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Posted at 9:45 AM ET, 12/21/2010

Cornell drug bust: $150,000 in heroin

By Melissa Bell
Wikileaks
Columbia University students Adam Klein, center, and Jose Perez, right after they were. (Tina Fineberg/AP)

What is up with school kids these days? No, really.

When news broke that two freshman were cooking up drugs in their dorm room at Georgetown University, it was shocking and sad. Some smart students became very stupid when they decided to turn their Harbin Hall room into a factory for the hallucinogenic drug DMT. But the story also felt very much like a fluke -- a one-time incident.

Two months later, five students at Columbia University were unceremoniously hauled away for selling LSD-spiked candy and drugs.

Now, news breaks that a drug bust at Cornell has a student caught with six ounces of heroin, valued at more than $150,000.

In the Columbia drug bust, two of the arrested students claimed the drug dealing was to help pay for their tuition. Are three high-profile drug arrests at top-level private universities just a coincidence? Or is something more going on here?

By Melissa Bell  | December 21, 2010; 9:45 AM ET
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