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Robert Edwards, father of in-vitro fertilization, wins Nobel Prize. What does IVF mean to you?

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(July 12, 2008 photo of Robert Edwards, left, Louise Joy Brown, right, holding her son Cameron, and at center left is her mother, Lesley Brown. (AP Photo/Chris Radburn, PA)

The British scientist who developed the process for creating "test tube" babies won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday.

Robert G. Edwards, who is currently a professor emeritus at the University of Cambridge in England, won the prize for his work with Patrick Steptoe to develop in-vitro fertilization (IVF), which involves fertilizing an egg with sperm outside the womb, in a laboratory, to enable infertile couples to have children.

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Louise Brown was born with the help of IVF treatment July 25, 1978 (AFP/Getty Images)

On July 25, 1978, Louise Brown was born, the first "test-tube" baby. Her face appeared on the cover of magazines and newspapers around the world; her existence was debated by scientists and religious leaders; every stage of her life was monitored to see if she would be different than babies conceived in the traditional way.

Test tube babies were an anomaly then, evoking images of Matrix-like, baby-making factories. Today, the procedure has become commonplace and the "test-tube" phrase has fallen by the wayside. Four million IVF babies have been born in the last two-plus decades, all as a result of Edwards' research.

In August, Elizabeth Comeau, the first baby born of IVF treatment in the US, wrote an article in the Boston Globe, "I don't have a baby book -- I have five volumes of newspaper headlines and VHS tapes from television announcements worldwide.... If my story helps couples or families learn about in-vitro fertilization, then the loss of privacy is worthwhile. People who have fertility issues deserve to know they can have healthy, normal babies."

The Nobel prize citation reads: "Approximately four million individuals have so far been born following IVF. Many of them are now adults and some have already become parents. A new field of medicine has emerged, with Robert Edwards leading the process all the way from the fundamental discoveries to the current, successful IVF therapy. His contributions represent a milestone in the development of modern medicine."

What do you think of the development of in-vitro fertilization? Has IVF impacted your life? Leave your stories about IVF or your opinions about the procedure in the comments!

By Melissa Bell  | October 4, 2010; 8:53 AM ET
Categories:  Your Take  
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Comments

IVF? Yes...four wonderful grandkids who simply would not be here without IVF.

Posted by: Socrates2 | October 4, 2010 9:28 AM | Report abuse

Little did I realize when I was 9 years old and reading a Discover article about the technology behind the "test tube" baby that I would be employing that techonology 25 years later.

The technology has come a long way and I now have a healthy 8 year old boy and two healthy 5 year old girls. Thank you Dr. Randy Morris and thanks to all who made this technology possible.

Posted by: Tlaloc2 | October 4, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

I am an egg donor and have donated nine times--tenth and final time come November. Sure, the monetary compensation is fabulous, but knowing that I can help someone who really, truly wants to start a family do so is what kept me going back to do more cycles. I am often dismayed by people who have kids just because they think that is what they are supposed to do with their lives, or have kids due to "accidental" pregnancies. And while I wish more people would adopt a child in need, it does say a lot to me that the folks go who through IVF have obviously thought long and hard about what it means to have children, and have committed much blood, sweat and money in order to have one. I also hope that their ability to fundraise for their IVF treatments also means they are in a good financial position to take care of their children.

I remember one early cycle I received an anonymous letter (my clinic's policies) from the recipient couple, and sitting there for half a day sobbing over what they wrote. It was heartbreakingly beautiful.

Without IVF I could not have been able to help them have a baby.

Posted by: bottlerocket26 | October 4, 2010 11:52 AM | Report abuse

IVF was the only way I would ever conceive. My husband and I went to the Jones Institute in Norfolk, VA and were able to conceive on our first try. We have an 8 year old daughter as a result of that success. She has a petri dish in her keepsake box. She has not asked about it yet, but some day soon she'll learn about the extra special way she came into the world. I am very happy that Robert Edwards has won the Nobel Prize for his work.

Posted by: Jenny22308 | October 4, 2010 12:01 PM | Report abuse

In a world where overpopulation is possibly the greatest threat to human dignity and future quality of existence (except for religion) this guy gets an award for foiling natures rare and feeble attempts to limit births??

