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Posted at 1:01 PM ET, 11/22/2010

Kennedy assassination: Where were you? (Photos)

By Melissa Bell
JFK Assination
President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy are shown in the presidential limousine moments before Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. (NBC/Reuters)

Pearl Harbor, 9/11 and JFK's assassination. Today is one of those thankfully few dates in American history that rocked the nation with a tragedy so big it stopped the clocks in people's memories. Forty-seven years ago, John F. Kennedy was shot and killed in Dallas, Texas. Share your memory of the day the president died.

Where were you when you found out about John F. Kennedy's death?
JFK Assination
John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy hold hands before boarding their convertible at Love Field for the motorcade through Dallas. (The Dallas Morning News/AP)
JFK Assination
Jacqueline Kennedy leans over President John F. Kennedy, slumped in the back seat of his limousine after being fatally shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. A Secret Service agent stands on the bumper. (Ike Altgens/AP)
JFK Assination
Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson takes the presidential oath of office aboard Air Force One at Love Field in Dallas just two hours after Kennedy was shot. (Cecil Stoughton)
JFK Assination
Jacqueline Kennedy kisses the casket of her husband in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. Daughter Caroline kneels alongside. (AP)
JFK Assination
Jacqueline Kennedy holds the American flag that covered the coffin of her husband. (Eddie Adams/AP)
JFK Assination
Lee Harvey Oswald, accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy, reacts as Dallas nightclub owner Jack Ruby, foreground, shoots at him from point-blank range in a corridor of Dallas police headquarters. (Dallas Times-Herald, Bob Jackson/AP)
JFK Assination
John F. Kennedy, skipper of PT boat 109, is shown relaxing in the South Pacific in 1943 (AP)
JFK Assination
Jacqueline Kennedy and her sister, Lee Radziwill, during a daytime boat ride on Lake Pichola, Udaipur, India, in 1962.
JFK Assination
(Dayna Smith/The Washington Post)


YOUR TAKE: Where were you on the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated?



Tells us where you were using #wherewereyou on Twitter and view the discussion here:




By Melissa Bell  | November 22, 2010; 1:01 PM ET
Categories:  Picture Shows  
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Next: Black Friday: Who, what, when, where and no need for a why

Comments

My how things have changed. In today's world JFK would have been a good, old fashioned, conservative. In other words, a Republican. Too bad the leftists, liberals, radicals, deviates and wackos have dragged us so far to the destructive, chaotic, irresponsible left.

Posted by: AG1231 | November 22, 2010 1:26 PM | Report abuse

UFO's and JFK, are two stories that I wish would go away; but they have dominated my life year after year. I pray for the Kennedy family and truly appreciate the sacrifices they have made for our country.

Posted by: johnhoens | November 22, 2010 1:35 PM | Report abuse

I sat in a third grade classroom. The principal announced the news in a low, monotone voice. Stunned silence is what I remember after that. Then my teacher burst into tears. We were allowed to go home early.

Even at the young age of eight, I felt united with a nation in mourning. I felt it again as I read today's article and looked at the pictures. So sad.

Posted by: ficwriter | November 22, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

I wish UFO's would go away, too, they're just taking way too much time. I have to get up in the morning, walk the dog, check on the UFO's, eat breakfast, go to work, look at the UFO's, etc. It's just too much, I'm trying to not let them dominate my time, but it's hard, you know. They're UFO's and everyhing, what am I supposed to do?

Posted by: mike8 | November 22, 2010 1:51 PM | Report abuse

My how things have changed. In today's world JFK would have been a good, old fashioned, centerist. In other words, a Democrat. Too bad the extremeists, teabaggers, RWNJs, FOXnon-news wackos have dragged us so far to the destructive, chaotic, irresponsible right that we can't even see where the center is.

Posted by: seriousfun | November 22, 2010 1:56 PM | Report abuse

I was a Junior in high school sitting in third-period German class in Lanier High School in Austin, Texas. An anonymous voice on the public address system came on unexpectedly and announced President Kennedy had been shot. The woman teaching the class broke into tears and sat there and wept while the rest of us just looked at one another, trying to fathom what had just happened.

Posted by: cwvail | November 22, 2010 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Today marks the 47th anniversary of the assination of President John F. Kennedy. Where were you when this happened? Of course many of you were not alive, but I was, and I was on Grand Turk Island in the Caribbean working in the Eastern Test Range Telemetry building along with Jay Grimes who came in running to tell me about the shooting. It was a sad day... indeed.

