Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Anchored by Melissa Bell  |  About  |  Get Updates:  Twitter  |   Facebook  |  RSS Feeds RSS Feed
Posted at 4:13 PM ET, 01/20/2011

Fountain Lady may sue, Jeff Koons is suing and Twitter gets sued: Today's legal roundup

By Melissa Bell
jeff koons
Jeff Koons's "Balloon Dog" (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Get the legal fight on:

Case 1: Fountain Lady vs. Mall Security

Last week, a video made the circuits of a woman making the all-too-common mistake of texting and walking. She just happened to be walking right in the path of a mall fountain. "I saw the water coming at me, I could see the pennies and nickels at the bottom of the fountain and then I was in it," Cathy Cruz Marrero told the Reading Eagle. Soaked and shaken, she gets out hoping that no one saw her.

Well, the security cameras in the mall did, and the guards played it over and over, much to the amusement of their friends, who recorded the whole thing, uploaded it to YouTube and introduced the world to Fountain Lady. Marrero, of course, wants the whole thing to go away, so she did what anyone would do to squash a viral video: She made the morning television rounds with a lawyer who said they would be investigating the incident and might consider suing the mall.

And the requisite news interview:

Case 2: Jeff Koons vs. Balloon Animals

Jeff Koons, the pop artist most famous for the giant, shiny sculpture of a balloon dog that has graced the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, does not like other balloon-dog sculptures. He's suing two design companies that sell balloon-dog bookends. They are not the same color as Koons's, and they are not the same shape as Koons's. The New York Times says the suit will be hard to win.

Twitter vs. someone with the same idea as Twitter

All those tweets of Kanye West and Justin Bieber could wind up giving VS Technologies a very nice settlement if a court rules in its favor. VS Technologies alleges that Twitter infringed on its patent for a "method and system for creating an interactive virtual community of famous people." TechCrunch offers this advice on their suit: "Yeah, good luck with that."

By Melissa Bell  | January 20, 2011; 4:13 PM ET
Categories:  The Daily Catch  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: America reCycled: cross-country by bicycle
Next: Google shakedown: Larry Page takes over from Eric Schmidt as CEO; sends Internet into a tizzy

Comments

I hope Cathy Cruz Marrero wins her suit. Mall "security" cameras are there for that purpose only-- SECURITY. They are not there for employees to check out who's in the mall with whom, act as agents for the media, or to take on the roll of paparazzi hiding in the trees and hoping for an embarrassing shot of their target. We too often want to deal with improper actions in terms only of money-- Did you suffer any financial loss as a result?

Yes, people find it funny, but there is a reasonable expectation of privacy and restricted usage of such security videos where public safety and criminal activity are not at issue. Catching someone on video walking through the mall 'digging in their nose' or 'scratching in the crack of their butt' may be humorous on Youtube, but that does not give the mall the right to upload a copy of the video to the internet.

Posted by: Afriend | January 21, 2011 1:28 AM | Report abuse

Afriend, did you see the video? Was this woman identifiable from that distance with that resolution? NO!!!!!! Is she looking for a payday? YES!!!!!! There is no one in the world who knew who the woman in the video was until she appeared on morning television. She has used this "violation" as the launching pad for her greed. Hopefully, there is no judge anywhere in the nation who will be so stupid as to allow the suit to be filed, but that is probably asking for too much considering the lame state of our civil judiciary nationwide.

Posted by: bigz976 | January 21, 2011 9:28 AM | Report abuse

Afriend, did you see the video? Was this woman identifiable from that distance with that resolution? NO!!!!!! Is she looking for a payday? YES!!!!!! There is no one in the world who knew who the woman in the video was until she appeared on morning television. She has used this "violation" as the launching pad for her greed. Hopefully, there is no judge anywhere in the nation who will be so stupid as to allow the suit to be filed, but that is probably asking for too much considering the lame state of our civil judiciary nationwide.

Posted by: bigz976 | January 21, 2011 9:30 AM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company