Posted by: Coruscator | October 4, 2010 1:18 PM | Report abuse

It affects me often when walking on busy city streets. The number of multiple child strollers is amazing, and getting past them is often difficult.

This is a significant problem needing to be solved.

Posted by: billsecure | October 4, 2010 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Millions of babies are created in a lab and millions of others are aborted. Mankind is simply rehearsing what it must feel like to be God. Old story.

Posted by: forgetthis | October 4, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

With out IVF and Shady Grove My wife and I would have been denied the sheer joy of having a baby. We are the very proud parents of a 17 month old baby girl. The process is by no means an easy one but hearing her say dada and moma then running over and giving out hugs and kisses to us is a pleasure i will never tire of and all made possible through IVF!

Posted by: tylerandersen | October 4, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

IVF held out hope to my wife and I. We went through the procedures many times.

None of the implanted embryos lived to produce a pregnancy. WIth the first, I felt compelled to wait outside a window at Stanford hospital during the evening, where I knew the embryos were in an incubator. While they did not survive in utero, for a brief time, I felt like a father. I keep every photomicrograph.

Posted by: Federal_City | October 4, 2010 2:00 PM | Report abuse

@Coruscator: 75 years ago, people with diabetes died because they were unable to control their blood sugar. Because of medical science, these people live relatively normal lives. Was nature just trying to "limit" the population? Much like it's trying to "limit" the population through infertile couples?

May you never have to go through infertility, it's pretty devastating. But mostly, I'm selfish. I hope you choose not to procreate because you're ignorant.

Posted by: tsheehan | October 4, 2010 2:06 PM | Report abuse

My beautiful twin girls conceived by IVF started kindergarten last month. We can't imagine life without them. Their lives would not have been possible without medical pioneers such as Dr. Edwards. His Nobel Prize is a long overdue honor.

Posted by: MaryinVA | October 4, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

The ethical questions and problems created by IVF trickle down to my life when my OB-GYN has a malpractice induced standard of care for me and my unborn child. If we can produce babies when and how we want, then children who are less than the "when and the how" are seen as expendable.

Posted by: hatsat | October 4, 2010 2:14 PM | Report abuse

My daughter donated for the first time this year and the letter she got back from the recipients(anonymously through the clinic)was so heartfelt and thankful it made us all cry. She plans on doing it again in the future.

Posted by: barbnc | October 4, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

My wife tried for five years. We tried everything even exploratory surgery to determine the condition of her tubes. IVF was our only option and we vigorously accpeted. We became pregnant on our first try. Our son, the love of my life is on 14yrs old, on the honor roll, plays football and basketball, plays piano and X-Box, hahaha. I am only grateful to God for the doctors who willing offered there expertise in allowing us concieve our son.
It was a difficult five year period, but worth every tear we cried for feeling abnormal or knowing was wrong.

Posted by: Kevin_J_Jenkins | October 4, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

My son is a result, 100%, of IVF.
My Brother's two girls are a result 100% of IVF.

Without IVF my parents would have 0 grand children.

Talk about an impact on human life.

Posted by: shimane1 | October 4, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

My beautiful, intelligent IVF grandson is now almost 7. I have another IVF grandson on the way. Each of these boys is wanted, loved and cherished. All children deserve to be welcomed into their families the way IVF children are. That is truly pro-life!

Had the anti IVF religious figures of the time had the political power that fundamentalist religious leaders have now over stem cell research, etc., there would be 3 million less beautiful, wanted children in this world.

Posted by: shatom | October 4, 2010 2:48 PM | Report abuse

In vitro changed my life! It made it possible for me to realize my dream of being a mom. I will be forever grateful.
I am very happy for Dr. Edwards on his award and send him my sincerest congratulations.
My son is now 4 and he has a brother who is 3, who came naturally, but I believe it is thanks to the treatment that I have them both.
Thanks Dr. Edwards and Dr. Juergen Eiserman in Miami, my doctor!

Posted by: normai68 | October 4, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

My husband and I would not have been parents without IVF. It produced a beautiful daughter who we love beyond words. The pain of 4 years of trying, and the cost, kept us from doing it again, but one child is wonderful. She is the best thing on the planet for us. Thanks so much to all who made it possible. It changed our lives, and my parents would not be grandparents if not for this fantastic little 6 year old in our lives!