Posted by: pafb1972 | November 22, 2010 2:06 PM | Report abuse

when the republicans start chanting that they want the world to be like it was in Ronald Reagans day, which don't Democrats respond that they would like the world to be like it was in John F. Kennedy's day.

Posted by: garyolney | November 22, 2010 2:10 PM | Report abuse

First, I'll establish Truth (it's what I do and who I represent), then, work from there:


The Coup of 1963, was unquestionably, the death of true Democracy in "America". Many of those who were both instrumental, and complicit in this unpardonable act (including many members of the Print and Broadcast Media), have seemingly escaped repercussions. One vital conspirator, was "elected" U.S. President in the 1980's. Yet, be not further deceived: Justice, true Justice, SHALL BE SERVED.
May The True and Living God, rest the soul of John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

Posted by: HisPrinceMichael | November 22, 2010 2:10 PM | Report abuse

First, I'll establish Truth (it's what I do and whom I represent), then, work from there:

The Coup of 1963, was the unquestionable death of true Democracy in "America". It irrepairably rendered "We, The People", null and void.
Many of those instrumental and complicit, in this heinous action
(including many in the Print and Broadcast Media)have seemingly escaped the consequences of their
sinister involvement. One, was
"elected" U.S. President in the 1980's, with many of his appointees, still active in U.S. "Government". Yet, be not further deceived: Justice, true Justice, SHALL BE RELENTLESSLY SERVED. May The True and Living God, rest the soul of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

Posted by: HisPrinceMichael | November 22, 2010 2:19 PM | Report abuse

Karen St. John's book review of Virtual Autopsy,19 nov 2010, posted on Veterans Today internet site includes:His references to trying to convince the authorities that he was telling the truth about hearing intentions of a group of military officers to oppose President John Kennedy is backed up by documents declaring he was telling the truth(polygraphs)

Posted by: cstamping | November 22, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

I was a small child of seven(7) sitting with my mom in the family room watching "As the World Turns". It was her favor soap back then. The news interrupted the station & all I remember my mom doing was crying then I started crying not quite sure why; but then later I was told, then I really started crying. In our home, all my parents talked about & the news was John F. Kennedy & the Kennedy family. What an impact they had on the world. It was a very sad day & time along with the passing of Martin Luther King Jr.. Two great men of their times!!!!!!

Posted by: machallebrown | November 22, 2010 2:32 PM | Report abuse

I can't believe all these years have passed, since Kennedy,I was in high school but home that day, I can remember every vivid moment, listening to the radio to the music of the day and time, it broke with the announcement , I was stunned, my Mother soon came home from work early , she was crying, they had to shut the plant down where she worked because no one could work the rest of the day everyone was crying and in shock. My Parents were DEMS I always watched politics with my Mother from about 8 years old when we got our first T V , We watched the news all evening with the horrible pictures, My mother cried and so did I , such a sad time, I believe when the President was killed America and the world was changed forever,it took something from the country , that we have never been able to regain somehow , out innocence was lost somehow, everything has seem violent since then.

Posted by: Dandylionet | November 22, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

I was only 11 years old...6th grade gym class. The school principal put the radio on over the loud speaker. I will never forget that day. School was cancelled for the next several days and I sat with my father, who explained about the boots turned backwards for a fallen hero. I also watched Lee Harvey Oswald being killed on live television and as an 11 year old child, knew instantly the story line being sold to the American public was not accurate. I wonder if we will ever know the real truth...

Posted by: wlfwmn | November 22, 2010 3:14 PM | Report abuse

now THAT was a day that changed the world--how much, we could not have had any idea. there were no 24-hour news channels then, although all the major networks turned into those for the next four days. and how we needed this common cracker barrel around which to huddle, to try to make sense of the bloody slaughter of our handsome, young, witty President. we didn't know in those days of the President's peccadilloes, only of his brilliance, his "vigah" [as mangled by his atrocious [but oh so Hahvahd Yahd-y] Boston accent], and the bright new dawn that had broken over the entire nation when he had taken the oath of office. Now night had fallen with sudden ferocity, and it wasn't going anywhere. We had to learn to live in a world where even being witty and pretty was no protection from getting one's head blown off.

