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Posted at 9:46 AM ET, 01/18/2011

1950s housewife on acid: 'I wish I could talk in technicolor'

By Melissa Bell

A writer unearthed some interesting footage from a television program in 1956: A housewife experiments with acid. Making the viral rounds this morning is an eight-minute clip of a "stable" housewife willing to undergo research in the name of science.

Dr. Sidney Cohen dosed volunteers at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Los Angeles to test the results of lycergic acid diethylamide, or LSD. The mild-mannered, well-dressed woman becomes stunned, high-as-a-kite and wide-eyed within three hours.

LSD was extensively researched in the '50s and '60s by the U.S. government. The co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, Bill Wilson, even thought the drug could help with the recovery process for alcoholics, Don Lattin, the author who discovered the footage, writes.

A few key quotes:
"Everything is in color and I can feel the air. I can see it, I can see all the molecules -- I'm part of it."
"There isn't any me."
"I wish I could talk in technicolor."
"If you can't see it, then you'll just never know it. I feel sorry for you."

By Melissa Bell  | January 18, 2011; 9:46 AM ET
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Comments

Great footage! Huxley is one of my favorite authors and raised serious issues and made world-wide breakthroughs in the research of psychedelics as well as our cognitive liberties. I drew a portrait as homage to the man and his works. Let me know what you think of it at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2010/07/aldous-huxley-rolls-in-his-grave.html

Posted by: dregstudios | January 20, 2011 3:46 PM | Report abuse

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