Posted by: briannholli | October 4, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

What about the even greater millions of less fortunate brother and sister embryos discarded in the process of IVF?
Also the thousands of embryos created to live in frozen banks, most of whom will also probably be killed rather than reach independent existence?

Posted by: patrickp | October 4, 2010 3:51 PM | Report abuse

My wife and I went through IVF. What a racket. The odds of that working are as much in the hands of the practitioners as chance alone. The appeal of IVF is amplified by the crushing desperation and anxiety of infertile couples. The clinics and doctors have learned the art of manipulation as well as any boardwalk hustler. The statistics defining success are meaningless when it comes to you and your partner. Did you do PGD to filter out genetic defects or other chromosomal abnormalities? Well, you may have thrown out the one embryo that would have gone to term and been a healthy baby. Or not. You'll never know -- but you'll always question whether you did the right thing by listening to the "wise" doctor. And of course, there is "selective reduction." Feel good about that?

At least it was our DNA. People who undergo IVF with donated eggs or sperm (or both!) would do well to consider what you and your donor(s) are enabling -- the two of you seem happy to p*** away your DNA into the human sea. Someday it may wash up on the shore of your own progeny. And someday, it won't seem all that unusual to browse a catalog in a comfortable office for the attractive blonde-blue-beauty model you want built for your family.

For those who achieved success with IVF, you have my congratulations and blessings. But for those of us who didn't and turned away from ART in horror, remember we have valid reasons to object -- and feel disgusted that the Nobel committee has recognized a practice that has opened the door to designer babies crafted for a price.

My wife and I have accepted that we'll be one of those childless couples -- and not by choice. While we are greatly disappointed, it's still a more satisfying alternative than conceiving a child in a freakish way.


Posted by: electra775 | October 4, 2010 4:01 PM | Report abuse

Several of the commenterss offer thanks to god (yahweh?) for their artificially conceived offspring. Are you aware that the common Judaeo-Christian-Islamic mythology clearly implies that he/she/it in outer space ultimately governs the ability to have children. Remember Abraham (Ibraham to Muslims)? He could not knock up Sarai (later Sarah) and so dallied with his Arabic "other wife" and produced Ishmael, "a wild ass of a man", in King James version, who became the primogenitor of the Arab nations. Later Abe made some kind of deal with yahweh and Sarai became pregnant with a full blooded Jewish embryo. She was past menopause and 90 years of age according to the tale. Her name then changed to Sarah. So you believers can see that reproduction is controlled by the sky god and you shouldn't need science to help you get around "his will" for your lives.

Another biblical reference says that one child is as good as another. Remember, believers, that yahweh, among inflicting other horrors upon long-suffering Job, killed all ten of his children. Then, when Job still didn't fold and show anger, yahweh gave him 10 new children as "replacements".

Why don't you adopt? There is likely nothing particularly great about your DNA versus that of available abandoned children.

I would never get a pet from a pedigree mill when there are millions of loving critters in the shelters, some awaiting execution.

Bottom line: If your "guy-in-the-sky" hints that he doesn't want you to reproduce why don't you take the hint.

Posted by: Coruscator | October 4, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

Several of the commenters offer thanks to god (yahweh?) for their artificially conceived offspring. Are you aware that the common Judaeo-Christian-Islamic mythology clearly implies that he/she/it in outer space ultimately governs the ability to have children. Remember Abraham (Ibraham to Muslims)? He could not knock up Sarai (later Sarah) and so dallied with his Arabic "other wife" and produced Ishmael, "a wild ass of a man", in King James version, who became the primogenitor of the Arab nations. Later Abe made some kind of deal with yahweh and Sarai became pregnant with a full blooded Jewish embryo. She was past menopause and 90 years of age according to the tale. Her name then changed to Sarah. So you believers can see that reproduction is controlled by the sky god and you shouldn't need science to help you get around "his will" for your lives.

Another biblical reference says that one child is as good as another. Remember, believers, that yahweh, among inflicting other horrors upon long-suffering Job, killed all ten of his children. Then, when Job still didn't fold and show anger, yahweh gave him 10 new children as "replacements".