Thank God Jackie refused to remove her blood-and-brain-clotted pink suit. "Let them see what they have done," she said.

Posted by: suffersfools | November 22, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

"My how things have changed. In today's world JFK would have been a good, old fashioned, conservative. In other words, a Republican. Too bad the leftists, liberals, radicals, deviates and wackos have dragged us so far to the destructive, chaotic, irresponsible left."

oh my my, how nice of you to inject your political delusions into a space honoring a former president. I'm aware that you folks on the right have no respect for anyone who does not pass your litmus test, but for a bracing dose of reality, why don't you check out President Nixon's record? - wage and price controls, creation of the EPA and, gasp, he visited China.

Tell you what - why don't you go back to school and study what the heck you seem so sure about?

And this once again is just another reason that tea parties are, in fact, for little girls. They both like to make up facts to make themselves look right.

Posted by: JohnDinHouston | November 22, 2010 3:18 PM | Report abuse

I was four years old and shopping in downtown Newark, NJ with my mother. I remember all the adults around me getting upset, with some of them crying, including my mother. I asked what was wrong, and she explained that something bad had happened to someone very important and we had to go right home. We got on the bus, and I remember that even the bus driver was crying. It was the first time I had ever seen grownups - both men and women - cry.

Posted by: kbetanco | November 22, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Can it really be 47 years ago?

I was a 3rd-grader on the playground at Nottingham Elementary in Arlington just after lunchtime. My teacher's 16-year-old daughter came racing across the field screaming and crying that "The President's been killed." As we were hustled back into the school building, I saw my sister, a 6th grade patrol, pulling the American flag down to half-staff.

Posted by: luv2bikva | November 22, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

It was a day before my 6th birthday and we were at my grandparent’s house. All the adults were gathered around the TV watching the news about Kennedy’s death. Being almost 6 they wouldn’t let me watch and with the little I was able to comprehend, my imagination took over. I envisioned President Kennedy riding in a white limo, top down, with bull horns on the front. The road was dirt and the buildings were right out of a western movie. Next from a roof top, a cowboy in a black hat shoots the president with a Winchester rifle, runs to the back of the building, jumps off the roof onto a waiting horse And rides away.

Posted by: smithce1 | November 22, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

I was 18 years old, a private in basic training at Ft. Dix, NJ marching on the parade grounds when all of a sudden sirens started sounding and planes appeared overhead flying in formation. The non-coms who had been drilling us gathered hurredly in a huddle without so much as an "At ease" command. We were young recruits just starting out and all of us were wondering exactly what was going on. After what seemed like an interminable amount of time, the training cadre broke up and told us what had just happened in Dallas. Everyone was naturally shocked. the rest of that day was a blur of memories surrounding the television accounts. Nobody said much since we were all stunned. I remember wondering how such a terrible thing could happen in this great country of ours. That was definitely a moment in time I will never forget. Things definitely changed from that day forth and not for the better.

Posted by: willkaup | November 22, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

It was a day before my 6th birthday and we were at my grandparent’s house. All the adults were gathered around the TV watching the news about Kennedy’s death. Being almost 6 they wouldn’t let me watch and with the little I was able to comprehend, my imagination took over. I envisioned President Kennedy riding in a white limo, top down, with bull horns on the front. The road was dirt and the buildings were right out of a western movie. Next from a roof top, a cowboy in a black hat shoots the president with a Winchester rifle, runs to the back of the building, jumps off the roof onto a waiting horse And rides away.

Posted by: smithce1 | November 22, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

I was in the fifth grade. We were having our post-lunch playtime in the classroom because it was raining and we couldn't go outside. Our teacher announced that the president had been shot. We just went on with our regular school day. Of course, we had the TV on at home most of the time and I watched Oswald get shot over and over again. I don't think anybody got much sleep that weekend.

Posted by: csb528 | November 22, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

What moron would ever think John Kennedy would stoop so low as to become a repug?

These idiots have destroyed what was a wonderful country and turn us into the pariah of the western world.

Their current wars are against the American people, civilization, education and our infrastructure.

Reagan wanted us all enslaved by BIG BUSINESS and the current crop of right-wing thugs and anarchist are doing their damnedest to make that nightmare come true. With factless, anti-American rhetoric they have pushed us over the edge and have spent the last four years obstructing ever attempt to stop the slide. But with the last campaign of distortions and lies they now have the ability to destroy the last vestige of human decency in this country at any cost. When your mission is a suicidal mission much like other right-wing terrorists the goal is to wreck the society. They are close to finished with their work.

