no otherway.

I don't call fat people "whales" and don't object to them going out in public - but I very much object to them portraying themselves as victims.

Victims of themselves ...

Posted by: fizzlechip | October 27, 2010 7:03 PM | Report abuse

"one woman's ideal" lol, you mean most, if not all, woman's ideal. Probably why they read vogue in the first place. such laughable political correctness.

Posted by: jhtlag1 | October 27, 2010 8:19 PM | Report abuse

I was in a full elevator at P and 14th and I read a twink's mind (I'm clairvoyant)- he was thinking "please make healthier choices". Thanks a pantload.

Posted by: rlmayville | October 27, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

re: matt_s
Morbo hmmm ...

Actually we are pretty schizo (hah hah get it?) about fat people. Are they bad people like those degenerate smokers or poor helpless disableds, err physically challenged, err differently abled ...
Oh I give up we're all nuts.

Posted by: Observer21 | October 27, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

I agree with dricks. I am fat. I am not offended by the term or ashamed of who I am. The unelected word police should not be permitted to remove this term from our collective vocabulary.

Posted by: harryejones | October 27, 2010 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Who even cares.

In this miserable, nearly hopeless economy, if you're not starving, and have a roof over your head, you're lucky.

Posted by: owut | October 27, 2010 9:06 PM | Report abuse

Fat people believe that all of you hateful critics are really stupid. You've got bad manners, poor reasoning and judgement, and really ought not to be addressing anyone in a public forum. You clearly have indulged your personal biases over your ability to learn and reason, and really don't need to shoving your silly, hateful opinions at others. If you don't like the television show, well, you can turn to another channel, there are plenty of other brainless things to amuse you.

Posted by: lats | October 27, 2010 9:10 PM | Report abuse

The Wookie said we should watch what we eat.


.

Posted by: edwhite3 | October 27, 2010 9:45 PM | Report abuse

Celebrating obesity is like celebrating smoking. Neither sets a good example for our children.

Posted by: theFieldMarshall | October 27, 2010 9:53 PM | Report abuse

Lets be real here.

If you look like the people in picture above, if you're 5'5 and 150, if you have to wear plus sizes, you're fat.

You're not big boned, muscled, heavy set, whatever, you're fat. Changing the word won't make you less fat.

Get some gumption, buckle down for the long haul with diet and exercise.

Posted by: Ombudsman1 | October 27, 2010 10:26 PM | Report abuse

hey fat bastard eat another eclair but please stay off Miami beach I want to enjoy myself looking at the hotties not your jelly rolls.LOL

Posted by: hynzerelli | October 27, 2010 10:42 PM | Report abuse

Most of you don't know what you are talking about. I became fat at the age of four. I was not eating anything differently than my brothers and sisters, although we were all adopted. When I was 40 I met my birth family and they were all fat like me. Hmmm, could there be something else here other that food consumption?

I have been dieting my whole life. I have lost and gained hundreds of pounds. Due to the peer pressure that I feel and my despondency about not being able to lose weight, I have tried to commit suicide because that is the only hope I saw for freedom from food. I'm sure many of you out there are saying I should have died, that the world doesn't need another fat person. DO you really think that? Please ask yourself why that is okay with you? Are you sick?

I have an Ivy League MBA. I own a company that actually employs people with good salaries and benefits. I do lots of volunteer work. But I have serious food issues. Sometimes when I am eating I cry because I don't want to be eating. Sometimes I pray to be bulimic. Does that give you the right to make pig noises at me when I walk down the street and make me feel worse? Does it give you the right to assume I don't exercise? I do. I have a personal trainer three times a week for an hour and do cardio two other days. I hate being fat. Society makes me feel worse about it. From childhood people have made me feel worthless because I was fat. I am working with a therapist (and using society's resources) because people have been so cruel to me and it hurts my feelings. Am I just supposed to accept this? Why do you treat me as a lower life form because I am fat?

Some of you just need to get down off of your high horses and find out what real life is about.

Posted by: jdcarroll | October 28, 2010 12:10 AM | Report abuse

@myhondaisfaster: Ever heard of a little something called freedom of speech?

Posted by: crunch99 | October 29, 2010 12:12 PM | Report abuse

In response to the recent post “Should Fatties Get A Room?” by Maura Kelly, which was clearly a blatant and obvious scream for attention. I now find myself compelled to encourage those she may have offended to take action.

Although I am not overweight or weight-challenged myself, I understand the plight of those who may be in a similar situation, and it is my opinion that the overweight have allowed themselves to be victimized for far too long already. It is in your power to change things, and I implore you to do whatever you can to end the cycle of abuse. If those of you who are overweight or obese do not allow others to victimize you, then you will no longer be the target of those who see you as vulnerable.

Isn’t the real issue here discrimination? It is discrimination against the overweight - a movement which I have witnessed growing in recent years. But being overweight is a transitory and temporary condition if we want for it to be, while errors in good judgement, such as those shown by CNN and the editors at Marie Claire are more permanent and require a greater effort to remedy. To any individuals who may have felt hurt or insulted by Kelly’s rant, which she not very cleverly tried to disguise as an article of her own regarding the revulsion she feels in having to endure the very existence of the overweight in our society and in the media, my advice would be to hit back in the only way that these people truly understand - and that is in their wallets. The overweight are an integral segment of the American population, and if they, and really any group that feels discriminated against would only fight back by flexing their collective muscle and boycott those media outlets, web sites, organizations, institutions, and even individuals whom they feel victimized by, true changes can be made in how you are received and treated by the population at large. For if Maura Kelly, or anyone else for that matter, continues to insist on forcing their biased and ignorant opinions on the rest of us, then perhaps publications such as Marie Claire, and media outlets such as CNN, as well as any other industries, corporations and institutions that give these polarizing individuals and attitudes a forum, should feel the economic brunt, and the consequences that maintaining such a stand will carry with it by withholding from them our consumer dollars. It is time that we all became more discerning regarding those we support, especially when they do not support us in return.

Everyone, regardless of the color of their skin, their personal preferences, their gender, religion, sexual orientation, shape, size or appearance, deserves the same respect that we afford the perfect few who walk among us, and until we can apply this same consideration to everyone, no one should feel secure in thinking that their own individual rights will be likewise protected or considered.

Posted by: rsegarra | November 1, 2010 4:11 PM | Report abuse

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