Why don't you adopt? There is likely nothing particularly great about your DNA versus that of available abandoned children.

I would never get a pet from a pedigree mill when there are millions of loving critters in the shelters, some awaiting execution.

Bottom line: If your "guy-in-the-sky" hints that he doesn't want you to reproduce why don't you take the hint.

Posted by: Coruscator | October 4, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

Not all IVF is for reasons of infertility. It can be used to avoid passing on genetically inherited disease using the sperm and egg of the couple who carry the risk in their genes.

Posted by: lakewood1 | October 4, 2010 4:10 PM | Report abuse

It distresses me to see adults determined to toy with a natural system. There are plenty of children and young adults who need parenting. No need to take extraordinary, unnatural steps to birth babies. Too many exist who are unloved. Let's advocate adoption and Big Brotherhood/Sisterhood.

Posted by: viewpoint3 | October 4, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Nope. Hasn't affected me.

I think it's great for those people who are desperate to have children and cannot, however it naturally lessens the number of people adopting babies and children, which is very not good.

There is no need for population growth, in fact, just the opposite is needed, so IVF is only meeting a WANT not a NEED. I'm not sure why this should warrant a Nobel Prize because of this.

Also, it is anti-Darwinism, but so are most of the discoveries in medicine to a certain extent, though not as distinctly.

Posted by: hebe1 | October 4, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

IVF has given my wife and I two beautiful children and no spare embryos.

Posted by: andrewmclean | October 4, 2010 4:38 PM | Report abuse

I first came across IVF in 1968, ten years prior to Edwards doing it. Edwards was just the first to ADMIT doing it.

Posted by: timothy2me | October 4, 2010 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Coruscator . . . You are absolutely correct in that the Basic Cause of our looming environmental destruction with concomitant violence to get lebensraum is the Exponential Growth of the Human Population.
BUT, to follow nature's remedy - - - We should eliminate ALL medicines and medical treatments (thus eliminating in vitro clinics as well).

(However, let ME keep one MD and pills/equipment to care for me and my family, AND please keep ONE in vitro clinic open just for my sterile wife).

While you’re at it - Please encourage the Vatican not to merely oppose the technical means for contraception, but to ACCEPT that they should, themselves, ABSTAIN from all UNNATURAL events such as heart transplants, appendectomies, flu shots, etc. ad inf.


Posted by: lufrank1 | October 4, 2010 4:40 PM | Report abuse

tsheehan: "May you never have to go through infertility, it's pretty devastating. But mostly, I'm selfish. I hope you choose not to procreate because you're ignorant."

Although I understand that not having children when you dearly want them is a hard thing to deal with, I find fault with your comment.
First, ignrance is due to a lack of information and therefore not a genetic trait that can be passed along; granted the person could keep a child isolated and therefore ignorant.

Second, the vast majority of people who resort to IVF CAN have children. It's called adoption.

When my uncle and aunt decided to have children, they opted for adoption. My aunt had just recovered from a mysterious illness that the doctors couldn't name. Instead of trying to subvert Nature in some way (one of the above posters commented that IVF helps in preventing inhereted illnesses), they decided to SAVE a life.

Unfortunately, IVF can be viewed as selfish; wanting soemthing instead of needing and insisting that it be genetically yours. That's not to say that people haven't been elated by IVF and the resulting babies, but...

Posted by: hebe1 | October 4, 2010 4:44 PM | Report abuse

My husband and I will always be incredibly grateful to Robert Edwards and the other scientists who invented the IVF process. Without it, we would not be the very proud, happy parents of our three children. One of our children has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is a genetic disorder that is sometimes associated with IVF, but we are so incredibly thankful to have been blessed with all three of our children just the way they are. I believe that it was God's will that these scientists discovered the IVF process, and God's blessing that somehow helped it work for us after many tries. I also do not forget, even for a minute, that we could afford to use all that reproductive technology only because we were lucky enough to live in a state that mandated insurance coverage for ART. Hopefully someday every state will have that mandate.

Posted by: tripletmommy | October 4, 2010 4:52 PM | Report abuse

I must agree with hebe & others. All these comments saying "I wouldn't/couldn't have had children/grandchildren but for IVF..." Well, yes, you could have. Your bio kids are here now & all congrats, but there is always the option to adopt children. Many, many children need homes, here in the US and abroad. Tho' I'm not "infertile" I adopted one of my two daughters (and she, like her bio sister, is smart & beautiful & wonderful [not that I'm biased!])...I really think people overestimate the value of their own genes....