Posted by: BigTrees | November 22, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

"if by a “Liberal” they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people — their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights, and their civil liberties — someone who believes we can break through the stalemate and suspicions that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by a “Liberal,” then I’m proud to say I’m a “Liberal.”"

Yeah - sounds just like today's Republicans...NOT!

Posted by: hrc2211 | November 22, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

The Secret Service goons were ineffectual at protecting President Kennedy that awful day...I resent the easy lives thay have enjoyed since.

Posted by: kase | November 22, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

I was walking back to school in Evansville, Indiana from lunch at home. When I got back to school, someone told me that he'd been shot.

About 2:30 that afternoon, our school principal came into our eighth grade Social Studies class and said "Boys and girls, our President is dead." Maybe he said "has died" but I think it was "is dead."

In a minute, he was off to the next classroom. Miss Syler, our only Black teacher, started talking to us about it. "This is a very sad day in our nation's history."

She never showed a tear. I was in one of the front rows and would have seen if she had. Now that I'm 60, I can't for the life of me see how she held it in.

I think that was when I started watching Huntley-Brinkley, watching them past midnight the first night and much of the weekend.

Posted by: whatt | November 22, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

I was in the Brackenridge high school darkroom processing the film from the day before; JFK's motorcade drove by our school on the 21st. This was San Antonio ,Tx. It was too sureal, I had just hung up the wet film to dry, when the radio anouncer's voice cut in to interrupt the news and state that the president had been shot...

Here, just the day before our entire student body had lined up the street, to wave and greet our president, now he was dead. At sixteen, you just don't have enough answers to fill your questions.

But to me that's the day you felt the most vulnerable. Why? The answers never came, just more questions and feeling like a member of your family had been killed. The school was dismissed and all you could hear were the people crying and praying for his family. It's one day that will be etched in all our hearts and thoughts, "where were you, when the president was killed"?

Posted by: fromo1946 | November 22, 2010 7:04 PM | Report abuse

I was in a Chinese art class my freshman year at San Diego State. Our professor came in and told us that JFK had just been shot. He then immediately turned on the slide projector and asked if someone could hit the lights. My best friend was in the class with me. We exchanged glances and quietly, and quickly, headed out the door.

Posted by: reporter1 | November 22, 2010 11:47 PM | Report abuse

An Air Force captain, I was recruiting candidates for officer training at TCU in Ft. Worth. It was a noon break, and I was in the student union watching live coverage of the motorcade in Dallas. After a time of horror, I knew my mission that day was over. I phoned the base headquarters at Carswell AFB outside town to see if they had any instructions, or to return to my home unit in San Antonio.

That drive from Ft. Worth to San Antonio alone was one of the longest drives of my life to that time, wondering what this might mean to my life in the Air Force, and what might follow the decapitation of our government.

Posted by: chasbrow | November 23, 2010 12:55 AM | Report abuse

I was in freshman chemistry lab in the basement of Clapp Hall at the University of Pittsburgh. We were in the process of generating Hydrogen gas (Zinc plus sulfiruc acid) in a flask. We were warned that anyone who blew up the hydrogen generator would fail the lab. The radio was blasting out Petula Clark's "Downtown" when simultaneously one of the generators blew and the song was abruptly cut off: " We interrupt this program with an important announcement."

Posted by: p2dppd | November 23, 2010 6:04 AM | Report abuse

Maybe it wasn't the song "Downtown", since it didn't come out till 1965. I think the DJ Porky Chedwick, well known in the Pittsburgh area, was on the radio at the time.

Posted by: p2dppd | November 23, 2010 6:10 AM | Report abuse

I was in the first grade. We had just come in from afternoon recess. A wild rumor started spreading across the classroom that President Kennedy had been shot and killed and that we were about to go home.

The teacher made us put our heads down to take a nap, but we could hear her discussing JFK at the door with another teacher. Sure enough, she soon came in and told us that we were going home earlier than usual. President Kennedy's demise was confirmed by my Parents on the way home. I must of asked fifty times what did the word assassination mean. DB in Houston

Posted by: kountzer | November 27, 2010 4:25 AM | Report abuse

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