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Google 10% raise won't go to one employee (well, ex-employee now)

By Melissa Bell
Google Pay Raise
The Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. (Paul Sakuma/AP)

Yesterday, word got out that Google employees could look forward to a nice little bonus of $1,000 and a 10 percent pay raise next year. Well, turns out that word got out thanks to one engineer who leaked an internal memo -- and now that leak has cost the person his or her job, sources told CNN Money:

Within hours, Google notified its staff that it had terminated the leaker, several sources told CNNMoney. A Google spokesman declined to comment on the issue, or on the memo.

Most Google watchers speculate the pay raise is to help fend off employees leaving for other businesses. Not sure whether a company that wants to appease its employees is sending out the best message by firing an employee, but so be it. Sorry, engineer!

By Melissa Bell  | November 11, 2010; 11:00 AM ET
Categories:  The Daily Catch  
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Comments

"Not sure whether a company that wants to appease its employees is sending out the best message by firing an employee"?

Really? Are you serious? Have you *seen* the heading of the blogged memo, the part where it says "CONFIDENTIAL: INTERNAL ONLY"?

The message seems completely consistent and appropriate: 1) The employees are appreciated and the company wants to keep them, so here's a 10% raise and a bonus. 2) If an employee violates the terms of employment by revealing confidential information, they're fired.

I'd say Google are operating with a lot of integrity.

Posted by: joe_engineer | November 14, 2010 7:58 AM | Report abuse

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