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Posted at 12:43 PM ET, 02/ 8/2011

Correct this post, please: Washington Post introduces correction submit form

By Greg Linch and Hal Straus

correctthis.jpg

Washington Post readers can now do more than shake their heads, send a Letter to the Editor, write a disdainful comment or tweet when they spot mistakes in staff-written articles: they can submit proposed corrections through a submission form linked to on article pages.

The Post started publishing corrections links in the right column of each of its bylined articles online late Monday night as an experiment designed to encourage reader feedback, and underscore its commitment to accuracy and accountability.

Registered site users can suggest corrections and ideas for future coverage by clicking on the links and filling out a Google form describing the problem they spot or idea they propose. Editors will review the user posts frequently during the day, and make corrections in print and online where stories turn out to be wrong.

"It addresses a chronic complaint that we don't make it easy for our online audiences to engage with us on stories, whether it is about factual issues or other ways to get us to meet their needs," the Post's Managing Editor Raju Narisetti said.

The program won't roll out with blogs quite yet, so for the time being, have a field day in BlogPost's comments.

By Greg Linch and Hal Straus  | February 8, 2011; 12:43 PM ET
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Comments

Hallelujah! The next step for the Post's management will be to ensure that such corrections are actually made, and in a timely manner. Must admit I'm a bit skeptical about that happening, but I sure hope to be proven wrong!

Posted by: DCSteve1 | February 9, 2011 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Why don't you just hire competent writers and editors so we readers don't notice so many mistakes?

Posted by: sarahabc | February 9, 2011 5:14 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of corrections, I'm still waiting for them to "correct" the daily summaries they email me. Every link goes to the "Page Not Found" page. Can't even stop them coming because the unsubscribe link goes to the same "Page Not Found" link.

Posted by: Ex-Fed | February 9, 2011 5:22 PM | Report abuse

Will 3000 characters be enough to correct EJ Dionne's mistakes each time he writes something, or will we have to split our posts into multiple sections?

Posted by: charlesbakerharris | February 9, 2011 5:48 PM | Report abuse

May I suggest that you form another bureaucratic layer, why don't you look up the word "editor" and when you have fully assimilated all its definitions, restructure your work force, up the standards for hiring reporters, and have a 3 and out policy for egregious reporting or lack of general reportorial skills. Kathryn Graham would be in apoplexy if she were still around to see what a rag your paper has become. I see better writing skills in almost all university student newspapers. What a shame!

Posted by: Jim-McLean | February 9, 2011 10:49 PM | Report abuse

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