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Veterans Day retrospective: Photos and interactivity from around the Web

By Katie Rogers and Melissa Bell
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Jim McGee, a member of the Fort Snelling Memorial Rifle Squad, salutes during a veteran's funeral at Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Bloomington, Minn. Every weekday during the year, members of the squad are out in force and in formation, paying tribute to veterans being laid to rest. (Dawn Villella/AP)

11/11/11: On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, Germany and the Allied Forces signed a cessation of forces along the Western Front, marking the de facto end to the First World War. The day was celebrated as Armistice Day until 1954, when a bill was passed to change the day into a memorial for all veterans of all U.S. wars. Here is a look back on some of the celebrations over the past decade.

Do you have a story you'd like to share about a veteran close to you? Use #honoringvets to respond on Twitter; fill out an interactive form that will allow you to share a photo and a story about a veteran, or submit a photo of your veteran.

Click here to jump to the bottom of this entry for a roundup of the best Veterans Day coverage from around the Web.

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Vice President Biden lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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President Obama, in Seoul for the Group of 20 summit, takes part in a wreath-laying at the Yongsan War Memorial. (Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images)
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Dylan Cox, 8, leaves a special gift after placing flowers on a relative's grave at Camp Butler National Cemetery in Riverton, Ill. (Seth Perlman/AP)
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An American flag in Maysville, Ky., during a 2008 Veterans Day parade. (Terry Prather/AP)
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A Veterans Day commemoration service for gay veterans in 2008 at the grave of Leonard Matlovich, a Vietnam War vet who led the charge for recognition of gays in the military in the late 1970s. (Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)
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Zora Kamman, 85, of South Riding was liberated from Dachau during World War II. He is salutes the flag during a 2006 Memorial Day ceremony in Sterling. (Rafael Crisostomo/The Washington Post)
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Veterans carrying the colors prepare to enter the amphitheater at the Veterans Day remembrance ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)
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The Joint Service Color Guard leads a parade along Pennsylvania Avenue from the Capitol to the Department of Veterans Affairs in 1997. (James A. Parcell/The Washington Post)

Best of the Veterans Day coverage


From The Post:

Veterans Day tributes. Articles and photographs honoring deployed service members and military veterans who have returned.

Marine Corps Cpl. Todd Nicely is one of three surviving quadruple amputees from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Nicely talks about his recovery experience in this video.

"Lethal Warriors: When the New Band of Brothers Came Home." Guest blogger David Philipps takes a Veterans Day look at how post-traumatic stress disorder has become an issue of vital concern to our troops and our nation.

Veterans Day: By the numbers. Did you know the military is 93 percent male? View this and other statistics about our service members.

From around the Web:

Newsweek's "The Young Boy." Read by Jason Davis, the animated video is part of a larger interactive series about how troops are remaking their lives at home.

#Wheretheyserved: TBD.com has created an interactive Google map where readers can share where personal stories of where they or a loved one served.

IAVA: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America have started a Facebook campaign to "show new vets you've got their back."

The Indianapolis Star launched "Faces of War: Hoosier Veterans," which uses video and photography to tell the stories of men and women who served.

"Fish Out of Water:" A short film from Explore about post-traumatic-stress-afflicted combat vets in a fly-fishing workshop.

View the Twitter conversation here:

By Katie Rogers and Melissa Bell  | November 11, 2010; 10:12 AM ET
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Comments

Yes, I have a comment, why do we need to segregate gays from blacks from whites from koreans from ricans from whatever in our war memorial sites?

When I was in the Army, we were all Green.

This makes no sense other than selfishness on those parties designed or funded the site.

I must say, gays in the same quarters as men or women, is a bad move, for you have a lot of people with deep natural fears and when men with lots of testosterone are boiling through for long periods of time with out women around to satisfy their natural urges, all the while, a gay man or women watch and get free peep shows is a bad move and a violation of their rights. Where is the justice in that?

If gays(men/women) are to be in the military, they should be taking separate showers, bathrooms marked "other" and while females or some males too, do not protest or simply do not know if someone is gay, that's just wrong for the rest of us.

By gays live in separate quarters, is no diff than females living in separate quarters, and are all soldiers, the memorials sites should still not segregate who is what, as they are all soldiers and should be commemorated EQUALLY.

The men, and women who are dying for our country should be all considered together, all GREEN, not black, not white, not asian, not this or that... but together. That makes sense to me. That's what they train us for to die together proudly.

That's my two bit, chew on that for a while.


Posted by: oly562 | November 11, 2010 12:31 PM | Report abuse

What does the Democrat Obama administration have to say on Veterans Day, this November 11, 2010? Little is said by the Commander in Chief, however, Secretary Shinseki of the Veterans Administration said to our brave soldiers, “War is hell, but … doesn’t need to be.” What an insult to the veterans of America.

If it were not for the Veterans of American, the U.S. would not enjoy the freedom and privileges of U.S. citizenship granted by the U.S. Constitution, representations in Congress and an elected President in the White House.

Remember General George Washington and FDR asking for God’s blessings on American Armed Forces. WW II Veterans of American received a personal letter from FDR and a copy of the New Testament of the Bible for inspiration.

Be reminded of the apostle Paul who wrote I have fought the good fight, finished the course and kept the faith that is in God in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. The sacrifice of Veterans demonstrates the greatest love of giving of their life in military duty for the freedom of others.

Posted by: klausdmk | November 11, 2010 3:20 PM | Report abuse

What does the Democrat Obama administration have to say on Veterans Day, this November 11, 2010? Little is said by the Commander in Chief, however, Secretary Shinseki of the Veterans Administration said to our brave soldiers, “War is hell, but … doesn’t need to be.” What an insult to the veterans of America.

If it were not for the Veterans of American, the U.S. would not enjoy the freedom and privileges of U.S. citizenship granted by the U.S. Constitution, representations in Congress and an elected President in the White House.

Remember General George Washington and FDR asking for God’s blessings on American Armed Forces. WW II Veterans of American received a personal letter from FDR and a copy of the New Testament of the Bible for inspiration.

Be reminded of the apostle Paul who wrote I have fought the good fight, finished the course and kept the faith that is in God in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. The sacrifice of Veterans demonstrates the greatest love of giving of their life in military duty for the freedom of others.

Posted by: klausdmk | November 11, 2010 3:21 PM | Report abuse

klausdmk, the President was at yongsan in Korea with US troops stationed there. I'm sure he delivered a speech, just wasn't reported though I am sure it is published on the web somewhere.

And Shinseki's comment were more related to the issue of PTSD affecting many veterans and that they don't have to face it alone. Unfortunately many Soldiers fear seeking mental health professionals help is showing weakness, and he is trying to help break that image. Way to spin it, especially considering Shinseki himslef is a veteran.

Posted by: whfr | November 12, 2010 4:31 AM | Report abuse

Missed it: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/10/AR2010111007798.html
not a bad quote from the CiC
"A country they never knew and a people they never met," Obama repeated. "I know of no better words to capture the selflessness and generosity of every man or woman who has ever worn the uniform of the United States of America.

"At a time when it has never been more tempting or accepted to pursue narrow self-interest and personal ambition," he continued, "you remind us that there are few things more American than doing what we can to make a difference in the lives of others."

Posted by: whfr | November 12, 2010 4:52 AM | Report abuse

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