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Posted at 1:16 PM ET, 12/14/2010

Chernobyl travel in 2011; Comic-Con tickets to go on sale... again; net neutrality and more

By Melissa Bell
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Reactor No. 4 in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. (Efrem Lukatsky/AP)

Links to know:

Odd news: Vacation in Chernobyl

The levels of radiation are still at a dangerous level. The name is synonymous with man-made disaster. And it could be your next vacation spot. The Ukraine government has announced plans to open the 30-mile radius "exclusion zone" around the nuclear reactor that exploded in 1986 in Chernobyl.

The down side: The area still has radiation levels at higher than normal. The plus side: Plant and animal life have thrived there, creating a biodiversity unlike in many other areas in the world. It also has all the elements of a modern-day Pompeii, as the buildings were abandoned and have been left untouched for years. Photographs of the area show the incredible ruins of a disaster froze in time.

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Odd news: Sex lives of presidents according to Larry Flynt.

It's a book and the above subhead pretty much sums it up. Here's one tidbit: "Franklin Roosevelt: His affairs boosted his self-confidence, which 'was essential to his unique ability to rally the country during the Great Depression and World War II. By pumping up FDR, [his mistresses] Lucy and Missy did the nation and world a great service.'" To read more about it, check out the Political Bookworm blog.

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Tech news: FCC proposal on net neutrality is 'weak'

Despite hopes that a new FCC proposal on net neutrality would curb broadband companies from imposing charges for the use of their network, the opposite is true. The proposal will allow for companies such as Comcast to prioritize its own content, giving better speed rates to it and its partners' products. Internet companies, such as Netflix, Amazon and Skype, have stepped up their lobbying of the FCC asking for a proposal that will not allow this type of paid-prioritizing to occur.

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Geek news: Comic-Con tickets: Third time a charm?

Twice Comic-Con has tried to sell fans tickets to the 2011 nerd prom extraordinaire that takes place every year in San Diego. Twice this year, the online booking system was overloaded with requests and had to shutter operations. The site was getting 250 hits a second, the San Diego Union Tribune reports. Comic-Con announced it has a new system in place and will run an initial sale of 1,000 tickets Wednesday morning to see if it can withstand the request onslaught. Last year about 130,000 people attended the four-day convention.

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Tech-odd: TwitterLeaks

For all those out there unable to tweet what they really feel, a new Web site offers an anonymous Twitter service. Simply submit your tweet and out into the Twitter ether it will go.

(Thanks, Mark!)

By Melissa Bell  | December 14, 2010; 1:16 PM ET
Categories:  The Daily Catch  
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