Posted by: iona123 | October 4, 2010 4:55 PM | Report abuse

I would encourage everyone who has not struggled with infertility to read this before commenting on IVF:
http://www.resolve.org/support-and-services/for-family--friends/infertility-etiquette.html

Posted by: ann_oyd | October 4, 2010 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Well, just because one is born female...does not mean that your purpose in life is to make babies...but, whatever works, if adoption is not something that is worthwhile. I do not think insurance should pay for IVF. I know many women who have skipped children and devoted their lives to teaching, writing and being good aunts to children of relatives!

Posted by: judithclaire1939 | October 4, 2010 5:01 PM | Report abuse

Well, just because one is born female...does not mean that your purpose in life is to make babies...but, whatever works, if adoption is not something that is worthwhile. I do not think insurance should pay for IVF. I know many women who have skipped children and devoted their lives to teaching, writing and being good aunts to children of relatives!

Posted by: judithclaire1939 | October 4, 2010 5:02 PM | Report abuse

Good point, ann_oyd! Resolve.org is a wonderful resource for those struggling with infertility. I would also add that people should do some research on the costs of adoption before blithely recommending it like it is easy and affordable. I have friends and neighbors who could afford the thousands and thousands of dollars and months off work to complete foreign adoptions, but not all of us have that kind of financial ability. In some states, insurance covers a big chunk of IVF costs, sometimes making it more financially doable than adoption.

Posted by: tripletmommy | October 4, 2010 5:04 PM | Report abuse

If the IVF baby is ugly people make comments like "spare the rod and spoil the kid."

Posted by: hurleyvision | October 4, 2010 5:20 PM | Report abuse

If the IVF baby is ugly people make comments like "spare the rod and spoil the kid."

Posted by: hurleyvision | October 4, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

Yonkers, New York
04 October 2010

Personally, I say "Kudos" to Robert Edwards for winning this prestigious Nobel Prize, his just reward for his signal achievement in In-Vitro Fertilization.

[I say 'personally' because a daughter of mine benefited from IVF, making it possible for her and her husband to have a boy, their only child, who is now 13 years old and is now in 7th grade.]

This boy, our newphew, happens to be one of the 4 million IVF babies born in the last 2-plus decades, according to this Report. That's around 8 million parents who have Robert Edwards to thank for.

But I wonder what the attitude of the Romano Catholic Church is about IVF, conscious of the fact that the only method of creating a baby which it considers proper and moral is for a man and a woman to engage in sexual intercourse.

My question is this: Are Romano Catholic parents who have babies through IVF guilty of running afoul of the Church? And, if so, are they liable to "Excommunication?"

Just a thought.

Mariano Patalinjug
MarPatalinjug@aol.com

Posted by: MPatalinjug | October 4, 2010 5:47 PM | Report abuse

Comrades: Technology is what CAN be done, ethics is what SHOULD be done, and politics is what WILL be done. IVF and Viagara are both 'feel good' technologies, designed to counter crushing (but hardly life threatening) psychological conditions, and make a bundle of $$ in the process. Oh, well . . . .

Posted by: rep15 | October 4, 2010 6:09 PM | Report abuse

IVF means more children available for adoption will have to go without parents.

Posted by: bobbo2 | October 4, 2010 6:38 PM | Report abuse

It gave my wife and I the most perfect, beautiful and angelic little daughter in the world. It presents challenges. It's not easy. But it's one of the greatest gifts science has given us in this millennium.

Posted by: tpwpny | October 4, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse

Like all wonderful scientific advancements, IVF presents us with a mixed bag of blessings and challenges. The blessings side is much more obvious. Enabling otherwise infertile couples is truly transformational and awe inspiring. On the other hand, it has enabled narcisistic DINKs to delay child birth to ages past normal fertility causing a host of social and financial issues. While those couples believe they are "entitled" to this mystery of science to be covered under their medical benefits, their infertility is most often due to their choice of waiting until they are past the age of normal fertility. Many IVF pregnancies result in multiple births which are more often than not, premature. The resulting medical costs are staggering, over $1,000,000 for a pregancy! Who pays this? We all do through our medical premiums. So the couple who was too self centered to take time out of their lives for a baby until they were "finanically secure" in their mid 40s now COST the rest of us over a million dollars for their narcisim. Interesting isn't it.

