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♪♫ The Edmund Fitzgerald story lives on in Gordon Lightfoot's song

By Melissa Bell
Edmund Fitzgerald
The Split Rock Lighthouse in Two Harbors, Minn., shines its beacon Nov. 5 to mark the great Minnesota November storms. Usually the light is only illuminated on Nov. 10 to remember the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. (Paul M. Walsh/AP)

It's a music day today. This song honors the 35th anniversary of the tragedy of Edmund Fitzgerald. The wild weather earlier this month in the Great Lakes has dredged up the memories of the sinking of the huge ship Fitzgerald. In 1975, the ship lost a battle against the stormy weather on Lake Superior and went down with all hands on board. The cause was never determined.

Gordon Lightfoot turned the tale into a haunting song whose refrain warns, "The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead/When the skies of November turn gloomy."

On the YouTube page, listeners recall where they were when accident happened. "I was out on Whitefish Bay that day on my Lake Erie fish boat; barely made it back to Mamainse Harbour. It was the most scared I ever been. We found washed up wreckage the next day," writes MisterBCBudman.

"I was 10 when that happened, and live in the Sault. ... I can't help but think of them almost everytime I see a ship go through the locks," writes Ralphyization.

Were you in the area when the boat sank? Do you remember the storm?

By Melissa Bell  | November 10, 2010; 1:18 PM ET
 
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Comments

Are there no editors or proofreaders left at the Post's electronic version? Does this author have the writing skills to actually be employed by a major newspaper? The number of errors in this relatively tiny blog posting are just ridiculously high.

Posted by: 7900rmc | November 10, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Song should be played as a dirge, sort of like St. James Infirmary, not a ballad. If it's slowed just a bit it becomes a really heavy piece of music.

Posted by: blasmaic | November 10, 2010 1:47 PM | Report abuse

@7900rmc

The number of errors in this relatively tiny blog posting IS just ridiculously high.

When "the number" is the subject, it takes a singular verb. The verb must agree with the subject, not with the prepositional phrase ("of errors").

Posted by: SilverSpring8 | November 10, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

QUOTE: "Are there no editors or proofreaders left at the Post's electronic version? Does this author have the writing skills to actually be employed by a major newspaper? The number of errors in this relatively tiny blog posting are just ridiculously high."

So people are complaining about the lack of editing for blog postings? I suppose the Post can hire more copy editors with all the money they make from giving their news away for free on line. Soon, people who get their news for nothing on the Web will be getting exactly what they pay for. And they will deserve what they get. You want editing? Buy the print version while it still exists. Otherwise, don't complain about the free stuff.

Posted by: fmullen | November 10, 2010 4:16 PM | Report abuse

The number of errors in this relatively tiny blog posting are just ridiculously high.
--------
You mean, the number of errors in this...blog posting IS just ridiculously high. Physician, heal thyself.

Posted by: bucinka8 | November 10, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

Free or not, if they're going to link to it from the front page, someone should at least look at it. Quoting YouTube postings? Including one from "MisterBCBudman"? One might as well source a Craigslist help forum.

Posted by: bob76 | November 10, 2010 11:43 PM | Report abuse

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