Posted by: slainte1 | October 4, 2010 6:55 PM | Report abuse

The Catholic Church would likely approve if the children created were in the families it infects or otherwise subject to domination by that pedophilic institution. They operate by trying to increase their numbers, same as the Mormons!

Posted by: Coruscator | October 4, 2010 7:27 PM | Report abuse

Remeber "OctoMom"??

Posted by: Coruscator | October 4, 2010 7:29 PM | Report abuse

That's Remember "Octo-Mom"??

Posted by: Coruscator | October 4, 2010 7:30 PM | Report abuse

I am the grandmother of two sets of twins. My daughter had natural identical twin girls and my son had a girl and boy set of twins from IVF. I am so grateful for these beautiful gifts from God.
I do agree with some comments concerning those who take advantage of this advancement in medicine but then there are those who take advantage of every situation and try to ruin it for everyone. The doctor who gave the octomom hers should have his medical license pulled. There has to be some common sense somewhere.

Posted by: greatgran1 | October 4, 2010 8:48 PM | Report abuse

It is true that the supposed "pro-life" movement has completely and conveniently ignored the up to 1 million human embryos that lie in freezers and which may never be used.

Posted by: jjedif | October 4, 2010 9:07 PM | Report abuse

"I would also add that people should do some research on the costs of adoption before blithely recommending it like it is easy and affordable."

Oh, would never say it was easy or affordable.

"I have friends and neighbors who could afford the thousands and thousands of dollars and months off work to complete foreign adoptions, but not all of us have that kind of financial ability."

Yes, but I don't have the ability to cover the increased insurance premiums of covering ART for YOU. Not to mention that the emotional and medical yo-yo a woman becomes while going through the process is not someone I should have to work or deal with.

"In some states, insurance covers a big chunk of IVF costs, sometimes making it more financially doable than adoption."

Yep...a great deal for the rich but not the infertile poor.

Posted by: hatsat | October 4, 2010 9:43 PM | Report abuse

I have been fortunate enough to have a child via IVF, to adopt a child and to very unexpectedly conceive a child. Each child, each way, is an absolute miracle that my husband and I are thankful for every day. I am so grateful for Dr. Edwards' work and congratulate him on his award.

Posted by: luckyone3 | October 4, 2010 9:46 PM | Report abuse

What does IVF mean to me? The existence of my 20 year old daughter, the love of
my life.

Posted by: erte1 | October 4, 2010 9:55 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry for all of the posters who are misinformed. My son is here because of advanced fertility technologies. After many, many procedures, and having one child from them, I know this for sure- doctors can create the science. Only God creates life.

Posted by: butforthegraceofgod | October 4, 2010 10:20 PM | Report abuse

After traveling down parallel paths of adoption and IVF, my wife conceived our twins before we could adopt. Unfortunately, she died during childbirth. Neither of us took the time to fully evaluate the risks, however low, of both paths. I encourage all to think about and seek out information about the risks before you set out on either journey. My two sons and I live our lives in honor of her life and sacrifice each day.

Posted by: budvar59 | October 4, 2010 10:28 PM | Report abuse

@hatsat -
Let me explain - we WERE the "infertile poor" (unless your definition of poor = unemployed.) We could not afford to adopt, and we could never have afforded our three cycles of IVF if my husband and I had not both had health insurance through our (not-very-high-paying) jobs. I am very grateful that my coworkers during our struggle with infertility were much more understanding and sympathetic than you seem to be.

Posted by: tripletmommy | October 5, 2010 9:22 AM | Report abuse

IVF has been, and will continue to a wonderful option for those who truly desire to have children. The stepping stone created by this technology is fascinating and I am happy he has received honors.I feel sorry for those who cling so desperately to the mis-information they have been fed, not only with this issue, but life in general. Good luck to all that make their "own" decision to pursue their "own" reproductive freedoms!

Posted by: dervish2 | October 5, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

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